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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 1 . I S S U E 9

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Occupy West Chester??? Sleep-out story see page 3

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

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PAGE 9

FEATURES

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ENT

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Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

SPORTS

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THE QUAD

LGBTQA hosts a successful Transgender Awareness Week By Margaret Weaver Staff Writer

This past week, Nov. 14 through Nov. 18, LGTBQA sponsored Transgender Awareness Week. Various events were held in Sykes. Transgender Awareness Week is observed all around the world. It is a way for the LGBTQ community to remember, reflect, and promote diversity to those who may not be aware of the struggles that Transgender people face on a daily basis. A table was set up from Monday to Wednesday where members of the organization handed out rainbow pride bracelets and pins commemorating Transgender Awareness Week. Flyers were also handed out to encourage students to attend the events throughout the week. On Monday, a Question and Answer session on Gender Identity was led by J. Daly, the secretary for LGBTQA. A film, “No Dumb Questions,” was shown that evening with discussion after the film. On Wednesday, Dr. Michelle Angello, a clinical sexologist, presented two seminars about working with transgender students in college and the college experience as a whole. According to Angello, the discussion was held to further appreciation for diversity, increase awareness with regards to the unique challenges that transgender students face on college campuses, and gain a greater understanding of gender identity. “You know your gender identity. It’s in your brain and in your heart,” Angello said. She clarified the differences between gender and sex. Sex has to do with a person’s anatomy and gender is the way in which someone identifies themselves. Gender identity, according to Angello, is who someone is versus sexual orientation which deals with

which sex a person is attracted to. One phrase that Angello likes to tell people in the media is “gender identity is not about whom I’m attracted to. It’s about who I am.” She gave the statistics from the West Chester University Climate Survey. West Chester got

According to the Transgender Day of Remembrance website, the event is held in November to honor Rita Hester. Hester was murdered on Nov. 28, 1998. Her death inspired people to start the Remembering our Dead project and a candlelight vigil in San Francisco in 1999. The

Photo by Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad Rebekah Balmer handed out carnations to students. The white carnations represented and remembered victims of transgender violence.

3.5 stars in the LGTBQA category. Further broken up, West Chester received a 5/5 in criteria in sexual orientation but only 1/5 for gender identity and expression. West Chester had points taken off because there is no non-discrimination policy for transgender harassment. On Thursday, Barbara Peronteau discussed the topic “A Trans-Woman and her Faith Journey.” Later that evening, J. Daly hosted “He Don’t Wear A Dress: A Queer Cabaret.” Friday was The Transgender Day of Remembrance. A service was held in the ballrooms to remember those who have passed away due to transgender violence. Students and faculty attended and if they wished, they placed white carnations on a table draped in black as the names of victims were read by Breckin DeWane.

Day of Remembrance is observed around internationally and nationally. Martin Gilliam-Kennedy gave a brief history of the Day of Remembrance. “Our goal is to show love instead of hate,” Kennedy said. “It is an opportunity for communities to come together and remember.” According to statistics, one person a month has died from transgender prejudice. Dr. Simon Ruchti also shared during the ceremony. “We live in a world of hate, but you know what? We also live in a world of love,” she said. Readings from poems and a slideshow tribute that showed pictures of those who have died were also shared during the ceremony. After the ceremony Ruchti, a professor at WCU, and her colleague, Dr. Matthew Pierlott, held a discussion about the Cisgender Privilege.

According to Ruchti, cisgender refers to those whose genders fit comfortably into the gender binary as opposed to gender queer, which refers to those whose gender doesn’t fit comfortably into the gender binary. Ruchti and Pierlott stressed, “We find ourselves making mistakes about gender.” They went over correct definitions and then had the audience participate in an activity where they were to list the privileges cisgender people have. Some examples shared were going shopping for clothes, looking for housing, especially in college dorms, and not worrying about which restroom to use. According to Ruchti, much of the violence against transgenders or gender queers happens in the bathrooms. Same sex bathrooms are safer but yet they are small in number in many public places. Both Ruchti and Angello brought up the new law that has been passed in Pennsylvania regarding gender identity. Individuals no longer need to have the surgery to change their sex. If they wish to change the gender marker, the F or M on a person’s identification, they only need access to a medical doctor or licensed psychiatrist or a social worker to do so. It doesn’t cost any money other than the visit to the doctor or the social worker. “Visibility brings a measure of tolerance,” Angello said. For more information regarding Transgender Awareness Week or to learn more about being an Ally or a member of the community, visit an executive board member in the LGTBQA office in Sykes Union Organization Complex, Room 233. Margaret Weaver is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MW678077@ wcupa.edu.

News NOVEMBER 21, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU Football coach receives harassing calls to office phone By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief Practicum Writer

West Chester University football teammates and coaching staff ended the season with a 4 – 3 Conference record. Like most people on the field, E.J. Sandusky grew up playing football before becoming a coach. This season he coached the running backs. Before joining WCU for his fifth season, Sandusky coached for Albright College for 11 years, including 10 years as their head coach. During this time, Albright won three ECAC championship game. E.J. Sandusky is one of the six adopted children of Jerry Sandusky, former defensive coordinator coach at Pennsylvania State University (PSU). Jerry was recently indicated on 40 counts of related sexual abuse which occurred over a 15 year span. Sandusky politely declined comment via e-mail saying “at this time my siblings and I are not commenting on the allegations against my father.” After Sandusky received harassing phone calls, the Athletic Director had requested the web master to remove Sandusky’s bio and contact information from the athletics website. His information was removed by Nov. 14.

Sandusky graduated from Penn State in 1992. While attending Penn State, he played football under former head coach Joe Paterno. E.J. Sandusky started as center on the PSU Nittany Lions team. His father retired as the assistant coach in 1999. Jerry Sandusky founded the Second Mile Charity. It opened in 1977 to foster children and now serves nationwide, including prevention, early intervention, and community-based programs and services, according to the website www.thesecondmile.org. Paterno and Graham B. Spanier, university president of PSU, were fired for failing to report allegations from 2002 against Jerry Sandusky to law enforcement officials. They also received criticism for not reporting the abuse. Jerry Sandusky has an early December court date for his alleged abuse from 1994 to 2009. E. J. Sandusky has 19 years of experience as a coach and is also a member of the American Football Coaches Association since 1993, according to the website www.wcupa.edu/ athletics. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@ wcupa.edu.


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Criminal Justice Department WCU hosts first Sleepout event offers unique Inside-Out course to raise awareness about homelessness and hunger By Jen Mika

Practicum Writer

The Criminal Justice Department is teaching a new course during the spring 2012 semester that will be taught inside of a Pennsylvania State Prison. The course is available to both university students and to the inmates of the prison in hopes that they will be able to help teach one another. The program originated with the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program which, according to their website insideoutcenter.org, “increases opportunities for men and women, inside and outside of prison, to have transformative learning experiences that emphasize collaboration and dialogue, inviting participants to take leadership in addressing crime, justice, and other issues of social concern.” Founded in 1997, the Inside-Out Program was created as an experiment to observe how college students and inmates worked together. Their goal was to allow all students to mutually benefit from one another in a safe and honest environment. Taken from their website, incarcerated men and women and college students stated that it “was simply not another learning experience – it transformed the way they viewed themselves and the world.” The idea for the program first originated with an inmate, Paul, who is serving a life sentence at a Pa. State Prison. He believed that

by combining college students and inmates, all people would have the opportunity to teach and learn by others. His vision was to create an environment that benefited all people involved and that allowed for honest input. WCU is now participating in the Inside-Out Program, giving students a chance to become a part of the movement. The course is Restorative Justice, which “examines the use of restorative

teaching the course at Montgomery County Prison this upcoming spring semester. He was trained as an Inside-Out teacher two summers ago. “I have taught courses at correctional facilities several times in the past, but never at West Chester,” O’Neill said. Since the end of the 2007-2008 school year, there have been more than 140 courses taught in 20 states at 37 different schools. More than 56 professors have joined the Inside-Out Program. The course is limited to 15 West Chester students and 15 inmate students, however the course is currently full with six students on a waiting list. There are no requirements to join and no prerequisites are required. “It is unfortunate, but inmates cannot earn any college credit for the class, but they homepages.indiana.edu will get a certificate Students at Indiana University participate and hopefully some in the Inside-Out program. confidence that they can do well in a college justice in the criminal course,” O’Neil said. justice system and its This is a great opporimpact on the victim and tunity for men and victim’s family, offender, women, both inside and and community at the out of prison, to learn in a adult and juvenile level” unique environment. It is (wcupa.edu). a chance to listen to The course will also other’s experiences and examine the use of pun- insights on all sorts of ishment within our topics. Although some criminal justice system. may be hesitant to learn It will observe the history within the walls of a Pa. and philosophy of punish- State Prison, this once in ment. Within the a lifetime experience will classroom environment at offer unforgettable a Pa. State Prison, knowledge that students students have the oppor- would not be able to gain tunity to hear inmate’s within a normal classroom thoughts on what they environment. think about our use of Jen Mika is a fifth-year punishment. student majoring in English Professor Brian O’Neil, with a minor in journalism. a criminal justice She can be reached at professor at WCU, is JM653231@wcupa.edu.

By Clare Haggerty Staff Writer

Beginning at 6 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 18 until 6 a.m. on Saturday, West Chester University participated in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week by hosting the first annual Sleepout to End Hunger and Homelessness. This event is actually a national event, taking place on campuses all over the country through the National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness. According to their website, “the National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness is a project of the Center for Public Interest Research, Inc. The Campaign is committed to ending hunger and homelessness in America by educating, engaging, and training students to directly meet individual’s immediate needs while advocating for long-term systemic solutions.” WCU decided to show its support of the homeless in their area by participating in this event. Students from WCU formed teams and set up tents, cardboard boxes, and other forms of shelter on the residential quad between University and Brandywine Halls. Participating students stayed outside overnight in order to raise awareness as well as to generate donations. Each student could

stay for as little as one hour or as long as twelve, and for every hour that each student stays out, something is donated (i.e., for every hour someone is outside, the sponsor will donate one canned good, $1-2, a pack of socks, a scarf, etc.). The donations from the event will be going to local West Chester area food pantries, including the West Chester Food Cupboard, the Chester County Food bank, and other Chester County Area shelters. A list of the suggested donations is canned goods (especially tuna fish, peanut butter, and low-sodium vegetable soup), packs of socks or t-shirts, hats, scarves, grocery store gift cards, sleeping bags, blankets, and toiletry kits. Keeping these things in mind, WCU can make a big difference for the Chester County area shelters, because if each sponsor decides to donate just $1 per hour to a team comprised of 10, that’s $10 per hour; and if each team member stayed out for the entire night, that could mean $120. If the sponsor donated canned goods or scarves, then it’s 120 cans, 120 scarves, etc., which makes a difference in the Chester County Area shelters. The event began at 5:30 p.m. with team captains registering their teams and setting up shelter. Participants began arriving at 6 p.m. and the residen-

tial quad shortly became very crowded. “I couldn’t believe how many people showed up,”participant,Colleen Curry said. “But it’s great, since it’s for such a worthy cause.” Representatives from the Chester County Area shelters and the local branch of Habitat for Humanity gave brief presentations, and even the governor stopped by to commend us for our cause. As the event continued, two movies were projected that had a theme of homelessness in them: “The Blindside” and “The Soloist.” Warm snacks and drinks were also offered, such as chicken noodle soup, s’mores, chili, coffee, and hot cocoa. As the event continued, the temperature continued to drop, reaching a low of 32 degrees over the course of the night. “It was absolutely freezing, but it served its purpose,” contributor Shannon Nolan said. “I feel worse for homeless people than I ever have before,” agreed her fellow teammate Nadia Thomas. Around 5:30 a.m., the ‘homeless’ on the quad began packing up their tents. This event was a success with at least 30 tents on the academic quad. Clare Haggerty is a first-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@ wcupa.edu.


