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Quad

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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. APRIL 4. 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 0 . I S S U E 8

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

IN THIS ISSUE

WCU Forensics Wins National Awards

NEWS

OP-ED

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FEATURES

ENT

SPORTS

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THE QUAD

Pa. College students rally tuition budget cuts By T. J. Cromyak

said. Both Wilson and English were recommended by their theater professor to take part in

organize the trip for the West Staff Writer Chester students. Johnston said the university would face many Students and professors from layoffs, cutting of programs and Pennsylvania state universities a loss in student rallied on the steps of the services if the proposed Capitol in Harrisburg on budget were to be March 28 to protest the passed. He also said proposed 2011-2012 budget that with the proposed that would cut more than 50 cut, the character of the percent in funding of higher university would education schools. change. Just to make Students from Lock up for the loss, the uniHaven University and versity would have to Millersville University layoff many of the prowanted to show their dedicafessors at the university. tion to their universities by The proposed budget running to the capital. The will spend more on corLock Haven cross-country rections facilities than team ran 100 miles towards on higher education. the capital and the Kyle Pelchy, a first-year Millersville University crossstudent, said that the country team ran 40 miles. increase in tuition will The budget cuts will not have a devastating only hurt the universities effect on his education and faculty, but also the at WCU. students. The budget “I wouldn’t be able to continues to be the afford to come back to school. topic of debate and I will lose my grants and students are encourhave to take out bigger T. J. Cromyak/ Special to The Quad aged to be involved loans,” Corey Wilson, a third-year Lock Haven Students from around the state line with the rallies. For a up on the steps of the capitol building complete breakdown of University student said. the proposed budget, Second-year Justine to protest the budget. visit http://www.budget. English from Lock Haven “United We Stand, state.pa.us to be more informed. University said she would have the T.J. Cromyak is a fourth-year to take a year off and hopefully Underfunded We Fail” rally. Six West Chester University student majoring in communication come back after she raised students attended the event as studies with a minor in journalism. enough money to come back. “My parents and I are trying well. Dr. Lisa Millhous and Dr. He can be reached at AC61771@ to avoid student loans,” she Clifford Johnston helped to wcupa.edu.

Forensics team competes in national competition By Mark Hickman Special to The Quad

Capturing one of seven highly coveted Superior Team awards, the West Chester University Forensics Team took the competition by storm at the Pi Kappa Delta Biennial National Forensics Championships at Mt. Hood Community College in Portland, Oregon, on March 23-26. Eighty-four teams from across the country vied for honors in this year’s championships in speech and debate. Fielding a squad of eight students—most of whom are in their first year of competition—WCU swept away their opponents in an upset victory. The team was led by their president, Sara Franklin,

fourth-year communication studies major, who won Top Superior (national champion) in Broadcast Journalism, Superior in Persuasive Speaking, Superior in Dramatic Interpretation, Excellent in Impromptu Speaking and Excellent in Program Oral Interpretation. Franklin is a four-year team member who significantly improved on her two Excellent awards at the previous biennial competition in Shreveport, Louisiana, two years ago. She plans to pursue graduate work in communication/public relations in the fall. She was joined by secondyear communication studies major, Lanie Presswood, who is in her second year of competition. Presswood was selected

to deliver a Showcase Performance in Communication Analysis, which she earned a Superior award. She also earned a Superior in Broadcast Journalism, and Excellent in Informative Speaking. Dan Hinderliter, secondyear Honors middle grades education major, a first year team member, won Superior in After Dinner Speaking, Excellent in Persuasive Speaking and Excellent in Broadcast Journalism. Daquann Chung, a first year undeclared major from Pocono Mountain, captured Excellent in Poetry Interpretation. Jake Markiewicz, a secondyear communication studies see FORENSICS page 5

News

APRIL 4, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Borough Council discusses various issues By Leah Skye Staff Writer

West Chester Borough Council met to discuss the issues of parking, building zoning and the potential implications of solar panels in the community with concerned residents. Both Holly Brown [Council President] and Mayor Carolyn Comitta maintained a welcoming and open vocal presence throughout the meeting, exceeding three hours in length. Residents of West Chester were given an opportunity to voice any concerns not formally listed on the agenda at the beginning of the meeting. Tim Lair, first to speak, brought to discussion some serious flaws in the newly adjusted parking system. Street meters, which were previously not active after 5 p. m. during the week, are now being strictly enforced until 10 p.m. which is causing more people to park in residential areas instead of downtown. Having lived on Miner St. for his entire life, Lair stated he had always been able to park in the lot across from his house. The recent change in meter enforcement has caused him great difficulty, and left him no choice but to park a ten minute walk away. Another frustrated resident stated that she can no longer find street parking near her home, also on Miner St., and she is not eligible to purchase pass for the J-Lot, which is adjacent to her home. Her concerns have become financial, and she said she has difficulty paying for the multiple parking tickets she receives weekly. Councilman James Jones suggested she remedy the situation by purchasing a pass for the Bicentennial High Street garage at $75/month, which she was unsatisfied with because it would not solve the financial burden that the new parking policies placed on her and her family. The most debated topic of

the evening came with the discussion of whether or not to appeal the Zoning Hearing Board’s decision for a proposed apartment building development on 220 East Chestnut St., formerly the Agway parking lot. Richard Sabo, a math teacher at Henderson High School, lead the opposition force. He reasoned that conditions for NC-2 Zoning, which is residential, were not satisfied. The maximum building height of 35 feet was exceeded by the structure being built. “I am fighting for the architectural integrity of the Borough when I say this should not be built,” Sabo said. “The size of the project is completely out of scale.” Tina Laskowski, another resident opposed to the building, argued that she wants to defend the town from imperial developers. “We need to be protected from the overly aggressive town center expansion,” she said. Bill Scott followed up her argument by presenting an architectural draft showing the size and placement of the building in question. The developer, Eli Kahn of E.Kahn Development Corporation, was present to state his case along with several residents living in direct proximity of the affected area. The original plan was to place an office building on the property but has since become a project to build an apartment development. Eli Kahn defended his company’s reasoning by bringing up that although the residents had valid points, the fact is the area is zoned TC [Town Center], which does not fall under the same building standards. He therefore did not see the issue. He supported his argument with mentioning the unanimous decision that was made by Borough Council in 2006, when the property was originally examined for potential development. Kahn said, “Just because a see COUNCIL page 5


APRIL 4, 2011

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Sisters United finds, breaks stereotypes By Ginger Rae Dunbar News Editor

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Register online at www.alvernia.edu/summer All courses are accredited and the credits are readily transferable.

Academic dishonesty found among students By Travis Pearson Staff Writer

“Academic dishonesty” encompasses plagiarism, buying or selling term papers, to simply looking at aneighbor’s test, and all local colleges and universities warn students that violating these strict rules can result in expulsion. Yet, for a litany of reasons, many students do cheat, and with technology like smart phones and highly-available WiFi and Internet, this trend looks to continue and perhaps even rise. Area students talked about the age-old practice, which research has examined thoroughly for decades. All students spoke with complete anonymity, and the picture they painted is a familiar one for researchers who crunch the numbers, and the administrators who hope to stop the dishonesty altogether. “Everyone I’ve gotten to know in my classes has cheated,” one student said, “I haven’t met anyone at West

Chester who hasn’t cheated.” “I would say that everyone either cheats, or at some point sees someone else blatantly cheating,” another confirmed. Students said that they will go to great lengths in order to get an edge. One student typed in formulas and answers into a graphing calculator in order to aid memory during an exam. The same student simply slipped a “cheat sheet” into the back of a standard calculator when the more high-tech graphing calculator was not permitted. “I needed that. I wasn’t studying enough to pass without that little extra ‘umph’ to get the ‘C’ and pass the class,” the student said. Another possessed an even more determined past: “I’ve written things on my hands and stomach. If you’re making up a test you take it in a different classroom. I took the test in a computer lab with some other people and everyone

who was with me used their notes.” Even students who claimed that they did not cheat said that they saw multiple instances of others breaking the rules. Some of the techniques seemed older, and did not rely on technology. “You see people looking at other people’s tests,” a WCU student said, “And it’s not that hard to see. Some people will leave their notes where they can see them. The inside of a water bottle to take notes is a classic.” Other methods stepped in line with modern technology. Numerous students mentioned smart phones that allowed students to get answers very quickly by accessing the Internet. Others just talked about basic texting in order to acquire answers. For homework or online assignments, the Internet also changes everything. “When you go onto the see DISHONESTY page 5

