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VOLUME 99, ISSUE 6

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE News:

Obama plans to create jobs pg 2

Bullying issues appearing more widely ‘Spirit Day’ aims to raise awareness on October 20 Carla Giorno

Practicum Writer

Op-Ed:

Technology: Where are we going? pg 4

This fall, there has been a great deal of media attention focused towards students who are a part of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community. These individuals are often the target of harassment and cyber bullying. The recent suicide of Rutgers student Tyler Clementi as a result of privacy invasion and harassment has been an eye-opening experience for college campuses nationwide on raising awareness and promoting the acceptance of the LGBTQA community. Clementi, an 18-year-old freshman, posted on his Facebook page, “Jumping off the GW bridge

Brown, shot himself, after what his parents called “constant suffering.” His mother and stepfather made repeated visits to Hamilton Middle School to speak with authorities, however they claim that their calls for help went ignored. Finally, Billy Lucas, 15, hung himself from rafters in his family’s barn in Indiana. On a Facebook memorial page for Lucas, one fellow student commented, “everyone just made fun of him.” Harassment works in several ways, but cyber-bullying is a little more complicated. There are two kinds of cyber-bullying: direct attacks and attacks by proxy.

proxy, which involves employing the help of friends to attack the victim. Attacks by proxy not only hurt the victim, but the people involved as well. The friends of the attacker do not always know that they are involved in cyberbullying. Campuses nationwide, including West Chester University, are taking an active role in stopping this behavior. Colleges and universities are beginning outreach programs and strengthening their support groups for LGBTQA communities and their families. There are also websites about projects like the It Gets Better Project, in which people from all

individually come up with an online training program to stop harassment in the workplace, which is available to both students and employees at the university. For more information on the campus outreach programs, visit the university website (www. wcupa.edu). More information can be found on nationwide support programs by visiting www.itgetsbetterproject.com, and visit the To Write Love On Her Arms organization at www. twloha.com. In addition, October 20 has been named Spirit Day, where people are asked to wear purple to show their support towards the

Features:

Hazing affects students pg 6

Ent:

Poet Michael O’Siahail visits campus pg 8

Sports: Rams win pg 16

Kevin R. Wexler/The Record/MCT

Students at Rutgers University held a candelight vigil in memory of Tyler Clementi in light of his recent suicide. Similar vigils are being held across the country for the recent deaths.

sorry,” after two fellow students filmed him during a “sexual encounter” in his dorm room and streamed it online. While his body has yet to be found, a wallet containing his identification card was found on the side of the bridge. Five other teenage boys have also committed suicide in recent months due to harrassment and bullying. Seth Walsh, a 13-year-old middle school student from Kern County, CA, hung himself in his yard after consistant tormenting from peers. Walsh, who had informed school authorities, was put on life support for nine days before eventually being taken off. Justin Aaberg, 15, was the fifth student at his high school to commit suicide in the last yearthree of which have been due to homophobic bullying. Raymond Chase, a 19-year-old sophomore at Johnson and Wales in RI was found dead in his dorm room.Chase was originally from New York. Another 13-year-old, Asher

Direct attacks are messages sent directly to the victim from the actual harasser. These attacks range from instant/text messages, blogs, and picture messages to internet polling and malware sent to the victim to control the use of their webcams. There are also attacks by

Greg Gilbert/Seattle Times/MCT

Positive messages are being spread all across campuses to show support.

over the world post videos about their struggles in the LGBTQA community, and what they have done to overcome adversity. The It Gets Better Project, run by the Trevor Project organization showcases both celebrities and the average citizen offering words of hope. The Trevor Project aims to help end suicide and bullying, and they offer information packets for educators to lead discussion in their classrooms, as well as other tools. They provide a 24-hour helpline, as well as a way for teens to ask anonymous questions and just have someone to talk to. Celebrities varying from Chris Colfer, Daniel Radcliffe, and Zachary Quinto have filmed It Gets Better PSAs for the organization. To Write Love On Her Arms, a support organization that now has been around for several years is traveling to college campuses to raise awareness of homophobic abuse, and to offer support to those who are being harassed. West Chester University has

LGBTQA community. According to the New York Daily News, the average age for a teenager to come out about their sexual identity has dropped from 19 to 14 over the last decade, and it’s becoming even more important for these young teens to know that there is support and allies for them, even if they aren’t getting that support at home. While wearing purple on October 20 will send a message to people who feel as though they have no one to turn to, it is also important to remember that bullying and harrassment takes place every day of the year, and wearing purple one day won’t stop it. The community as a whole needs to be conscious of this issue every day of the year. Carla Giorno is a student at West Chester University. She can be reached at CG633075@wcupa.edu. Additional reporting on this article was done by Jenn Rothstein, a fourth year English education major, who can be reached at JR649299@wcupa. edu.


PAGE 2

NEWS

OCTOBER 18, 2010

Obama pushes infrastructure plan to create jobs Margaret Talev

McClatchy Papers

With the weak economy driving voter discontent three weeks out from congressional and state elections, President Barack Obama Monday renewed his call to spend an additional $50 billion on improving the nation's transportation infrastructure. His plan calls for rebuilding 150,000 miles of roads "enough to circle the world six times" laying and maintaining 4,000 miles of railways, restoring 150 miles of airport runways and advancing a new air-traffic control system. Obama said that America's

crumbling infrastructure weakens our economy and leaves the nation trailing foreign competitors in investment, including China, Russia and Europe. By embarking soon on the infrastructure buildup, he said, "we will create good, middle-class jobs right now." Obama's push comes with the nation's overall unemployment rate stuck at 9.6 percent. Voters are upset about the economy and job losses, but they're also unhappy about federal budget deficits and the skyrocketing national debt. The deficit for fiscal 2010, which ended Sept. 30, was $1.3 trillion, the second highest since World War II, according to an estimate

last week from the Congressional Budget Office. The highest came the preceding year, at $1.4 trillion. Obama said "this plan will be paid for. It will not add to our deficit over time," but that depends upon Congress, which hasn't taken the plan up yet. Obama spoke upon release of a new report by the Treasury Department and Council of Economic Advisers, which concluded that U.S. infrastructure "is not keeping pace" with economic demand and Americans' expectations, and that now would be a "particularly timely and beneficial" time to spend more. The report said Obama's plan

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would create middle class jobs, primarily in construction, manufacturing and retail trade. The report also said for 9 in 10 Americans today, transportation costs eat up nearly 17 cents of every dollar of income. "Nearly 1 in 5 construction workers is still unemployed and needs a job," Obama said. "And that makes absolutely no sense at a time when there's so much of America that needs rebuilding." With Congress out until mid-November, then back only briefly, there's no realistic prospect for action on the president's proposal this year. Some Republicans are openly hostile, saying that Obama's $814 billion stimulus program, which passed last year, was supposed to improve infrastructure and create jobs, but hasn't done enough. Rep. John Mica of Florida, the top Republican on the House of Representatives Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, called the new report "pitiful." He also said that more than 60 percent of infrastructure funding in the stimulus act has yet to be spent. He said he'd be happy to work with Obama and his advisers "when they return to planet Earth with both feet on the ground."

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Obama insisted that America's outdated highway, air and rail systems are taking a toll on the economy in lost productivity. As a percentage of GDP, Obama said, U.S. investment in infrastructure is less than half of Russia's and a third of Europe's. He said that China will build dozens of new airports in the next decade. He said such investments show that other countries are "creating jobs today, but they're also playing to win tomorrow." "So there's no reason why we can't do this," Obama said. "This is America. We've always had the best infrastructure." In Congress, a highway and public transit bill has been stymied largely because of disagreements over how to pay for it. The 18.4 cents a gallon federal tax on gasoline isn't yielding the needed revenue, and some Democrats are pushing for a higher gas tax. The White House has balked at that. House Democrats want a six-year bill that would cost about $500 billion. Previous authority for highway projects expired about a year ago, but has been funded by a series of short-term extensions that run out on Dec. 31.


OCTOBER 18, 2010

NEWS

“It’s not an original idea. Rappers have been doing this for years. They just have the decency and respect not to film it. You know who should really be pissed? The E! Network because this show is basically The Girls Next Door.” -Chelsea Handler, on the polygmist reality show, Sister Wives.

On The Record

“Marriage- it gives you the one family member you get to choose. -Pandora Radio Ad, for twoofus.org, a site offering relationship advice. twoofus.org

time.com

time.com

PAGE 3

“I married my first husband because we wanted to sleep together. It lasted six months and we were in bed for six months.” -Betty White, on her first marraige.

“Wait, so.. The Rams won, but the Flyers, Phillies and Yankees all lost? I guess the stars were aligned.” -Dr. T, The Quad faculty advisor, on what an interesting night it was in sports. Amanda Warren/The Quad

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&

Opinion

By Tara Tanzos Editor-in-Chief

Editorial

People give power to words. Let your words give the people power.

The Quad West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383

Phone: 610.436.2375 | Fax: 610.436.3280 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Tara Tanzos

Editor-in-Chief

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edi.to.ri.al [ed-i-tawr-ee-uhl] Dear technology: where are we going?

FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383. Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quad@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before that Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2010 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 12 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 5,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Bartash Printing in Philadelphia, Pa.

Recycle The Quad - because who wants to chop down a tree?

The topic of my editorial this week is a combination of two conversations I’ve had recently: one with my mother (a fourth grade teacher), and the other with visiting poet Micheal O’Siadhail, who discussed poetry in my workshop class last Thursday.

