Page 1

Quad

The

W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014

VOLUME 106, ISSUE 7

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Jimmy Peifer crowned Mr. WCU 2014 Story and pictures on pages 2 and 14 Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor


PAGE 2

News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU By Alexandra Arbiz Special to The Quad

W

est Chester junior, Jimmy Peifer was crowned Mr. WCU on March 26 in the annual men’s competition. More than 500 students, faculty, friends, and family were in attendance at Emilie K. Asplundh Concert Hall for the event. Peifer is a liberal studies major and is involved with the Catholic Newman Center and Rotaract at WCU. His platform is the Band of Angels, which is the world’s largest provider of non-medical information on Down Syndrome. The competition began with the introduction of this year’s judges, which included Miss Delaware 2011 Maria Cahill, the first ever Mr. WCU Chris Dickerson, Emmy Award winning producer Todd Marcocci, and former Miss Delaware contestant Ashley Morley. Ben McLain and Paul Peglar from the comedy and music act Dakaboom were the hosts for the evening and even performed some of their acts. They have been featured on well known TV shows such as “Glee” and “The Sing Off.” This year’s contestants entered the concert hall dancing down the aisles to songs such as “Pop,” “Bye Bye Bye,” and “Twist and Shout.” The gentlemen looked

very in-sync with one another as they performed. They even incorporated the guys’ escorts into the piece as well. Following the opening number the contestants were introduced by Dakaboom along with each of their platforms such as The Trevor Project, Philabundance, Scouts for Equality, and Youth Mentoring Partnership. This year there were 13 contestants: Nick Giorgio, Chris Conaway, Tarik Williams, Sean Bobbie, Doug Nieweld, David Thompson, Jimmy Peifer, Stephen Hood, Mike Dattalo, Adam Cerretani, Peter Ho, Nick Murray, and Shawn Kurnik. Following the introductions was the casual wear portion. The men’s outfits ranged from banana costumes to bathing suits and flip flops, cowboy hats and flannel shirts to a sweater and khakis. Some of the guys did a little strut across the stage as the hosts introduced each of them once again. Next was the talent portion in which contestants performed something of their choice. Talents included singing, different styles of dance, a piano piece, an original rap, and even a human puppet show. The guys kept the audience laughing throughout this entire section, and each of the men did an awesome job. “I though the human puppet show was hilarious, especially when

THE QUAD NEWS

MARCH 31, 2014

Jimmy Peifer crowned Mr. WCU 2014 Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

the judges deliberated their final decisions, the hosts announced the superlative awards. Most Dedicated, which goes to the contestant with the most spirit, attends all practices, and always gives 110 percent, went to Nick Giorgio; People’s Choice, which was voted on by the audience members, went to Shawn Kurnik; Mr. Photogenic was awarded to Doug Nieweld; Escorts’ Choice, which is voted on by the contestants’ escorts and goes to the guy who charmed all the ladies, was Chris Conaway; and Mr. Congeniality, which is voted on by the contestants, went to Sean Bobbie. Finally it was time to announce the results. Second runner-up went to Mike Dattalo and first runner-up went to Tarik Williams, leaving Jimmy Peifer to be crowned Mr. WCU 2014.

Tarik Williams was first runner-up at Mr. WCU 2014. Wrecking Ball came on is your favorite part of land,” “Happy Days,” Gadget,” and he started swinging being a West Chester “Inspector “Sesame Street,” “Saved back and forth,” audi- student?” ence member Amanda As the judges deliber- by the Bell,” and “Power ated who the Top Three Rangers.” The duo defiMcCullough said. After the guys fin- contestants would be, nitely had captured the ished their talents, Dakaboom entertained audience’s attention as there was a 15-minute the audience with a per- they switched from song intermission in which formance of “50 Theme to song. Next it was time to audience members were Songs in Under 5 Minencouraged to place utes” which had the announce the Top Three their votes for the Peo- audience in awe. The contestants in no particArbiz is a fourth-year ple’s Choice superlative piece featured theme ular order: Jimmy Peif- Alexandra student majoring in communicaer, Tarik Williams, and award. Escorts of the songs from “The Brady tion studies. She can be reached at contestants also walked Bunch,” “Gilligan’s Is- Mike Dattalo. While AA736117@wcupa.edu. around collecting donations to benefit the winner’s platform. Following the intermission, the contestants prepared for the formal wear portion of the contest. During this section, Dakaboom asked each contestant to pull a random question out of a bucket to answer for the audience. Questions ranged from: “What advice would you give your 16-year-old self?”, “If you had one magical power, what would it be?”, “If you could relive any event in your life, which would you choose?”, and “What Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor


MARCH 31, 2014

14

THE QUAD NEWS

PAGE 3

High Street Harmonix hosts spring concert By Jill Heagerty Practicum Writer

W

CU’s High Street Harmonix a cappella ensemble held its first spring concert with the University of Delaware’s Deltones, from season three of the “SingOff,” on Mar. 22 at 7 p.m. in Ware Recital Hall. The High Street Harmonix, an all-male ensemble, took the stage first, donned in button-up shirts ranging from black to bright colors to exhibit each gentleman’s individuality. The group featured new music that showed as much range in genre as the colors of their shirts. They started with the currently popular “Wake Me Up” by Avicii, with soloist Billy Natter leading the melody. Next, they took it down a notch and performed a slower Beyoncé mash-up of “Halo” and “Heaven” with soloists Malik Muhammad and Kyle Mclemore. Their third piece dated back 30 years with Tower of Power’s soulful “You’re Still a Young Man,” which were the words of wisdom the ensemble gave to soloist Tyler Propfe as he tackled the lead vocals about heartbreak. The group brought the fun and energy up with “Can’t Hold the Applause,” a mash-up of Macklemore’s “Can’t Hold Us” and Lady

Gaga’s “Applause.” Soloist Jake Billings, rapping the verses, immersed himself into the image as he put on a maroon hoodie and sunglasses over his formal clothing. The Deltones performed second with the pieces: “Nothing Ever Hurt Like You” by James Morrison, “Story of a Girl” by Nine Days, “Beautiful Disaster” by Kelly Clarkson, and “Feelin’Good” by Michael Bublé. For the finale, High Street Harmonix, along with two ladies from the Deltones, did a Zedd mashup of “Clarity” and “Stay the Night.” Each girl took a melody as the all-male WCU group gave supporting vocals. The High Street Harmonix started the spring semester of 2013, with the intent of highlighting the vocal talent of WCU students from varying majors. The founder and current president Ben Saltzburg, a trombone music education major from Horsham, Pa., elaborates, “The group formed because I was sick and tired of there not being an outlet for the incredibly talented singers this campus holds almost as a secret. I myself am a trombone music education major, yet I love to sing. No one would know me as a singer if it wasn’t for High Street Harmonix and the

opportunities it has opened for me, artistically. Also, I had a friend whom I knew was a dynamite singer, but did not have any medium to get involved. I wanted to start something so that people like him, who have no affiliation with the school of music, can display their passion.” Gracenotes, an all-female a cappella ensemble on campus founded in 2006, gave the newer group its support and knowledge. Leaders in High Street Harmonix thank the Gracenotes for the opportunities the established group has given them in order to grow and develop as well as getting their name out there. The High Street Harmonix focuses on entertaining the campus and community, and that doesn’t always include competing. Over Valentine’s Day members offered their services to deliver personal messages through song. The ensemble also participated in the Camp Dreamcatcher “Pitch Perfect” Benefit Concert, hosted by Pi Kappa Phi on March 13, to support therapeutic and educational programs for youths infected or affected by HIV/AIDS. The C Flat Run a cappella ensemble at University of Pittsburgh has invited the High Street Harmonix to attend its annual spring

facebook.com

High Street Harmonix poses with the University of Delaware’s Deltones. concert on April 12. The WCU group plans to spend the next couple of weeks practicing for the opportunity and raising money to get there. Tyler Propfe, music director for the group and a music education and vocal performance major from