Sisters United, named organization of the month for March, presented a program on defining and breaking stereotypes. Members of the organization began by reading aloud some of the stereotypes other West Chester University students had written out. The members handed students slips saying: “Just because I’m _____ doesn’t mean I’m ______.” The stereotypes were posted in Sykes for others to read and discover what bothers their fellow classmates. “There are more stereotypes than we thought,” one member of Sisters United said. “We’re not sticking to the mold [of typical stereotypes].” Many of the stereotypes that students presented were relating to their gender, race, relationships or sex life and how they dress or appear. Janet Sackey, freshman representative of Sisters United, said these are the stereotypes that WCU students are thinking about and what affects them. Several students in the room said stereotypes “haunt” people. Students came to the consensus that stereotypes may be “opinions” about people. These opinions they agreed are “not always bad” as they “help us in a way.” Sackey said it is possible for people to use “stereotypes for answers” about another person. Other students added to the conversation that several stereotypes are “hurtful.” Sisters United presented that stereotypes, good and bad, may “stem from something you don’t know about.” When asked where stereotypes come from, one student believes people start to “generalize” people around them. In addition, another student said it comes from “families and past generations.” Past experiences seemed to affect the way students thought about others they interact with or pass-by. One student said when something happens just one time, for some people, it sets a standard across the board. One student shared a personal anecdote; after being jumped on a bus, they know to not get on that bus anymore. The student jokes about it now to “bring light to the situation” despite how this stereotype may be true. “Stereotypes put you in a box,” Sackey said. Sackey presented that while people may see something specific, such as a specific gender

or race, does not mean the person is sexist or racist. She also said students, do not embody typical stereotypes commonly associated with their involvement in specific groups or organizations. These involvements included stereotypes about Greek life organizations and on-campus clubs. “We make stereotypes because it’s easy [to do],” one student said. “In our minds, it puts people in a box.” Students did not believe that ignorance caused stereotypes to form. One student said it is about the way people present themselves. However, she also said that when people do not know about someone else, they should get to know others, without assuming how the person is. “If you don’t want to be stereotyped in a certain way, then you should be mindful of how you conduct yourself,” one student said. Other students encourage others to find out how people are instead of assuming or making up a stereotypical aspect of others. Some stereotypes are presented by the media, as people may obtain stereotypes from what they view when watching TV. Debbie Pierre, junior representative for Sisters United, said stereotypes had to come from somewhere. Sackey asked how this gets portrayed through medias. Many students discussed racial stereotypes found on TV. Many focused on the example of a white tank top shirt that was coined as a “wife beater.” One student said they do not understand why people call the shirts wife beaters. They said there was a stereotype that wife beaters wore this type of shirt. However, they said they realize not everyone does that even though they wear those types of shirts. One student said people may not associate this stereotype with people who wear beaters. However, people still recognize the type of shirts as wife beaters. One student reminded others that they “should not go in with a closed mind.” Stereotypes may cause people to have a certain “mentality” that they want to keep “without progressing” it, one student said. She explained when people do this, they are inhibiting themselves. One student suggested the English language developed in a see STEREOTYPES page 5


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APRIL 4, 2011

Reign break dance club becomes official By Ginger Rae Dunbar News Editor

Thanks to two friends whose love of dancing began in high school, West Chester University has its first break dance club, Heavy Reign Crew. The name came from the two creators of the club, who wanted the club to have a “control of destinies” with a “powerful” name. The club became official on March 21. Nick Magno, a third-year cell and molecular biology (pre-med program) major and Phil Bieg, a third year communication studies major, worked on making the club official last year. Bieg has wanted to create a break dance group since his sophomore year of high school. Bieg and Magno met their sophomore year, during which they began learning how to break dance. They tried getting their high school friends involved. When they found out they were both attending WCU, they wanted to create the club together. The two had attended various dance organizations offered on-campus, but felt limited as the dancing was choreographed. “Break dance is a form of dance that can include choreography,” Magno said. “For Phil and I, break dancing is a form of free style. It doesn’t restrict our freedom in dancing.” Magno said the real term for break dancing is “b-boying” as it is composed of break dancing and popand-locking. The two friends met a third dancer who was in the audience watching them compete in WCU’s “So You Think You Can Dance.” They met Micha Cook in the audience as he danced in between rounds of the show. Cook is now the treasurer for the club. The three students would dance together the following semester, spring 2010. They won first place in the English Club’s competition of “WCU’s Got Talent” show. The following year, Magno competed with four sisters of Phi Mu sorority in Delta Zeta’s “Best Dance Crew” in fall 2010. The sisters of Phi Mu joined Magno and Bieg in their dance session practices. Carrie Oechsle, of Phi Mu, is now a member of the break dance club. “I’m one of the few girls

that can do this,” Oechsle said. “It shows that girls can break dance too.” Magno taught her how to do foundations, freezes, windmills, and chair, and she is working on doing a head spin. The two competed in a dance battle in Philadelphia, “ L o v e r ’s Rock.” Another member of the group, Anna Petrucci, met Magno while he was practicing moves in the basement of his residence hall. She saw a flier he posted about break dance sessions, and joined the group at the beginning of the academic year. She free-style dances with them as she has a background in hip-hop and jazz. She is a member of the crew this semester. Magno said that within the club, there is a desire to do community service by performing at juvenile detention centers or at the YMCA, in order to “break cultural barriers.” Magno and Bieg have spent parts of their summers at the YMCA daycare to teach less-thanfortunate kids, ages 4 – 16, how to dance. They also taught kids at the Juvenile Detention Center of Chester County. “We like to talk with the kids to promote break dancing as a cultural activity,” Magno said. “Every person can break dance, and it brings people together through this culture.” Magno said break dancing is about foundation, style and power. Foundations are the basis to learning other moves. Every dancer has their own style in how they do certain moves. The club members do not require that students have experience in break dancing. The members of the group teach one another moves and help with technique and styles. At their sessions, they gather to free-style. “Dance because you love to dance,” Magno said. “We’re not a competitive crew, we do it more for fun.” The club meets Tuesdays from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. in Ballroom A of Sykes. They welcome all students and they also session in Hollinger Field house gym several times a week. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourth year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

Jessica Guzzardo / The Quad

Heavy Reign crew, the newest club to WCU campus, performs their style of freezes.

Nick Magno and Phil Bieg are the creators of the break dance club. Their goal of creating such a club has become a reality in college. If you have an interest in joining the club, e-mail Magno at NM668104@wcupa.edu.

Carrie Oechsle of Phi Mu, is performing a “chair” move. She continues to dance with the crew after competing with Nick Magno and her sorority sisters in a greek dance event.

Nick Magno (above) began taking breaK dancing classes at the Kennett square YMCA when he was 16. He befriended his teacher, known as Iceman. Jessica Guzzardo / The Quad


APRIL 4, 2011

COUNCIL from page 2

few people don’t like it, well sorry.” He has so far invested around $200,000 in the project and has no plan to stop. Being a seasoned developer with multiple property holdings in Downingtown and Malvern, he said he is used to this kind of controversy. “We could try to build a park there and someone would think it’s not the right place for it; I’m used to that,” Kahn said. Another prevalent issue was the discussion of potential benefits of going green. They have opted to implement a “green roof” on a Lacey St. building in need of repair instead of traditional drains. The roof is covered in succulents and various types of greenery to absorb rain water, promote wildlife and help lower cost and temperatures. There was talk of introducing solar panels to West Chester in order to cut energy spending and reduce the community’s carbon foot print. It is estimated that the project will require $300,000 to get started. It is also predicted to save $51 the first year of use and increase annually after that. In response to the discussions and concerned residents, Mayor Comitta called the meeting “a wonderful display of democracy” and said she is not sure how the council will vote on the final decision for the zoning dispute. She encouraged all with an opinion to come voice it at the Borough Council meetings. Mayor Comitta said,“I do not tolerate people criticizing without being willing to step up and make a suggestion on how to change things.” Leah Skye is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at LS685444@ wcupa.edu.

FORENSICS from page 2 major, who is also in his first year on the team, won Excellent in Informative Speaking. Ashley Murphy, a first year Honors English BSED and special education major from Wallenpaupack, captured Excellent in Impromptu Speaking. Joe Tetreault, a secondyear history education major, who is in his first year on the team, earned an Excellent in After Dinner Speaking. Brian McCormick, a first year Honors Biology major, netted preliminary scores high

STEREOTYPES from page 3 way that people do not question negative connotations of words or objects. She gave the example of women crossing the street when a male is walking behind them. She said people are not hurting themselves by protecting themselves, however this hinders them from breaking a stereotype they hold. A member of Sisters United asked the group if they think some of the stereotypes are true. Many said yes. After reading aloud stereotypes other WCU students had written, the member said many students do not seem happy with their stereotype. “You can’t break something you don’t know about. I didn’t know about these stereotypes (written on a board at Sykes Student Union),” one student said. “I was surprised people felt this way.” Agreeing with this view, one student added that “you can constantly be aware of yourself and not make stereotypes by keeping yourself in check.” Addressing some stereotypes as the truth, one student pointed out that the associations of appearance or actions came from somewhere. She said when proving a stereotype to be false, “you need to show (people) how you really are.” One student said not all stereotypes are true, including her own she wrote anonymously. She said her stereotype makes her feel belittled, in which another student agreed stereotypes belittle people. “Acknowledge the stereotypes you make . . . acknowledge stereotypes people make towards you,” one student said. “It can be empowering.” Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourth year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu. enough to push WCU into the Superior team finish. Director of Forensics, Mark Hickman, who teaches in the Department of Communication Studies, states that WCU can be very proud of how these students represented the university. In capturing this top honor, these students sent a message to the country that WCU is an academic leader that can match its students against the very best in the country. The forensics team is open to all undergraduate students who are in good standing with the university. For more information contact Mark Hickman at mhickman@ wcupa.edu or 610-430-5848.