O’Siadhail briefly commented on the technological revolution, and how it’s a much faster revolution than any other. Specifically comparing it to the Industrial Revolution, he pointed out that advances are approaching at whirlwind speeds, rather than spanning across generations. This then made me think of the conversation with my mother over Fall Break. Primarily a math teacher who has been working for the same school district for 20+ years, my mother is accustomed to chalk dust on her palms and mounds of paper tests to grade. However, as she was telling me about the class schedule her students have throughout the day, I noticed a drastic change in the amount of technology integrated into the classroom. The school where my mother teaches is by no means the lowest on the educational food chain, but it’s also not a prestigious establishment. It currently has been facing troubles regarding keeping faculty and modifying budget, so it surprised me to hear about the ability to use so much technology in elementary classrooms. One example is the use of Math 24. 24 is a basic four-function, calculator-free game where players are to use the four numbers on each card to make 24. For example, using the card to the right: 4 divided by 2 = 2 4 times 3 = 12 12 times 2 = 24

aacps.org

There are usually multiple ways to solve each puzzle, and the player who solves it (mentally) first, reaches out to tap the center of the card. If they recite their answer correctly, they keep the card. 24 was played in my elementary school as a competition in fourth and fifth grade. We used decks of the cards to hold games between four students at a time, gradually eliminating players until we had two from each grade. I went to the 24 Districts Tournament in fourth grade at Lehigh University, where the same process was repeated, using paper decks. My mother’s school has transferred this process to the computer, where students play the game during their last period of the day. This seems to take away the face-to-face competitive element of playing with classmates. In addition, my mother’s fourth grade students now have computer classes. That’s right. Computer classes, featuring Excel and Powerpoint and, if it continues to progress at this rate, HTML and CSS spreadsheets by 2020. I do remember using computers while I was in elementary school, but they often only featured supplemental programs to whatever material was being learned, and they were only used during recess or for mandatory quizzes. It feels strange to have these “back in my day” moments, when they were barely ten years ago. For example, in third grade my class was to learn and match the capital cities to their respective states. We were allowed to use a program which would time us through various matching exercises, helping us to improve our recall and memorization. In first and second grade I used a Donkey-Kong-ish pixelated gorilla to help me do double-digit math without a calculator. Every answer I got right, he was able to climb another limb of a tree, in pursuit of Chiquita bananas. Technology has carved its placement in the modern world, and proved its necessity in our culture. It shows no signs of slowing its evolution, but will our generation be able to adapt? Will we become lost, and similar to prior generations, some of whom won’t bother with cell phones and computers? What will be “too much” technology for our generation to handle? Finally, if we can adapt, where will it take us next? peace to you, TjT


OCTOBER 18, 2010

OPINION & EDITORIAL

PAGE 5

A student’s food guide to downtown West Chester: where to go, what to get, how much to spend

By Matt Boyd

Practicum Writer

If you’ve never gone out to eat in downtown West Chester (freshmen and commuters take note: by downtown West Chester I mean Market and Gay Street, about four blocks north of WCU’s campus) you are missing out. West Chester has been referred to by the Philadelphia Inquirer as “one of the world’s most perfect small towns”… a statement I happen to agree with. Part of downtown West Chester’s appeal is its excellent night life: most people will agree that the wide array of social establishments located downtown can provide both casual and constant partiers with entertainment, whenever the need to grab a drink or two (or three?) arises: from “Mexican Mondays” to “Fishbowl Fridays,” there’s always something going on. Heck, Vanilla Ice even performed at Hardware Bar last year (actually Hardware Bar is now closed and I heard Mr. Ice got booed during his performance… still entertaining nonetheless). Any clown with his older brother’s I.D. can tell you about the bars though… the goal of THIS article is to give the inexperienced diner the rundown on some of downtown West Chester’s phenomenal restaurants

(NOTE: just kidding about the fake I.D. thing, if you try to get into a bar underage you will be arrested, expelled from school, and your life will be ruined.) Being a fifth year senior, I can say with mixed emotions that I have probably spent enough money to pay for a year’s tuition at the various restaurants and establishments of West Chester during my time here. I’ve experienced a good amount of what West Chester’s dining establishments have to offer, and lucky for you readers, am ready to share my experiences. Going on a date? Downtown West Chester offers options that can accommodate most occasions or budgets. I’ll start with the most expensive, and work my way down. For any “high rollers,” committed couples, or persons interested in seriously impressing their date, I would like to start my list of notable restaurants with Pietro’s Prime Steakhouse and Seafood, located on Market Street. This place is no McDonald’s - I

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Street, is another excellent option for a date; this restaurant and Pietro’s mentioned above are definitely the two best in town. Not as expensive as Pietro’s, the moderate spender can get away with a $70-$80 tab for a party of two at Limoncello. I’d recommend the house special; “Veal Limoncello,” - one of the best Italian dishes I have ever eaten; Limoncello offers hearty portions, you won’t leave hungry. Making reservations in advance is highly recommended. This place is absolutely packed on weekend nights. The Mediterranean is an interesting restaurant located on West Gay Street. Offering “Mediterranean/Lebanese” food, take your date here if you’re looking for something a little out of limoncellowc.com the ordinary. I got the “lamb shiskebob”- the food is menu offering both steaks and seafood make Pietro’s the perfect decent, the restaurant has a place for a special occasion (I plan great atmosphere, and you and on trying the lobster tail next a date can have a nice night for about $50-$60. time). Kooma, a sushi restaurant on Limoncello, located near the intersection of Walnut and Gay Gay Street, is also very popular, spent just under $130 on the bill for my date and I, but had one of the best steaks I have ever eaten (House Special- Filet of sirloin, $30). Generous portions and a

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    

and is an excellent option for a unique and moderately priced date or to grab dinner with friends. Kooma offers a variety of good quality sushi (if you like sushi) and taking a date will only run about $40. The portions aren’t the biggest in the world (sushi isn’t very filling), but it is “cool,” different, and has a fun atmosphere. It is also, to my knowledge, the only place in West Chester that people of age can order Saki, Japanese alcohol that is worth trying if for no other reason than to say you’ve tried it. Don’t go to The Olive Branch, located on Gay Street, unless you want to pay a lot of money for a little bit of food. The place offers a tapas style of dining, meaning that you order a several small portions to share rather than one large meal. While “Shrimp Stuffed with Crab Meat” sounds delicious, it was a little disenchanting to get only three shrimp with the order (for $15). The food was decent, but I paid $80 for my date and I, and left starving. Other more standard options for dining in West Chester include places such as Barnaby’s, Kildare’s, Iron Hill, Landmark, Ram’s Head (formerly Baxter’s), and Ryan’s Pub. All of these places are relatively cheap ($10-$15 a plate), have decent food, but are nothing too out of the ordinary- unless you are looking for hot wings. On Sundays, Landmark and Rams Head both offer cheap wing specials (30 cents a wing last time I checked), that are absolutely delicious. For breakfast, go to the Market Street Grill. This restaurant (strictly breakfast/ lunch…only open till 2 p.m.) is very popular on Saturday and Sunday mornings - you’ll probably see people you know amongst the diners. Market Street Grill offers all of the essential breakfast options, and has really cool specials sometimes (I once got a Macaroni and Lobster Omelet… it was great). One last place I would like to mention uptown is Buddy’s Burger. More of a fast food option, Buddy’s Burger offers great chicken sandwiches, burgers, and fries (I’d recommend the Old Bay seasoned fries). Don’t let “fast food” make you associate this place with Burger King, they grill the burgers and chicken right in front of you- it’s all fresh. They have different specials every day of the week, and you can get a quick, good meal for about $7 or less. I hope this summary helped anyone, every restaurant I mentioned above is definitely worth trying (except for the Olive Branch) anything I left out, I either haven’t been to, or wasn’t worth mentioning. Matt Boyd can be reached at MB634884@wcupa.edu.

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  

  

westchesterdish.com


PAGE 6

OCTOBER 18, 2010

Features The Quad

To see the student poll question, see page 7

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Hazing affects organizations new members By Margaret Weaver Staff Writer

“I was blindfolded, told to eat a goldfish, and left in the middle of nowhere,” one girl said. “We saran-wrapped girls together and made them ride in the back of a pickup truck while singing the Backstreet Boys. At the stoplights they had to take shots. It was fun!” said another. “I was told to cut class and went to somebody’s house. Left blindfolded in a room with people I don’t know (members), who hit me with the belt 10 times. Went home with purple legs. Couldn’t walk straight for days,” a male said. These were some of the responses to Elvis Duran of Q102’s following question on Oct. 1: “Tell us about your sorority initiation stories. What gross, crazy, stupid things did you have to do get into a sorority? Dish it!” Referring to hazing, Duran received many comments on Facebook that either condemned hazing or accepted it because “it happens.” Hazing does exist and the consequences can be severe but there are also fun alternative ways to have a great experience in an organization. One woman said: “Good lord people. I’ve never been in a

sorority, but the hazing comes or affiliation with, or as a with the tradition. My husband condition for continued memis a submariner in the Navy bership in, any organization and they have their own tradi- operating under the sanction tions that I think are absurd, of or recognized as an organizabut they are done regardless, tion by an institution of higher and my husband wouldn’t have education.” Hazing does not [had] it any stop with other way. Greek [ComplainLife. ing] about So the hazing why does wont make hazing it stop- as happen? A long as no fraternity one is ever or sorority hurt then its is also not that big supposed of a deal.” to be about According bonding to Pennsyland the vania Law, imporstated on tance of stophazbrothering.org, the hood or definition sisterhood. of hazing is Instead “Any action of making or situation new which reckmembers lessly or www.fmqb.com do harmful intenthings Elvis Duran is a DJ for Q102, he asked for callers tionally themto share their hazing experiences from their sorority to endangers or fraternity’s initiation. selves, the mental why not or physical health or safety of have craft nights and movie a student or which willfully nights so that the sisters and destroys or removes public or new members can all get to private property for the purpose know each other a lot better of initiation or admission into before initiation? Impress upon

girls the important bond of sisterhood, and for guys, the importance of being a brother. Sisterhood and brotherhood are not about stuffing people like sardines into a small room and making them line up or taking them to the middle of nowhere and forcing them to trudge home alone. Unfortunately, hazing happens outside of the fraternity and sorority scene. A woman commented about her husband’s time in the Navy and said that the Navy, along with the majority of the Armed Forces, holds ritual hazing activities in order to train officers and see what they are made of. A girl in ROTC said, “Army ROTC Frat: we were swung into a stinky algae pond at one in the morning, then had to ride home in the back of a pick up truck in 17 degree weather. We also had to carry bags filled with the candy that the brothers liked, so if they saw us on campus, they’d yell at us to give them the bag and they’d pick what they wanted. It only got much worse from there...” One of the pro-hazing comments was the one about making the girls take shots at stoplights and saying that “it was fun.” The peer pressure involved in hazing makes the