New Hartford, Conn., has confident aspirations for the young group. “Look out for us next year. We have some big plans coming up. We plan on competing, so fingers crossed, hopefully you see us on the program for the next ICCA competition. We also plan on doing

more joint concerts, not only with Deltones, but with other local groups. We are also constantly improving, constantly learning. We’re a very new group, so we’ve got a very high ceiling.” Jill Heagerty is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at JH760370@wcupa.edu.

NEWS D R I E W A

college student in Florida was dragged up the Atlantic coast in his kayak for two hours - by a hammerhead shark. The student was fishing, and when he cast out his line, the shark took the bait. The student guesses that the shark towed him around for a total of 12 miles before dropping him off at another beach in Florida.

A

n 18-year-old from Norway now has a McDonald’s receipt tattooed on his right arm. Stian Ytterdahl of Lorenskog, said that his friends wanted to punish him for being “too active with the ladies,” so they gave him the option of either a butt tattoo of Barbie or a McDonald’s forearm tattoo. A spokeswoman from McDonald’s Norway has stated that the teen is “obviously a loyal customer.”

A

fter three weeks of terrorizing a Swedish family, the rodent deemed “Ratzilla” by the media is dead. The “mutant” rat, so named for its size, was discovered living under the sink, “gulping down leftovers.” Eventually, exterminators caught the rat in a trap, discovering that the animal was 16 inches in length, not including the tail, and weighed more than two pounds. The children were reportedly afraid that the rat would come back to life as a “zombie rat.”

facebook.com

High Street Harmonix and the Deltones visit Kiwi in West Chester for frozen yogurt.


PAGE 4

THE QUAD NEWS

MARCH 31, 2014

Number believed missing in Washington mudslide drops dramatically

T

By Susan Kelleher Special to The Quad

he number of people believed missing in last weekend’s deadly mudslide in Oso, Wash., has dropped dramatically, from 90 to 30. Jason Biermann, program manager for the Snohomish County Department of Emergency Management, said the number could drop even lower in the coming days as investigators continue to verify the exact total of people who were in the mudslide’s path. A few days ago, officials feared the number of missing could be as high as 176. Biermann also announced that the number of confirmed dead increased by one to 18. He indicated an additional body was found Saturday, but is not yet included in the official number. Biermann also revealed for the first time that in some cases only partial remains are being recovered, a stark indication of the force of the March 22 mudslide that buried a community along the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. The condition of some of the bodies has added to the difficulty of making identifications, he said. “The slide hit with such force that often the rescuers are not recovering full, intact victims,” Biermann said. Along with the confirmed victims, there are additional remains that have not been identified and are not considered part of the official total. That number could be as high as 10. A death is considered

confirmed only after a victim has been identified by the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office, the family notified by a chaplain and the body released to a mortuary. The dramatically reduced number of missing brought some relief in a week of grim updates from emergency-management officials, who at times struggled to provide consistent figures of the toll. Pastor Michael De Luca of the First Baptist Church in Darrington, Wash., said he was not surprised to hear the lowered figure. “I suspected all along that 90 was too many,” he said. He said firefighters and rescuers initially wanted to know about every person who might have been in the area of the mudslide, but many of the names submitted at the beginning have since been accounted for or crossed off the list. “We found one guy living right next to the post office,” De Luca said. “He was quite surprised to find he’d been listed as missing or dead.” The difficult work of sifting through the mud by machine, shovel and hand came to a brief halt at precisely 10:37 a.m. to honor the mudslide’s victims. Gov. Jay Inslee had urged people across the state to pause in a moment of silence at the exact time the mudslide hit on March 22 to pay tribute to the dead. “One week ago today our city changed forever,” Darrington Mayor Dan Rankin told reporters shortly before the observance in his town. At the Oso Fire Station,

not far from the devastated community, firefighters, volunteers and community members doffed their baseball caps and bowed their heads as traffic was stopped on Highway 530. After about a minute, the caps went back on, the traffic was waved through and the station again became a hive of activity. “We’ve got to get back to normal,” said Tara Wallen, 38, a bar manager who stopped by to drop off $2,086 in cash and checks contributed by members of a Stanwood Eagles club. “Yes, it’s going to be painful and it will take time, but we’ve got to get people back in homes.” Biermann, the county emergency-management official, said the search for victims Saturday was slowed by a steady rainfall that added to the muddy misery of the small army of people combing the slide area. Master Sgt. Thomas Siegel, who serves in a Washington Air National Guard unit based out of Spokane that specializes in search-and-rescue missions, led a recovery team working with crowbars, shovels, probes and tools. Whenever they find human remains, they stop, mark the spot and call for assistance “It plays out day-to-day, hour-by-hour. There is no real hard count on it. If we locate (remains), the specialists move in, and we move on,” said Siegel, whose civil-engineering squadron is attached to the 141st Air Refueling Squadron. Siegel said his team works off grid coordinates, and sometimes members get down on their knees to

redistribute their weight on boggy areas. When human remains are found, the locations are marked with GPS, and the remains are eventually removed using helicopters. “In a nutshell, it’s a giant pile of goo,” Siegel said of the slide area. “You just keep working your way slowly through it and keep going forward.” Siegel said the teams work closely with civilian volunteers on scene. “The community folks, they keep us moving. They are our motivation.” Volunteers include 18-year-old Forrest Thompson, a young logger who started working in the rescue effort a week

ago. He grew up in Darrington and knows many of the missing. He helped convince emergency-response officials that local volunteers should be a part of the response. “We pretty much just buck the root wads and trees off the top,” Thompson said Saturday. “If we do find somebody underneath a pile of logs, we just buck everything out of the way, and dig it out by hand rather than by machine.” Also at the scene are two teams of materials specialists who are working to find and contain contaminants at the mudslide site to protect searchers. Dick Walker,

senior spill responder with the state Department of Ecology’s spill-response program, said the entire mudslide site is believed to be contaminated with household chemicals, diesel and propane from heating tanks, mineral oil from transformers, and flammable gas tanks. Most of the material found so far has been crushed from the force of the slide, he said, but searchers are also looking in pockets and voids. “We don’t want people reaching into spaces where they may get a chemical burn,” Walker said. Susan Kelleher can be reached at skelleher@seattletimes.com.