THE QUAD

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Thoughts from the Mayor’s Office By Mayor Carolyn Comitta Special to The Quad

Like you, I am a Golden Ram. I am a proud graduate of West Chester State College, Class of 1974 - BS in Elementary Education with a concentration in Special Education. (MEd with a concentration in Gifted Education from Widener University, 1986). I lived in Goshen Hall, and then off-campus on Miner Street. At that time, the hot topics were the Vietnam War, (concern about friends and fellow students being drafted as well as war protests), fears of nuclear war, environmental issues and the first Earth Day – 1970. Also on a lighter note, “streaking.” Following graduation, I worked in the Octorara School District for 12 years, developing and teaching programs for academically gifted students, until the birth of our two children, who are now in their mid-20’s. Since 1988, I have been the Vice President and CFO of Thomas Comitta Associates, Inc., a West Chester firm specializing in town planning and landscape architecture, and have worked in a number of

DISHONESTY from page 3 Internet or Google, the answers are right there. You can get them efficiently and correctly,” an area college student said. In general, WCU students seem to think that many of their peers cheat on a regular basis. For an informal poll, students were given some examples of academic dishonesty, as defined by the university’s website, and asked to estimate what percentage of their classmates cheat at one point or another. Twenty-five upperclassmen gave 71 percent as an average answer. Research on the subject is imperfect, but still provides a solid statistical background to check students’ claims. One 1994 study by researchers Graham, Monday, O’Brien and Steffen found that 90 percent of students admitted to cheating at least once while at college. A similar 1996 study run by two researchers concluded that 68 percent cheat at least once. More recent studies prove more inconclusive due to problems with testing, but most experts agree the number remains high. These same studies give a fascinating view of cheating from a professor’s point of view. The same 1994 survey referenced earlier revealed that a

capacities with World Information Transfer, Inc, a non-profit, non-governmental educational organization in general consultative status with the United Nations, promoting awareness of health and environment issues. Prior to being sworn in as Mayor in January of 2010, I was a West Chester Borough Council member for four years. The Mayor has the responsibilities to oversee the administration of the West Chester Police Department, attend and deliberate in Borough Council meetings, has authority to break a tie or cast a veto, serves as the ceremonial head of Borough government, and takes action to bring people together to improve our community. I am delighted to spend a good deal of time on campus have the pleasure of seeing many of you regularly through the College of Visual and Performing Arts Dean’s Advisory Board, the Community Board for Aid to South Africa; as a WCU LGBTQA Ally, through the Campus Community Coalition, several School of Music international students

for a number of years special student-run programs and events and new student orientations, to name a few. A WCU student serves as Intern to the Mayor. In addition, our family has hosted several international music students over the years. So you can see that I am a proud member of the WCU family. I am very interested in hearing your thoughts and opinions and questions. Please feel free to contact me any time by e-mailing mayor@west-chester.com. I welcome your questions and suggestions for columns in the future. Join me on Facebook: Mayor Carolyn Comitta and Twitter. April in the Borough: Borough Council meetings: www.west-chester.com. All Parks Clean-Up on April 9, bring gloves to a park near you. West Chester Restaurant Festival: April 25-30 www. downtownwestchester.com. West Chester Film Festival: April 29-May 1. United Nations Health and Environment Conference: April 27 www.worldinfo.org (e-mail me if you would like to go).

stunning 79 percent of professors sampled witnessed cheating. Out of this group, only nine percent reported the offender. A different study and subsequent academic guide by Bernard Whitley and Patricia Keith-Spiegel discussed many issues faculty have with curtailing and then reporting academic dishonesty. Professors cited an “unwillingness to devote time and energy to the issue, reluctance to undergo an emotional confrontation, and fear of retaliation by the student, of losing students, of being accused of harassment or discrimination, and even of being sued for these offenses and/or defamation of character.” When questioned on the issue of getting caught, some students mentioned extreme angst and nervousness, while others felt very calm and even confident. Perhaps even more important than how many students is the question of why they are doing it. “Mainly laziness,” one student said. Laziness seemed to be a common theme. Even more so, though, was the pressure to achieve good grades. Students mentioned this many times, and surprisingly many said that the pressure was selfimposed.

A few others mentioned external factors: “It’s the pressure to get good grades. You have to have a certain GPA to get into a good graduate school. If you fall below a certain level then no graduate school will accept you,” a student said. All-in-all, many students cheat and are willing to rationalize their actions in a lot of different ways. “It’s not that I didn’t study, and I prepare as much as I possibly can, but cheating gives me the assurance that I can get a good grade,” one said. Another summed up the situation, “There are two kinds of people: the bad kids who cheat because they drank too much the night before and didn’t study, and the good kids who do it because they need a little extra help. I wouldn’t say that I’m a bad person.” Academic dishonesty is as old as academia itself. New technologies make cheating easier and easier for students, but also force professors into difficult situations. Despite the massive risks involved, the pressures of getting good grades will more than likely insure that students continue to cheat, and at a high volume. Travis Pearson is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at TP651537@wcupa.edu.


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Opinion

THE QUAD

&

Editorial Student statue gone missing? I’m a full believer in students having an evening or afternoon completely away from their work. As a full-time student with full-time jobs on top of school, my “me time” is spent at the Village each Thursday night, to spend time with a close group of friends and watch one of our favorite shows – “The Office.” These Thursday nights have settled into a pretty relaxed routine: finish up Tai Chi class around 7p.m., drive back to the Village (because I don’t have cable at my apartment), scrounge up a late dinner and sit around the living room watching NBC comedy night. Sometime around 11p.m., my fiancé picks me up to take me home, and when we pass the football field, I ALWAYS turn around quickly in surprise at see someone in the stadium, looking like he’s trying to hop the fence, in the shadows.

APRIL 4, 2011

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | Fax: 610.436.3280 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Tara Tanzos

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Rae Dunbar News Editor Lisa Dellaporta Op-Ed Editor Angela Thomas Features Editor Mike Sheehan Entertainment Editor Amy Festa Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Joshua Cash Business Manager Phil Bieg Advertising Manager Dan Colon Asst. Advertising Manager Brittany Silver Art Director

EDITORIAL STAFF Steven Fisher Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor COPY EDITORS Sarah Gurgal Lauren Whitcomb Linda Charles

DISTRIBUTION Kyle Pesce Sarah Kemmerer ONLINE EDITION Kristin Solanick FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between

The Michael Horrocks statue, dedicated to the WCU alumni and 9/11 pilot, is a beautiful monument to our campus community and history. However, driving by it at night is frightening.

500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space re-

The past couple weeks, however, I haven’t had that series of moments – the “WHAT THE – PERSON! Wait – oh, *catches breath* wow. ” Why? Because the statue isn’t there.

istration of West Chester University.

Apologies for the false alarm if the statue has been replaced, or if my ever-decreasing eyesight has deceived me the past few weeks. Yet the past two or three times I’ve left the Village, I haven’t seen the mysterious man on the field. At first I thought it was being re-primed or painted (or whatever you do to manage and upkeep statues), but it’s now been several weeks. Where’s our statue? Any information about Michael Horrock’s whereabouts would be greatly appreciated – even if it’s a simple “get your eyes checked, you dolt.” Thanks, West Chester. Peace to you, Tara T. Editor-in-Chief

straints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or adminThe deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


APRIL 4, 2011

Letters to the Editor

THE QUAD

To the editor: As you stated in your publication, Governor Corbett announced his budget proposal. As a result, many people are not happy. I acknowledge that Pennsylvania, along with other states, has budget issues. States no longer have the resources to fund programs and employees as they have in the past. Everyone has to realize that they are going to suffer as states balance their budgets and make necessary cuts. Even though desperate times call for desperate measures, this drastic cut to education is extreme. I find it hard to imagine a 50% cut to education; just think of all the implications of this historic cut. Penn State has said that they may close all of their satellite campuses, and the state universities, including West Chester, are talking about laying off staff and professors, cutting programs and majors and raising tuition to a rate most of us will struggle to afford. This proposed cut will increase class sizes and directly affect the quality of our education. This budget proposal will affect us all as the University will try to find ways of creating revenue. The worst possibility can happen, if we do nothing. The state colleges, including West Chester, have already held rallies and protests against Corbett’s budget proposal. I believe more will happen and a protest at Harrisburg is scheduled to occur soon. We must not stop with these actions, however. Students must be proactive and contact their state representatives and senators in Harrisburg. The State Assembly will lower the cuts that Corbett proposed if we pressure them to do so. Please act now! Scott Good, West Chester student

PUBLIC HEALTH. LIVE IT.