Breast cancer survivor promotes awareness with recent campaign By Ginger Rae Dunbar Features Editor

A recent campaign asks when was the last “friendly reminder” one received from a friend about “feeling your boobies”? “Feel Your Boobies” is a reminder campaign for all women to feel their breasts for lumps. This campaign developed after Leigh Hurst discovered a lump in her breast simply by “feeling her boobies” as opposed to performing a self-breast exam. Hurst felt a lump that went undetected by her doctors. At the age of 33, Hurst was diagnosed with breast cancer. Her cancer was stage one, an early stage of breast cancer. Hurst said that she had no family history of breast cancer and therefore did not believe she was at risk for breast cancer. After finding a lump in her breast, she encouraged and reminded friends to “feel their boobies” as well.

While some women would find this message offensive, Hurst believes this message gets through to young women for them to realize that they are at risk for breast cancer. “Feel Your Boobies” educates women to feel their breasts in unconventional methods and unexpected ways. According to www.feelyourboobies.com, research shows that “feeling your boobies” is just as effective at identifying changes or lumps as doing a formal self-breast exam. The website directs women to feel their breasts by pressing firmly, using the pads of their fingers. Women should examine their collarbone and underarm area. The website informs women to look for lumps or thickening, puckering or inflammation and nipple discharge. This website encourages women to feel their breasts any time they want, such as when they are getting dressed or are in the shower.

Campus Shenanigans This past Friday in Introductory to Ethics, a classmate stated they thought many of the theories seemed as if they would be developed while under the influence of drugs. The professor laughed and replied they agreed that could be possible. The question was then asked if the professor ever did drugs. The professor laughed for a longer period of time than before stating “I’m not allowed to answer that question.”

Allegheny Hall had their monthly firedrill last week. After the building the evacuated, we were allowed to go back into the building. Because we were not allowed to take the elevators back to our rooms, we needed to take the stairs. This one guy in front of me was trying to show off to his friends. It ended up with him missing a step and falling up the steps. Needless to say, his friends were making fun of him all the way up to the seventh floor!

National “Feel Your Boobies Week” was Oct. 9 – Oct. 16. The campaign encourages women to “feel yours and remind a friend” as posted on the website. Hurst created t-shirts for friends that had the slogan “Feel Your Boobies.” Hurst did this for fun, as the slogan saved her life. Soon after she created her non-profit organization in 2004, she created a way to promote breast cancer awareness to reach young women. This organization does not have information on brochures; however the organization does put their name on certain buses or has banners with their logo being towed by an airplane. To make a donation visit the website, www.feelyourboobies. com. Or go online for more information about the website. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa. edu.

feeling of belonging overcomes common sense. The consequences of hazing involve chapters shut down on some campuses or put on probation. Probation is the more serious punishment because a chapter technically can still exist but they cannot do anything on campus. According to stophazing. org, states have their own laws on hazing. Pennsylvania gives a complete definition and also gives the following consequence: “ Any person who causes or participates in hazing commits a misdemeanor of the third degree.” The website also stated that transcripts may be withheld even if a student wishes to transfer away from the school where hazing took place. Diplomas are withheld as well. So the next time people want to haze just put it out of their minds. Want to make the pledges wash the executive board’s cars? Make it a chapter event to raise money and have a car wash. “Clean” fun involves the entire group, allowing for better bonding between members and a decrease in hazing. Margaret Weaver is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MW678077@wcupa. edu. www.knowcancer.com

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month

www.causes.com

Leigh Hurst began an non-profit organization after she felt a lump in her breast in an unconventional way. She hopes that other women will do the same to take caution of having breast cancer and feel for lumps in their breasts.

Have you seen any type of Campus Shenanigans? Tell The Quad about it at Quadfeatures@wcupa.edu


OCTOBER 18, 2010

FEATURES

PAGE 7

Student Poll Question: What are your thoughts on hazing?

Name: Jim Benedict

Name: Josh Williams

Name: Christine Klingaman

Major: Criminal Justice

Major: Phys Ed

Major: Pre-Med

Year: Fourth-Year

&

Year: Third-Year

Year: First-Year

Response: Inappropriate to make consume ridiculous amounts of alcohol.

Health

Response: Against it. Since your going to be a member with those people for probably three years why would you want to haze them?

Response: Against it of course. Just like all the added pressure.

Name: Valeire Reason Major: Education Year: Second-Year Response: Low level hazing is ok but it becomes inappropriate when one is publicly embarrassed or hurt as a consequence. Understand, it is a right of passage.

Have a student poll question you want to ask? E-mail The Quad your question at Quadfeatures@ wcupa.edu Visit us on our website www. wcuquad.com

Greek Beat: New greek members attend FGL By Anita Ung

Special to The Quad

The members of Greek community have been very busy since school has begun; keeping up with their dedication and pride to West Chester’s campus and community, continuing to strive for academic success, and prolonging their motivation in leading their peers in a positive direction. The social sororities and fraternities welcomed new members to their close-knit community through the process of recruitment and rush. Entering a place of endless opportunities, lifelong

learning, and lasting memories, the new members of each organization attended the Future Greek Leaders (FGL) retreat, organized by the Panhellenic Council and Interfraternity Council. They learned about the different local and national philanthropies each chapter engages in and about the Greek community’s largest philanthropy project, Camp Dreamcatcher. It provides a one-week therapeutic and educational camp for children infected and affected by HIV/AIDS at no cost. Each chapter helps collect funds for Camp Dreamcatcher and the counselors and staff

consists of some members of the Greek community. At FGL, the new members went to different workshops to help build leadership skills and enhance their knowledge of their community. The Greeks learned about the different leadership opportunities that they can entail, the risks of drugs and alcohol on a college campus, and the importance of grades. The Greek community promoted their WCU pride and showed their support to West Chester University’s athletics department. The InterGreek Council (IGC) gave away pom-

‘10

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A H E A D

ALL WINTER

COURSES ❆ SESSION ARE OFFERED ONLINE ❆ EARLY REGISTRATION BEGINS OCT. 20

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poms and tattoos at the Oct. 7 televised football game against Shippensberg. Throughout the stands of the Farrell Stadium, members of the Greek community cheered their way to a victory. IGC organized a borough clean up after Homecoming day. Members of each chapter were assigned blocks to clean up throughout the streets of West Chester. Many chapters of the Greek community have already organized events for their national philanthropy, from bake sales to staying up all night for donations. Zeta Tau Alpha and Beta Theta Pi organized a blood drive with the National Red Cross, helping save hundreds of lives. Alpha Phi teeter tottered for donations for their philanthropy, Cardiac Care. Phi Sigma Sigma rocked on their rocking chair outside Chris’s Pizza for their Rock-A-Thon, raising money for the National Kidney Foundation. Delta Chi had their three day Quarters for a Cure event to

benefit the Jimmy V. Foundation for Cancer Research. Phi Sigma Sigma is hosting their annual Phi Singled Out November 16 in Main Hall 168. “Phi Singled Out” is a question and answer contest based on the popular MTV dating show ‘Singled Out,’ where the main contestant is blindfolded and wins a gift card with the opposite sex by eliminating them based on their answers to a variety of questions. Proceeds are going to their national philanthropy, the National Kidney Foundation. Delta Phi Epsilon is hosting Deepher Dude on November 1 from 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. in the Sykes Theater. “Deepher Dude” is a male beauty pageant that consists of talent, interview and costume portions. There are more upcoming philanthropy events, so look out for flyers around campus and Facebook events. Anita Ung is a third-year psychology major. She can be reached at AU682403@wcupa.edu

Life  is  calling. How  far  will  you  go? A  Peace  Corps  recruiter  will  be  on  campus   Wednesday  to  discuss  the  thousands  of  new   overseas  volunteer  positions.

Peace  Corps  Info  Table Wednesday,  October20  from  12-­‐4pm Sykes  Student  Union  Ballroom  

Peace  Corps  Information  Session Wednesday,  October20  from  5-­‐6pm Sykes  Student  Union,  Room  254 Peace  Corps  Volunteers  work  in  77  countries.   To  date,  132  WCU  graduates  have  s erved   overseas  in  the  Peace  Corps.