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DPS releases Clery Act, numbers decrease

By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief Practicum Writer

The Department of Public Safety (DPS) released the 2011 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report, including crimes occurring over the three previous years for West Chester University. This report, known as the Clery Act, is compiled by DPS in accordance with the federal law. The Clery Act, as stated in the report, requires all post-secondary educational institutions participating in federal student financial aid programs to publicly report crimes statistics. The Department of Education reviews the reports, fining institutions $27,000 per every error. The Clery Act defines burglary as the unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. Burglary numbers have dropped over the years. In 2008, 62 reports were made, 30 of which occurred in residential facilities. One report occurred on public property. This area according the report is “within the campus or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.” The high number dropped by 50% in 2009, with 17 of the 31 reported Burglaries occurring in residential facilities. The number continued to drop as 9 of the 14 burglaries occurred in residential facilities. One robbery report occurred on public property in 2008, no reports in 2009 and one report in 2010 occurring on campus property. The Clery Act defines robbery as the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody

or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. Forcible sex offenses reports have lowered in numbers, from eight reports in 2008, to five reports in 2009 and 2010. Clery definition states any sex act directed against another person, forcibly and or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent. All offenses were reported in residential facilities (offenses took place on campus in residence halls). During these three years no reports of non-forcible sex offenses were made. The Clery Act defines this as incest

for two of the 14 criminal categories. Reports of intimidation occurred due to race once in 2008, five reports in 2009 and once in 2010. Two more intimidation reports were made in 2010, one for religion and one for sexual orientation. Reports of destruction, damage or vandalism of property occurred due to race with three reports in 2008, five reports in 2009 and four reports in 2010. In addition, one report occurred each year of the past three years due to religion and also one report each year due to sexual orientation. In 2010, one additional report occurred due to religion. One arrest in 2008 and another in 2009

http://www.wcupa.edu/dps/

and statutory rape. Two reports of arson occurred in residential facilities in 2008, none in 2009 and one in 2010 on campus property. One report of aggravated assault in 2010 occurred in a residential facility. Three motor vehicle thefts were reported during the last three years, occurring once per year. Over the three previous years there have been no reports of murder, non-negligent and negligent manslaughter. On campus hate crimes show numbers

included a weapon violation. In 2009 four judicals were given for weapon violations, while one judicial was given in 2010, all taken place in residential facilities. Drug law violations leading to an arrest included 80 in 2008, 82 the following year and increased to 103 arrests in 2010. Most of the on-campus occurrences took place in the residential facilities. In addition to this, 12 drug related arrests were made on public property in 2008. The number of drug-related

arrests decreased to 3 in 2009 and six in 2010 on public property. Liquor law violations leading to an arrest have decreased over the years, according to the Clery Act Statistics. In 2008 the highest rate with 578 arrests, it decreased to 533 in 2009 and dropped again with 352 arrests in 2010. Chief Michael Bicking of DPS said the Clery report provides information to current students and employees, informing them of any crimes committed on-campus. The report also provides incoming students and employees with the same information. The Jeanne Clery Act Discourse of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, is commonly known as the Clery Act. The act is named after Jeanne Ann Clery and requires schools to publicly release a crime report. Sexually assaulted and slain in her residence hall at Lehigh University in April 1986, she was a 19-year-old first-year student. Her parents helped develop the act to require a public report of violent crimes occurring on a college campus. Lehigh University had a total of 38 reported violent crimes on-campus over the three year period prior to Jeanne’s death. To find the DPS report, visit www.wcupa. edu/dps. To read more on Jeanne Clery or to learn of Security on Campus (SOS) Inc. visit www.securityoncampus.org. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@ wcupa.edu.

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Forensics Team dominates fall classic tournament

http://www.wcupa.edu/pr/2011/2.25ForensicsPA.asp

By Clare Haggerty Staff Writer

Over the weekend of Oct. 28 and 29, the West Chester University Forensics Team attended the Collegiate Forensic Association Fall Classic Tournament. The Fall Classic took place at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, W. Va.. The team won high honors, dominating the competition. Dan Hinderliter, Forensics Team Treasurer, won the most awards for the team, including champion of Dramatic Interpretation, Impromptu Speaking, Dramatic Duo (with fellow team member Lanie Presswood), and Pentathlon, which is the speaker versatility award. He also placed second in Poetry Interpretation and After Dinner Speaking. Other team members did an exceptional job. Aside from being the Dramatic Duo Champion with Dan Hinderliter, the aforementioned Lanie Presswood, Forensics Team President, was also champion of After Dinner Speaking and Poetry Interpretation. Presswood also received fourth place in Pentathlon and fifth

place in Prose Interpretation. Jake Markiewicz, Pi Kappa Delta province student representative and team historian, was the Informative Speaking champion and he won third place in Prose Interpretation, fourth place in Impromptu Speaking, and fifth place in Parliamentary Debate. Markiewicz also won second place in Parliamentary Debate Team with team Vice President Joe Tetreault. Tetreault also won second place in Prose Interpretation and Informative Speaking, sixth place in Poetry Interpretation, and fifth place in Pentathlon. The final number of awards won by the Forensics Team was a whopping total of 19. “I could not be more proud of my teammates’ recent successes,” President Lanie Presswood said. “To finally see all the work we have put in over the past few years turn into both competitive success and community recognition fulfills many of my early dreams for the team.” Clare Haggerty is a first-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@ wcupa.edu.


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2011

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Flash mob on campus promotes upcoming event Nutter wins second By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-In-Chief Practicum Writer

Students having dinner at Lawrence Dining Hall on Tuesday night were entertained by the Honors College as they broke out with a dance flash mob, promoting their upcoming “Dance for a Chance” event. Music started playing, catching the attention of the unsuspecting students eating dinner. Students put their food down and stood up to watch a flash mob begin with about five dancers. The choreography continued as roughly 40 dancers joined around the main food station in the dining hall. Dancers consisted of Honors College students, both core and seminar students, as well as members from the West Chester University Dance Team. Once students got over their state of shock or

confusion, many used their cellphones to get pictures and videos of the flash mob. The conclusion of the dance received applauses and Amy Millar got on the loud speaker to announce the cause. “You’ve experienced a dance flash mob,” Millar, Junior Director executive member, said to the stunned crowd. She informed students they could purchase tickets for Dance for a Chance. “I’ve never seen something like that before,” Steven Arthur, a second-year history major said. He stood on his booth seat to see the dance show as the flash mob began. “It got everybody’s attention.” His friend, Frank Argentieri added that it seemed like dinner and a movie. Dance for a Chance is a 16-hour dance marathon, held on Dec. 3 into Dec. 4, to raise money. Teams must register for the dance

marathon or can pay $5 to watch. Of the money collected, 50% will go to the charity of the first place winner’s choice. Dr. Kevin Dean, Honors Student Association Director of the Honors College suggested they host a flash mob to promote their dance marathon. This is the first year for the event. Millar said they wanted to inform students of the event so they can have a “huge” turn-out. Second-year students, Carly Farrell, Corine Taninies and Paulina Chow, said they would have seen the “cool” flash mob as they tend to eat dinner in Lawrence Dinning Hall. Farrell, a biology major, said they didn’t know what was happening at first when they heard the music. The secret flash mob was put on with the help of WCUR. The radio station set up speakers for the mix of songs to be

heard by all patrons in the dinning hall. The director of Lawrence dinning hall agreed to allow the event, and they were “excited” about it, Millar said. “I thought it was a great idea to raise awareness for their cause,” Erin O’Connell, a fifth-year elementary and special education dual major, said. “It was nice to see the dancers were supported by the students applauding them.” The Honors College used teamwork to make the flash mob a success. They believe teamwork and leadership will result in a positive change to the campus life and community according to the website www.wcupa. edu/honors. Registration forms can be found on the Dance for a Chance Facebook page. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

Photos by Carol Fritz/ The Quad

Students involved in “Dance for a Chance” perform in Lawrence Dining Hall.

term as Mayor of Philadelphia By Dominique Perry Practicum Writer

Last week, at the Radisson Plaza- Warwick Hotel, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter won a second term beating his opposing Republican candidate, Karen Brown by a 3-1 ratio, and his Independent candidate rival Wali “Diop” Rahman. Rahman, Nutter’s Independent party competition who won 3% of the vote said that his campaign was “a victory for the people,” particularly “the historically oppressed black and Latino communities.” The voter turnout in this year’s mayoral race decreased by 9.7% from last year’s 27.7% turnout when Nutter beat republican Al Taubenberger in 2007. Olivia, Nutter’s teenage daughter, introduced her father to the crowd after his victorious defeat. The mayor wanted people to know that his victory was not to be celebrated with happiness but with intolerance. Mayor Nutter accepted his win with a progressive message to the crowd at the Radisson Hotel. “It is with great pride and humility that I say thank you. Tonight is not a night for satisfaction but for impatience. We have in fact begun the renaissance of this great city, but we’re not done yet,” Nutter said. As a second time mayor at age 54, Nutter had to lay-out goals for the future which his legacy has worked hard to maintain. Some of the goals include:

improving the Philadelphia school system, boosting resident education levels, renovating the property-tax system, reducing blackon-black crime and creating more jobs. Federal cutbacks resulted in $629 million in budget cuts this year. The problems of the city merely match the ones of the Philadelphia School District. Students are of poverty level and low socio-economic status.Violence is another major issue in the Philadelphia schools. New appointments to the school reform, and property tax increase should help the Philadelphia School District. New ways to seek relief for low-income property owners will be implemented next year. The economic recession is frustrating most politicians and makes the plan to create more jobs more difficult. Nutter hopes to expand the Philadelphia Convention Center which, in turn, could create more jobs. Nutter hopes to see more African Americans and minorities owning more businesses. “I want a hotel built in the city by a black company, owned by African Americans and other minorities,” Nutter said. “This is where you get into real economic participation. Working somewhere is great. Owning something is better.” Dominique Perry is a fifth-year student majoring in professional studies with minors in journalism and studio art. She can be reached at DP633925@ wcupa.edu.


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NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Transgender Day of Remembrance All photos by Jess Guzzardo/The Quad

Students, faculty, and staff were invited to participate and remember those who were victims of transgender violence during the Transgender Day of Rememberance ceremony.