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PAGE 7

CARTOONS


Features

PAGE 8 THE QUAD “Some things don’t last forever, but some things do. Like a good song, or a good book, or a good memory you can take out and unfold in your darkest times, pressing down on the corners and peering in close, hoping you still recognize the person you see there.”-Sarah Dessen

Aid to South Africa makes a difference By Angela Thomas Features Editor

Aid to South Africa first started six years ago at WCU. A few students from the Honors College had just returned from a trip to South Africa. “After seeing all the poverty in the area, they decided they wanted to help somehow,” Stephanie Eckman, the main coordinator for A.S.A. said. The six students that started Aid to South Africa planned the event to be held outdoors in Farrell Stadium. On the day of the premier of Aid to South Africa, it poured down rain, resulting in very little attendance. “But they stuck with it and it kept going, and now we are on our sixth year of hosting Aid to South Africa,” Eckman said. For an event that started off in pouring rain, Aid to South Africa has made an outstanding impact on their cause. Aid to South Africa has raised over $25,000, and has 1,000 to 2,000 people come out to the event every year. “It’s the largest campus and community fundraiser that we have at West Chester University,” Eckman said. A.S.A has three missions and they are to reduce poverty, provide comfort to AIDS victim and raise awareness about both HIV/ AIDS and poverty in South Africa. “The event that we put on is a fundraiser as well as an awareness raiser so when students and the community come to the event, they will be able to see a bunch of awareness displays, statistics and pictures that the honors students have taken personally on their trips to South Africa,” Eckman said. For those who attend Aid to South Africa and choose to donate and/or sponsor the event, the

money they’ve donated will go to the three beneficiaries that A.S.A has paired up with. Help Ministry Soup Kitchen, one of the beneficiaries, is a home-run soup kitchen managed by Reverend Cecil Begbie. Begbie feeds over six thousand people. Five thousand of those people are from primary schools and 1,000 are unemployed adults on a daily basis. His soup kitchen started in his garage and it still functions from there. The second beneficiary is Sparrow Village, which is the first AIDS orphanage in the world. “Sparrow Village is a refuge for

successful with sponsors,” Eckman said. Aid to South Africa has four levels of sponsorship: $1,000, $500, $250, and $125. This is the biggest year for sponsorship for Aid to South Africa. Aid to South Africa will include plenty of fun and creative games to the event. “Our games and activities chair is new this year and she is quite creative. She is bringing her expertise in baking into the various games and activities. We’re going to be having a dunk tank, which is new this year; we’ve already gotten Miss WCU, Kristin Hector, to agree to be in it. And we’ll be having other activities like necklace making, henna, facepanting, tie-dying t-shirts and various other things like that,” Eckman said. There will also be a cookie-decorating contest. Eckman hopes to raise $9,000 this year and get 20 teams registered to walk. So what will students get out of the event? “I think they’re going to learn a lot. Stephanie Eckman/The Quad People don’t realize how bad it is children who probably don’t know because it is just so hard to pinthat they are infected with HIV/ point a place to help with so AIDS, and it gives them a place much tragedy going on in the to live out their final days with world. But South Africa is a place friends and in good company,” we have chosen and I think we do Eckman said. a good job in raising awareness,” The third beneficiary is new to Eckman said. the A.S.A event. Nkosi’s Haven Eckman wants to thank her was started by a white South committee chairs for “coming African woman who adopted a together despite being such a child who had been infected with diverse group of people.” She HIV/AIDS named Nkosi. would also like to thank Dr. Dean “She experienced first hand all and Donna Carney for all of their of the discrimination that he love and support and everyone on faced and that she faced just from the campus and in the communiwanting to help him and so once ty who make the effort to become he passed away, she started this involved in the cause. Aid to group in his honor that serves as South Africa will be held on a refuge now for mothers and Sunday, April 10 from 12p.m. their children,” Eckman said. until 6p.m. in Hollinger Field Eckman also points out that House. Nkosi’s Haven is a unique organiAngela Thomas is a fourth year zation because it focuses on both student majoring in English and the child and the mother infected with a minor in web technology. She by HIV/AIDS. can be reached at AT683005@ “This year has been incredibly wcupa.edu.

Every day, 8,000 people die from AIDS 1,000 of them die in South Africa

APRIL 4, 2011

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Communication Studies creates WCCT

By T.J. Cromyak Practicum Writer

Students in the Communication Studies department were given the opportunity this semester to take on television roles with the creation of WCCT. This semester the television studio in the basement of Brandywine Hall is being used well. Students enrolled within the Communication Studies major have the opportunity to be part of a new channel coming to the community. WCCT will be integrated into the channel listings along with the regular line up. Professor Michael Boyle, head of the operation, said that he is currently working with Verizon to complete the channel installation, and that the channel should be up and running within the next two months. The goal of WCCT is to present students with a medium to broadcast information on some of the many activities that take place on campus and within the community. Boyle also said that WCCT is a great opportunity for the university, students and community. “It provides excellent hands-on experience for our students and will strengthen the broadcast and television production aspect of our major,”Boyle said. One aspect of the WCCT station is to highlight many of the activities on campus. Many of the students involved with the station have been asked to seek out different activities and film them for

broadcast. In addition to the field projects, students put together studio shows, such as WCU Live, a sports talk show, and Coaches Corner, a showcase of WCU coaches and athletes. The students have been asked to create eight hours of content per month for the station, so students and organizations around campus are encouraged to get in touch with WCCT to have events filmed for broadcast. One other project the students took on is the Last Lecture Series. Boyle said that the Last Lecture Series highlights the accomplishments and teachings of the faculty here at WCU who are either retiring or going on sabbatical. “We are doing some great things here, and it’s pretty simple to get involved and to have a hand in producing content,” Boyle said. Students of the Communication Studies major can also have an opportunity this summer to create content for the station in the form of an internship during the first summer session. Boyle added that this is a great opportunity for the campus to build a strong relationship with the community. Students have already started producing hours of content and can be found on channel 956, which is WCU-TV5, until WCCT is up and running. T.J. Cromyak is a student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AC651771@wcupa.edu.

http://www.wcupa.edu/infoservices/Digitalmediacenter/studio.asp


APRIL 4, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 9

Alpha Sigma Tau hopes to inspire others to make a difference By Angela Thomas Features Editor

Lauren Bolden, co-Philanthropy chair of Alpha Sigma Tau, a Greek organization on campus, has big plans for her sorority. She is very proud of the positive impact that her sorority as well as other Greek organizations have had on campus. “During the Fall 2010 semester, all eight sororities raised $8,600 for their various philanthropies and logged 4,200 hours of community service. In just one year sororities on this campus donated over $16,000 and completed 6,190 hours of community service. If you compare the Panhellenic [sorority] community to the campus-wide totals for community service, sorority women alone contributed 10% of total donations raised and 10% of community service hours logged,” Bolden said. Alpha Sigma Tau’s presence on this campus has not been invisible. They, along with the entire Panhellenic community, helped volunteer for the Pink Zone Basketball Game. $3,192 was raised overall for the event. “Over this past year alone, roughly 40 sorority women have worked with Dr. Zotter through the Sister-to-Sister Peer Mentor Program. These women volunteer a considerable amount of

their time to educate other women in their sororities and across the campus on issues surrounding body image, self-esteem, eating disorders and empowerm e n t , ” Bolden said. The Sisterto-Sister program has helped plan plenty of events to help the WCU student community recognize that eating disorders are a serious issue. The Sister-toSister program also goes as far as to train the young women who are a part of the program to intervene when recognizing a student who might be suffering from an eating disorder. “The Sister to Sister Peer Mentors are amazing women and represent just some of those in the Panhellenic council who are dedicated to making our campus a better one,” Bolden said. Alpha Sigma Tau was founded on Nov. 4, 1899 nationally.

However, the West Chester University chapter was found on March 29, 1969. One of the things that Alpha Sigma Tau prides

with my executive board, we encouraged our members to attend the event. Since I am also my sororities co-philanthropy/ community service chair, I asked my sisters to volunteer their time and efforts so that we could co-sponsor this wonderful event. Alpha Sigma Tau not only helped publicize the event but we were also ushers for both nights,” Bolden said. Bolden also says that with the help of the Greek community, “The Human Experience” was publicized more. “We [the Greeks] are a better community because of it,” Bolden Lauren Bolden/The Quad said. Alpha Sigma Tau has been preparing for their itself on is their outstanding com- huge event called “Battle of the munication with other organiza- Sexes” which will be held on April tions and events. The sorority 5 from 7p.m. until 10p.m. in was one of the co-sponsors for the Sykes ballroom A. Alpha Sigma screening of the documentary, Tau is collaborating on the event “The Human Experience,” which with Black Men United, another held two screenings in February. organization on campus. To par“I became good friends with ticipate, Alpha Sigma Tau is askLori Brooks, the student who ing for a $3 entrance fee. Students coordinated The Human who go to the event will have a Experience. I currently hold an chance to raffle for prizes. “All executive board position on the money raised will benefit Camp Panhellenic council. Together D r e a m c a t c h e r . C a m p

Dreamcatcher is the largest philanthropic project of the Greek community at WCU. It offers a therapeutic and educational camp for children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. Each chapter works year round to collect funds for the camp and many Greek members also serve as counselors and staff during the one-week camp,” Bolden said. “We hope to enrich the West Chester University community by promoting the understanding of diversity, interpersonal connections and the desire to serve others,” Bolden said. Bolden is proud of her fellow sisters and of the other women in the Panhellenic community. “Many women within our sororities have one-to-two jobs, internships, a full course load, maintain 4.0 a GPA, hold leadership positions in and out of sorority life and still manage to fit in hours of volunteer work a week to better themselves and their community,” Bolden said. Bolden, a LGBTQA ally, is happy to see other greek members participating in LGBTQA as well as Women Leading Up, becoming certified student leaders and achieving other outstanding credentials. Angela Thomas is a fourth year student majoring in English and with a minor in web technology. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.