Apply  Online  Today! The  process  takes  8-­‐12  months  to  complete.

www.peacecorps.gov


PAGE 8

ENTERTAINMENT

Entertainment The Quad

OCTOBER 18, 2010

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Poet Micheal O’Siadhail visits WCU

Leads discussion in poetry workshop By Tara Tanzos Editor-in-Chief

On Thursday, Oct. 14, Micheal O’Siadhail made a WCU appearance in a more private setting - a classroom. O’Siadhail led the discussion for Dr. Kim Bridgford’s poetry workshop class, which had been studying “Globe,” O’Siadhail’s 2007 poetry collection exploring the connectedness and evolution of today’s world. O’Siadhail was part of a generation that observed the Holocaust, the flower child era and the French student revolution, a time where politics and ways of living were fought for in extreme ways. In the 1970s, the atmosphere changed: students became conservative and workdriven, as did the rest of society. The main motivation for a better lifestyle was no longer creating a political statement for all, but maintaining individual successes (i.e. getting a better job, constantly improving financial stability). “It was looking back and just thinking ‘what happened’… paired with this extraordinary technological revolution - that’s where ‘Globe’ came out of,” O’Siadhail said. “Globe” was written in four parts: Shadow Marks, KnotTying, Wounded Memory and Angel of Change. Each part of the book asks a major question regarding the changes the world (and O’Siadhail) has seen. Shadow Marks focuses on “how does the past bear the present” while Knot-Tying looks at the people behind the shift and connection of past and present. One of the poems discussed was “Shift,” from Shadow Marks. “Shift” looks at how change happens though the metaphor of language. One example is the difference in verb conjugations across generations, such as the subtle change of “have got” to “have gotten.” A poem from Knot-Tying, “Cue,” was also examined. Within “Cue,” O’Siadhail pays homage to Shakespeare. “He’s my knot-tyer, because he added and brought so much to language.” The goal of “Cue” is to mimic Shakespeare’s writing, while

including references to all of his works. “You really have to get inside of him in order to try and understand him,” O’Siadhail said, explaining why the poem is longer in form. “You know he must have been a bloody windbag.” The third section of the book asks how the human race is meant to remember historical tragedies. “My youth was colored by the Holocaust,” O’Siadhail said. “it absolutely shadowed [my youth]. But how are we to remember these tragedies? That’s what Wounded Memory is about. It’s how we remember.” The last section of the book, Angel of Change, acknowledges the change in the world as a fast-paced whirlwind. “The speed of change has gone very quickly, if you look at it,” O’Siadhail said. “If you look at the Industrial Revolution compared to the technological one, you see things move much faster now. It’s a globalization, but the question is, will it be an ethical one?” In addition to discussing several of his poems in “Globe,” O’Siadhail also discussed poetry as a field with the class and took individual questions: Q: Poems can have so many different layers of meaning do you sit down and plan each meaning, or do they just happen? A: “It’s a meeting of the author’s intention and what it means for you. Every person brings their life experiences to reading, so it’s really a meeting place of community and individual. I’m not trying to be clever, I’m just trying to give the poem a texture.” “You don’t own a poem, really. It’s like offspring,” O’Siadhail said. “it goes off into the world on its own.” Q: What is the hardest part of writing?

Long May You Run By Charles Brenner Special to The Quad

Competitive running has been rising in popularity over the years. For proof, take a stroll down High Street in the afternoon. One is sure to share the sidewalk with determined joggers who hit the streets regularly no matter the conditions. Even in town, there are shops devoted to the sale of running shorts, shoes, and whatever else an avid runner may desire. “Long May You Run: All Things Running” is a comprehensive guide for the dedicated runner, and provides newcomers to the popular sport an easy to read orientation to the growing phenomena of competitive running. The author of “Long May You Run”, competitive runner Chris Cooper, illustrates the essential

steps one must take to prepare for a career in competitive running. For the casual runner, the book also provides plenty of interesting trivia on running, often mixing humor with fact for positive results. This book is not heavy on words, but rather relies on illustrations and quotes to make points. There are recurring themes throughout Long May You Run, including an international “Running Hall of Fame”, selected celebrity running stories, and milestones for the dedicated runner to work towards. One of the more outrageous selections from the book included a story about a running organization called the Hash House Harriers, which sponsors nearly 2,000 international clubs and offers beer and snack foods as incentive to run. The Harriers organize events called hashes -

Performs reading and lecture on campus By Samantha Greenberg Staff Writer

A: “Really believing and finding yourself. That’s the hardest. But what can you do in life that isn’t hard, or has hard parts of it?” Q: Poetry seems to be such a large field, that encompasses a wide range of possibilities. How would you define “poetry?” How would you define “a poem?” A: “Intensity of expression. That’s the wonder of language, that you can do all these things to it - it has playability. In the end, I trust language, in all its slipperiness.” “It’s the only thing I couldn’t spend my life not doing.” Regarding a poem, “it becomes what it is in its making. A poem really just has to come into being.” Micheal O’Siadhail recently published another poetry collection focusing on language titled “Tongues,” which can be bought on Amazon.com and Bloodaxebooks.com. More information about O’Siadhail can be found on osiadhail.com. Tara Tanzos is a fourth year student majoring in English and minoring in creative writing. She can be reached at TT649875@wcupa.edu.

based on the old English tradition of Hare and Hounds - where participants called hounds follow a trail left by one runner, called the hare. The ultimate goal for the hounds is to reach the trail’s end

On Wednesday Oct. 13, West Chester had the privilege of welcoming Irish poet Micheal O’Siadhail to Phillips Autograph Library for a craft lecture and a reading of his work. According to Poetry Center Director, Dr. Kim Bridgford, O’Siadhail’s visit is a part of the new global emphasis initiative the University is in the process of implementing, as well as a goal of the new Poetry Center. “I think it’s exciting for WCU because of the stamfordplus.com global emphasis. It’s important to have an international [emphasis] because of the quality of West Chester Students Art should be shared. Micheal O’Siadhail is the perfect place to start.” Bridgford said. The reason why O’Siadhail is a prime example of this global emphasis, because his work is influenced by the places he has traveled and the languages he speaks. “I have a terrible disease. I cannot bear to go to a country where I don’t know the language. I hate being a tourist. I like to be a visitor” O’Siadhail said. O’Siadhail dubs Japan as the most influential place he has been, calling it “a great marriage between Eastern and Western culture.” The craft lecture which took place during the afternoon was based upon the form of the sonnet. O’Siadhail covered the history of the sonnet and paid homage to users of the sonnet throughout history like Shakespeare, Donne and Thomas Wyatt. He brought to the forefront how these writers used the sonnet differently, as well as the evolution of where a buffet of booze awaits them. Hash House Harrier’s mission statement is stated clearly as “to promote physical fitness amongst members (and) to get rid of the weekend hangover.” This example is found early in the book, and certainly helps draw readers into the book no matter their experience with competitive running. For the seasoned runner, the book is full of advice from professionals worldwide who’ve competed in marathons and Olympic events. There are checklists of accomplishments for runners to aspire towards, such as the “Races Every Runner amazon.com

the form. According to a student who attended the lecture, it was interesting to how the sonnet in its simple form affects the world of poetry on many levels. The reading took place at 7p.m. and was centered on readings from two of O’Siadhail’s books: “Globe” and “Love Life. “The two books are an example of the contrast that O’Siadhail likes to use in his work between extremely personal and impersonal pieces. “Love Life” is a collection of poetry chronicling O’Siadhail’s 36-year relationship with his wife, and is about the dynamic between two people. “Globe,” a more recent collection, focuses on the ideas of globalization, embracing social change and the dynamic between humanity. A text messaging and cyberspace are relevant themes in Globe and this was evident when O’Siadhail shared the poem entitled Footprint. The reading started with O’Siadhail reciting the poem Consentina from the book “Love Life.” He then spoke about different synonyms for the act of marriage and read a poem based on the words “knot,” “slice,” “hitch” and “plunge.” The poem was separated into four sections based on the words, a method that O’Siadhail is accustomed to both in individual poem and whole collections. “Globe” is separated into four sections according to the theme of the poem. For example, part three, called “Wounded Memory” is about how we as a society remember world tragedies, with titles such as Bushmen and Palistine. Part two describes what O’Siadhail refers to as Knot-Tying, the knot-tyers being influential people throughout history. During the evening he read a poem about Nelson Mandela to exemplify this. The evening was ended with the recitation of the poem Overview. Samantha Greenberg is fourth-year English major with a minor in journalism and can be reached at SG655862@ wcupa.edu. Should Try at Least Once” or “Run a Race in Every State”. There is material on conditioning and proper technique, as well as an entire section called “Get the Gear” (there’s more to running than just the right pair of shoes). Long May You Run: All Things Running provides the reader with all of the necessities to prepare for a career in professional or recreational running. The book accomplishes its ultimate goal of arousing a reader’s interest in running as a competitive sport. Every day on campus, I see fellow students who have made running a part of their daily lives. I would recommend that anyone who takes running seriously give this book a chance. The information is direct and accessible, and there is sure to be something contained within that anyone can enjoy. Charles Brenner is a second year communications major and can be reached at CB679085@wcupa.edu.


OCTOBER 18, 2010

ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 9

Concert Review:

The Hold Steady at the Trocadero

blogs.psychsterdata.com

The Social Network By Anthony Fioriglio Practicum Writer

By Tara Tanzos Editor-in-Chief

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, The Hold Steady brought their "Heaven is Whenever" tour to Philadelphia. The Hold Steady is an indierock band from Brooklyn that combines blunt, half-spoken lyrics with layered rock tones. The band was formed by Craig Finn (lead vocals) and Tad Kubler (guitar), both formerly of the band Lifter Puller. A unique aspect to The Hold Steady is their wide audience. Even though the majority of their lyrics are riddled with references to drugs, sex and gambling, devoted fans range from college-age students to their grandparents. I was speaking to an older gentlemen prior to the show's start, who was also seeing the band for the first time. His motivation came from noticing the similarities between The Hold Steady and The Kinks, an English rock band known for hits like "You Really Got Me." He commented on the common traits between both lead singers: "The one thing I expect out of Craig Finn is great writing," he said. "Great writing and great expression." The opening band for the Trocadero show was Wintersleep, an indie band from Halifax, Nova Scotia. I wasn't overly impressed with Wintersleep - the most unpredictable element about their set was that they started promptly at 8 p.m. The lead singer had a nasally wasp to his voice, which, like my initial reaction to Craig Finn, took several songs to get used to. I also was distracted by their stage presence; each band member seemed to be wearing a different shade of skinny jean. In addition, the lead singer would turn his knees and feet inwards (as if he missed the bathroom break before the show) every time he hit a higher note in his range - which happened a lot. Ironically, I was most visually drawn to the bassist, who was tucked away in a shadow behind the band's amps. Besides having the best sense of rhythm and groove, he had pretty difficult and forefront parts that changed from song to song. The rest of the music however, became very predictable. Each song had the same frame with different lyrics and keys tossed around, which made the band sound self-generic. The drum parts seemed too simple for the music; much more space could have been filled. Also, the singer could do with a shot or two of espresso and a limit on vocal echo settings.