West Chester University may leave PASSHE Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor

O

n Mar. 13, PA State senators Robert Tomlinison and Andrew Dinnimin gave a presentation in the Asplundh concert hall on their new piece of proposed legislation. This legislation, PA Senate bill #1275, if passed, would allow the schools in PASSHE (Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education) to leave the state system if they so choose. If West Chester did leave the system, the university would attain “state-related” status, like that of Temple University and Penn State University. Reactions to this proposal are extremely mixed. During the Q&A session

afterwards, the bulk of the questions asked centered on financial information. Students are primarily concerned about raises in tuition, which the senators claim would only raise by approximately $550 dollars per semester. Several students and faculty, however, refuted this, pointing out that Temple’s tuition is roughly $7,048 for a full-time undergraduate in-state student per semester, as opposed to West Chester’s $3,311 per semester for a full-time undergraduate in-state student. These figures do not include costs of housing and meal plans. The senators also stressed that if West Chester left the state system, the university would gain much greater autonomy in terms of its own decisions. The argument here states the University is

restrained by the current system, and by leaving the system, these restraints would be removed and the University would be able to function better. Opponents argue the loss of funding would be far more harmful than gains in autonomy. The senators repeatedly stated throughout the presentation and Q&A session that by introducing the legislation, they have stimulated conversation on a topic that has repeatedly been ignored, and have constantly asked for feedback from the audience on what could be done to improve the proposed legislation. On Mar. 12, the bill was sent to the Senate Education Committee for review. There has been no vote yet. Adam Farence is a third year student majoring in history and French. He can be reached at AF764146@wcupa. edu.


MARCH 31, 2014

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

PAGE 5

The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

As the weather warms, so do tensions

W

ell West Chester, it finally looks as though temperatures are taking a turn for the better. And for the better, I mean upwards in the WARMER direction. The number one complaint I have heard this past week dealt with the cold weather, with myself being a contributor. But now, perhaps outdoor activities can start up again, and stay. Now that we are back from Spring break and half the semester has already passed, it is time to put our game faces on. The semester still has several weeks of fight left in it, and as much as it pains me to say, we cannot relax quite yet. There is quite a bit of work left to be done, now is not the time to slow down and call it quits on the semester, not quite yet. Now is where things matter most, and truthfully, where people tend to lose sight of their goals – especially with the allure of warm weather knocking at our doorstep. With warm weather comes even warmer, or should I say “red hot,” feelings over certain issues. On a global scale, we have Russia’s incursion in the Crimea. On a national scale, we have President Obama’s Affordable Health Care act topping six million signups. But here in Pennsylvania, we have the Senate Bill 1275 on our minds. This proposed legislation would allow schools in PASSHE to leave the system and change to “state-related” status. This issue reflects every student and faculty member here at West Chester, and I am interested in everyone’s opinions. If you would like to write a piece for the newspaper or give a brief video interview, please email me at AF764146@wcupa.edu or QuadOPED@wcupa.edu. Debate and discussion are nothing without varied opinions and ideas, and I encourage everyone to share them, whether you are a student or a faculty member, your thoughts are important.

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor, The Quad

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor Laura Wayne Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor Ilana Berger Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Drew Schmitz Business Manager Andrew Miller Advertising Manager

EDITORIAL STAFF Jose Mestre Asst. Photography Editor Ryan Calpin Asst. Sports Editor

COPY EDITORS Stephanie Loeh Drew Drevyanko Jeffrey Holmes

DISTRIBUTION Drew Schmitz Andrew Miller ONLINE EDITION Chris Wilwol FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright ©2014 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


PAGE 6

THE QUAD OP-ED

MARCH 31, 2014

Pharrell Willams stands apart from hip-hop world By Drew Mattiola Staff Writer There was once a period of time when the hiphop industry was highly substantial and divergent. Allow me to rephrase myself – There was once a period of time when music in general was highly substantial and divergent. It all began in New York City with Bronx MC, Slick Rick who has been widely regarded as the quintessential figure to the genre in 1988. During that glorious epoch, Slick Rick released his debut, The Great Adventures of Slick Rick, an album that has bared more significance than triviality to this day. Upon its initial release, Slick Rick earned the dazzling reputation of “hip-hop’s greatest storyteller” in which he playfully composed tracks layered of fictional accounts molding worlds of fantasy and tragedy together. In a rare interview with XXL Magazine in 2006, Slick Rick discussed his sudden disappearance in the hip-hop industry, as well as his unfavorable decision to abandon his recording career in an attempt to produce for other artists. When asked about his label

josevinaxia.com

situation and his current relationship with Def Jam Recordings, the troubadour bravely replied, “I’m waiting for a market to open up for a more mature audience to see where we can fit in. We need to be inspired. Right now, the market is pretty much…it’s not bad, but it caters to the youth. And the youth market, they really talk about stuff that we’ve already talked about: going to the club, meeting girls, trying to be the tough guy here and there. All of that stuff we did in our 20s, and I’m 41 now. I’d rather talk about things that 41-year-olds talk about, but without sounding preachy, just having a good time. This how we talk, this is how we move. We just keep it sensible and true.” Eight years since his interview with XXL, the Bronx MC has not released a follow-up to The Art Story Telling, and at the humble age of 49, Walters is a man of his word rather than a corporate sellout as he thoroughly described many of his fellow peers, as well as the current state of the music industry. However, showings of a mature market have slowly materialized after Virginia Beach

native, Pharrell Williams returned to the misogynistic hip-hop scene with an intelligent and delightful tune, “Happy” in 2013. Williams has become a oneman wrecking crew over the last few years while R&B and hip-hop fans have been anxiously anticipating the release of his second solo studio album entitled, G I R L. Fortunately, Williams managed to fulfill his promise on March 3, 2014 when G I R L became available on iTunes Music Store and in retail markets such as Best Buy and Target. With “Happy” anchoring the commercial appeal through radio play and digital sales, G I R L became a smashing success. In 2010, Williams composed the score to the critically-adored Golden Globe-nominated animated film “Despicable Me” as well as its acclaimed sequel, “Despicable Me 2” both starring Steve Carrell and Miranda Cosgrove. During the production of both films by Illumination Studios, Williams crafted a grooving happy-go-lucky composition for the franchise spawning a surprise radio single with, “Happy.” Since criminal mastermind, Gru and the always-looney minions have dominated the summer box office for the past three years, things have certainly been trending upwards for Williams. Having appeared on four number-one charting singles from various artists such as Daft Punk, Robin Thicke, Ludacris, and Snoop Dogg, Williams had the tendency to remain modest and creative behind the scenes as opposed to exploring a career as a solo artist. Before the release of G I R L, Williams was not one to truly embrace the spotlight. Williams to this day has been very humble about his output of work occasionally contribut-