NOVEMBER 21,

2011

THE QUAD

Opinion & Editorial

Sleep Out for Homelessness

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The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief QuadEIC@wcupa.edu EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor

COPY EDITORS Kelly Adams Sarah Gurgal Bethany Van De Water

Putting on my winter coat and gloves, I joined my friend for moral support and DISTRIBUTION BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF company as she placed herself in the shoes of a homeless person. I found her wrapped up Art Director Alexis Caporizzo Mike Coia in blankets sitting on a cardboard box. She and her friends had set up several cardboard Britt Silver Business Editor ONLINE EDITION boxes to use as shelter. When asked if that kept them warm, one girl responded saying Mike Mills Kristin Solanick it might not actually be warm, but she felt it was doing an okay job keeping her warm. Advertising Manager Dan Colon FACULTY ADVISOR Mind over matter. Dr. Philip A. Thompsen Students in the residential quad watched groups of people leave their residence halls not wearing jackets and complaining about the cold weather. They had money burning in their pockets. They walked past the shivering people, not looking twice and not offering Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] anything. Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted durthe academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes One student leaned up against a pole, huddled in his sleeping bag, truly reminding me ing Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary of my perception of someone who is homeless. He read a novel on and off. With no gloves for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address on, I imagine he stopped reading when his hands got too cold and he had to get warmed All and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ up. The light from the light pole he leaned against may have been too faint to see. Glanc- artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are ing back at him, it was hard to tell if he was sleeping or fighting to keep his eyes open. not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and Either way, he seemed to not be having a restful night. 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. I looked around to see what else was happening at 4 a.m. In the residential quad many edit Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West visible students appeared to be sleeping, cuddling in their sleeping bags or some sort of Chester University. equivalent to keep warm. In other directions, tents were set up, appearing more like oc- The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m. cupy West Chester or a sleep out bonding experience. Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Noticing a small group of people circling the area, my friends and I wondered what they were doing. The few that were still awake could not remember them from earlier. I Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and searched our surroundings - school bags lay in plain sight, next to sleeping bodies or on the commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. the outside of tents. I would hope that no one would prey on college students sacrificing Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the their warm beds to raise awareness. Realizing a greedy eye could see easy money and a student-run academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budquick getaway, I knew if I were spending the night, I wouldn’t be able to sleep and leave get through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. my belongings unattended. Then I realized people have to take that chance each night Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web when they don’t have a roof over their heads. site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. Sleeping out may have even made students think of how thankful they are for what The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within they have. A roof over their heads, a heated room, running water, the list is endless. five days of publication. Have a happy and safe Thanksgiving break! The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa. ~ Ginger Rae, Quad Editor-in-Chief


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

The Continuation of the Getting my dog Buddy “Occupy” Movement By Nicholas Silveri-Hiller Special to The Quad In the early morning of Nov. 15, 2011 the New York Police Department raided, pepper sprayed, beat and arrested protestors at the Occupy Wall Street encampment. This raid destroyed the birthplace of what has become an international movement against the rich elite and their exploitation of the working and middle classes. Mayors of cities across the nation are following in New York City Mayor Bloomberg’s footsteps and are conducting raids at Occupy encampments across the nation, thus ending what can be seen as the first phase of this movement. For all of the courage we have seen in the national Occupy movement, our greatest challenges are before us. We have seen the bravery of the people that not only have created liberated spaces for the communalization of services and materials of survival, but to defend those spaces. We have seen the defense of those spaces in the general strike in Oakland, California. In New York City occupiers defended their encampment for two months from police repression. In Denver, Colo. we’ve seen the people reoccupy after riot police raided their encampment. In Portland, Ore. we’ve seen the people lock arms to stand between the police and their encampment to stop an eviction. In Chapel Hill, N.C. we’ve seen the people stand up to S.W.A.T. Team members raiding an occupied abandoned building, which was to be

turned into a social center, with semi-automatic rifles. We have seen the bravery and courage of the people to stand up against the 1% and defend their liberated spaces where new possibilities of social relations can be created. But now as the police destroy what the people have created, and winter quickly approaches, we are going to hit our roughest seas yet. We now have the great challenge to learn from the past months and use this knowledge to move this resistance as far as it can take us. We must also learn from the elders who have struggled long before we set up our tents and joined the movement. We must learn from our histories and see what can be used to further our resistance. We must learn about the student and worker uprising in Paris in 1968, when students and workers joined together to create new forms of social relationships based on mutual aid and worker’s dignity. We must learn from the Black Panther Party who struggled against the racist and colonialist American empire from within. We must learn how they built a movement for the people and by the people to create a new society outside of the capitalist mode of production. We must learn from the anarcho-syndicalists who organized and fought fascism in Spain in the 1930’s. They created new forms of production based for the people’s needs, as well as discovered new and egalitarian ways to combat the forces of oppression. The list can go on and

on of examples of our comrades who fought against the exploitation of the elite. But the important lesson here is that we are not the first people to struggle, and we are far from alone in this struggle. There is no need to reinvent the wheel, we must not only learn what made these struggles powerful, but also what made them weak. We can learn from our histories what paths not to follow and what mistakes made these movements fail. As the current phase of our movement ends, and as we see our numbers in the camps dwindle due to police repression and the chill of the winter air, we must educate ourselves of the lessons of the past. When this movement started in mid September, no one could have imagined that it would have left to what it is now. It started as a rag-tag group of folks disenfranchised with the current social structure and with the dreams of the possibilities of a new social system. Now it is a global movement of working and middle class people from diverse backgrounds demanding an end to the alienation and exploitation of their capitalist daily lives. We must use this lull as an opportunity to study and reorganize ourselves for when the warmth of spring returns our movement can be more fierce and powerful than before.

Nicholas Silveri-Hiller is a student at WCU majoring in gender and women studies with a minor in African American studies and sociology. He can be reached at NS660747@ wcupa.edu.

By Alanna Smothers Special to The Quad I stared at the largest coffee-colored eyes I had ever seen. I lost sight of him as he wiggled his body, weaving, almost mechanically, through his siblings. His large pink tongue flicked out of his mouth and took position there, lolling, as he wandered around with his foolish grin. I tried to keep sight of him, but it was hard; he seemed to have trouble keeping still for very long. He blended in perfectly with the rest of their dull shades of beige and cream. As they moved together, a mass of light-colored fur driven by the sound and smell of humans, I knew

almost immediately that he would belong to me. When I finally got the chance to observe him up close, I noticed that he was much smaller than the others: the runt of the litter. I always had a soft spot for outcasts. When I ran my fingers through his thick, curly fur, his body responded in a way that made me laugh to myself. The moment my forefinger connected with his spine, his body would pulsate, starting with a shake of his oversized head until it ended with a short wave of his diminutive tail. My brother stood next to me, amidst the sea of other people, who were here, I suppose, just like

us, looking for a companion to bring home with them and keep them company at the moments when they were so lonely they couldn’t stand it. My father was around here somewhere, probably trying to negotiate with the owner on the price. Four-hundred dollars was pretty steep, even if it was for the cutest cockerspaniel puppy I had ever laid my eyes upon. As I knelt down, my fingers still tangled in the fur of his back, I motioned to my brother to do the same, hoping to win over his vote on the runt as well. However, he seemed to be preoccupied. It looked as if See Buddy on page 9

Letters to the Editor To the editor: The recontextualizing of Middle East history by Palestinian sympathizer, Dr. Lawrence Davidson imagines a Middle East in which Israeli agression is the source of all pain and an excuse for Palestinian violence. He is correct that current situation is almost unbearably complex, and in many ways, Israeli policies towards Palestinians are demoralizing and dangerous, but his onesided blame-laying ignores several critical realities and questions: 1. The programs and attacks on Jews by Arabs during the early 20th century were racially motivated and instigated by the penetration of Nazi ideology among Arab leadership. Hamas leaders, and Palestinian leader Abbas have NOT accepted the reality of having a Jewish nation for a neighbor, as Abbas made clear just last week. 2. Israel is a parliamentary democracy and often, unfortunately, a coalition government beholden to extremist minority parties. As such, the tacit policies of the Israeli government often are not the general will of the Israeli people, the majority of whom have indicated on polls that they’d return the land acquired in 1967 in return for a guaranteed and genuine peace agreement. 3. Those who object to Israeli treatment of Palestinians are often Israeli Jews, able to do so because they live in a democracy with free press. Where are the Palestinians who protest the Hamas bombing of Jewish towns and schools? Why do the Palestinians tolerate the basing of armaments in their schools and hospitals when locating weapons there makes those buildings military targets? Is it because Palestinians fear Hamas retaliation if they object, or does Dr. Davidson really imagine that principals, teachers, and parents support those Hamas actions? 4. Palestinians under Yasser Arafat were the recipients of billions of dollars in direct international aid designed to spur education and economic infrastructure development. Arafat and his cronies embezzled large portions of this money and Palestinians are still trying to recover some of it from Arafat’s widow. Palestinian adminstrative corruption is behind much of Palestinians’ suffering. --Ann Colgan


NOVEMBER 21,

2011

Buddy from page 8

he had his eye on the exact opposite of my claimed dog: the biggest, burliest, most rambunctious pup of them all. While my beloved puppy only had eyes for me, and I for him, his brother seemed to have managed to catch the eyes of about half of the patrons in the store. A crowd formed around him, wondering what it was that he would do next. As it seems, he was not one to disappoint. He meandered through the flocks of dogs and people, stealing kibble from bewildered children’s hands and knocking into the backs of legs of various inhabitants. When it appeared as if he would slow down, he did the unthinkable: he charged. Head down, feet splayed, crashing right into one of his unsuspecting siblings. This, of course, sent them tumbling, yelping, or understandably, both. In comparison to that brute of a dog, the dog I had chosen seemed to be a saint. For the most part, he was relaxed and wellbehaved as far as I could tell. And friendly; anyone who bothered to pet him received an amorous lick in return. However, since he was the runt of the litter, he was used to being left out. When the owner made his way over to the pens that held the dogs (with my perplexed father in tow), and kneeled down next to the bowls to feed the ravenous pups, I watched as my dog ecstatically squirmed out of my hands, only to be the last to reach the destination point, half-tails of his brethren wagging furiously, keeping him well away from the food he so enthusiastically desired.

THE QUAD At this point, I felt extremely bad that I had held onto him so tight, leading him to miss out on the feeding frenzy that his family seemed to be enjoying so thoroughly. I watched him as he stood in the back, futilely trying to force his way through. Every time he almost made an advance, he would be pushed back, waiting until one of them dropped a morsel out of their mouths, so he could desperately lap it up. Finally, after what seemed like forever, the other dogs seemed to have their fill of the food they received. My dog stood there at first, as they all began to move away; some back to their hopeful owners, others causing chaos as they ran amuck, looking for something to keep them entertained. It was a moment until he realized that they were all gone, the bowls mostly empty, but harboring some scraps of what they had left behind. He visibly pepped up then, and gobbled what little was left in the bowls in what could be most accurately described as a millisecond. When he was done, he scuttled his way back to me, dancing his special dance, glee splashed across his face. It was then that my father joined us, seemingly deep in thought; his brow furrowed. I imagined he wasn’t able to do very much negotiating. After a minute, he seemed to have noticed that I was clutching to my chest, rather possessively, the beige and cream runt. He kneeled down too, patting the puppy on the head. The dog looked up at him with the same eyes that drew me to him, and I silently prayed that they would have the same effect on my father. My brother dropped to his

knees as well, and took the puppy’s whopping head in his hands, massaging gently the huge curly ears that seemed to be too big for even his already large head. After we had spent a while playing with the dog I had chosen, after some persuasion from my brother, we went to play with the monstrous one, who by this time had calmed down some and was allowing himself to be petted on the belly by some small kids. I begrudgingly relinquished my hold on the puppy I held, and watched as he switched away, his tail moving out of sync with his body. We waited a bit, until the kids were tired of their play and moved onto a different breed of dog. Before we even got a chance to grab hold of the fearsome ball of fur, a commotion somewhere in the center of the pen distracted us. A tall man stood there, shouting obscenities to the store owner, as the woman standing next to him flushed a deep scarlet. Kids pointed and laughed, and I saw, out of the corner of my eyes, a beige and cream blur shoot off in the distance, until he stopped, cowering and looking ashamed in the corner. I moved closer to the man, to see exactly what all the commotion was about. Under his seemingly new, white, and presumably pre-spotless New Balances, lay a huge hunk of brown goo. The perpetrator was none other than the streaking ball of fur who I now refer to lovingly as Buddy. Alanna Smothers is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AS620230@ wcupa.edu.