I really tried to like Wintersleep, but knowing I was seeing a band as dynamic and versatile as The Hold Steady forced me to judge them against that level of talent. Little errors, such as the lead singer leaving his guitar untuned for part of a song, also didn't impress me. Overall, I'd give them a B-, in that they're enjoyable to listen to while multitasking, but I wouldn't buy a ticket to a headlining show. The Hold Steady walked out to the theme song from "The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly," before switching straight into "Positive Jam," linking into "Stuck Between Stations." It became quite clear from the first few chords that Craig Finn is actually meant to hold a guitar as opposed to actually play it. This doesn't matter however, due to his stage presence being so overpowering that it's easy to forget he's holding an instrument. Finn creates wide gestures that emphasize the music behind him; exaggerating the accented chords and creating a contagious energy, leaving his guitar to be more of an ornament than a contributing instrument. Combined with the talent around him, The Hold Steady creates a raw, naked experience of music and emotion. The set list consisted of a wide range of songs from earlier and more recent albums. My favorite song, "You Can Make Him Like You," was seventh in the set, with one of my favorite lyrics: "you can wear his old sweatshirt, you can cover yourself like a bruise." This song was followed by "Stevie Nix," "Multitude of Casualties" and "Hot Soft Light," in which the two guitarists (who were not Craig Finn) dueled within the solo. It seemed only fitting that afterwards, Finn would strum quarter notes to introduce the next song. "I play this chord and it sounds sad. But it's not a sad song, it's about a boy and a girl and a horse," Finn said, before the entire band broke into the opening riff of "Chips Ahoy!" The energy continued throughout the set, ending with "Killer Parties." After a few minutes of

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applause and shouts, the band came back out to play a four-song encore. Unfortunately, for all the awesome fans in the venue, there was one which decided the spotlight should be his. A crowdsurfer, repeatedly told by security to stay "grounded," made his way onto the stage in the guitar jam portion of "Your Little Hoodrat Friend." While the three guitarists stood in a triangle on the opposite side of the stage, the delinquent resisted security and began to start pulling at the band's equipment for support. From my seat, it then appeared that he received a swift punch to the face by a security member (though I've heard since then he was actually kicked), prior to being escorted off the stage. It was easy to see that Finn and the rest of the band were very uncomfortable while this was taking place, but they handled it gracefully and transitioned appropriately into "Stay Positive" before closing the show with "How a Resurrection Really Feels." As a semi-frequent concertgoer, I have to place this set near the top of my "favorites" list. The energy was constant throughout, and the set as a whole was tight and flowed in a very precise way. Overall, I'd give this show an A-, with points only really taken off due to factors outside of The Hold Steady's control. Tara Tanzos is a fourth-year student majoring in English and minoring in creative writing. She can be reached at TT649875@wcupa.edu.

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss and their business partner Divya Narendra. The trio claimed that Facebook came from an idea called the Harvard Connection, which the group explained to Zuckerberg in the hopes that he would write the necessary computer code to make the site possible. The rest of the film follows the meteoric rise of Facebook and the ensuing legal and personal troubles that Zuckerberg faced. Remarkably, the film’s cast consists of relative unknowns who gave incredible performances that will likely result in at least one Oscar nomina-

Once in a great while, a film will come along and define a generation. “Rebel Without a Cause” perfectly captured the teenage angst of the post-World War II era. “Wall Street” captured and defined the excesses of the 1980s. “The Social Network” captures this generation, the reclusive, yet somehow social, generation that finds sanctuary behind a keyboard. Based on Ben Mezrich’s book “The Accidental Billionaires,” “The Social Network” chronicles the early days of Facebook, beginning with its supposed inception in Mark Zuckerberg’s Harvard dorm room and continues through the present and its current status as a social juggernaut with more than 500 million users. Director David Fincher used a script penned by acclaimed screenwriter Aaron Sorkin, whose previous works include “A Few Good Men” and the Emmy-winning television show “The West Wing.” Sorkin framed the film around two separate legal depositions in which Zuckerberg faces lawsuits over the creation and ownership of Facebook. Aaron Sorkin claims to have based the majority of his script on testimony given in the two separate deposiindometric.com tions and contends that The real Mark Zuckerberg tion for the the story presented is film. Jesse Eisenberg, of “Zommerely dramatized, not fiction- bieland” fame, stars and nails alized. every nuance in his performance, The real-life Mark Zuckerberg making Zuckerberg seem like has openly disputed this claim, an incredibly unlikable person, saying that the story presented yet somehow still vulnerable. in “The Social Network” is Andrew Garfield, tabbed to play almost entirely fictionalized Spider-Man in the franchise’s outside of the fact that he created next film, excels as Eduardo Facebook and that others have Saverin, Zuckerberg’s one-time sued him over the ownership of best friend and, later on, the the creation. plaintiff in one of the lawsuits. The film starts with Zucker- Justin Timberlake continues berg’s girlfriend Erica dumping to shed the boy band image by him because he was, to put it playing the neurotic inventor mildly, an arrogant jerk. After of Napster and part-owner of the breakup, Zuckerberg got Facebook Sean Parker. drunk and hacked into Harvard’s David Fincher began his servers; He stole pictures of career directing music videos. the majority of the school’s He quickly moved on to feature female population, and wrote films and has acquired a portfolio a program, called Facemash, that includes modern classics which compared the pictures such as “Fight Club,” “Seven,” side by side and allowed users to “The Curious Case of Benjamin vote on which girl was “hotter.” Button,” and the criminally The program proved so popular underrated “Zodiac.” Amazingly, among the male student popula- “The Social Network” may have tion that it crashed the school’s surpassed them all. servers. Zuckerberg instantly Anthony can be reached at became notorious and hated on AF650463@wcupa.edu. the Harvard campus. To hear Zuckerberg’s side What do you think about facebook? of the story, Facebook grew in Comment online his mind from popularity of at wcuquad.com! Facemash. Others disagreed, most notably twin brothers


       

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OCTOBER 18, 2010

Classifieds The Quad

PAGE 11

VISIT WWW.WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE

Placing Classifieds

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The Quad Crossword

1 Symbol of concentration 12 Water potential symbol 15 Noted pier site 16 Org. offering the Canine Good Citizen program 17 Rap sheet notes? 18 Manhattan liquor 19 Vexation-plus 20 Irish __ 21 Make potable, in a way 23 Some phones 25 Emit coherent light 28 “Sexy” Beatles woman 29 Folded parts 31 The south of France 33 __ fide 34 Milk sources 36 Stumblebums 38 Clearance level 40 Pocono and others 43 Virginie et Floride 46 Out of control 47 Sound heard very close to your ear 49 Mexican waters 51 Spoke Abyssinian? 53 “Don’t __ word!” 55 -an counterpart 56 Hoped 58 Polish, say 60 Memorable time 61 Respectful title 62 Stock, usually 66 Cologne conjunction 67 Calcium oxide 68 Orgs. with chiefs 69 Accepting personal responsibility Solution to last issue’s puzzle

To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and click “classified ads.” Our website makes it easy to enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and add special features like boxes and reverse type. Pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Please note that we cannot accept orders for classified ads over the phone, by e-mail, by postal mail or by drop off at our offices. Classified ads must be placed at The Quad’s website at www.wcuquad. com. Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 12 noon on the Sunday before publication.

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35 Places for sweaters? 37 Physics leader? 39 Fine and dandy: Abbr. 40 Increases sharply 41 Portmanteau word for a certain native 42 Each of them is “one who, in a perilous emergency, thinks with his legs”: Bierce 44 Receives on the radio 45 Italian Riviera resort 48 Fool’s gold 50 Two-__: tandem 52 Car battery ignition system pioneer 54 Q5 and Q7 57 Anthropologist Fossey 59 “The Well-Tempered Clavier” composer 63 Locus in __: the place in which (Lat.) 64 SEAL’s org. 65 Pitch preceder

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OCTOBER 18, 2010

Diversions The Quad

Brewster Rockit: Space Guy

Bliss

by Henry Bliss

Read The Quad online at www.wcuquad.com

PAGE 12

by Tim Rickard


OCTOBER 18, 2010

SPORTS

PAGE 13

Rollercoaster season continues By Brynn Dougherty Staff Writer

The Golden Rams started out last week with a two-game winning streak with shutouts against the University of Penn and LaSalle. The winning streak came to an end after two consecutive losses against Ursinus and Saint Joseph’s last week. The match against LaSalle started the Golden Rams off with a 3-0 shutout victory in their first Atlantic 10 Conference game, but they evened out their record after their 3-1 loss against St. Joseph’s. West Chester holds a 1-1 record in the Atlantic 10 Conference and is 5-8 for the year. Leah Angstadt came up big for West Chester with three goals in the past four games. Angstadt scored the lone goal in the 1-0 win against Penn, and put up two for the Golden Rams in the battle against Ursinus. The University of Penn match was a non-league, 1-0 shutout victory at Vonnie Gros Field. The win broke the Golden Rams’ six-game losing streak last Wednesday afternoon, Oct. 6. The Quakers started an aggressive first half with three shots in the first 11 minutes. Their efforts were silenced after Angstadt was awarded a penalty stroke in the 21st minute and sent the ball into the high left side of the goal past Penn goalkeeper Danielle Rothman. Angstadt’s goal was the only tally to make the scoreboard. The Golden Rams shut down the Quakers as they had one shot thereafter, and were unable to put up any goals against their hosts. Penn was awarded eight penalty corners and made four shots in the tilt. West Chester took five penalty corners. Kristen Arnold made three saves for the Golden Rams and Danielle