Students are given chance to test for Chlamydia By Rebekah Balmer Staff Writer

The Women’s Center and the Health and Wellness Center are partnering together to give students the opportunity to get tested for chlamydia. On Monday April 11 from 10a.m. until 2 p.m. in Sykes Ballroom A, free chlamydia testing will be provided to all West Chester Students. The first 75 students to get tested will get a free t-shirt and the next 100 will get a free water bottle. The Residence Hall Association and Residence Life and Housing are also hosting a competition to see which residence hall can encourage the most students to get tested. The residence hall that has the most students to get tested wins a free social. Chlamydia is a bacterial infection of the genital area, and there are about two million new cases of chlamydia each year. The highest rates are among women ages 15-25, but men can catch chlamydia too. Chlamydia has no symptoms among men and women who have it. Women may experience abnormal vaginal discharge

and bleeding, missing periods and pain during urination. Men can develop discharge or pain during urination within one to three weeks of having sex with an infected partner. By having unprotected sex, one is more prone to spread chlamydia. If chlamydia is untreated it can cause an increased risk for infection of other sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. For women, chlamydia can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which can lead to infertility and tubal (ectopic) pregnancy. Babies born to infected women can develop eye or lung infections and infected men uncommonly develop pain and swelling in the testicle. Chlamydia is a serious problem among college-age students. Alicia Hahn, Assistant Coordinator of Wellness Programs at the Health and Wellness Center, said that, “According to the GYT website (www.itsyoursexlife.com), one in two young

people will get a sexually transmitted infection by the time they are 25. Many of these infections will not be visible to the eye, which is why regular testing is so important.” Dr. Adale Sholock, director of the Women’s Center said “the centers for disease control said that the number of young adults with chlamydia are way up, they

pee in a cup.” It should only take about 15 minutes and “it’s great to know your status,” Sholock said. It is recommended that people go with whoever they feel most comfortable. They can go alone, with a close friend or with their partner. Partners can and should get tested together. “There is no shame in knowing you status and the testing will be painless and easy.” Sholock said. There will be free prizes, DJing by student Zuri Stone and information tables. There is a negative stigma about getting tested, but there shouldn’t be. Getting tested and knowing one’s status makes the world safer for everyone. “If you care about yourself and future partners, you’ll get tested,” Sholock commented. “The GYT (get yourself plannedparenthood.org tested) campaign is part of a larger campaign sponsored by MTV, The Kaiser are seeing more WCU students Family Foundation and the US with it and so it’s a major public Centers for Disease Control. The health issue.” campaign promotes open commuSholock recommends getting nication about sexually transmittested: “It’s so easy, all you do is ted infections among young peo-

ple,” Hahn said. “The free HIV testing campaign was a huge success last year, so we wanted to give students another opportunity to get tested. Chlamydia is one of the more prevalent STIs in the 18-24 age range, so Adale and I thought it was important to bring this testing to campus.” All testing results are confidential and will be reported about a week after the testing day. If someone tests positive, chlamydia is completely curable and treated with an antibiotic that students can get from the Health Center for $10. For more information about the testing day,Hahn and Sholock can be contacted via the West Chester University e-mail system. Rebekah Balmer is a fourth-year student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology . She can be reached at RB649636@ wcupa.edu.

Get yourself tested on April 11 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. in Sykes Ballroom A


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APRIL 4, 2011

THE QUAD

Follow the Quad online! @TheQuadWCU

Entertainment

Music Review: Sara Ramirez EP By Carol Fritz Staff Writer

As if winning a Tony Award, a SAG Award, and having juicy on-screen hook-ups with both McSteamy and the delightful Dr. Arizona Robbins on ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy was not enough, Sara Ramirez’s newest endeavor is taking the world of music by storm. Ramirez, best known for her roles as “The Lady of the Lake” in Broadway’s “Spamalot” and as Calliope “Callie” Torres in “Grey’s Anatomy”, released her debut EP on March 27, 2011. The four-track EP includes three original songs and a powerful cover of Brandi Carlile’s “The Story”, which Ramirez sang for Grey’s Anatomy’s recent musical episode. The first song on the EP, “Break My Heart,” is sarcastic, upbeat, and vocally impeccable. Although her musical theater background is apparent when she sings, Ramirez effortlessly belts out the notes but has

enough control over her voice so a pop song like “Break My Heart” is not overly dramatic. The song has mostly pop and singer/songwriter elements and the piano-heavy melody is addictively catchy. The tonguein-cheek lyrics like, “I’m so tired of being happy/ Baby, won’t you come and break my heart?/ Sick of you and me always laughing/ Baby, won’t you come and break my heart?” add feistiness to the bubbly chorus. “Waitin’” varies greatly from “Break My Heart,” exhibiting Ramirez’s musical chops and bluesy, sultry skills. It is reminiscent of a song that Joss Stone would sing, but Ramirez, thankfully, has a much more pleasant voice. Ramirez’s hushed low notes and powerful high notes are both highlighted in this unforgettable track that is sure to hit all the right notes with listeners. Likewise, it is rather hard to forget the way Peter Gabriel’s “In Your Eyes” set the mood for

the “Say Anything” make-out session, (and who can forget the gorgeousness that is John Cusack’s face?) but Sara Ramirez’s “Eye to Eye” could give Pete a run for his money. The soft, whispered lyrics definitely create marvelous macking music, but the emotional sweetness of Ramirez’s crooning voice and the subtle, banjo-like background music melt together to create a unique blend of sensuality and charm. The final track is entitled “The Story,” which was originally performed by folk singer Brandi Carlile. Ramirez recorded the song for a special “Grey’s Anatomy” music event that aired on March 31, 2011, during which the cast performed songs that the television show had essentially made famous. This arguably has the strongest vocals on the EP, much like the vocally solid original pop/rock ballad. The

picture, still in theaters. “The Adjustment Bureau,” which cost about $60 million and has grossed about $100 million worldwide (no smash, but no flop), carries the courage of its unformulaic convictions straight through to the end. It is a sincere fantasy about soul mates passing the ultimate test. My second time, I brought my 10-year-old son. My hunch proved correct (you never know, do you?). He fell headlong into the movie and came out dazed, but pleased. It gave him a few things to think about. The second time through, I realized something truly remarkable about the film: First-time feature director George Nolfi, handling his own screenplay adaptation of the Philip K. Dick short story “Adjustment Team,” managed to make a star-driven studio picture, a thriller (though more of a thinker) wrapped around a romance, without a single gun being drawn. Not one. I confirmed this with Nolfi on Wednesday. “Nope, no guns,” he said. “I mean, come on. The Adjustment Bureau’s a super-

natural force. They don’t need guns. And anyway, films should have the minimum amount of violence needed to tell the story.” He added that plenty of stories require plenty of violence. Just not this one. Subconsciously, I suspect, the absence of firearms may have been the reason I was keen on taking my jaded 10-year-old sophisticate to “The Adjustment Bureau.” It’s an antidote to all the assaultive diversions aimed his way every week, on television and in the movies. The film contains a single use of the F-word, in a throwaway context, and a discreet, non-exploitative scene of lovemaking. Millions of Americans, more nervous about language and skin than I am, will wonder about the film’s appropriateness for a 10-yearold. But my concerns as a parent lie almost wholly with how much violence, and what sort, my kid is being fed by the media, as facilitated by his parents. “The studio,” Nolfi said, “didn’t market the movie to young people at all, but when

PAGE 11

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

greysgabble.com

intense guitar riffs and Ramirez’s raw, passionate interpretation of the narrative lyrics practically throw the listeners into the songwriters’ shoes and lace them up with their heartstrings. Ramirez’s self-titled EP showcases her versatility and ability to sing a multitude of

genres. Within the first five days of its release, the EP peaked at No. 6 on iTunes’s Top Albums chart. Sara Ramirez can be seen on ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” on Thursdays, 9/8c. Carol Fritz is a second-year student majoring in communication studies and German. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu

Bad News for Industry; Some Good News for Moviegoers Michael Phillips Chicago Tribune

With movie theater attendance in North America down a grim 20 percent so far this year compared with 2010, as reported by the Los Angeles Times, it’s natural to point fingers at the biggest flameouts. “The Green Hornet.” “Sucker Punch.” The early 2011 list of unprofitable pain is long; if it weren’t, AMC Entertainment Inc. honcho Gerry Lopez wouldn’t have said in the LA Times piece that sluggish business at the multiplex “boils down to the quality of the movies.” There are, however, mediumbudget films of considerable quality to help us through these doldrums. “Source Code,” made for around $30 million, deserves an audience; it plays fresh variations on familiar science fiction ideas, time travel and alternative realities for starters. It’s genuinely exciting. And it believes in love, which for the record I’d like to point out is a nice thing. I felt the same way about a very different, lower-keyed

they did their market research they found it scored best with audiences younger than 21. They were shocked.” He told me he has received a surprising amount of mail from people who took their kids to “The Adjustment Bureau.” They’re grateful, he said, for the way the film handled the story. “It doesn’t seem like a kid-appropriate film, yet there’s no reason to think kids aren’t interested in those large questions of fate and free will, or can’t be taken in by the love story ... it’s an odd movie, no question. It’s the moviebantercom uncynical, which for those expecting a “The Green Hornet” proved harder science fiction movie to be a rather sub-par movie. is something to get angry sarily marketed at his about. Maybe that’s why some patronized, coarsened, coveted younger kids have responded to age group, the movies (even if it: It isn’t a cynical, dystopian they’re good, not great) that vision of the world.” dare to engage without the As my son begins to explore usual bullying tactics will more and more films not neces- always get my money.