PAGE 9

Homelessness Awareness

By Rebekah Balmer Features Editor As many are aware, the campus held a sleepout to raise awareness about homelessness and hunger on Friday night in the residential quad. As much as I am in support of raising awareness about this very important issue if anyone actually attended the event it would be noticed that it didn’t seem like they were “walking in the shoes” of the homeless very much. Many students had tents and plenty of blankets. I’m not saying all homeless people live in cardboard boxes, though many do, but many of these tents were large. Many students had layers upon layers of blankets, sleeping bags and clothing. Poverty and homelessness is a huge issue, I’m not denying that fact and I’m not going to deny that we need to raise awareness around this issue, but couldn’t it have been done in a more productive way? I think walking around town giving the homeless food or working at a soup kitchen or sleeping in front of the courthouse would have been a better way to educate others on this topic. Hosting a sleepout romanticizes homelessness. Not only were hot beverages and food supplied, but there was a movie screen and speakers playing movies on it. The homeless do not have such nice things like this. Many of them keep their belongings in a backpack and sleep on the streets of cities, not in tents and not in sleeping bags. I do not want this to be a “this event was horrible” type of article. That is not what I am saying. I’m simply trying to have people realize that what they did is not “walking in the shoes”

of the homeless. I hope their event was a success in the fact that they got money to give to shelters and got donations to give to the homeless. I think being in college we need to educate ourselves on these issues. We should be spending time researching and knowing the facts about homelessness and hunger. Poverty leads to homelessness and hunger and there are many websites out there filled with data about

those who slept out in the residential quad in the cold all night, but I ask that they think about what it would be like to not have a tent or sleeping bag, and to be out in the cold all winter. I understand that there are shelters for the homeless to stay in, but those fill up quickly and don’t have enough room for everyone. Also, it’s not February when the temperatures would be even colder. I understand we need to keep ourselves

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

this issue and trying to help raise awareness and money to help those in need. I wonder if anyone who participated in the sleepout ever had a conversation with a homeless person. Or do they see the homeless on the street and assume they are lazy and don’t want to find a job? The unemployment rate is at it’s highest right now. People with college degrees don’t have jobs and can’t find affordable housing. Single mothers with children are living in shelters because they can’t find a job that pays enough to have a home. What are the stories behind the homeless we see? Has anyone ever stopped to ask? Again, I understand the main point of the event, but I don’t think it was as effective as other events could have been. I support

safe from danger and sickness and that’s why people slept out in November. I’m asking you to really think about what you did and what you could do to help. Romanticizing homelessness doesn’t raise awareness and doesn’t actually help the homeless and hungry. It makes it a fun event in the cold, a time to bond with members of our organizations to which we belong. I hope next year there are no tents allowed, no movie showing, and people really begin to realize poverty as a problem, including homelessness and hunger in our own places of residence. Rebekah Balmer is a fifthyear student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology. She can be reached at RB649636@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 10

Ask Malik

THE QUAD

By: Abdul M. Muhammad

Please email personal advice questions to Malik at askmalik92@gmail.com Dear Malik, What’s your opinion? Is it okay to go through your girlfriend/boyfriend’s phone/facebook/e-mail either with or without their permission? Should we all just stay out or should they have nothing to hide? Signed, Slightly Snoopy

Dear Slightly Snoopy, Well first let me say, that if you feel like you need to be going through your girlfriend/boyfriend’s personal things, at all, then that relationship may not be the best thing for you to be in right now. Relationships are supposed to be about trust. You shouldn’t have to question what your significant other is up to when you’re not around or who they’re talking to or whatever the case may be. But if you feel it is a must, asking for permission would be the best way to go about it. If they really have nothing to hide then it shouldn’t be a problem at all. Now, it might come up that he or she gets upset for you even questioning their loyalty to you and that is an entirely different problem in itself. Like I said before, if trust and loyalty is becoming a problem in the relationship maybe you should reevaluate who you are with.

Dear Malik, My 17 year old sister is pregnant. I want to let her know that I support her but not act overly thrilled about it, considering the circumstances. Any advice as to what I could say to her to let her know that I’m here for her? Signed, Supportive Sis Dear Supportive Sis, I know that this can be a very difficult situation to be in. You want to be happy for her because bringing life into this world is a joyous thing. On the other hand, she is very young and may not be ready to support that life. Just be honest with her. If you really are thrilled and think that she can handle it, then let her know that you will be there for here throughout the entire pregnancy and when your little niece or nephew pops out! However, if you do believe that she is not ready, you have to allow her to make her own decision. You can be there for her with whatever she needs, but she put herself in this situation and has to make a decision on what she wants to do. Help guide her on making the right decision. Things like this happen all the time but it is completely up to the individual on how they decide they want to act on it. You can only be there to support her in all the ways that you know how.

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Interview with Kureck Ashley: Happiness

By Adam Anders Practicum Writer Everyone goes through life changes, changes that make up the entire being of the human race. Changes are something that most people dread even thinking about, but the only way you can truly face changes in your life is to confront them, according to Kurek Ashley, a world renowned performance coach. Kurek coaches and mentors tens of thousands of people each year at his workshops and seminars on how to improve their lives and get themselves back on their feet again. Kurek Ashley was born in Chicago in early 1961. He grew up idolizing his father, trying to mimic everything that he did. He recalls “lathering up with no blade” with a razor next to his dad facing the mirror, just so he could be like his old man. At age three though, Kurek had to deal with a major struggle at such an early age; his parents were going through a divorce. His mom married a man who already had three children of his own. Kurek’s two siblings had to now welcome three others into the family, as well as another child from his mother and step-father’s new marriage. “I wasn’t well liked by a lot of my siblings, so I tended to have times where I was very lonely. I had great memories and fun as a child, but I was isolated a lot by my siblings,” he said. He had the same usual idols as most oth-

ers of his time; Elvis and John Travolta were two that he always looked up to. “I wanted to make a name for myself and do something big like they did,” he said. Instead of attending college after high school, Kurek knew what he already wanted to do in life; he wanted to be an actor. With that in mind, he drove to Hollywood with $300 in his pocket, hoping to get a name for himself quickly. Unfortunately, it ended up taking him three years to find a steady job that would make him happy. After working with many famous names like Sylvester Stallone and Chuck Norris, he finally thought he found his calling in life. Kurek was now acting in movies while also being a stuntman for films. It was while he was acting in the movie, “Delta Force 2” that his lifelong dream would soon be put on hold. Unexpectedly during the filming, one of the helicopters on set crashed, causing his life to change in an instant. Five of his friends, including his best friend Mike, would eventually die due to this awful accident. “I felt like a loser because I couldn’t save my friends’ lives. Also my own mortality was in my face; I realized how real death is. Mike was only 29 years old when he died in my arms; you’re not supposed to die that young,” he said. This event is what caused Kurek to spiral into a dark and downward depression that he never thought

was even possible. He became truly upset, not even wanting to live anymore. At 27-years-old, he didn’t know what to do with his life. After all, he felt that living wasn’t worth it anymore. “How am I still alive, but my best friend isn’t?” he said. During this time, he went through bouts of homelessness. There were times he had $20 to his name, sleeping in his car at night with nowhere to go. “With all that was going on, I still remembered to be grateful. By being grateful, I was able to keep things in perspective,” he said. At least I still had a car to sleep in at night. I also kept myself physically in shape everyday, which helped to turn my emotions around.” After years of depression, Kurek realized he needed to start living a healthier life, which led him to where he is today. He started to look at the positive in life and realize that he was still pretty lucky compared to many other people. “I had experienced awful loneliness, pain, and sadness. Once I started to truly bring happiness into my life, I realized that everyone has the same potential,” he said. “It became my hunger to study and learn as much as I could to keep myself happy and help others to do the same.” When asked if he would consider himself a motivational speaker, he says no. “My job is not to teach content; it is to teach change. MotivaSee INTERVIEW on page 11


NOVEMBER 21,

2011

Interview from page 10

tional speakers are great people, but that’s not for me. Motivation is temporary, true life change is forever,” he said. Kurek goes all around the globe to spread his message and now lives in Australia. It was there, while he was giving a free seminar, where he found his next big calling in life. At his workshop, he was talking about how nobody wants to finish last. He was using the reference of the Olympics, where the top three finalists stand on boxes to receive their medals. “Nobody wants to be on that third box, everyone wants to finish first,” he said. A girl raised her hand though, and she said that she literally was on that third box. He was speaking to a member of the Australian Women’s Volleyball team who had finished third in the Summer Olympics. Kurek apologized for his reference, but the girl told him that she needed his help to win. In 1998, he started to coach the team, urging them to realize that they can win if they try hard enough. Sure enough when Australia held the Summer Games in 2000 in Sydney, the Australian Women’s Volleyball team took the gold. “It was one of the proudest moments of my life,” he said. Kurek tries to help people understand that everyone has an equal potential in life if they just put their mind to it. “There are only two groups of people in this world. There are the successful people and the unsuccessful ones;

THE QUAD and I’m not talking about money,” he said. “The formula for being in the unsuccessful group is easy: don’t follow the successful formula. If you want to be in the successful group, you have to change first before anything else in your life does. You have to reinvent yourself before you get results.” Kurek doesn’t simply stand on a stage and talk to those who come to his seminars; he wants to get them involved. At some of his seminars, he has an optional “fire walk” or “glass walk.” These events involve getting the audience (at their agreement to do so) to walk barefoot over a path of hot coals or broken glass. He actually holds the world record for the longest fire walk at 266 feet. “I realize most people think this impossible, but thousands of people have done it under my watch. You just have to believe in yourself. I do this at my seminars to show people that they can overcome their fears and move past boundaries in their lives that they think they can’t,” he said. Kurek is also a bestselling author. His book, “How Would Love Respond” has sold tens of thousands of copies, and reached number one on amazon.com after only being published for four hours. It has made over 20 best seller lists, and took him four years to write. In his book, he talks about how he went through depression and overcame it, and he also teaches people his advice on how to achieve better success in their lives. There is a section of his

book that talks about his then-wife Marie. Kurek thought he was in a happy marriage, until one day Marie approached him wanting a divorce. At first, he was devastated and heartbroken; he loved his wife and didn’t want his marriage to come to an end. His eventual reaction though was one of complete gratitude and love. “I realized that she wasn’t

leaving me, she was going to find herself, and I’m the one who taught her how to do that,” he said. “I got my engines back on and told myself that I had to handle this in an empowering way.” Kurek is now married to his wife Johanna, and they are expecting their first child in less than four weeks. He met Johanna at a winery that his friend owned. “She

PAGE 11 was pouring wine and looked like an angel to me,” he said. “She told me that she wanted to be a success coach one day; I chuckled and gave her my business card. It was a total coincidence. She e-mailed me the next day, and we have been together ever since.” Kurek’s overall message is one of love. His goal is to teach people that gratitude is every-

thing. “Gratitude makes you feel better, which makes you act better, which makes you produce better results,” he said. “Buddha said it best when he said ‘there is no way to happiness; happiness is the way.’” Adam Anders is a fifthyear student majoring in political science with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AA652656@ wcupa.edu.

CAreer trAining. money for College.

And An entire teAm

to help you

suCCeed. Serving part-time in the Air National Guard, you’ll have an entire team of like-minded individuals who want to help you get ahead. You can choose from nearly 200 career specialties, and develop the high-tech skills you need to compete in today’s world. You also train close to home, all while receiving a steady paycheck, benefits and tuition assistance. Talk to a recruiter today, and see how the Pennsylvania Air National Guard can help you succeed.