Rothman also made three saves for the Quakers. The Quakers have lost five of their last six games and have a 1-8 record. The following game opened West Chester’s Atlantic 10 play last Friday, Oct. 8, at Vonnie Gros Field. The Golden Rams’ winning streak continued with a 3-0 shutout win against LaSalle (5-7, 0-1 Atlantic 10). The win was West Chester’s fourth shutout this season. West Chester picked up their first goal in the first half and tacked on two more in the second. Their opponents were unable to sustain any offense. The Explorers were held to one shot in the first half and five shots overall. Nicole Fiorilla scored ten minutes into the first half off of an assist from Kate Zunski to take an early 1-0 lead. Nancy Stehman continued the scoring in the second half for her first career goal off of a pass from Caitlin Dempsey in the 48th minute. Kelsi Lykens assisted Alisha Moran in her fourth goal of the year sweeping in a shot along the end line. LaSalle goalkeeper, Emma Ruth, made eight saves in the cage for the Explorers, six in the first half alone. Kristen Arnold (4-3) was in the cage for the whole game and had two saves for her second consecutive shutout. Arnold’s defense

helped her team to a two-game winning streak. The Golden Rams held a 17-5 advantage in shots and 9-5 lead in corners. The winning streak came to a close after a 3-4 overtime loss to Ursinus at the 31st annual Eleanor Snell field hockey game on Sunday afternoon at Vonnie Gros Field. Angstadt put up two goals for West Chester, while Jennifer Bayzick came up big for the Bears

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

with the final overtime goal, and three goals overall. Urisinus, who is fourth-ranked nationally in Division III, extended their ten-game winning streak. Their last loss was at their season opener against Messiah. The game evened out the Bears’ record in the all-time series with the Golden Rams (23-23-9) and the Eleanor Snell series (14-14-3). The game was the fourth battle in the last five years to be decided in extra

time for the two oldest field hockey programs in the country. In those four OT matches, West Chester is 1-3. The teams exchanged shots for the entirety of the game with aggressive offense from each side. Bayzick opened up scoring 10 minutes into the first half for the Bears. Nicole Fiorella responded with a tying shot 17 minutes later. Fiorella connected with a rebound that hit the post and ricocheted onto her stick directly in front of the Bears’ cage. A minute later, Alyssa Thren took the lead back for the Bears with an unassisted goal, her 15th of the season. The goal allowed the Bears to retreat to their locker room with a 2-1 lead. Angstadt put up her first goal of the game off of a penalty corner in the 45th minute tying the score 2-2. The score remained tied until Bayzick scored her second goal of the day with an assist from Bridget Resetco fourteen minutes later. Bayzick’s goal left the Golden Rams trailing 3-2 nearing the end of the second half. With 3:45 remaining, Angstadt was awarded a penalty corner after the ball was caught under Bears goalkeeper Lauren Lightwood-Mater. Angstadt sent the ball into the upper left-hand corner of the cage through Lightwood-Mater’s outstretched stance, sending the game into overtime. Three and a half minutes into overtime, Bayzick put up her third goal of the game lifting the Bears to a 4-3 victory. Arnold was in the cage for the Golden Rams, evening her record to 4-4. Ursinus goalkeeper LightwoodMater (10-1) was credited with five saves. Ursinus was awarded 17 penalty corners to West Chester’s eight. Four of which were in overtime and eventually lead to the game-winning goal.

The Golden Rams continued their play in the Atlantic 10 with another loss (3-1) in a match up against St. Joseph’s University, on Friday afternoon at Buckley Field. The loss evens up the teams’ records to 1-1 each in the Atlantic 10 conference. The Golden Rams are 5-8 overall after the loss and St. Joseph’s record improved to 4-9 overall. Kayla Gluchowski put up the first tally of the game off of an assist from Fiorella in the 11th minute, giving the Golden Rams an early 1-0 lead. The Hawks commanded the remainder of the game with three unanswered goals. Nicole McCreight shot off of a direct corner nine minutes later from Caitlyn Crane and Hannah Rogers for her 10th goal of the season. In Casey Fry’s first game back since an injury, she continued the scoring for the Hawks four minutes later sending the shot past Gabby Panasiewicz, her fourth of the year. In the second half, Ellen Rowe sent in the Hawks’ third and final goal of the game 58 minutes in, lifting the final score to 3-1. The Golden Rams did not take a shot in the remaining 12 minutes of play. Panasiewicz was in the cage for the first 35 minutes giving up two goals and making two saves. Arnold took over for the remainder of the game and was credited with five saves. She gave up one goal in the second half. St. Joseph’s goalkeeper Kelly Swanick made seven saves letting in one goal. The Golden Rams travel to Temple for a Sunday afternoon game at noon for another Atlantic 10 Conference game. Brynn Dougherty is a third-year student at West Chester University. She can be reached at LH639694@wcupa. edu.

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PAGE 14

SPORTS

OCTOBER 18, 2010

Volleyball takes 3 of 4 on road By Steven Fisher Asst. Sports Editor

The West Chester University volleyball squad defeated both University of the Sciences and PSAC East division rival Millersville, but fell in five games to the Shippensburg Raiders. After losing two straight against Indiana (Pa.) and Clarion, Kassie Bellaver’s squad rebounded with a win over University of the Sciences last Tuesday night. The Golden Rams easily discarded USP by a score of 3-0 in a non league volleyball match at Bobby Morgan Arena. WCU won by scores of 25-14, 25-19, and 25-13. Sophomore Lexi Kegerise registered 12 kills to help lead the Rams past USP. Senior Michelle Powers contributed offensively with a kill percentage of .450 and 10 kills of her own. Helen Fitzpatrick had 26 assists and Dana Markol led the Golden Rams with eight digs. Libero Lisa Campbell posted seven digs of her own. USP’s volleyball squad now falls to an overall record of 5-9 on the 2010 season. Christine Puschak led USP with eight kills, while Cady Rich added seven. Stacey Wooden had an impressive defensive performance for USP, recording 15 digs against WCU. The Golden Rams had a

come-from-behind victory over Millersville in a PSAC East women’s volleyball showdown at Pucillo Gym Friday night. WCU fell behind early and dropped the opening set, but fought through adversity to capture the next three in succession to pick up the win. WCU won by scores of 23-25, 25-18, 25-22, and 25-20. Four Lady Rams ended up with double figures in kills in the win over Millersville. Kegerise yet again had a team-high 15 kills while teammates Julie Boblits, Powers and Kelly Martin each posted 10 kills. Martin added a team-best seven blocks and Powers was right behind her with six blocks of her own. Overall WCU managed 15 blocks against Millersville. Fitzpatrick registered 38 assists and five blocks to go

along with seven digs. With WCU down a set and tied at 14-all, the Lady Rams went on an 11-4 run following a well timed timeout to close out the second set with a win that tied the match at one apiece. Bellaver was at it again with

another well-placed timeout in the third set that led to another come-from-behind win. The Golden Rams trailed by three when Bellaver halted the Marauders’ momentum with the TO. “We try to call the timeouts in order to stop any momentum that the opposition has gained.  We just try to get back on track offensively and talk about what set we are going to run,” Bellaver said. Saturday, Oct. 16, WCU hit the road again to visit PSAC East rival Shippensburg. The Lady Rams fell behind early with a close game one loss, 22-25. Behind one game to none, WCU lost game two, 16-25 and found themselves exactly where they Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad did not want

to be. As the Golden Rams have done all year long, they battled back to win game three and four to force a fifth game by scores of 25-17 and 25-21. In an air-tight back and fourth game, Shippensburg was able to come away with a 17-15 game five win to take the PSAC East match against West Chester. “The match with Ship was tough, but we had our opportunities and could not execute in the end,” Bellaver said. After dropping a disappointing match to Shippensburg, the Golden Rams took out their frustration on Glenville State. The thrashing of Glenville State took place at Shippensburg. WCU disposed of GSU in just three games, winning the match 3-0. Bellaver’s squad now has an overall record of 17-8 and is 5-8 in the PSAC Conference. West Chester will host Kutztown University inside Hollinger Field House on Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 7 p.m., a match that will have playoff implications. The Lady Rams will travel to Cheyney University on Saturday, Oct. 22; the game starts at 7 p.m. Saturday Oct. 23, WCU will take on Lincoln University in Philadelphia at 11 a.m. Steven Fisher is a fourth-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at SF674180@ wcupa.edu.