ing as a guest on Neptune produced records for friends and close collaborators such as Jay-Z and Justin Timberlake. As the Neptunes reached commercial height in 2003, the duo founded Star Trak Entertainment and released a compilation album entitled The Neptunes Presents… Clones in which Williams made his solo debut on “Frontin’ featuring Jay-Z. At the time, Williams firmly insisted the single was a “one-off,” and that he was purely a producer and not an artist in his own right furthermore dismissing rumors of a solo album. It was not until 2006 when Williams officially released his debut album entitled, In My Mind which met mixed to positive reviews. After reteaming with Haley and Hugo on their alternative projects under the moniker of N*E*R*D* from 2008 to 2013, the demand for solo material became

greater, and so became “Happy.” Like an infectious rash or a contagious disease, Pharrell Williams’ “Happy” sucks listeners in from the very beginning of the Neptunes’ signature introduction contrived of off-kilter stripped down electronic funk. There’s not a lot you can criticize with “Happy.” William’s timeless voice resembles that of the strong Motown vocality we have heard from prestigious crooners such as Marvin Gaye and Smokey Robinson. It’s simple and archetypal with little to no embellishments. Unbelievably catchy, it’s definitely the kind of song that makes you want to dance and sing along - an important element for any children’s film tune. More importantly, it’s infectiously cheerful with its summer-like vibe that ease that seasonal misery of winter often brings and it’s just so wonderfully innocent. It can become a lit-

tle repetitive at times, but maybe that’s the beauty of it. It’s highly simplistic with a very clear sentiment, and sees if you don’t clap along “if you feel like a room without a roof.” “Happy” is not something often found in modern age radio. In fact “Happy” is one of those positive uplifting records that are so seldom seen. In a oversaturated market where male chauvinists and egotists such as Lil’ Wayne, Nicki Minaj, Drake, Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber reign supreme, Williams’ “Happy” seems out of place in a cesspool full of monotonously looped chants, gluttonized concepts, carnal-driven anthems, and savage-minded engineers. Lost in a sea of materialistic urchins and scum, Williams manages to unearth success and appeal despite being positive-

WILLIAMS see page 7

Scholarships Available $1000 scholarships awarded on basis of leadership activity and academic achievement to two students who have completed at least 30 credits and have a GPA of 2.75 or higher. More information & application: Email Marie Cavacini mcavacini@wcupa.edu

Application deadline: April 21, 2014


nt st r.

4

MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD

PAGE 7

Williams from page 6 and inspiriting. Here is my question to the readership – Why are we as listeners drawn to records centered upon lust, partying, unprotected sex, heterodoxy, and avarice? There have been many powerful and inventive records over the past two decades such as “Ordinary People” by John Legend, “Dear Mama” by 2Pac, “I Used to Love H.E.R.” by Common, and “I Believe I Can Fly” by R. Kelly, all reaching the pinnacle of commercial and aesthetic excellence. Why do we constantly tend to clasp records such as “Lookin’ A**” by Nicki Minaj instead of “Rule” by Nas or “Count Your Blessings” by Damien Marley Jr.? Ultimately consumerism determines what broadcasts and what doesn’t. What the radio and the industry itself is truly deprived of is variety and a sense of diversity for the lack of a better word. Today we as listeners are so content and so acclimated with entertainment that we immediately idolize whatever is trending unknowing of its message and meaning as opposed to what is quality show business. My definition of music may differ from others, but truth be told, mature records like “Happy” will hang around longer than the ancient Pyramids of Giza. The reason being, they hold insight and conviction unlike today’s radio single. The existence of “Happy” only sheds further light on the mature loyal audience that has been long tucked away in the corners of public radio for the past decade and a half. “Happy” has a purpose, it has a meaning, and most importantly it has a soul. According to Williams, happiness is certainly the truth. Drew Mattiola is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RM814408@ wcupa.edu.

Thoughts from the Mayor’s Office Building sustainability in West Chester What better time than spring to recognize the wonder and beauty of the changing environment around us. Let us not forget the importance and threat of climate change that could take away beautiful spring days like these ahead. A time where global warming was debatable has ended, and now thought has shifted to what needs to be done to slow down the extreme affects of climate change that are barreling toward us. West Chester University has already taken action to reduce its part in global warming. Dr. Paul Morgan, director of undergraduate and graduate certificate programs in education for sustainability at West Chester University, shared that while recycling has helped, “there is so much more included to sustainability.” Morgan explained what has been done and what will be done in the future for our university’s involvement in emission reduction and sustainability. Currently, the university follows the Good Samaritan Laws, which allows unused food to be given to those in need under good intention. Also, by the recreation center, Geothermal heating is beings installed which pulls energy from the earth for heating and cooling purposes. In the future, geothermal technology at the university hopes to shut down coal boiler fires during the summer, which will eliminate excessive gas emissions. To reduce vehicle use on campus (who wants to spend unnecessary gas money and find impossible parking anyway?), WCU now has a free shuttle bus

that runs to and from the Exton train station and university. Morgan also shares that West Chester University is a member of the Pennsylvania Environmental Resources Consortium (PERC), which works to enable and encourage colleges and universities to share knowledge and take action towards building a sustainable future. In fact, Morgan hopes to see our university become hdwallpapers.in a part of PERC’s PA Higher Ed Food Recovery Challenge, which you can read more about at www.pagreencolleges. org. In the near future, Morgan hopes to see an increase in the use of the shuttle bus, which will lead to lesser vehicle use on campus. As for Morgan’s long-term goal, he hopes West Chester University will become a “zero policy waste campus where all waste produced is recycled, reused, or composted.” There is no doubt that students and the community will benefit from West Chester University’s role in minimizing climate change If our university is taking extreme measures to minimize global change, then what is the town of West Chester doing? BLUER, an all-volunteer committee formed by West Chester’s Borough Council, plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10% over 2005 levels by the year 2015. David Mazzocco, Chair of BLUER Committee shares

that the committee took initiative in sharing sustainability issues with residents, business owners, and WCU. BLUER also helped to educate them and provide incentives and tools that would help reduce their carbon footprint. Listing BLUER’s successes in our community thus far include, but are certainly not limited to, gaining approval of the purchase of wind en-

ergy for all the borough’s municipal power needs, the implementation of outreach programs for commercial and residential greenhouse gas contributors, and the continuation of advising the Borough, and local legislators, in making smart energy decisions on future projects. Working side by side with BLUER, Mayor Carolyn Comitta works to encourage and implement sustainability in the town of West Chester. She shares that because of BLUER’s climate action plan for the borough, West Chester has been recognized “by the EPA for its ‘Energy Star Ordinance’ and this year will reach its goal of 100% renewable energy to power all borough government buildings.” Mayor Comitta is also an active member of the Board of Directors