PAGE 12

THE QUAD

Want to nominate a professor for the “Teacher feature?” E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu

Features NOVEMBER 21, 2011

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Teacher Feature: Dr. Carla Verderame

By Hannah Burner Practicum Writer

As a professor in the Department of English, Carla Verderame earned her undergraduate degree at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, where she studied English literature. Verderame continued her education at Brown University, earning a Master of Arts in teaching. She then went on to earn a doctorate degree at the University of

Michigan. Here she studied English with a focus in American literature. When asked why she chose these areas of study, Verderame said, “I loved the English classes at Smith. We read and discussed literature and I saw its application to other areas of my life.” Verderame said that one of her favorite memories of college was simply having fun with friends. When asked why she wanted to become a

teacher, Verderame said, “I had wonderful teachers in my life and I loved going to school. I wanted to spend my time learning and giving back.” Verderame has been teaching at WCU for 14 years and teaches English courses in American literature and teacher education. She has also taught middle and high school and was a Teaching Assistant while earning her degrees at Brown

University and the University of Michigan. Two of her favorite courses to teach at WCU are “Southern Women Writers” and “Native American literature.” Verderame has published several articles on literature pedagogy and American Literature, including “Traditional Mothers and Contemporary Daughters in Linda Hogan’s Solar Storms,” “Teaching Thomas King’s Medicine River,” and

“Visible Teachers, Invisible Students: Education as Imposition in Flannery O’Connor’s Fiction.” When asked to describe her current academic goal, Verderame said, “I have plans for a manuscript on contemporary Native American authors.” Her best academic achievement was earning her doctorate degree. When Verderame is not at work, she likes traveling, playing piano, weaving, hiking, swimming,

and, of course, reading. She has traveled to all of Western Europe, Japan, Hong Kong, a few parts of Eastern Europe, and she hopes to one day visit Australia and New Zealand. Verderame’s advice to students is “try to find balance between working and having fun while staying focused on your goals.” Hannah Burner is a fourthyear student majoring in English, with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at HB674784@wcupa.edu.

West Chester shoppers find a “Nich” By Dominique Perry Practicum Writer

For five years, Nich boutique has contributed a modern day assorted style to the downtown West Chester area. Students from the university, working mothers, and young adults shop at Nich, and are huge fans of Kristy Mak’s ability to appeal to their innovative taste and progressive style. The idea of finding a “niche” in style comes to some easier than others, but for Mak, the “Nich” was a space dedicated to capturing the inner and outer beauty of creativity for various young women. When Mak opened the doors to her affordable trendy clothing boutique in the downtown West Chester area, her “niche”

was fulfilled. The boutique was named Nich, dropping the “e,” to add its own character to the word and definition of what “Nich” Mak’s customers had for fashion. Five years ago, with a troubled economy, the 30-year-old Asian American, Mak, pondered starting her own clothing business. After years of working for various retailers, such as Urban Outfitters and Nordstrom, her experience in quality customer service and trendsetting expertise bolstered Mak’s confidence to run her own boutique. “After three months of working at Nordstrom, I quickly began a business plan for my boutique, and it took me four months to get the business up and running,” Mak said

Both of Mak’s parents were business owners, so they supported and inspired their daughter’s business venture. Mak’s boutique, just minutes away from West Chester University, offers apparel, accessories, shoes and an incredible shopping experience. Mak constantly travels to New York City and Vegas to attend fashion events in order to know what to buy for her boutique. It is important for Mak to delve into the lastest fashion through magazines, blogs, and celebrity tabloid photos. She uses her own fashion sense and what is popular when making buying decisions. Some of the affordable designer fashions sold at Nich are, Vigoss, Jack by Be Be Dakota,

Skies are Blue and Ya Los Angelos. The comfortable Tom shoe is another attracting feature at the Nich boutique. The merchandise price range is anywhere from $20 to $100. Students, mothers and working women ages 18-30 come in to shop with Mak and gain personal insights about her fashion expertise. “One woman traveled an hour and a half just to ask me if a pair of shoes went well with her dress before she went to a special dinner,” said Mak. Customers are more than just business clients to Mak, some are good friends whom Mak knows personally. “I like for customers to feel comfortable and at home when they are shopping at the Nich

Boutique,” Mak said. The boutique is divided into three compartments enlivened with a modern art décor. The first room represents an “art nuvo” theme. This room houses the bulk of the merchandise Nich has to offer. Chandeliers light the room just enough to see the merchandise. Antique wooden tables and metal bars are arranged meticulously for hanging dresses, folded tops, laying jeans, knotted scarves, sitting sunglasses, and dangling fashion jewelry. Mak’s sense of style and sophistication crafted a white canvas layered with black lace that fits into the wall. This illusion of space in the wall adds texture to the yellow interior design. Victorian, vintage mirrors are hung

for customers to hold up the attire and accessories near them to quickly glance before purchasing. The next room, is painted blue with an “industrial” inspired theme. White, unpainted patches, in the walls support an “industrial” theme. The industrial room accommodates the outerwear, graphic tee shirts, footwear and other staple pieces for ones wardrobe. The silver bars, which resemble metal plumbing pipes, glisten under the lighting fixtures. The fixtures in the ceiling are also silver wired, which creates geometric shapes, with each corner holding a small florescent light.

see Nich on page 13


NOVEMBER 21, 2011 Nich from page 12 After gathering dresses, jeans, shoes and outerwear, Nich shoppers have the opportunity to engage in their potential purchases. Two brown leather rotating chairs are separated by an oldfashioned glass table with collections of magazines for keeping up with latest trends, celebrities and fashion updates. Most of the relationships and personal connections are made with Mak and customers during the outfitting decision making time in the fitting room.

THE QUAD Mak scatters around the boutique looking for sizes and exact colors or items to suit the needs of her customers. If the piece is not in the store, Mak’s customer service finds exactly what the customer wants. The exclusiveness of service has kept Mak in business thus far. The future holds a growing business in the West Chester area for women and men to shop for the latest trends. Eventually, Mak plans to open a branch shoe store, which the West Chester town lacks. The exceptionality of the boutique will maintain a valued shopper at

Nich, therefore Mak has no plans to open stores at new locations across the country, or state. Mak and her boyfriend converted what used be a jewelry store into lucrative business geared towards embracing self identity for a relatively cheap price. Nich Boutique can be found at 29 South High Street in West Chester, Pa. www.facebook.com/Nich twitter is @shopNich http://shopnich.com/ Dominique Perry is a fifth-year student majoring in professional studies wtih minors in journalism and studio art. She can be reached at DP633925@wcupa.edu.

tes Association, almost 26 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with diabetes and nearly 79 million are in danger of developing type two diabetes. Although the disease affects 26 million people, many do not understand the disease, nor do they take it seriously. Diabetes is a disease that is developed when blood levels are above what they normally should be. Diabetes can be split in two ways; type one and type two. Type one diabetes is when the

body does not produce insulin and type two diabetes is when the body does not respond to any of the effects of insulin. According to WebMD, insulin is what helps regulate blood sugar levels and allow sugar to be used as energy. Diabetes symptoms should not be taken lightly. Many people with diabetes, and before being diagnosed with diabetes have the following symptoms: frequent urination, excessive thirst and hunger, blurred vision, nausea, unusual weight gain

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Dominique Perry / the Quad

November recognizes diabetes awareness By Angela Thomas New Editor

The month of November usually brings to mind many thoughts; images of families coming together for Thanksgiving, stores decorating early for the holiday season, and the celebrated Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Not many people think of diabetes when they think of November. November is also the national American Diabetes Month. According to the American Diabe-

and weight loss, vaginal and yeast infections, as well as cuts that are slow in healing. If someone is experiencing any or all of these symptoms, he or she is encouraged to call their doctor to get tested for diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, someone is diagnosed with diabetes every 17 seconds. When someone is diagnosed with diabetes, whether it be type one or type two diabetes, it is important to learn about the different treatments that

there are to offer those with diabetes. Many treatments include different types of insulin as well as oral medications, which are given to those who still have enough insulin to help maintain blood sugar levels. The American Diabetes Association also states that diabetes claims the lives of more people than HIV/AIDS and breast cancer combined, and that by 2050, one in three Americans will have diabetes. The American Diabetes Association encourages

everyone to get involved in the cause to stop diabetes. By “liking” their facebook page www. facebook.com/AmericanDiabetesAssociation, they will be taking the pledge to stop diabetes. People can also visit www.stopdiabetes.com or call 1-800-DIABETES to learn more about what can be done to help prevent and stop diabetes. For more information, go to www.diabetes.org. Angela Thomas is a fourthyear student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@wcupa.edu.

Want to write for the features section? E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu www.diabetes.org


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Republican candidates run for president

By Adam Anders Practicum Writer

Something on the mind of most Americans is how to turn this economy around. There are many familiar faces running for President of the United States, hoping to grasp voter’s attention before next fall. The unchallenged Democrat President Obama, demonstrating his beliefs and views on the current issues since he has been the Commander-in-Chief for over three years, is a candidate. There are eight potential Republican candidates out there trying to appeal to voters. The only woman in the race (since former Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin declined) is Michelle Bachmann. She graduated from William and Mary Law School in 1988 and went to work for the U.S. Treasury Department. In 2000, she ran for state senator and won, followed by a run for the U.S. House of Representatives in 2006. She has been serving in the Minnesota House ever since and has been a major force in the Republicans most conservative group; she is known as the “Tea Party Darling.” Bachmann is a strong supporter of massive spending cuts, saying that neither the Republicans nor Democrats are fighting the “big fight” to stop our overreaching spending in the government. She is a pro-life believer going as far as trying to defund “Planned Parenthood” and repealing Roe v. Wade. The congresswoman is a mother of 28 (23 of those being foster children), and has

been married to her husband Marcus for 30 years. Herman Cain is the only candidate running who has never been elected to political office. He prides himself on being a strong businessman that understands the problems of the nation’s economy. Cain graduated from Morehouse College and went on to work as a mathematician in the U.S. Navy. He has worked for CocaCola, Pillsbury, and became CEO of a failing Godfather’s Pizza in 1986 and returned the company to profitability. He has an economic plan called the “9-9-9 Plan” which would instate a 9% Flat Business Tax, a 9% Flat Individual Tax, and a 9% National Tax. He says that “production drives the economy, not spending.” Cain believes that we need to keep a closer eye on North Korea due to their development of nuclear weapons. The businessman believes that the Obama administration has taken a back seat on this issue. He has two children, and has been married to his wife Gloria for 43 years. Former Speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich, has many years of experience in the political field. A graduate of Tulane University, he went on to teach at West Georgia College as a history professor until he ran for a seat in the Georgia Congress in 1978. In the early 90’s, Gingrich was elected as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives after he helped write the