Hockey club still settling in By Kenny Ayres Special to the Quad

On Oct. 1, the WCU Men’s sport club hockey team opened up the 2010 season with a huge win at home over Niagara, starting off the season on the right foot. It is no surprise that an airtight defense is what ultimately gave the Rams the win over a strong Niagara team. Looking at the stats only, WCU was blown away as Niagara outshot them 52-35 in the game. However, a flawless defense forced the Niagara offense into taking wild, ineffective shots from the perimeter; shots that hardly did any damage. They also killed a key penalty in the third period that proved crucial in stopping Niagara from getting themselves back into the game via the power play. Matt Murnane was lights out in goal as he steered away 50 of the 52 shots to help guide the Rams to a 4-2 victory, their first of the season. The offense was no slouch either. The Rams enjoyed goals from Dan Griffiths, Jon Reitz, Tim Margadonna and Steve Meade, thanks to assists from Bob McInerny, Mike Ahle, Adam Ball, Tim Higgins (2), and Jeff Dugan. Coach Dorsey was extremely pleased with this showing. “I am really proud of how the boys competed. They really worked hard. Niagara is an excellent team who is very pesky; they never quit. This win was huge for our team,” Coach Dorsey said. To win the opener was big, but to go 2-0 on the first weekend of contests would be phenomenal. That is exactly what the Rams did. A day after shutting down Niagara to win their first game of the season, WCU came away

with win number two against Penn State Berks. However, this game was not played as crisply as the previous night. “We came out not skating hard and Berks capitalized on our mistakes.  They scored on a few of our penalties, and on some of our defensive zone let downs,” Murnane said. That was the big difference between games one and two. Whereas the offense was there and working (the Rams scored two short handed goals in the first period to go along with 10 other goals in the game), the defense seemed a bit slow and idle. The game turned into a high scoring affair as the third period started with the Rams up by a score of 7-5. Perhaps a pep talk between periods amped the team up a bit as the intensity really picked up in the third period. The Rams dominated Berks outscoring them 5 to 1 in the third period on their way to a second win in as many games. Regardless of how sloppy the game was, there were bright spots. Twelve goals in one hockey game speaks for itself, as does defenseman Steve Meade’s 100th point of his college career, an impressive feat. The Rams went into their week two showcase in Ohio confident and pleased with the position they had put themselves in early on. Then things seemed to take a turn for the worse. WCU journeyed to Ohio last weekend for a showcase hoping to pick up where they left off, but their opponents had other ideas. On Friday against an Indiana team new to the Division I league, the Ram’s were simply outplayed. The hard working Indiana team handed the Rams their

first loss of the season, an 8-3 thrashing. Although the loss was tough to swallow, an upset, yet positive Coach Dorsey said: “We were not happy with this in the least bit. We addressed the problem and told the boys to just let this one go.” Getting some rest and starting fresh the next day seemed like it would do some good. It was only one game and there was a lot of weekend left to recover. The next day the Rams came out and played a crisper, sounder game against Western Michigan. However, their defense and goaltending continued to struggle. Despite putting six goals on the board including a hat trick by captain Steve Jones, the Rams dropped their second game of the weekend by a final score of 7-6. Visibly frustrated, Coach Dorsey discussed his unhappiness with the net minding. “I was pretty disappointed with the goal tending in this

game, as I thought we played well otherwise. Anytime you score six goals, and lose, it is just unacceptable,” Dorsey said. Although they did not play up to their potential, the Rams had a chance to at least salvage one game from their showcase. Sunday’s game against Arizona did not fare any better for the team. The Rams got off to a very slow start and seemed to be on the wrong end of the official’s calls all game long. Despite their drive to save one game from their weekend, the Ram’s lost 7-3 and had to walk away with three losses in three days pushing their out-of-conference record to 2-3 for the season. Coach Dorsey stressed that his team had to defend the net much better than they did. “Goaltending was an issue all weekend. All three goaltenders played on the weekend, and none of them got the job done,” Dorsey said.

Despite the disastrous weekend that took shape the players and coaches are remaining calm, as there is a very long season ahead. The attitude amongst the players remained positive as an enthusiastic. “I look forward to seeing how the team reacts  and plays this weekend against our league rival Delaware,” Murnane said. Coach Dorsey is not at all concerned either. When asked about how he plans to go about fixing this weekend’s mistakes he said: “The goals are still the same. The season is young, and we’re a very young team. There’s going to be some adversity like this, but it’s important to stay the course, and keep the goals in mind. This is just a speed bump, and we’ll be fine, the boys just need to keep working hard.”  Kenny Ayres is a first-year student. majoring in communications. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa. edu.


OCTOBER 18, 2010

SPORTS

PAGE 15

Men’s soccer lights offensive spark By Travis Pearson Special to the Quad

Following the West Chester men’s soccer 1-0 loss at home against New York Institute of Technology, circumstances certainly appeared very bleak. The Golden Rams had dropped six games in a row, saw their record plummet to 2-6 overall, and, even worse, held a 0-4 record in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC). To top the whole thing off, five of the losses had come via shutout. As cloudy as the forecast appeared for the team, some rays of optimism still shone through. WCU had been getting more chances and five of their losses came by only one goal. Players commented that the talent was readily available, they just needed to get on track and create more chances and then finish the job when the opportunity presented itself. The team was able to do that, finishing with a 3-2 mark since October 3. Consecutive wins over non-conference foes, University of the District of Columbia (UDC), Holy Family University and Lincoln University, got things off on the right track. The losses came in a home game against Shippensburg and a game at California (Pa.). West Chester started their hot streak by defeating UDC 2-0 on a sunny, cool day in Farrell Stadium. Kevin McCann and Ricky Williamson both scored goals for the Rams, and Peter Weiss stopped all three shots he faced to notch the shutout. McCann tallied in the 37th minute, launching a deep shot from outside the penalty area into the far upper-right side of the net to beat UDC goalkeeper Kyle Heatherington. McCann has been dangerous from the outside all season for the squad, and the goal was his second of the season. Williamson added his goal in the 55th minute after controlling a pass from Kyle Miller and beating the goalie to the right. WCU posted a great effort all

around. They played tremendous defense while only allowing UDC five shots on goal. The offense was equally up to the task. They took 13 shots, and created many chances by putting 10 of those on net. The Rams could finally exhale a sigh of relief after a big victory. “It definitely feels great to break a losing streak and finally get another win,” sophomore defender Taylor Eisenhauer said. The win improved the team to 3-6 overall. In their next tilt, West Chester jumped out to a big lead and never looked back, beating Holy Family 5-2 and extending their winning streak to a modest two games. Williamson again led the charge for the Rams. He scored two goals less than three minutes apart in the first half, and assisted on the opening goal for the Rams on a pass to Zac Tassone only 14 minutes into the contest. Miller scored the next goal only 1:22 after Tassone’s goal off an assist from Josh Labik. Next came Williamson’s two scores with Jake Maxwell collecting an assist. Finally, Conor Malarney assisted on a Nic Sakiewicz goal. It was Sakiewicz’s first career goal for WCU. West Chester all but ended the game after the first half of play thanks to their 5-0 lead. Five of the Rams first six shots resulted in goals. By the end, they outshot their opponents 10-8. “We were able to work the way we want to offensively and it resulted in plenty of goals,” Eisenhauer said. Holy Family’s Richard Morawski and Patrick Pires each added a goal

for the Tigers in the second half. Kevin Marron got the start in goal for the Rams and made three saves in almost 83 minutes of action. Weiss came in to close out the final moments. In the last of the team’s stretch of non-conference games, West Chester dismantled an overwhelmed Lincoln University team 7-0 to up their record to 5-6 and improve their winning streak to three. Labik, Miller, Williamson and Malarney each scored in the first half to stake the Rams to an early lead. In the second half it was more

perfectly acceptable for the Rams to be positive. The once anemic offense seemed a thing of the past heading into a PSAC home game versus a red-hot Shippensburg, who had won four in a row. A win would have gotten WCU back to .500 for the first time since Sept. 11. “We were confident heading into the conference game since we were having a great deal of success scoring,” Eisenhauer said. However, the PSAC has been a different situation for West Chester, as a 0-4 record with only two total goals demonstrated. The

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

of the same, as Maxwell, Tassone and Eisenhauer all notched goals. Marron played the entire game for WCU and stopped three tries. West Chester accumulated 32 shots in the game, and placed 21 of those on goal. Lincoln’s Andre Wilkinson made 14 saves in an effort to keep his team in the ballgame. After the past three games it was

offense would have to keep rolling to get a victory. They didn’t, as a 1-0 loss in Farrell Stadium halted the Rams’ momentum and dropped the team to 5-7 overall to remain winless in the PSAC. Shippensburg’s Miles Harriger scored the lone goal of the contest in the 27th minute off a feed from Michael Celius.

“We actually had more chances than Shippensburg did in that game,” Eisenhauer said. “There were opportunities to score, but we just weren’t able to capitalize on them.” WCU did, in fact, outshoot the visitors by a 13-6 margin. Shippensburg’s Clay Sale was perfect in goal, collecting seven saves and going the distance to record the shutout. Weiss also played all 90 minutes and made three saves. “It’s tough to go from scoring lots of goals to being shut out. So far we aren’t able to put up many goals in conference play,” Eisenhauer said. West Chester dropped a heartbreaker of 3-2 at California (Pa.) on a partly cloudy, blustery day. Cal’s Mike Kalas scored the first goal off a corner from Spencer Crider only 3:41 into the game. West Chester’s Labik was able to tie up the game before halftime by deflecting a shot off a corner into the back of the net. Eisenhauer and Malarney received assists on the play. In the second half, Cal’s Nemanja Visekruna scored on a penalty kick for his third goal of the season. Again, WCU equalized—Miller scored off a feed from Malarney in the 82nd minute. The decisive goal came courtesy of Kalas, who scored his second off a deflection from a free kick. The goal happened just over a minute after Miller’s goal, and left WCU very little time for a comeback, which they could not mount. Weiss made one save for the Rams, as only four of Cal’s 11 shots were placed on goal. Cal’s Derek Yobbi made five saves. WCU took nine shots and put seven on goal. The loss dropped WCU to 5-8 and 0-6 in the PSAC. West Chester plays Chestnut Hill in a non-conference home game on Oct. 19. Then they travel to Erie, Pa., for conference games against Mercyhurst and Gannon (at Edinboro) on Oct. 22 and 23, respectively. Travis Pearson is a fourth-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at TP651537@wcupa.edu.