with the UN’s World Information Transfer, which is a non-profit organization concerned with promoting environmental health and literacy. Her participation in World Information Transfer has helped her understand that making environmentally unhealthy choices affects everyone in our interconnected world. As an example, Mayor Comitta states “ polluted air and water flows freely from place to place and in some cased circumnavigates the globe.” The public sees environmental issues at a national and global level frequently. However, it is often at the local level where action and policymaking is taking place to reduce carbon footprints and improve health. By encouraging community sustainability, we can begin to piece together an environmentally friendly world. With our town and university thoroughly involved with sustainability, where should we as students, faculty, and community members start? As David Mazzocco explains, “Sustainability starts with you, so start with your own actions and be willing to change.” Beginning with habit-based behaviors is a great way to participate. For example, turn your TV and lights off when they are not in use, ride your bike during these spring months, open windows on cooler days, and turn off your air conditioner. Starting small can have a huge impact on sustainability in your own community, and is cheaper on your college

budget. Mazzocco also encourages support of businesses who are encouraging environmental friendliness by writing them a letter of appreciation and spreading the word of what these businesses are doing. In addition, BLUER meetings are open to the public and welcome student and community input. BLUER is always looking for student volunteers on various subcommittees and will sometimes offer internship positions when appropriate. As Mayor Comitta states, “Students have a responsibility to shape the future,” and we should start by educating ourselves and others on issues of climate change and promote a sustainable a healthier environment in our own town. Promotional efforts can include spreading awareness, voting for elected officials who support legislation to reduce carbon emissions and sustainability, and getting involved with organizations and groups, such as BLUER, to support a healthy and sustainable environment. Now that you know what the West Chester Borough and University are doing to become environmentally friendly, you have no excuse to not get involved in the action. Start small by turning off energy sources in your home that are not in use, go talk to individuals like Paul Morgan at the University, or attend a BLUER meeting! When you go outside and appreciate the spring weather, let it be a reason to remember your environment is worth fighting for. -Mayor Caroyln Comitta


PAGE 8

THE QUAD

Will there be peace? By Marisa Claggett Special to The Quad

game. If one nation rids their arsenals of nuclear weapons, the advantages in war and negotiation only increase for those that do not comply with international laws and guidelines, as well as non-state actors seeking their opportunity to strike. The management of nu-

During this past week, President Barack Obama of the United States and 34 other nations pledged to transform nuclear security guidelines into national laws at the Nuclear Security Summit (NSS) in Hague, Netherlands on Tuesday. President Obama, who in 2010 hosted the first NSS, made it a goal of his administration to limit the threat of nuclear proliferation and nuclear mashable.com terrorism. At the two-day summit, it was agreed upon by 35 clear grade material is the out of 53 nations to allow main preventative meaindependent reviewers to sure outlined by President evaluate security measures Obama of nuclear terrorfor nuclear fissile material. ism around the globe. An One of the main goals of the example of successfully summit is to prevent nucle- preventing a dangerous ar terrorism, which would nuclear situation is when, be catastrophic on even a at the 2010 NSS, Ukraine small scale. decided to remove all of While reading about the its weapon grade material event, I found it all too co- from its nuclear sites. Conincidental that I had just sidering the current situareceived back an essay tion in Ukraine’s Crimean I had written, about the region with Russia, the fact long-term consequences that the material is absent resulting from President removes what would have Truman’s decision to drop been another cause for conatomic bombs on Hiroshi- cern in the conflict. ma and Nagasaki. While Following the proliferathe debate surrounding tion of nuclear weapons, that history is largely dor- the Unites States realized mant, the concept of how that the task of preventnuclear weapons has cre- ing other countries from ated a dangerous environ- starting their own nuclear ment that is almost impos- programs was a difficult, if sible to reverse. In a series impossible task. Adversarof events resulting from nu- ies, such as Russia, would clear proliferation in WWII, obviously see the need to more states have joined the defend their homeland with “nuclear club,” increasing nuclear power. Fast forthe likelihood of terrorists ward 60 years, adversaries acquiring nuclear material. around the world possess The only way the threat enormous amounts of decan be lessened is through structive power that could international management be used against the enemy of such weapons and ma- in the matter of minutes. terial. The possibility of India and Pakistan, whose eradicating nuclear weap- animosity has existed since ons entirely is a zero-sum their independence in 1947,

both have nuclear weapons programs. Israel is known to possess nuclear capabilities as well. Iran, in constant conflict with Israel, could potentially become nuclear in the near future. North Korea, an enigma to the world, has conducted nuclear tests which could eventually be aimed at South Korea. One of the biggest issues at the summit is the fact that many major nuclear powers did not agree to translate nuclear security guidelines into law, including Russia, China, India, and Pakistan. Although the NSS is a huge step towards nuclear security, the fact that many countries still are not cooperating is the weakness in efforts to protect the world against nuclear war or nuclear terrorism. While countries have the ability to negotiate terms and find alternatives to nuclear attack, some terrorist organizations are ideological rather than political. Complete destruction and world disorder may be their goal. Unfortunately, focusing on the threat of nuclear terrorism was largely overshadowed by the Ukraine crisis, another cause for concern. If peace was not established at this nuclear security summit, which from the looks of it was not, world leaders must come together again and realize that while they may dislike one another, nuclear terrorism threatens all nations. To agree to allow management of nuclear fissile material is to assist in preventing the end of the world as we know it through nuclear means. Marisa Claggett is a first-year student majoring in political science and minoring in Arabic. She can be reached at MC808919@wcupa.edu

So It Goes. It’s all in atmosphere

MARCH 31, 2014

By Rachel Alfiero Staff Writer

Imagine this scene: had an interesting, unique you’re in a venue that’s stage presence and Groudark, dank, hazy, and has plove, well, they blew my an indescribable aroma mind. Their energy was that can only be made high-octane and jumpy in by mixing at least five or the best way possible. The six various scents. The light show was vibrant mood is antsy; the room’s with rays of teal, red, temperature is almost to and lime green splashing a point of uncomfortable off the walls and into the humidity, and the people are packed together, with more filing in by the minute. Then, without notice, the neon lights beam on and illuminate the stage. The bass starts up and you can feel the pounding of the blindgossip.com drums as it syncs up with the pounding in your chest. The razor- crowd’s faces. Afterwards, the whole sharp scream of the guitar kicks in, followed by the night got me thinking lead singer’s vocals, and about concerts, but one before you know it, you’re detail in particular: their belting out the lyrics of atmosphere. I thought the song along with every- about what goes into a concert’s atmosphere that one else in the room. What else could I be makes it awesome and describing other than a enjoyable, and in other concert. As is now the cases, excruciatingly lackcase when thinking of top- luster. I came to the conics for So It Goes, I take clusion that if I’m going inspiration from things to a concert, I want it to that happen throughout be in a cool venue, have the week. This past week, a sick set of visuals (i.e. Tuesday the 25th to be light shows, artwork, proexact, I went to a concert jections, etc.), and have an in Philly with my friend audience that can match Katie. The venue was the the energy of the artist(s). Let’s face it, you can go uber-cool Electric Factory and the acts were (in or- to a concert to see your fader) Alex Winston, MS vorite band or singer, and MR, and Grouplove. On that alone would be great, a side note, I just want to but if the overall vibe of say that Tuesday was my the event isn’t right, the first time at the Electric whole experience can be Factory, and I have to say diminished. I decided to ask a friend I thought it was a really groovy, underground-ish who has gone to a lot concerts recently for his opinplace to go for a show. Anyways, the entire ion on atmosphere. Wilshow was great. Alex hem Barnes, a sophomore Winston, a Michigan-born here at West Chester, has singer-songwriter really been to at least 18 conbrought it vocally. MS MR certs at various places, his