“Contract for America” (a document drafted by Republicans that would change policy in Congress). Between 20092010, Gingrich raised over $32 million for his “undecided campaign” which is more than a combined amount raised by all of the other Republicans. He says that he would be able to balance the federal budget within a few short years, pointing to his success in the House,

helping to create surplus budgets for four straight years. The speaker supports the war in Iraq but refuses to comment on President Obama’s decision to withdraw all U.S. troops by the end of this year, saying that “commenting on it makes zero sense if you don’t put it into context.” He has two daughters, and has been married three times; currently married for eleven years to his wife, Callista. John Huntsman boy-

omy. The governor also strongly supports the second amendment, approving two bills while governor, furthering citizens rights in Utah to bear arms. Huntsman has seven children (two adopted), and has been married to his wife Mary for 28 years. Ron Paul graduated from Gettysburg College, becoming an obstetrician and a gynecologist. He has delivered over 4,000 babies to date. He entered politics in 1971 by becoming a delegate to the Texas Republican Convention. Paul then became a Texas congressman and has been one on and off since 1978. He won his 12th term in Congress in 2010 with over 80% of the vote. The congressman ran for President in 1988 as a Libertarian and again in 2008 as a Republican. He is known for speaking his mind and not being afraid to give his views that are sometimes known as radical, like getting rid of the Homeland Security Department and historyguy.com the Federal Reserve. “When an individual Governor of Utah and was is broke, they’re supposed elected again in 2008 with to quit spending money almost 80% of the vote. It and pay off their bills, but was in the middle of his we haven’t done that in second term when Presi- Washington,” Paul said. dent Obama asked him He is also a large propoto become U.S. Ambas- nent of the government sador to China, given his staying out of civil rights, experience as a mission- thinking that certain isary worker in the country sues like gay marriage years before. Huntsman and gay rights should not believes that a three-tier be dealt with by Congress. rate instead of the current He also believes that affirsix tier, and the elimina- mative action is wrong for tion of the capital gains any group of people. Paul and dividend taxes will has five children, and help to improve the econ- has been married to his cotted the last GOP Debate saying that it was “more important to participate in a town hall meeting for the people.” He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, and worked for 15 years for his family’s business, “Huntsman Corporation.” Huntsman worked for President Reagan as an aide and for President George H.W. Bush as Ambassador to Singapore. In 2004, he was elected as

wife Carol for 54 years. Attracting to religious voters, Rick Perry came out strong when he announced his late entrance to the Presidential race, but has slowly been declining ever since. He went to college at Texas A&M University, and then enlisted in the U.S. Air Force, rising to Captain in his five years there. When State Representative Joe Hanna passed away, Rick Perry took over his seat as a Democrat, serving six years. During this period, he served as the State Chairman to the Walter Mondale and Al Gore Presidential campaigns in 1984 and 1988. Towards the end of his third term in Congress, he switched parties to become a Republican. Perry ran for Lt. Gov. in 1998, serving under then Texas Gov. George W. Bush. In 2002, Perry ran for the governorship and is currently in the middle of his third term. The governor believes he has the experience to fix the economy given the healthy housing market that his state has produced for the past few years. He quotes the Bible many times on the campaign trail, saying that “biblical principles will foster the return of our economic fortune.” Perry’s stance on immigration doesn’t hit home with many Republicans, because of the estimated 1.6 million illegal immigrants living in his state. He is against building a fence along the border of Mexico, saying it would “worsen the problem.”

see REPUBLICAN on page 15


NOVEMBER 21,

2011

Republican from page 14 Perry has two children, and has been married to his wife Anita for 29 years. The frontrunner in nearly every poll across the nation in the Republican race is Mitt Romney. He went to college at Brigham Young University and got his masters at Harvard Law School. Entering the business world he eventually became CEO of Bain & Company, helping to bring the corporation out of an economic crisis. He was the top organizer in the 2002 Winter Olympics, leading to his position as CEO of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee. Romney became the Governor of Massachusetts in 2002, serving one term. As governor, he led the fight of spending

THE QUAD

cuts and increasing fees, helping the state avoid a projected $3 billion deficit. He also signed into law the Massachusetts health care reform legislation, providing near universal health insurance access to state citizens. Many on the right criticize this move, because this legislation helped jumpstart President Obama’s health care law that has been put into place in the past year. Romney came in a close second to Senator John McCain for the Republican nomination for President in 2008. The governor believes the best way to fix the economy is to reduce the corporate income tax rate to 25%, implement free trade agreements with more countries around the world, and cut non-security discretionary spending

by 5%. Romney supports tax-deductions for out of pocket medical expenses and would permit states to direct funds spent treating the uninsured to assist them in purchasing private health insurance. He has five children, and has been married to his wife Ann for 42 years. Conservative candidate Rick Santorum graduated from Dickinson School of Law, followed by working as the Director of Pennsylvania’s Senate Transportation Committee for five years. In the early 90’s, Santorum beat seven-time incumbent Doug Walgreen in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. When his term ended, he served two, six-year terms as Pennsylvania’s Senator. The senator has been a strict opponent of the Wall Street bailouts and

President Obama’s stimulus packages. He supported the Bush tax cuts, saying, “Reducing the tax burden on businesses and individuals is key to economic growth.” Santorum believes that the Obama administration didn’t do enough to intervene in Libya and Iran when both country’s leaders and revolutionaries clashed. He has seven children, and has been married to his wife Karen for 21 years. Voting gets ones voice heard. As anthropologist Margaret Mead once said, “never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” Adam Anders is a fifth-year student majoring in political science, with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AA652656@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 15

Looking for a Non-Traditional Thanksgivng Meal? Try these out! -Pork chops -Lasagna -Parmesan crusted chicken -Honey smoked ham -Gyros


PAGE 16

THE QUAD

Follow The Quad @TheQuadWCU

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Songs remind listeners to be appreciative this Thanksgiving By Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor

November—the month during which candy corn becomes candy canes, the pumpkins turn, not into enchanted carriages, but into sleighs, and bites from vampires are replaced with kisses under the mistletoe. Consumers running away from zombies race right into the Target checkout line on Black Friday. Every year, one poor holiday is neglected and overlooked. Thanksgiving in the United States has become a mere stepping stone used to reach the “real” holiday season. It is practically just a pre-

December celebration without even getting 24 whole hours to itself as thousands of people prepare for Black Friday before Thanksgiving has even one foot out of the door. In an attempt to reverse this trend, there are many songs that can assist in celebrating the true meaning of Thanksgiving and in giving thanks for all of the “little” things. -Although his musical endeavors are most known for “The Channukah Song,” Adam Sandler also created “The Thanksgiving Song.” As zany as expected, “The Thanksgiving Song” pays an ode to the delicious holiday

Photo credit: dallasobserver.com

with lines like “gobble gobble goo and gobble gobble giggle, I wish turkey only cost a nickel.” -Get the grandparents groovin’ with Sam and Dave’s 1968 hit, “I Thank You.” -“Thankful,” the title-track from Kelly Clarkson’s 2003 debut album, expresses her thanks to those close to her and to her supporters. -Is a holiday really a holiday without the Peanuts gang? Check out “ P e a n u t s Thanksgiving Theme” by Guaraldi Trio from ‘A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving.’ -Rapping his appreciation for hip-hop,

Photo credit: beatcrave.com

Adam Sandler brings holiday cheer with his comedic “Thanksgiving Song.”

Jay Z uses “Thank You” as his greeting card of gratitude. -Macy Gray’s upbeat ‘Beauty in the World’ is sure to get listeners dancing around the dinner table as well as appreciating small tokens of beauty. -Show loved ones some appreciation with ...a Led Zeppelin song? “Thank You” is one of the group’s more poignant songs of reflection. -Encouraging others to be thankful, Bob Marley sings “Give Thanks and Praises,” a spiritual tribute song. -Add some southern

twang to Thanksgiving with Green on Red’s “Little Things in Life.” -Dido’s sweetsounding “Thank You” understatedly reminds listeners that life “is not so bad.” -The Redwalls channel the Beatles in their song called, again, “Thank You.” -Pianist extraordinaire George Winston sets a calming tone in his instrumental piece, “Thanksgiving.” -New Buffalo, the former alias of Australian singer Sally Seltmann, pays tribute to the little things like wildflow-

ers and dancing in her bubbly song “Cheer Me Up Thank You.” -Finally, Earth, Wind, and Fire ‘got plenty love’ for listeners with the song “Gratitude.” So before Black Friday rears its chaosfilled head, and everyone begins preparing for Santa’s long-awaited visit, listen to these songs as appreciative reminders of life’s blessings this Thanksgiving. Carol Fritz is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 21,

2011

THE QUAD

Book review: “Best of Me” by Nicholas Sparks By Jacqueline Valentino Staff writer

The most important part of a novel is that the reader can relate to it and this novel has that. N i c h o l a s Sparks’s novel “Best of Me” is about high school sweethearts whom get separated because of their family issues and find themselves brought back together by the death of the man who helped them hide their love. When the two meet again at the

place where their love started, they realize that they have never stopped loving one another. Nicholas Sparks takes readers through twists and turns of the two rediscovering their love for one another and how life is never as easy as it is often imagined to be. This novel will have the reader in tears by the end, and hanging on every single word until one gets there. This novel is truly amazing. The level of emotion that Sparks is able

to instill in the reader is fantastic. He instantly draws the reader in following the story of two sweethearts and their first love, something most readers will be able to relate to. He takes the audience on their journey of rediscovery and presents the challenges to the readers instead of watching the journey unfold from the sideline. Sparks, once again, produces a work of art, in the form of “Best of Me.” His one

downfall throughout all of his novels would be that they are getting predictable -- two people fall in love and then lose their love. The one thing that makes his novels so successful is that while the plot is predictable, he makes the characters so interesting that he leaves the reader wanting more. Jacqueline Valentino is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JV671648@ wcupa.edu.

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Photo credit: shockya.com


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

“50/50” catches attention of an elder crowd As I sat in the theatre while waiting for the new film entitled “50/50” to start - I noticed one strange thing about the audience; everyone was elderly. At 20 years old I might have been the youngest person in the theatre. I was so surprised at why a bunch of old people would want to see a movie about death and cancer! My sister even joked that the retirement home must have let them have a field trip. What’s even more shocking is they all enjoyed it a little too much. They were the ones laughing the loudest and crying the hardest. The film is about a straight laced (doesn’t drink, doesn’t smoke, doesn’t swear) 27-yearold, Adam (Joseph Gordon Levitt) who is diagnosed with a rare form of cancer that most patients die from. The funny thing about Adam is that he is afraid of death. He won’t even get his license because car accidents are one of the top five reasons for death (cancer beats it though). Adam is portrayed as very innocent and childlike which makes you feel sympathetic for him throughout the entire film, especially when his illness gets worse. The film follows Adam throughout his sickness and up until his final surgery, which could help or hurt him. It focuses mainly on how his relationships, both old and new, are affected because of his illness. The most interesting, and even a little bit touching, relation-

ship to watch is between Adam and his best friend Kyle (Seth Rogen). The only complaint I have for Rogen is that he seems to play the same character in all of his films, which was present entirely throughout this film as well. Interestingly enough Rogen is supposedly playing himself in the film. Kyle is portrayed much like Rogen’s character in “Knocked Up” - a lazy, fat, sex hungry, and somewhat creepy immature young man. For much of the movie it seems that Kyle cares more about getting laid than his best friend dying. Despite Kyle’s lazy attitude and risky lifestyle he is always there for Adam, which is a lot more than can be said for Adams live-in girlfriend and primary care giver Rachel (Bryce Dallas Howard). Rachel and Adams relationship becomes turbulent throughout Adams sickness, and will eventually lead to a nasty and hurtful break up (still funny to watch though). Their breakup is a turning point in the film because it shows just how close Kyle and Adam are. Moreover, Kyle shows the audience that he isn’t as bad as he seems, and that he really does care for Adam more than he cares about sex and partying. We also see a new relationship blossom between Adam and his therapist, Katherine (Anna Kendrick). Part of Adam’s treatment involves seeing a therapist to deal with his sickness and the idea of his own death. His therapist, who is a 24-year-old working on

her Ph.D. with only two other patients under her belt, becomes one of Adams closest confidants. At first, Adam was cautious with such a young therapist and called her out on her age and credibility within the first few minutes of meeting, but the audience will slowly start to see a trust form between them - and an unhealthy doctor to patient relationship evolving. Kendrick did a phenomenal job with her character - a book smart geek with a schoolgirl crush. I found myself on “Team Katherine” from the start - you fall in love with her character instantly. We have Adams parents: a mother who is known for worrying too much and a father with Alzheimer ’s who doesn’t even remember his own son. Adam is annoyed with his mother for much of the film and often ignores her and does not return her calls. However, after talking it over with Katherine he finally realizes how much he disregarded her - which is an attitude he carried for most of his life. In fact, my favorite part of the movie was when Adam was in therapy with Katherine complaining about his mother and Katherine shuts him up by asking, “So your mother has a husband who can’t talk to her and a son who won’t?” After that Adam learned to appreciate his mother and rekindle their relationship before his final surgery. Adams father is a bit of comic relief throughout the film. He has no idea who he

is - let alone that his son is dying, but always seems to be smiling/laughing figure in the background. However, the entire theatre erupted in tears when Adam said goodbye to his father before his surgery. This is probably the best scene in the entire film. The way his father reacted to the goodbye was heartbreaking and shocking. By the end of the movie I knew why the theatre was packed with old people - cancer is never something that can be taken lightly - but this film, directed by Jonathon Levine, shed a little bit of much needed light on a very dark subject. It was the perfect, but extremely rare, mixture of comedy, drama, and romance. Moreover, with this cast, this movie has to be funny. My only complaint about the film (if you can call it a complaint) was I left the theatre not knowing what to feel. My sister and I walked in silence as we approached the car. We weren’t sure if we should laugh or cry - to talk about the funny parts or the sad parts (however we did talk about how GordonLevitt still looked pretty cute bald). This movie left me thinking long after the credits, which means it must be a good one.