Golden Rams hold on for 48-34 victory Football from page 16

score to give the Wolves a 14-13 lead. On the Golden Rams next drive, the mistake prone offense turned the ball over once again. Following a 15-yard pass completion to senior wide receiver Dan DePalma, White gained 16 yards out of the wildcat formation before fumbling which was recovered by free safety Stan Banks for Cheyney. The Wolves orchestrated another long drive to increase their lead. This time, Cheyney ran the ball all 10 times led by Jones 36 yards. Running back Julius Faison capped off the drive with a one-yard plunge to give the Wolves a 21-13 lead. West Chester came back and answered the Cheyney score. Mattei connected with Keyser for 28 yards to get within Wolves territory. Mattei found White five plays later for 19 yards on fourth-and-13 to extend the drive. Three plays later, junior fullback Brian McDermott scored on an 11-yard screen pass to cut the Cheyney lead to 21-20. In the second half, the Golden Rams made the Wolves pay for their mistakes. Jones fumbled

the ball on the fourth play of the opening drive of the half and senior strong safety Cedric Jeffries recovered the fumble for West Chester. Redshirt freshman quarterback Sean McCartney, who made his first career start in the double overtime victory against Shippensburg last week, relieved an injured Mattei four plays into their first second half possession. McCartney completed his first pass to Keyser for 16 yards before senior running back D’Andre Webb scored from one-yard out to give the Golden Rams a 27-21 lead. “[Sean] did a really good job for us when we needed him again tonight,” Zwaan said. Jones fumbled once again for Cheyney as senior defensive end Travis Ford-Bey forced the running back to lose handle of the ball and Jeffries

recovered his second fumble of the game. McCartney completed a 21-yard pass

to DePalma before the two hooked up again two plays later for a 14-yard score to make it 34-21. The Wolves answered back on their next possession. On a third-and-three, Anderson completed a quick pass to Stewart, who then scampered 67 yards for his second touchdown of the game to make it 34-28. The back-and-forth scoring continued into the fourth quarter. McCartney connected with freshman wide receiver LaRonn Lee for 33 yards on the first play of the fourth quarter. Two plays later, Webb scored his second touchdown of the evening from seven yards out to make it 41-28. Cheyney answered back once again. Jones took a handoff up the middle and dashed 66 yards for a touchdown on the second play of the drive to make it 41-34. After forcing a West Chester punt, the Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad Wolves made another

mistake. Banks muffed the punt and senior fullback Adam Young recovered the fumble at the Cheyney five-yard line. Two plays into the drive, Fagan scored his third rushing touchdown of the game to make it 48-34. Mattei finished 9-15 for 205 yards with one touchdown and one interception. McCartney finished 6-11 for 91 yards and a touchdown. Keyser led the Golden Rams with 109 yards receiving. White finished with 217 all-purpose yards. West Chester had 425 yards of total offense, while the Wolves had 387 yards on the evening. “I think I’m getting more comfortable with the offense,” Keyser said. “I’ve been in the offense for two years now. Everything is starting to come together; I really am starting to understand the concepts and schemes.” This week, West Chester travels to their PSAC East rival, the Bloomsburg University Huskies for a 3:30 p.m. matchup on Saturday. “We’re playing a really good team this week and we have to clean up all the mistakes,” Zwaan said. LJ Harrell is a graduate student majoring in communications studies. He can be reached at LH639694@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 16

Sports The Quad

OCTOBER 18, 2010

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

West Chester avoids major upset against Cheyney By LJ Harrell Staff Writer

week. We’re not a good enough team to take anyone lightly. I feel like we lack some focus and you can see it at times.” “The PSAC is a tough

Cheyney ran the ball 52 times for 282 yards, 211 by running back Marcus Jones, as they more than doubled the Golden Rams 129 yards rushing on the

The West Chester University Golden Rams entered their tilt on Saturday with their cross-town rivals the Cheyney University Wolves having won 29 straight contests in the series. Unlike most of the games over the last three decades, this one turned into an offensive explosion by both teams as the Golden Rams (3-4, 3-1 PSAC East) held on to their slim hopes of winning the PSAC East with an exhilarating 48-34 victory over the Wolves (1-6, 1-3 PSAC East). West Chester scored 28 second-half points after trailing by one going into halftime to win the game, which was a lot closer than fans could have anticipated given the recent history between the West Chester’s run defense struggles to contain Cheyney’s running attack, two teams. “Who are we to come out flat?” head coach Bill league,” redshirt freshman evening. “They know what they are Zwaan said. “We had two wins wide receiver Tim Keyser said. coming into the game and I tried “It seems like a shootout every doing with that offense,” Zwaan to explain that to the kids all week, but every week you have said. “And certainly they put a to come ready to play.” big scare in us today.”

West Chester received great field position on their first drive of the game after freshman running back Rondell White took the opening kickoff

line. Two plays later, junior running back Jackson Fagan scored his first touchdown of the evening from five yards out to open the scoring. Cheyney, who has performed much better this year unlike the previous couple of years, answered right back. Wide receiver John Newman gave the Wolves great field position with a 73-yard kickoff return to the Golden Rams 16-yard line. Three plays later, quarterback Chris Anderson found wide receiver Prince Stewart for a 13-yard touchdown pass to even the score. West Chester wasted little time in answering the Cheyney score. Mattei found Keyser for 52 yards before Fagan scored his second touchdown of the game with a one-yard score to make it 13-7 Golden Rams. On their ensuing drive, the Wolves put together one of the longest drives of the season against the West Chester defense. Of the 11 plays, Cheyney ran Photo courtesy of Amanda Warren the ball 10 times. Jones rushed for 37 yards and 32 yards to midfield. On the Anderson ran for 20 yards: first play from scrimmage, including a one-yard touchdown sophomore quarterback Mike Mattei hit White for 44 yards to See Football page 15 get within the Wolves 10-yard

WCU top team in PSAC By Amy Festa Sports Editor

The West Chester women’s soccer team is back to their old ways as they handed their opponents scoreless losses in their past four games. Their pivotal match came in their fourth when they would match up with California (Pa.), who was their only obstacle to the top of the PSAC standings. After IUP gave West Chester a run for their money two weeks ago, forcing the Rams to secure their win in overtime, West Chester took down Edinboro, Clarion, and Shippensburg by a combined score of 10-0. At the beginning of last week, West Chester still held onto the number two spot in the PSAC standings after Bloomsburg lost close games to Gannon and California (Pa.). California (Pa.) was the leader of the PSAC conference with 28 points. Their one tie gave them the one point edge over West Chester. West Chester traveled to California (Pa.) on Saturday to try and snap the Vulcan’s season long unbeaten streak and regain their position as the best team in the PSAC. The game was extremely important for both teams. A win for each team would either place California (Pa.) farther out of reach atop the PSAC, or lift West Chester above Cal. for the top spot.

The first half proved just how close these two teams are and they went into halftime still locked in a 0-0 tie. The second half would shift the momentum towards West Chester when Sarah Oswald tormented her opponent yet again. In the 54th minute, Oswald knocked Cal. back on their heels as she lifted the Rams to a 1-0 lead. Bernardini got the win in goal for West Chester as they now jump atop the PSAC standings. The win gave West Chester 30 points while a loss left the Vulcans two points behind. West Chester now holds a 10-1 record in the PSAC and is 12-1 overall. Cal. moves to 9-1-1 in the PSAC and 13-1-1 overall. West Chester’s climb back into first place began the weekend before when the Rams shutout three straight opponents. The first victim was Edinboro, who only allowed the Rams to get one goal past their keeper, but it was enough to secure the win. Devon Swaim was the lone scorer for the Rams and recorded the game winning goal in the winding minutes of the first half. Swaim collected a pass from Jen Hutchinson to put the Rams ahead 1-0; a score that would remain until the final whistle. The score made the game

seem much more balanced than it actually was. The Rams outshot the Fighting Scot’s 14-1 in the match. Lyndsie Bernardini played the first 68 minutes of the match before she was replaced by Leeny Tarnowski to finish out the last 22. On only 24 hours rest, the Rams were back in action against Clarion. Clarion sits on the bottom half of the PSAC standings. Melissa McKeary started the scoring for the Rams in the 16th minute when she headed in a ball that came off of a corner kick. Oswald sent a perfect ball to the

center of the box for Tara Malkiewicz, who then forwarded the ball to McKeary who was waiting at the far post for the easy goal, her third of the year. McKeary’s goal held up as the only one of the first half. Jen Gangl, Oswald, and Jess Bennett added second half goals to give the Rams the 4-0 win. Bernardini played the entire 90 minutes and made two saves in the shutout. West Chester rounded out their home stand when they hosted Shippensburg last week. Oswald recorded six points (two goals,

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

WCU leads the PSAC by two points after knocking off the previous leader, California (Pa.), 1-0.

two assists) in the 5-0 win over the Raiders. With the two assists, Oswald broke the school record for assists with 30. Oswald opened up the scoring for the Rams when she bent a corner kick into the far side netting in the 19th minute. It only took three minutes for the Rams to strike again when Oswald put another corner kick in almost the same spot. Malkiewicz was there this time to deflect the ball into the goal. In the second half, Gangl added the third West Chester goal followed by Oswald, who notched her second of the game after beating four of the Raiders defenders. Rachel Miller scored her first goal of the year in the final moments of the game to finish the scoring for the Rams. Bernardini added another shutout win to her career totals without having to make a single save in the match. West Chester continues their road trip with two more games next weekend. Their first is against Mercyhurst on Oct. 22 followed by another conference tilt against Gannon the following day. The Rams will return home for their final home game of the regular season on Oct. 26 in a non-conference match against Philadelphia University. Amy Festa is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@wcupa.edu.


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