favorite being the Union Transfer in Philadelphia. When I asked Barnes what goes into his idea of the perfect concert atmosphere, he replied, “It depends on the concert, the music, and the artist’s energy. But generally I look for great light shows, stage focus, and the overall visual appeal.” Curious for more perspective, I reached out to a Public Speaking classmate of mine from last semester, Lynda Selegean. I recalled that she gave a speech about the sense of community she feels when she attends concerts. Selegean shared a lot of the same opinions as Barnes. “The three most important things that contribute to an awesome concert experience for me are the quality of the lights and sound, the energy and etiquette of mutual fans, and the stage presence of the band.” I have to agree with both of my two interviewees in saying that there is not just one thing that goes into making the atmosphere of a concert great. It draws on a variety of things from sound to crowd behavior to the actual artists performing. However, I also believe there is a little bit of mystery to it, and that mystery adds something that nothing else quite can. Till next time my fellow concertgoers, so it goes. Rachel Alfiero is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at RA806657@wcupa.edu.

We


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD OP-ED

PAGE 9

West Chester University trapped in an illusion of safety? Students call for policy reform

By Tasha Buckley Special to The Quad Let me paint a picture for you. You’re walking around town with your friends one weekend. It’s late at night and your friends decide they want something to eat. After searching your wallet, you realize you are all out of cash, and you left your debit card at home. Fortunately, you remember that you have some Rambucks on your ID card. Luckily, many restaurants in town have formed a relationship with the university, accept the card and use it as a debit card. Thank goodness because you really wanted some Pita Pit. I’m sure the idea of a nice warm Pita excites you, but have you ever thought that the night might end badly for you on your trip to or from the short distance to Gay Street? Sadly many students have had their nights end in catastrophe after an innocent night spent taking advantages of the experiences that West Chester has to offer. There have been numerous assaults recently occurring against West Chester University students, yet the student body has not been informed

blogs.houstonpress.com

about them. Earlier this March, a West Chester University student was the victim of an assault that occurred on High Street, around 200 feet from the edge of Campus. The event was unprovoked, and the student sustained serious injuries. However, the oncampus Public Safety refused to release a Timely Warning statement informing the student body about the event. The student, who has chosen to remain anonymous, made the following statement regarding this incident: “I can’t help but feel bad for the tortured soul that feels the need to commit such senseless acts of violence. That being said, it would be a shame if these acts were allowed to continue unpunished, and without proper warning given out to the people that could be affected. If college kids are going to be at risk of being in danger in the town of West Chester, then West Chester University needs to make this better known to its students. Also, if there are a considerable amount of crimes being committed against WCU college students, then maybe there are steps the university should be taking to

prevent such crimes.” While this student’s experience was severe, these types of incidents occur very often. They may range in severity, but are all equally devastating to the individual victims. As of now, University policy states that assaults and similar incidents do not have to be reported to students if they did not occur on campus. What the university is really doing with these assaults is failing to inform and protect their students. There is a blurry line between where campus ends and where town begins. Most of the students that go to this school live off campus, and the town is a huge part of the culture here at West Chester University. There have been too many students seriously injured while they are out and about. This view Public Safety maintains, is that because it did not occur on campus, it is not a concern to students this concept needs to change. It is understandable that Public Safety would not want to over-report incidences for fear of scaring potential and current students. However, it is more damaging to students to under-report than it is to over-report. The campus is not just the university; it is the entire area where students live, work, and play. The University recognizes that students spend their time off campus, and they form relationships with businesses allowing students to use "Ram Bucks," which goes through the school. By doing

this, they are thus recognizing that this is the students’ domain, and therefore is also the university’s. These assaults not only are unprovoked, but often met with an unsympathetic attitude from the West Chester police and Public Safety. Why do these law enforcement officers act as such? It is most likely because these assaults occur all too often to students, and there is no one to place blame on. If students were aware of what is really going on off campus in West Chester, if they saw through the illusion of safety that the town has, they could better protect and prepare themselves from the potential of danger. The real issue is that students are not

aware these incidents are even occurring. While it is the student’s responsibility to consider his or her own safety while out in public, this is impossible if they are not informed of the crimes being committed against WCU students. There has been a petition started to require the school to alert the students about any assaults that happen to West Chester students in the borough of West Chester. WCU is not the only university suffering from the issues of not being informed. Recently, Temple University students have made attempts to bring awarness to their university that they do not feel safe and informed. They have already had success in

changing university policy. Kudos to Temple University for taking their students’ concerns into consideration and making changes to better protect and inform the student body. If you believe that it is your right to know what is going on in the place that you call your second home, then I urge you to sign the petition that has been created for WCU. If you would like to help in this effort, please contact Tasha Buckley at TB764692@wcupa.edu. Until we are able to make changes to better the safety of the student body, stay alert, walk in groups, and like my mom always tells me, make good choices. Tasha Buckley is majoring in Nutrition Dietetics. She can be reached at TB764692@wcupa.edu

Need Summer Courses?

Find them here bucks.edu/summer ➜ Explore hundreds of classes at bucks.edu/summer ➜ Browse courses, dates, times, schedules ➜ Select your classes and register online

Classes start May, June, & July • Register today! bucks.edu/summer • 215.968.8000

Bucks County Community College

Newtown • Bristol • Perkasie • Online

Prefer to register in person?

Visit bucks.edu/register for dates and times

14059


PAGE 10

Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Planting seeds: The “Seed on Diamond Street” alternative spring break program By Meghan Cox Special to the Quad Carefully, silence settled into a symphony of slumber on Diamond Street. Softly, day one concluded as evening wained on the threestory brownstone home in Northeast Philadelphia. The walls creaked with the cold. After a day of calm introductions, mother nature promised to play with winter’s wonder, but little did she know that spring had sprung in the hearts of 15 West Chester University students. O n l y hours before the cold had broken, a car packed full of students and collaborators reached the neighboring metropolitan city of Philadelphia. Possessions and the excitement of years of planning were stuffed into three separate vehicles. All aspects of the trip seemed to effortlessly coalesce on the sunny Saturday morning. The spring of 2014 is a time for flourishing. West Chester is a university

experiencing exponential growth - from a satellite campus to a diversified student body- and this spring will prove the observable. In March, students and staff from West Chester University co-collaborated with community members in Philadelphia, and all participated in the first annual Alternative Spring Break Program. Connecting the campus to the community, West Chester University co-op-

Scholars in Service on the campus of West Chester began to formulate Alternative Spring Breaks. After a training in the fall, A Seed on Diamond Street Alternative Spring Break was officially planted. Growing in the soil of past collaborative projects and cross-discipline relationships, the alternative spring break was sponsored by the WCU Office of Service Learning and Volunteer Programs, and