PAGE 12

THE QUAD

Top 7 Cartoons from the 90s:

4) Catdog

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1) Rugrats

APRIL 4, 2011

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5) Magic School Bus

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THE TROCADERO: April 5- Amos Lee May 4- Protest the Hero May 7 - The Airborne Toxic Event MAy 31- Matt & Kim June 3- The Script June 4- Death Cab for Cutie

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Interested in advertising? The Quad is looking for individuals interested in marketing and business to add to our Advertising Team. Contact quadeic@ wcupa.edu if interested.


APRIL 4, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 13

More photos from Break Dance Club:

c us

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

JG

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PAGE15

WCU salvages one game from Ship Baseball from page 18 coaches’ poll selected WCU to finish second in the PSAC East. Currently the Golden Rams sit in fifth place, but with a strong finish they are still capable of catching East Stroudsburg and Millersville. The Golden Rams will be back in action on Monday, April 4 when they will travel to Philadelphia to face Chestnut Hill in a non-conference tilt. On Friday, April 8, they will make their way north to visit East Stroudsburg in a PSAC East doubleheader. Games start at 1:00 and 3:30 p.m. Local fans can watch WCU at Serpico Stadium on Saturday, April 9 as they will conclude their home-andhome doubleheader series with the Warriors at 1:00. and 3:30 p.m. Steven Fisher is a fourth-year student majoring in communications. He can be reached at The Golden Rams baseball team dropped three of four to PSAC East opponent Shippensburg over the weekend. sf674180@wcupa.edu.

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Softball’s winning streak snapped PAGE 16

By Riley Wallace Special to The Quad

The West Chester University softball team entered this past week on a four game winning streak with a record of 15-11. On Monday, March 28 the Rams split a non-conference doubleheader with University of the Sciences of Philadelphia (2-16), winning the first game 3-1 but falling in the second game 3-4. The team then took on PSAC (Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference) East conference foe, Millersville (11-13) on Wednesday in another doubleheader, losing game one 4-3, then winning game two 5-2. The Golden Rams got all the offense they needed early in the first game, scoring three runs in the second inning, giving pitcher Devon Utterback all the room she needed in a complete game win. Allowing just two hits and only one run in the sixth, Utterback (9-2) dominated the devils from start to finish Monday afternoon. Leftfielder Erin MacNamee drove in third baseman Jessica Schuck and rightfielder Brianna Rowlands with a single, and shortstop Jessica Norris followed with a single of her own that knocked in MacNamee. That was the only scoring for a while, until USP managed a single run in the top of the sixth. The Rams scored their three runs on seven hits and took advantage of the three

THE QUAD

APRIL 4, 2011

errors committed by University of the Sciences. Utterback received the win while Devils pitcher Gina Murray (0-3) got the loss after giving up three earned runs through four innings. Utterback gave up one run on two hits, striking out 11 batters, while walking three. Schuck and Rowlands each had two hits in three at-bats, and MacNamee and Norris each had a hit while batting in one and two runs, respectively. The Lady Rams fell behind early in the nightcap only to climb back into the lead. A two-run homerun in the seventh ultimately did the Rams in, losing 4-3. The victory for University of the Sciences was their first against West Chester since 1992. USP jumped out to the early lead with two runs in the first, but WCU responded with two runs of their own in the third. Centerfielder Megan Kelly hit a solo homerun, her third of the season, and MacNamee doubled down the line and eventually scored on an error by USP. The Lady Rams took the lead in the sixth inning when Schuck singled and Mandy Gerhart pinch ran for her, and was batted in by Rowlands. USP had one final chance left with basemen Courtney

Corcoran up to bat. She hit a two-run homer to put the Devils ahead for good. Kim Murl fell to 7-7 after pitching 6.1 innings, allowing seven hits and four runs while striking out four and walking one. Utterback relieved Murl for the final two outs and had one strike out. Courtney Spina improved to 2-6 after pitching all seven innings and giving up seven hits to go along with

six strikeouts and two walks. The Rams were led on offense by Schuck who had two hits in three at-bats and Rowlands who went 1-for-3 with a run batted in. West Chester kicked off its second doubleheader of the week Wednesday afternoon at Millersville, once again falling behind early after giving up a

hit batter. Murl relieved Utterback and finished the game facing four batters, striking out one and walking one. Millersville’s pitcher, Signore, picked up the win tossing all seven innings to push her mark to 3-4 on the year. The Rams were led on offense by Kmiecinski along with second basemen Abby

Block and Kelly who each had a double in three plate appearances. In the second game of the doubleheader against Millersville, the Rams took a three run lead in the third and never trailed thereafter. The Marauders added a run in the bottom of the fourth, but West Chester answered right back with two of its own in the top of the fifth, before Millersville added one more in the bottom of the frame to give the Lady Rams the victory at 5-2. Block went the distance in the third for a two-run homer, and Murl pitched all seven innings in the win to make her record 8-7 on the year. Murl gave up eight hits but only two runs while striking out six batters and not walking any. For Millersville, Hughes (6-6) picked up the loss after pitching only 3.1 innings before being relieved by Eckman who finished the game. The Rams put together a lot of success on offense, led by Block’s homer. MacNamee went 3-for-4 with a triple and a run scored. Rowlands added two hits of her own and a run batted in. The Lady Rams have a busy week ahead of them, playing four doubleheaders in five days beginning with Shippensburg on Tuesday, April 5 and Lincoln on Wednesday April 6, both at home. Riley Wallace is a second-year student at West Chester University. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.

five points of breathing room with a score of 6-1. Millersville’s Ashley Henderson took a feed from Kelsey Schmoltze at the 6:39 mark to put the Marauders on the board. The Rams followed up with three more tallies to end the half. Less than a minute into the second half, Millersville’s Kathryn Kehring tacked another goal onto their score only to be answered by three more from the Lady Rams. Within the next five minutes, the Rams rattled off four goals to Millersville’s two, keeping a commanding lead at 13-4.

Although the Marauders hunted for more goals, successfully netting three, the Rams’ substantial lead was topped off with another goal, setting the final score at 14-7. Grimwood lead the team in scoring, netting five of the team’s 14 overall goals. Dugan also posted her third consecutive hat trick in the past three games. The win allowed the Golden Rams to preserve their perfect PSAC league play, putting their regular-season conference winning streak at 65 games. Millersville’s record slips to 3-4 overall and 1-4 in the

PSAC. O’Keefe went the distance again for the Rams, and was credited with 10 saves. Marauder goalkeeper Courtney Haggerty also played the whole game. She took the loss registering 10 saves of her own. “The games versus Gannon and Mercyhurst were huge games because they are both ranked, and they counted as conference games,” Patterson said. “Winning those games was really important to our quest for PSAC championships. We were so pumped up for that weekend and all showed up big time when that

time came.” West Chester travels to Shippensburg this weekend for another PSAC league match. The Raiders were picked sixth in the same PSAC preseason poll that deemed West Chester the No. 2 seed. The Raiders are 2-4 in the PSAC and 4-4 in non-conference play. The Golden Rams will take on the Raiders at Shippensburg on Saturday at 1 p.m. Brynn Dougherty is a thirdyear student at West Chester University. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa.edu.

run in the first inning. The Marauders added two more runs in the bottom of the fifth before West Chester finally got on the board when catcher Kate Kmiecinski hit a solo homerun in the sixth frame, pushing the final score to 3-1. Utterback (9-3) picked up the loss after pitching 4.1 innings. She give up five hits and three runs while striking out six to go along with four walks and a

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

Grimwood leading the charge for WCU Women’s LAX from page 19

game for her because she is the mastermind behind the talent.” Building upon their victorious morale, the Lady Rams added onto their streak with a 14-7 win against visiting Millersville in a PSAC contest at Vonnie Gros Field on Tuesday evening. Once again, the Rams gained an early lead over the Marauders (3-4, 1-4 PSAC), breaking for halftime with


APRIL 4, 2011

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Philly Sports Corner hillies:

The most anticipated season in the 128 year history of the Philadelphia Phillies is officially underway. Forget the sunshine of Clearwater, Florida. This weekend the Phillies returned north to the cold, windy, rainy and snowy comforts of Citizens Bank Park. The expectations are as high as they have ever been and that is because General Manager Ruben Amaro Jr. has done an outstanding job of putting together this team, the pitching rotation in particular. Two seasons ago the Phillies acquired left-handed pitcher Cliff Lee. Last offseason they acquired righthanded pitcher Roy Halladay. A day later they traded Lee to the Mariners. Last season they acquired right-handed pitcher Roy Oswalt. And this offseason the Phillies signed Lee to a five-year, $120 million contract; the largest contract ever given to a pitcher. These moves, along with the young left-hander Cole Hamels, give the Phillies the best rotation in baseball, and maybe even the history of baseball. This is why there are such high expectations for our Fightin’ Phils. But what could derail this potentially historic season? First, let’s start with injuries. During spring training, second baseman Chase Utley didn’t take an at-bat and is starting the season on the disabled list. Closer Brad Lidge is also starting the season on the disabled list. Second, offensive consistency. Over the last couple of

seasons, the total number of runs scored for the Phillies has decreased. And with the departure of Jayson Werth, the Phillies will need to find the offense to score enough runs; something that hindered them in the NLCS against the San Francisco Giants. Finally, the Phillies cannot rely on the long ball. They have to start playing small ball. With Shane Victorino at the top of the lineup and Jimmy Rollins in the threehole for now, they have to use their speed to create run scoring opportunities. And the big man Ryan Howard has to get back to his homerun hitting, RBI producing ways. Years ago the Phillies had to rely on young guys like Rollings, Utley and Howard, who at the time were not nearly as popular as they are now. In 2011 with all the injuries, the team may only go as far as today’s young guys take them. Wilson Valdez is not going to be Utley, however, he did have a big clutch hit in the opener against the Astros. Also, John Mayberry Jr. will have to step up and be a contributor. Hopefully Dominic Brown comes back from a hand injury and adds some pop to the Phillies lineup. Ben Francisco is decent but he is not going to be as good offensivley or defensivley as Jayson Werth was. What will happen this season? In my opinion, the Philadelphia Phillies will win 100 games, win the National League East and make another trip to the World Series, this time against the Boston Red Sox. From there, it’s anyone’s ballgame. L J Harrell is a graduate s t u d e n t majoring in communications studies. He can be reached at LH639694@ wcupa.edu.

The Sixers:

With only five games left in the season, the Sixers have earned themselves a trip to the NBA playoffs. By the way the standings looked at the beginning of this week (April 3), the Sixers would meet Boston in the first round. Although Boston is constantly on the top of the standings, Sixers fans can be optimistic about this matchup. In their last meeting with the Celtics on March 11, the Sixers beat Boston 89-86. In their only other regular season match-up, the Celtics just slightly topped the Sixers 84-80. So, if nothing else, Sixers fans could expect a series full of close games. Aside from Boston, the teams sitting atop the Eastern Conference can prove to be a tough challenge for the Sixers. The Miami Heat are sitting in the number two position now and their big three of Wade, Bosh and James have been a thorn in the side of the entire NBA all season long. Chicago leads the Eastern Conference behind possible MVP Derrick Rose. Philadelphia will be led into the playoffs by Doug Collins, who was named the NBA’s Coach of the Month for February. This is Collins’ first season on the Sixers bench, but he has won Coach of the Month honors with three other franchises. Jrue Holiday has played and started in all 77 games for the Sixers this season. He averages 35.3 minutes and almost 14 points per game. Holiday is young and doesn’t have much playoff experience, but can lead this team throughout the playoffs. Elton Brand leads the team in points per game with 14.9. In comparison to Holiday, he is a veteran of the NBA and has the experience to lead the team throughout the playoffs. The Sixers end their season with four straight home games against New York, Toronto, Orlando and Detroit. The NBA playoffs begin on Saturday, April 16. Amy Festa is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@wcupa. edu. The Philly Sports Corner was compiled by the editors of the sports section.

The Flyers:

What is wrong with the Flyers? Everyone keeps asking the same question dayafter-day. They have lost to some teams that they should beat; however, they did recently defeat the Penguins 5-2. In fact, they are perfect inside the CONSOL energy center, taking all three games from the Penguins this season. Of course it’s frustrating when they lose to the Atlanta Thrashers three times in one month. Occasionally their goaltending is less than stellar, and it seems as though when they do get a good outing from Brian Boucher, or Sergei Bobrovsky, their offense does not show up. Flyers fans need to relax, and here’s why. Need I remind everyone that they are sitting atop the Eastern Conference? Not just first place in the Atlantic Division, but first place overall in the East. Chris Pronger is going to be out for the rest of the regular season but should be ready in time for the playoffs. He has not played in weeks and the team is still doing well. Typically one man does not make that much of a difference on a team, but Pronger does. With the addition of Pronger coming back for the playoffs, the powerplay should immediatly benefit from his presence on the blue line. Although I am not making excuses for what a dreadful powerplay the Flyers have right now, Pronger’s absencce does hurt. Not only can he unload a heavy missle from the point, he is decisive. Often times, Flyers players look hesitant to shoot while on the man-advantage. Pronger knows when to shoot and when he does, he get’s it on net.

In addition to Pronger’s absence, the upcoming playoff season means that there will no longer be shoot-outs. We all know they suck at shootouts, but they will not have to deal with that come late April. Also, let us not forget the magical playoff-run they put together last season. The Flyers defeated their archrival the New Jersey Devils in just five games. After going down 3-0 in the series against Boston, they shocked the hockey world by winning four straight and advancing to the Eastern Conference finals. After quickly running through the Montreal Canadiens, they did collide with a good team in Chicago. Perhaps this team plays their best when their backs are up against the wall. In that case, I would reccommend all of you Flyers fans to keep putting them down. It will be difficult for any team to beat the Flyers three out of four times come playoff time. At least we know that they will definitely be in the playoffs. Would you rather them go through last year’s chaos just to capture the seventh seed? I don’t think winning a playoff spot on the last day of the season, in a shoot-out no less, makes anyone feel any better heading into the post-season. So stay optimistic about this year’s Flyers team. Relax and enjoy the ride once again, because you never know when it will be Philadelphia’s year to hoist Lord Stanley’s cup again. Steven Fisher is a fourth-year student majoring in communications. He can be reached at sf674180@ wcupa.edu.


Youthful group struggles on diamond PAGE 18

THE QUAD

innings of game one. WCU’s Chris Pula went 4-for-4 with a bases-clearing double in the first inning of game one. The Raiders were able to score three runs in the first and second to keep the score close. After a game tying RBIsingle in the fifth, SU took the lead in the sixth with a sacrifice fly by sophomore Sam Phillips. Shippensburg’s Josh Scott came on in relief in the second inning and quieted the Golden Rams’ bats that had erupted early in the game. Brent Roehrich (2-1) suffered the loss, facing three batters in

the sixth inning and allowing just one unearned run. Joe Gunkel started and lasted just five innings. He gave up 10 hits, walked two and struck West Chester’s baseball out four Raiders. squad lost their weekend In game two of Saturday’s series to PSAC East opponent doubleheader, Jordan Lehman Shippensburg three games to (2-3) earned the win, giving one and now hold a record of up two runs on three hits in 13-14 overall and are just 5-7 three innings of work. He in PSAC play. relieved starter Conor Kerins, WCU split their Saturday who went the first three doubleheader with innings. Kerins had a good Shippensburg at Serpico outing as he continues to Stadium, losing game one 8-7, progress from having Tommy but winning the nightcap John surgery last season. 13-5. The Golden Rams lit up Joe Wendle smashed a Shippensburg’s starter for three-run homer in the bottom seven runs in the first three of the third that gave WCU their first lead, 5-3. Wendle was 1-for-3 in game two, and now has three homers on the season. Jack Provine was e 2-for-4 with four g e l ol iology – ion – RBI, including a b it ity C n u tory – n – compos is h double and a m t r a – io Comign language– –communicicast – educatiohneducation – t rip le. R eid y t n s lt y tr u n om ea Pulford went s Co – America – chemis ice – econ erman – h t study – 2-for-3, and Bucinkg – accounhteinfgapprentnicceesh–ipcrimina–l jufirset scienciteie–sG– indepenmdaernketing –e Brandon Wolfe eLearn hnology – cmation scie e – fine arts ty – human nagement – rsing – offic sics – finished the doubiotec uter & infor nd languag – hospitali rature – ma music – nu ation – phy logy – comp h as a seco preservationalegal – lite edia arts –hysical educ nce – socio bleheader going Englis y – historic – law/par ant – multimosophy – p estate – scie 4-for-5 at the histor – journalismedical assist e arts – phil afety – real plate. Not to be r n s c m e a n c li a – li n a It oo s matics n – performology – pub outdone by Wolfe, e e h t t a a m psych istratio radu Chris Pula was a g , admin al science – rts p ch u se load t combined 6-for-8 a politic h – visual a c , r head fall cou ee Spanis on Saturday. a e p r um n your r degr he sho n J The Golden t ighte rate you ime for Rams lost both n L t e l cce ill have ks) PSAC East games n A ions3: 0 (6 weeeks) st s d s n e at Shippensburg A ) S n s e e k r w n e me 23 – Ju ly 18 (8 (12 we ks) on Friday, April 1. m u S May 23 – Ju gust 11 (9 wee ) WCU lost game 1 u s y Ma 23 – A ugust 1 6 week one by a score of May 13 – A ust 11 ( 8-4, and game two e g n Ju 5 – Au 6-5. The Golden July Rams battled back in game two and were able to tie things up at 5-5 in the top of the seventh. They were then unable to hold off Shippensburg as they scored the game-winning run Where to learn. Where to return. in the bottom half of the inning with Register early for best class selection one out. Visit bucks.edu/wc for the latest course listings Wendle reached base on a fielding Admissions 215.968.8100 error by Ship’s second basemen in the seventh and eventually came around to score on a one-out single to Newtown • Bristol • Perkasie • Bucks.edu right field by Reid 11045 Pulford. By Steven Fisher Asst. Sports Editor