ELECTRIC FACTORY:

Upcoming Shows

By Liz Thompson Special to The Quad

Liz Thompson is a third-year student majoring communications with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at ET715984@wcupa.edu.

November 22 - Five Finger Death Punch November 23 - Badfish November 27 - Simple Plan December 9 - Get the Led Out December 10 - The Devil Wears Prada December 29 - Dark Star Orchestra

THE TROCADERO: November 22 - Rocky Loves Emily December 1 - As I Lay Dying December 2 - Anthony Renzulli Band December 8 - City and Colour December 16 - Wu-Tang Clan December 29 - Feed Me

THE TLA: November 23 - Infected Mushroom November 30 - Steel Panther December 4 - Dashboard Confessional December 8 - Borgore December 10 - Saints and Sinners December 24 - Matisyahu

THE NOTE: November 23 - Nomad Clientele November 25 - Splintered Sunlight December 2 - Can You Canoe December 3 - Max Bemis December 8 - Graham Colton December 9 - Deadbeatz Inc.

Interested in writing for the Quad Entertainment section? E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


THE QUAD

PAGE 19

Classifieds

How to Place Classified Advertising in the Quad To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and click “classifieds.” Then enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 11 a.m. on the Sunday before publication.

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NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Women’s hockey downs University of Maryland By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer After a long break in between games, the women’s ice hockey club took to their home ice once more last Saturday night, when they faced off against the University of Maryland, beating them 5-2. After back-to-back losses against the University of Delaware, West Chester was eager to get back to the ice and win some more games. This was evident by their fast action as soon as the puck dropped in the beginning of the first period. West Chester came out strong by trying to get the puck into Maryland’s zone early. Maryland was quicker on the forecheck when they made an attempt on goal six minutes

into the period, but the West Chester defense was on it by keeping the puck out of the crease. Despite this, they were still having a hard time getting the puck out of their zone, as Maryland’s offense continued to push at the net. Goaltender Aly Golia kept her composure as she continued to make saves and kept Maryland’s players from scoring. Even so, West Chester was struggling to keep returning the play back into their opponents’ zone. Maryland was granted the first power play opportunity at the 11th minute of play, but West Chester was quick to kill this off and protect their zone. Maryland received another power play, and still Golia held her own with back-toback saves. During one of

these saves, the net was even dislodged, but play was never stopped, and Golia kept her composure by covering the puck. West Chester started to build up more momentum during the last few minutes of the first period. They were able to gain the lead in the game by scoring the first goal of the game just seconds before the first period ended. In the second period, there was a lot of action on and off the ice. West Chester was on the forecheck early when forward Allison Smith scored the second goal of the game. They were even awarded their first power play opportunity at the 15th minute of play, but Maryland remained on the penalty kill. There was actually an

unofficial break during the second period when a West Chester and Maryland player were laid out on the ice. During this, an argument between rival parents ensued regarding the referees not making the right calls. The argument got so heated that a physical fight broke out between two fathers within the bleachers. Noticing that something was going on off the ice, the whistle was blown and the referees conversed with both of the hockey teams for five minutes. After all the commotion died down, play returned at center ice and no penalties were called. Maryland was on the forecheck after the face-off scoring their first goal of the game in an attempt to come back. West Chester tried to retaliate by keeping

play in Maryland’s zone and had a few good attempts at scoring. Forward Becky Dobson was penalized for poking at the net when she was trying to get the puck past rival goalie Adriane Faust. After her two minutes out of the game was up, Dobson came back to take on Faust one on one by scoring an unassisted goal a few minutes later. Not to be outdone, Maryland came back to West Chester’s post with a second unassisted goal of the game, in an attempt to close the scoring gap late in the second period. The goal preceded the end of the second period by only a few seconds. The third period started with West Chester still having the lead in the game by 3-2. Still the

deficit was only by one goal, so West Chester was still aggressive on the forecheck. West Chester scored a fourth goal of the game towards the beginning of the period, and attempted to keep the puck in Maryland’s zone as much as possible. West Chester had widened the scoring gap even more after a Maryland penalty allowed them the player advantage. Defenseman Amanda Vito gained the benefit of this player advantage as she scored the power play goal. WCU was able to stand their ground and defend the net, as they came off with the 5-2 victory. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@wcupa.edu.

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NOVEMBER 21, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 21

Men’s hockey rebounds to sweep Stony Brook By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Everything was in line for the West Chester University men’s hockey team to have a rough series at home against Stony Brook last weekend. They had lost a 7-0 game with Penn State the week before. They had lost Tom Scocozza to an injury and Matt Feeney to a suspension during that game. And, perhaps most importantly, they lost any momentum when they trailed the Stony Brook Seawolves 6-3 in the third period on Friday. But they won. West Chester swept their home series with Stony Brook, capping an incredible comeback with a 7-6 overtime win on Friday, and holding on for a 7-5 win on Saturday. Both games were very physical from the first face-off to the final buzzer. On Friday, the first period score was not indicative of how both teams played. WCU got a goal from Matt Sklodowski around the 12-minute mark, and added another goal later in the period when Jeff Dugan found the net on a power play. Stony Brook matched WCU however, getting goals of their own from captain Chris Ryan and Bryan Elfant in the middle of the period. The Rams escaped with minimal damage in the first. They gave up three power plays to SBU and were lucky to be tied as they were outshot 17-9. They were not as lucky in the second period. The Seawolves came out strong, setting up an aggressive forecheck for long periods of time and ripping numerous shots in on goal. Within the first five minutes of the period, SBU had scored two goals and took a 4-2 lead.

The Seawolves pulling the Rams within and I was able to get his knocked down and fired continued the pressure for one. It was WCU’s third and put the puck in the past the goalie. It put West most of the period, domi- goal in less than 5:45. net,” Meade said. Chester up 2-1 at the time, nating West Chester in The third period stayed Doyle, who amassed two but Stony Brook tied the time of possession, chances, relatively quiet from then goals and an assist Friday, game late in the third when and shots. on. WCU kept the pressure was pleased with the deter- Nick Dereskey was left Then something but was not able to lock the mination he saw in his wide open in the slot by the happened that was not good game at six goals apiece. It teammates. WCU defense. The first for the Rams at the moment, was not until the game was “I think it shows our ended in a 2-2 draw. but may have benefited almost over that the depth and heart that we The tie did not last long them in the long run. Steve constant pressure paid off. can overcome a four goal into the second period, Meade was speeding With just 10 seconds left in deficit and ultimately come however. Doyle, who was through center ice when he the game, Stony Brook iced out on top, especially being practically unstoppable in was hit by an arguably low the puck and gave WCU down our captain and some the series, scored again just hip check. Meade was sent one last chance. of our best defensemen with 19 seconds in. Meade was tumbling through the air, They capitalized on that Feeney and McInerney out. credited with the assist, his and the hit prompted a chance. We battled hard and 100th point as a Golden quick response from his Doyle scored his second showed that we are a team,” Ram. teammates. As Meade was goal of the game, which Doyle said. Halfway through the hobbling off the ice, a scuffle came just six seconds before WCU found a way to period WCU added to their broke out that involved a lot the buzzer and sent the carry the momentum from lead. Doyle fed a pass down of pushing and shoving, and game to overtime. the win into the second low to Gentile, who slipped even a few punches. a backhand past the Meade, who returned SBU goalie. Minutes soon after, believes this later, Meade found small fight was just what Doyle again in front of the Rams needed. “I the net and Doyle think that scuffle actually one-timed the puck got our guys a little fire in across the line, earning their eyes,” Meade said. the hat trick and “We played with no putting WCU up 5-2. emotion really until the After Gentile scuffle happened and it scored his second goal was huge that we used it of the game in the for energy to start our third, WCU would not comeback.” look back. The Whether that was the Seawolves got goals reason or not, the Rams from Mike Cacciotti, certainly did seem to play Wesley Hawkins, and with more energy from Pat Foster to bring that point forward. After them within one, but giving one more goal in that was the closest the second and another to they would get. begin the third, WCU Bill Pellegrino put Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad began their comeback. the icing on the cake Their first break came Chris Doyle, who had 7 points in the two games against Stony Brook, with a long shot into fights to regain control of the puck. when the Stony Brook the empty net to seal a goalie came out to play 7-5 WCU victory. the puck and ended up That was when a Halfway through the game of the series on weekend full of tempers handing it right to Glenn Monkman. Monkman extra period, a rebound of Saturday. Doyle stepped up broke loose. Mike Ahle and scored easily, cutting the Meade’s shot found Doyle’s his performance to an even a Stony Brook player began stick, and his shot higher level in the second exchanging shoves, igniting SBU lead to 6-3. Minutes later, Stony rebounded right back to game. a pushing match between Brook defenseman Jason Meade. The net was wide During a first period all five skaters. Aro took a crosschecking open and Meade did not power play Doyle charged As all of this was up center ice, swung wide to happening, Randy Japchen penalty, and a few seconds miss. into the powerplay Chris “I was looking to take the left, and beat the SBU and Stony Brook’s goalie, Doyle scored on a feed from the puck wide and fire a goalie with a quick Chris Hausel, were Mike Ahle, chipping the shot low to see if we could backhand shot. exchanging words from Seawolves’ lead to two. get a rebound to kick out, Later in the period, Matt across the ice. Tim Higgins scored less and luckily it worked. Doyle Sklodowski blasted a shot The two goaltenders than two minutes later, was able to get the rebound, that Harrison Welch met at center ice, dropped

their gloves, took off their helmets, and settled their differences with their fists. Four right-handed punches later, Hausel was on the ice. “It’s not the first thing that you want to do or have happen, but it seemed like he was trying to go after our guys, so I went out a little bit to make sure he didn’t jump in. He called me out and I wasn’t going to back down,” Japchen said. Japchen will be suspended one game for the fight, as will Brian Ruskowski who dropped the gloves for a brief fight with SBU defenseman Sean Fitzpatrick. “It wasn’t the smartest thing to do and I’m sure most people will tell you that. But night in and night out the boys fight for me and Will (Parra) and I’m just returning the favor,” Japchen said. After the fisticuffs were settled and the clock ran down, WCU celebrated their second home sweep in a row. In the two games, Doyle collected five goals and two assists, Meade had a goal and three assists, and Ahle had four assists. Discipline, however, was again a major problem as the Rams took 15 minor penalties and seemed to stray from their game plan. “We got sucked into their game a lot. We can’t play into the other teams game plan, we have to stick to our game....When we played our game, we were successful, and when we played their style, we weren’t,” Dorsey said. West Chester will have to be consistent next Saturday when they play in the WVU Tournamnent Kenny Ayres is a secondyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 22

THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 21, 2011

Men’s basketball off to solid start By Riley Wallace Staff Writer The West Chester men’s basketball team went 2-1 in its first week of play, defeating visiting non-conference foe University of the Sciences as well as PSAC West member Slippery Rock, while dropping an away game to nonconference opponent Philadelphia University. The West Chester men’s basketball team kicked off its 2011-2012 season last Sunday evening with a convincing 62-53 victory over visiting University of Sciences of Philadelphia. The Golden Rams were led by Lance McDowell who had a team-high 17 points to go along with six rebounds. Khalif Foster added 10 points, Gary Lawrence pulled down a team-high nine boards, and Jon Breeden dished out a team-high four assists. West Chester took a

32-28 lead into halftime and came out firing in the second half scoring the first five points. University of Sciences answered right back with a 12-0 run of their own to take a three point lead. The contest remained close throughout the second half and was tied for the eighth time at 46-46 with 6:42 left to play. The Golden Rams scored six straight and survived a late charge by the Devils to go on and win by nine. The Devils were led by the trio of Myer Messinger, William Kernan, and Garrett Kerr who scored 12 points each. Kerr pulled down 11 rebounds to record a double-double. The loss dropped the Devils to 0-1 for the season. West Chester dropped its first road game of the season losing 71-59 to Philadelphia University last Tuesday night. The Golden Rams were led on offense by Jon

Breeden who scored 19 points and dished out three assists, both team-highs. He received little support on offense though as both Lance McDowell and Khalif Foster were both in foul trouble. McDowell, Foster, and Corey Blake each added eight points and Foster managed to pull down 11 rebounds. The Golden Rams kept the home team close in the first half, going into halftime tied at 32, but Philadelphia University opened the second half on an 11-4 run. West Chester cut into their lead and eventually did tie the game again at 45 with just under 14 minutes to play, but the host opened up a 10 point lead and never looked back from there, ultimately winning by 12. West Chester went only 8 for 10 from the foul line while Philadelphia University went 21-26 from the charity stripe. Philadelphia

University Rams put all five starters in double digits, led by Nick Schiltzer’s 23 points. Stephen Griffin added 10 to go along with a team-high 8 rebounds. Temi Adebayo also added 10 points but blocked 10 of West Chester’s shots. Nick Christian and Corey Francisco had 16 and 12 points respectively. The win for Philadelphia University improved their record to 1-1 for the season. West Chester’s final opponent for the week was PSAC foe Slippery Rock, who they defeated 69-55 Saturday at Hollinger Field House. The Golden Rams were led by starters Lance McDowell and Jon Breeden who scored 17 and 11 points respectively. Corey Blake shot 6-7 from the field coming off the bench to add 14 points. McDowell also added eight rebounds, which was a team-high and Breeden dished out six assists. Both

teams started off a little sluggish with each team recording over 10 turnovers in the first half, but the tempo picked up as the first half progressed with the Golden Rams taking the lead into the locker room by the slim margin of 26-25. In the second half, both teams came out aggressive trading punches until Blake hit a jumper with 11:44 left in the second half that put West Chester on top for good. The Golden Rams outscored Slippery Rock 43-30 in the second half, clearly outplaying the visiting team at both ends of the court. West Chester’s pressing defense forced Slippery Rock into committing a total of 19 turnovers. Slippery Rock was led by guards Aubin Reeves and Jon Valeriano who each scored 12 points. Devin Taylor led the team with 13 rebounds, including five on the offensive glass. The

team recorded eight assists, which were spread out over five different players. The loss drops Slippery Rock to 1-1 for the season and 0-1 in the PSAC. For the time being, West Chester will sit atop the PSAC tied for first with a conference record of 1-0. After facing Mercyhurst (2-1) in another PSAC showdown on Sunday, the Golden Rams have only one game over the next nine days. Tuesday, they will travel to Chestnut Hill (4-1) for a non-league game at 7 p.m. After that the Golden Rams get to rest up for a week before taking on Holy Family (3-1) the following Tuesday and won’t have another home game until they host Clarion University (1-3) to begin their PSAC conference play on Saturday Dec. 3. Riley Wallace is a third-year student at West Chester University. He can be reached at RW718681@wcupa.edu.

Ram’s win home opener against Slippery Rock By Joey Samuel Staff Writer The West Chester women’s basketball team played their second game of the season on Saturday, and earned a 79-68 win over Slippery Rock at Hollinger Field House. In the Golden Rams’ conference opener, senior guard Alison Hostetter led the way with a team-high 19 points as well as five rebounds. Junior forward Alex Lennon added 13 points and five rebounds, while fellow junior forward Ambreelinne Ortman scored 11 points and grabbed four rebounds of

her own. Freshman forward Kendall Benovy, in her first taste of PSAC action, led the team with six rebounds in addition to her six points. West Chester shot 45% from the field to Slippery Rock’s 40%, but the key to victory for the Golden Rams may have been their ability to get to the line. West Chester made 13 free throws from 22 attempts, while Slippery Rock only made five free throws from 12. That eight-point advantage went a long way to helping West Chester to victory.

The Golden Rams’ defense was outstanding as well. West Chester grabbed an astonishing 17 steals in comparison to the Rock’s four. West Chester also blocked two shots, while Slippery Rock didn’t block any. The West Chester bench also contributed in large part to the victory. The Golden Rams got 28 points from the bench, while the Rock only managed seven. Slippery Rock never led the game at any point. West Chester jumped out to a 45-36 lead at halftime, and Slippery Rock wasn’t even able to trim the

margin in the second half as West Chester extended it to an eleven-point win. Although the game was West Chester ’s PSAC opener, it wasn’t the first game of the season. The season began on Tuesday, when West Chester traveled to Philadelphia University and earned a road win in a close game, 78-77. Hostetter showed up big in that one as well, and her late-game dramatics sealed the win. She made both free throws in a 1-and-1 situation to take the lead with 1:23 remaining, and West Chester managed to hold on for the win.

Although Hostetter only tallied six points, she led the team in rebounds with 10. Ortman scored a team-high 20 points, and even went 4-for-6 from three-point range. As a team, West Chester was outstanding from beyond the arc, draining 10 threes throughout the game. The Golden Rams managed to take 32 offensive rebounds against Philadelphia, and that may have been the key to victory. It led to a 21-6 advantage in second-chance points, which along with the three-pointers, gave

West Chester just enough to top Philadelphia. We s t Chester continued their PSAC schedule on Sunday with another home game against Mercyhurst. It finished too late to be included in this issue, but the score can be found on the athletic website. The team will then enjoy a small break and not return to the court until Nov. 29, when they travel once again to Philly to play against Holy Family. Joey Samuel is a thirdyear student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 21, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 23

WCU beats UMass-Lowell for national title By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The Golden Rams took the 2011 NCAA Division II Field Hockey National Championship with a 2-1 victory over UMassLowell at Busch Stadium in Bloomsburg, Pa. last Sunday afternoon. Seniors Nicole Fiorilla and Brynn Adams each contributed tallies in the first half to keep a hold over the defending champions and snag the national title. “The moment when the horn buzzed and the game was over was surreal for most of us,” first-year head coach Amy Cohen said. “We set a goal to win a National Championship and we completed our mission.” Fiorilla put up the first goal of the game in the seventh minute, off a pass from Kayla Gluchowski. The marker was her 13th of the season, her first since Oct. 11. Adams added on the lead eight minutes later,

taking an assist from Leah Angstadt off a penalty corner, and netting the shot past River Hawks’ goalkeeper, Melanie Hopkins. Adams’ shot gave the Rams an early 2-0 lead over their competitors—a comfortable feeling unlike their semifinal match on Friday against Bloomsburg, which came to a close after doubleovertime and penalty shots. The Rams kept the River Hawks silent for the remainder of the first half and cruised into the second with a comfortable 2-0 lead. In the 57th minute, UMass-Lowell’s Ali Ferraro scored off a penalty corner, creeping in on the Rams’ hold. Minutes l a t er, Gluchowski was yellow carded, prohibiting her from play for five minutes. UMass-Lowell was desperate to even the score with the opportunity, and pulled their goalkeeper to add additional pressure to West Chester’s zone.

“The last 15 minutes were definitely stressful,” Cohen said. “Our goalkeeper did a great job, and the girls in front of her did a great job as well.” Golden Rams’ goalkeeper Kristin Arnold felt the pressure too. “I knew that for us to be successful I would have to have a good game,” Arnold said. “My defense played amazingly and really kept their good opportunities to a minimum and made my job a lot easier.” “With about 1:24 left on the clock Adams took the ball and started to kill the clock on her own. I started to smile because I knew the game was over,” Cohen said. Arnold halted the River Hawks offense, and let the buzzer sound with the realization of their national victory. Arnold made a season high of 12 saves, one short of her career high against North Carolina last season. Hopkins was credited with 10 saves for the

loss. West Chester outshot UMass-Lowell by a margin of 20-17, and held a 15-10 advantage in corners. “This game was by far the most exciting game I ever played in,” Arnold said. “The feeling is so surreal; it still has not really set in what we’ve accomplished as a team. I just feel such a huge sense of pride that I was involved with a team that was able to accomplish so much.” The victory was the first national championship for West Chester in Division II, and fifth overall for the field hockey program. The field hockey team joins the 1961 men’s soccer team, and the 2002 and 2008 women’s lacrosse teams as the only NCAA champions in West Chester’s history. “Brynn Adams and Michele Shrift had amazing seasons from the very first game and I think they set the tone from the very first whistle,” Cohen said of

the senior and junior. “Game by game we had other players raise their level of play and match their intensity, until we had a full roster playing at their potential.” Coach Cohen’s assessment was harmonized, as four players from West Chester were named to the 2011 Longstreth/ NFHCA Division II AllAmerican squad this week, including Adams and Schrift. Adams was also named the South Region player of the year, making her a contender for the title of national player of the year. Adams finished an impressive season third on the team in scoring with 26 points, four defensive saves, and three game-winning goals, including her game-winner in the national championship. The first team is composed of Adams and Schrift, while the second team includes Angstadt and Gluchowski. Schrift finished fifth on the team in scoring with 17 points, seven

goals and three assists. She also put up a goal, an assist and a defensive save in the semifinal match against undefeated Bloomsburg. Angstadt placed fourth on the team in scoring with 24 points, eight goals and eight assists, with one game-winning goal. Gluchowski tied Fiorilla to lead the team in scoring with 13 goals and 30 points, ranking 24th in the country in points and 26th in goals. “The team has done just an amazing job in learning and growing on and off the field. I am very proud of each and every one of them,” Cohen said. “This goal was something that 24 women set for themselves, and with hard work, focus, and determination they were able to win a National Championship for West Chester University.” Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa.edu.

Courtesy of Pam Schrift

Courtesy of Pam Schrift

The West Chester University field hockey team poses for a team photograph after winning the 2011 Division II National Title.

Nicole Fiorilla nets West Chester’s first goal of the NCAA Tournament off an assist from Kayla Gluchowski.


PAGE 24

THE QUAD The Phildalphia Phillies signed former Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon to a 4-year, $50 million dollar deal last week. The Phillies initiated talks with Papelbon after failing to reach a deal with long time Phillies pitcher Ryan Madson.

Sports NOVEMBER 21, 2011

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU field hockey wins DII National Title

(Top left) The Golden Rams pose with their first place trophy. (Top right) Brynn Adams, the 2011 Division II Player of the Year in the South Region, kills the clock with a 2-1 lead with a minute left in the game. (Bottom left) All-American player, Michele Shrift, battles off a UMass-Lowell midfielder. (Bottom right) The team celebrates victory immediately after the buzzer sounds. All photos courtesy of Pam Schrift

Quad 101-09  

The Quad Issue of November 21, 2011

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