Photo By: Meghan Cox

erated with BreakAway. The growing organization provides an adaptable model sweeping across the nation and the globe- on a mission to inspire lifelong active citizenship. Trained by the BreakAway model,

began to grow. Allies aligned from the Political Science and Social Work Department. Dr. Linda Stevenson and Dr. Travis Ingersoll were the faculty who led the project. Meghan Cox and Marcie

Cohen were selected as the student to begin to underundergraduate and gradu- stand Latino Philly and ate student leaders. In the Philadelphia’s living hisfall, organizers sought a tory. After laying some roots, clear concept for the alterstudents began to branch native break. Today, the “Seed on DiaPhoto By: Meghan Cox mond Street” is an opportunity for motivated West Chester University students (both graduate and undergraduate) to adopt a vision of the Semilla Arts Initiative. Semilla meaning seed in Spanish is a grassroots movement founded by Philadelphia mural artist Ms. Betsy Casañas. The Semilla Arts Initiative uses art as a catalyst for social change. Embodying the Telos of a seed, the Arts Initiative is grounded in artistic collaborations as a means of empowering individuals and out. Engaging two of the growing communities. The mission of the al- eight components of the ternative spring break is alternative spring break: to work in solidarity with service and reflection. Each day, the students diverse communities. For one week, direct service and staff participated in provided cross-cultural ex- one of seven different serperiences and exposure to vice projects. The first, and the largest the power and influence of public art, and the basics of the several moving parts of community building- all within the project was striving towards active citi- the opportunity to paint a mural with Pennsylvania zenship. On March 15, 15 West Academy of the Fine Arts Chester University stu- (PAFA) graduate Ms. Sandents departed with staff dra Gonzalez. Ms. Gonzato engage the program and lez’s mission is to curate further begin to grow the six murals in the halls of “Seed on Diamond Street.” Isaac Sheppard ElemenStarting to galvanize ac- tary School off of Cambria tive citizens for one week, Street in North Philadelstudents were encouraged phia. From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to paint, plant, and particiMonday through Friday, pate! The group found home in seven or more students the residence and art gal- attended the elementary lery of Ms. Betsy Casañas, school with Sandra to situated within the Nor- teach, engage, and paint ris Square neighborhood with the elementary school in North Philadelphia. students. Another project was with The home and its location proved a reich insight for local artist and illustrator

MARCH 31, 2014 Stephen Haigh who employed several students to prepare a spring gallery in the home of Ms. Casañas. Students painted the walls of the gallery, moved, and installed various pieces. Working in solidarity (and around the weather), students participated in urban gardening. Ms. Candida Casañas, Betsy’s mother, recruited students and staff to clean and prepare the Semilla Arts Initiative Children’s G a r d e n for spring. Situated in the heart of “Latino Philly” the urban garden was exposed to the elements of city-life and the harsh winter. Students cleaned and cleared the garden for the spring - more planting will occur next month. Further engaging the Latino community, students were assigned to work with a local nonprofit and arts organization Taller Puertorriqueño. Known to the community as El Corazón Cultural del Barrio (The Cultural Heart of Latino Philadelphia), Taller Puertorriqueño provides community development through the arts. Mr. Rafael Damast worked with West Chester students to create informational outreach presentations for local students and community members. Other students found their service through ulterior organizations. The

See SPRING BREAK page 11


MARCH 31, 2014 Spring break from page 10 “Seed on Diamond Street” collaborated with a Philadelphia charter school and The Department of Making and Doing. In addition to daily service projects, each student, staff, and collaborator participated in a series of evening reflections. Reflections were student-led guided by Cohen and Cox. Participants reflected on their experiences and welcomed a series of guest speakers. Other activities included a poetry reading, meeting and conversing with local artists, and dancing. The week on Diamond Street flew by, but through solidarity in service, evening reflection, and the communal living style, family was established and the seeds of change began to grow in the grassroots of a community. Before retiring for the evening on that first cool night, I thought to myself: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has,” words spoken by Margaret Mead. As the spring begins to blossom I encourage one and all to seek seeds of change and inspire the community in which to flourish. If you would like to grow with us and the Seed on Diamond Street program please consider attending this year’s Alternative Spring Break Showcase Thursday, April 17th 4-6pm in Sykes Ballroom C OR follow us on twitter @ SeedOnDiamondSt. OR on Tumblr. - http:// sods2014.tumblr.com/ Meghan is a fourth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in philosophy and political science. She can be reached at MC737693@wcupa.edu. Meghan Cox is a fourth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in philosophy and political science. She can be reached at MC737693@wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD FEATURES

A meeting of the spirits: WCU students attend the Greater Philadelphia Asian Consotorium Jeffrey Holmes Copy Editor On March 22, I had the distinguished opportunity of attending the Greater Philadelphia Asian Studies Consortium (GPASC), at St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, Pa. This event, open to all undergraduate students regardless of majors across the entire state, was an all-day expose of works and essays by students on a range of topics pertaining to the religions, philosophies, and ideologies of South Asia. Organized by a team of scholars from the university, the day was divided primarily into multiple panels that convened presenters in accordance with the country on which they were presenting after a continental breakfast. China and India were covered by two panels held simultaneously, from 9:30 - 10:45 a.m. in separate rooms. Following lunch and a presentation from Dr. Deven Patel of the University of Pennsylvania, panels on Japan, Buddhism, and a final panel on Korea, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Myanmar, took place in separate areas from 11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Representing West Chester University were four undergraduates: sophomores Reginald B. Smith and myself, as well as seniors Caroline Pitocchelli and Hannah Wikowski. My presentation was

a culmination of four months of comparative philosophy research, contrasting the goals of Theravada Buddhism with existentialism and comparing the similarities found in their methods. I discussed the difference found in living a Buddhist life as a means to break the cycle of life, death, and rebirth juxtaposed by an existential life in which one’s life goal is determined by the individual. As far as commonalities go, existential-

The actual act of presenting went as follows: myself and the other panelists sat at a table facing a large crowd of other university students and professors. After using an allocated 15 minutes to speak on our topics, an additional five minutes was used by the crowd to ask questions. Not only did I receive recommendations from professors on additional readings, I was asked questions such as, “Have you considered using other specific texts

surprisingly shadowed by his sweetness and humility. He talked about working as a professor as nothing short of an honor, and the importance of studying the humanities, specifically Asia, and its application to the rest of the world. He raised the issue of Asia not receiving enough attention in schools, as despite being a Western society, the emotions felt by not just Asia, but the rest of the world, are essentially the same. Asian philosophies

Photo By: Jeffery Holmes

ism believes in a genuine freedom, which is defined by Simon de Beauvoir as dedicating one’s own existence towards the existence of others. Existentialists like Donald Crosby decry nihilism as a temporary feeling and encourage using compassion as a compass for life. Such can be seen in Theravada Buddhism, as texts from the Pali Canon promote the same community-based compassionate lifestyle.