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Ben Miller doubled for Ship with one out in their half of the seventh and advanced to third on a wild pitch. Tyler Uphouse knocked in Miller for the game-winning run to complete the sweep of WCU. Raimo tied the game at three with a two-run single in the fourth inning. Shippensburg put two runs on the board in the bottom half of the inning to go back up by two runs. Brandon Wolfe went 2-for-3 with an RBI while shortstop Dylan Zigman was 2-for-2 with a run knocked in. Anthony Clemens (2-2) went the distance on the mound for WCU. He gave up six runs, four of them earned, on nine hits. Clemens walked three and struck out eight Shippensburg batters. Kody Kibler pitched the seventh for the Raiders to pick up the win. Matt Baer looked like his old self, going 2-for-4 with a pair of RBI in the opener. Matt Zielinski started game one for WCU and struggled in the opening inning. Zielinski gave up eight runs total, six of which were scored in the first inning. Yet again WCU got up off the mat and made it 6-4 at the end of two. Baer hit a bases loaded single that drove in two during a three-run second. “The team did show heart in coming back at both games against Shippensburg,” head coach Mark Jackson said. “Our goal is to play the game hard pitch by pitch so that we are in a position to be creating momentum all the time in a game. Most baseball teams wait for something positive to happen instead of making something positive happen by constant pressure. We are still trying to get better at playing the game pitch-bypitch.” The Raiders managed to drive in two more runs in the fourth to push their lead to four. Overall Zielinski gave up eight runs on nine hits in just four innings. He struck out three and walked two Raiders. John Barr finished up with two scoreless innings on two hits. Tom Bush (5-0) was impressive for the Raiders as he pitched a complete game. WCU advanced to the Bill Giles championship with a dominant performance over visiting Philadelphia University on Wednesday, March 30. The Golden Rams

hit early and often as they piled up 22 runs on 20 hits, including three home runs. The 22-7 victory over Philadelphia University was the largest margin win for WCU this season. The Bill Giles championship game will be played on April 12 at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia. Over the past three years the four-team Division II tournament has been captured by West Chester. Philadelphia University’s record falls to 2-14 on the season. Oddly enough, the Golden Rams scored 20 of their 22 runs with two outs, putting up three runs in the fifth, nine in the sixth, three in the seventh and five more in the eighth. Kristian Von Kiel hit a monster three-run homer in the sixth inning while Provine did the same in the eighth stanza, followed by a solo shot from leftfielder Baer. Provine finished the day 2-for-3 with six RBI. Wendle went 2-for-3 with five RBI and three runs scored, including a bases loaded triple in the fifth that broke open a 2-1 ballgame. Raimo went 4-for-5 with three runs scored from his lead-off position in the order. Baer accumulated four hits with five RBI. Zigman went 3-for-4 with three runs scored. Dylan Porter (2-2) evened his record with the win over Philadelphia University. He tossed 7.1 innings of three-hit ball. He gave up just three runs, only two of which were earned, while striking out seven batters. With their offense struggling to stay consistent in the previous weeks, WCU took full advantage of a less-talented team in Philadelphia University. Through the first 27 games of the season, Coach Jackson has juggled his lineup and batting order on a consistent basis to try and find a combination that consistently works. “We are in search of the best possible team on the field. Injuries and statistics play a role in determining the lineup,” Jackson said. With half of the season over, Coach Jackson and his club must recapture their winning ways if they want to make a run at another PSAC East title. The preseason See Baseball page 15

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WCU remains perfect in PSAC By Brynn Dougherty Staff Writer The women’s lacrosse team continued their seven-game winning-streak after triumphing over Mercyhurst and Millersville, leading head coach, Ginny Martino, to her 200th victory at West Chester University. On Saturday, March 26, the Rams completed their weekend sweep after conquering Gannon on Friday. No. 7 West Chester (8-1, 6-0 PSAC) defeated Mercyhurst (7-2, 3-1) in a PSAC match with a final score of 16-10 on Sunday afternoon. The victory allowed West Chester to maintain its perfect record in 2011 league play. Jackie Hoover tied her career-high, knocking in five goals, and surpassed her own personal record by accumulating seven points overall. The Golden Rams made their presence known by the

end of the first half with three unanswered goals, exiting the half with a 9-5 advantage over their competitors. Mercyhurst kept the game interesting in the second half, responding to the Rams’ goals with four of their own. Ally Keirn earned two of those goals to help put themselves within reach, 10-8. Hoover took a feed from Tori Dugan behind the cage to regain their three point lead, until Mercyhurst’s Alisha Catalino brought the Lakers back to a two point deficit. For the next 12 minutes, each team displayed aggression that kept the game within reach. In the final 11 minutes of play, Mercyhurst could not keep up with West Chester’s five unanswered tallies. With that, the Golden Rams put Mercyhurst’s sevengame winning streak to an end, while extending their own streak to six consecutive games. Devon Lotkowski and

D u g a n finished with hat t r i c k s , finishing with four and five p o i n t s , respectively. Shannon H a y e s posted three assists and C l a i r e Grimwood put up two goals. Erin Oczkowski, J a c k i Patterson and Lauren G l a s s e y each scored once. K e i r n and Kayla M i n n e r netted three goals apiece for the L a k e r s .

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Kiern accumulated five points, while Kayla Minner was close behind with four points overall. Catalino put up two goals, while Kimberly Masterson and Anna LeGrett made up the difference, scoring twice each. MacKenzie O’Keefe (5-1) was credited with the win with three saves. Jess Henderson took over the second half, recording three saves as well. Mercyhurst’s Jenny Perkins (7-2) stayed in the cage for the whole game, stopping 11 shots. Jacki Patterson commented on the team’s celebration after Martino’s victory: “We were all so happy to be a part of Ginny’s 200th win. We had flowers, balloons and a card for her after the game which she really appreciated. We really wanted to win that See Women’s LAX page 16

First PSAC win since 2003 By Brian Johnson Special to The Quad

The past week has been much more productive for West Chester University’s men’s and women’s tennis teams, seeing them both finish with 2-1 records. When the week started, it looked as if it were going to be much of the same for the men with a 9-0 loss to PSAC (Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference) opponent Mercyhurst College on March 26. The two closest results came at the number one and three doubles with an 8-5 and 8-6 loss, respectively. Freshman Connor Dunn’s match was the highlight of the singles competition, with WCU’s representative falling in a close 7-5, 6-4 match. “We should have came out with a 2-1 lead heading into the singles but didn’t win the crucial points to make that happen,” head coach Tina Tharp said. “They are a much stronger team than West Chester from 1-6 singles although, Freshman Connor Dunn played an amazing match, losing close.” Not to be spurned by the

result from the day before, the men went after PSAC opponent Edinboro University for an 8-1 victory. The match was full of dominating performances at doubles and singles with WCU dropping only 13 of the 64 games played in their winning matches. The match started off with 8-1 and 8-0 victories from the one and two doubles pairings followed by an Edinboro forfeit, giving the Golden

Rams a 3-0 lead going into singles play, which was dominated by WCU’s players. Edinboro’s lone point came from a win at second singles from Jason Hoffman. The highlight of the past week, and for that matter, the whole season, came on March 29 when the Golden Rams defeated PSAC Eastern Division rival East Stroudsburg University 5-4 without their No.1 singles

player Nate Geigle, who has been sidelined due to an ACL tear. The victory marked the end of a 30 match losing streak within the division dating back to 2003. Things started off tight in the doubles competition with WCU edging out 8-6, 8-6, and 9-8 victories, with a 7-5 tiebreak win in the third doubles match to seal the win. Things only got tighter as ESU took number one and two singles with three set v i c t o r i e s . However, WCU completed their victory with three set victories of their own with wins from Steve Hlava and Jimmy Aridas at third and forth singles. The women’s week of competition started in similar fashion to the men’s, falling to Mercyhurst 7-2. WCU’s points came from Luisiana Souto Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad and Claire

Afrassiabian at second and forth singles. “I thought we left some winnable matches out there,” coach Tharp said. “We [still] need to work on some things.” Like the men, the women responded to the loss against Mercyhurst with a 9-0 demolishing of Edinboro, with their stellar performances leading to only four dropped games in the match. Unlike the men, their match against East Stoudsburg was a much more comfortable 7-2 victory. Like the men they swept the doubles competition giving them a 3-0 lead and things looked to get a bit precarious as ESU took first and second singles. The Golden Rams earned fairly comfortable victories from Ali Fetter, Afrassiabian, Alex Santoro and Kara Shumock. With these results, both teams are currently 1-0 and conference play with eight matches to go for the women and six for the men before the PSAC playoffs begin. Brian Johnson is a third-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at BJ669485@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 20

THE QUAD

John Mayberry Jr. delivered a pinch-hit walk-off single on opening day for the Phillies. As always, the hero gets shaving creamed.

Sports

APRIL 4, 2011

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU Baseball falls to Ship WCU Lax remains perfect in PSAC - Page 19

Tennis earns first PSAC win since 2003 - Page 19

WCU’s bats came alive in their PSAC doubleheader against Shippensburg. Brandon Wolfe finished Saturday’s games going 4-for-5, while Chris Pula was a combined 6-for-8. Joe Wendle hit his third homerun of the season, which leads the Golden Rams in long balls. Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

Quad 100-08  

The Quad issue of April 4, 2011

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