for your work, or do you find understanding each philosophy in comparison to one another useful to understanding them each holistically?” My panel was followed by a luncheon with a presentation on the work done by Dr. Patel at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert in Sanskrit language, comparative philosophy, and critical theory on the English language, this man’s prestigious credentials were

may promote an alternative lifestyle to the more prominent JudeoChristian attitudes seen in the West, but they do not need to be forced on schoolchildren; the options merely need to see more presence in those students’ lives. In between panels and break for food, there was plenty of time to make friends with professionals in these studies, and also other students. One student, Reginald Smith

PAGE 11 commented, “Jeffrey and I made friends with another brilliant scholar at the conference. It seems like this conference really sets you up to make lasting friendships that will extend to a lot of different professions.” Smith said this after he and I met Villanova senior and philosophy major Mark Bookman. Bookman presented a virtuosic approach to comparative philosophy that he called the teleological approach. Bookman argued that through using commonalities and correlations, mankind can understand each other’s ideologies and beliefs without needing to practice them. The key point of his presentation was the ability for philosophies to coexist, which is easier done through mutual understanding. His presentation aside, the amount of phone numbers I exchanged with other students and contact information I got from professionals in writing and philosophy was amazing. I felt so free to express my original ideas without apprehension of judgment. I could discuss the works of Edward Said and Ferdinand de Saussure with other English majors, or the historical evolution of Buddhist traditions to those who enjoy reading it. That seemed to be the key point to this event: literally everyone was elated to be among fellow bookworms and scholars and in our free time, we just threw our ideas at each other, and listened to every word with an open ear. To be blunt, I was among my people at the GPASC, and if I ever have another opportunity to present my research, I will take it in a heartbeat. Jeffery Holmes is second-year student majoring in English with a minor in ethnic studies. He can be reached at JH791223@wcupa. edu.


PAGE 12

THE QUAD FEATURES

MARCH 31, 2014

Chester County district attorney fights for justice By Jill Heagerty Practicum Writer The Deputy District Attorney to the Child Abuse Unit in Chester County put away a former Chester County Prison lieutenant this year with charges that he molested 10 kids in 20 years. Today, she continues to work long hours for child abuse cases. Deborah Ryan, the Deputy District Attorney, described Lt. Leroy Mitchell, as “a beloved member in the community. Everyone thought he was the most selfless, kindest person.” He fostered 50 kids, had children of his own, volunteered, and coached sports in his free time.

No one expected him to be accused of child molestation. When Mitchell’s 10-year-old granddaughter approached her school counselor and mother about her grandfather molesting her, her mother accused her of lying. The mother told Ryan that the girl “lied all the time.” After Ryan and forensic investigators met with the granddaughter, Ryan believed the girl over the mother. To prevent the trauma of going to trial, Ryan got the girl to go on wire, call her grandfather, and accuse him of molesting her, Mitchell confessed. Ryan elaborated, “We gave her a script and this girl was amazing. She was

10 years old and able to speak about these horrible things that happened to her in front of strangers and then get a confession. She was unflappable.” Despite continued allegations and a confession at the sentence hearing, Mitchell’s wife called all the victims liars. She accused children who were three to five years old that they wanted to break up her marriage or were jealous that her family did not adopt them. For Ryan, handling this case was easier than most because Mitchell’s granddaughter was able to get the confession. She elaborated that her job usually consists of victims who struggle to

WCU English Club to host “Year of Color” event By Allison Cleary Special to the Quad After a grueling winter of only white and gray suffocating the skies and landscape of West Chester, the vibrant, perky colors of spring will be a welcome change. Color can influence a person’s mood, the amount of attention he or she gives to an object, and so much more. A bright, sunny day with green grass, blue sky, and pink or purple flowers generally elicits a much better mood than a rainy day with dark gray clouds and murky brown puddles. Color affects not only what is seen with the eyes, but also what is seen with the mind. Works of literature often employ the use of certain colors to promote theme, emotion, and/or

character traits. In April, the English Club will be hosting two events focused around the importance and effects of color in literature, film, and design, sponsored by the SSI Sykes Student Union. The English Club itself is anything but black and white. The club’s only requirement is general interest in anything English related: literature, creative writing, Open Mic nights, novels, short stories, poetry, fiction, nonfiction, the list is endless. Meetings are held in Sykes Student Union, room 254 every Monday night from 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. The topics of the meetings come in a rainbow of colors. Past meetings included discussions of authors and poets like Shel Silverstein and H.P. Lovecraft, books like

“Perks of Being a Wallflower,” how to tell a ghost story, how to write a good love poem, and Englishthemed board games. But the English Club is more than just meeting and discussing some aspect of this book or that author. The Club organizes monthly Open Mic Nights during which any student can attend and/or perform. The acts include music, poetry, short stories, comedy, rap, dance, and any other creative performance students wish to present. For students who would like to publish such creative pieces, Literati is the English Club’s literary magazine, produced annually, which accepts submissions of poems, short stories, artwork, and photographs from all West Chester University students (members

put words to their traumas and juries who do not understand why someone would keep silent for years and then come forward. As a prosecutor, Ryan faces long hours and small wages. When she spoke to a WCU journalism class on Mar. 11, she admitted that she knows school teachers who make more than her. “You don’t go into my job for the money. You do it because you’re trying to help,” Ryan said. Her sense of justice developed as a child. Ryan’s grandparents were Holocaust survivors. Her grandmother lost her entire family and her grandfather lost everyone but his brother and mother.

With the physical and mental scars of the Holocaust, Ryan remembers her grandmother telling her, “The whole world knew what was going on and nobody did anything.” She taught Ryan how important it is to stand up for other people and to have a good heart. Ryan earned her bachelor’s degree in psychology at Boston University. After working as a waitress and back-packing through Europe, she decided to get into law because of her desire to help others and interest in debate. She received a law degree from the University of Pittsburgh and started her career working at the District Attorney’s office in Philadelphia.

and non-members). Look out for English Club book sales around campus to purchase the 2014 edition of Literati. In April of 2013, the English Club—thanks to the “Year of Paper” grant— was able to host the Paper Detective, Carter Hailey, for a talk about his work with Shakespeare’s folios. The Club was also able to peek at Shakespeare’s Folios in the Francis Harvey Green Library. This spring, the English Club will be hosting two events for the Year of Color. On April 17, the Club will be screening “The Green Mile,” the film adaptation of the novel written by Stephen King. The film tells the story of prison guards and prisoners on death row through the eyes of guard, Paul Edgecombe. From title to tile, this film emphasizes colors themselves—the color of the skin of prisoners, victims, and guards, the color of the linoleum leading to the electrical chair—and

stresses that there is no color for guilt and no color for innocence. Anyone and everyone is welcome to attend this film screening on April 17 in Sykes Theatre from 4:00 - 7:00 p.m. and watch the effects of color on the prisoners and guards that walk the Green Mile. Similar to last year’s “Year of Paper” event, the English Club will be hosting another speaker at West Chester University on April 22 for the “Year of Color.” This year, the English Club is hosting Kimberly Glyder, the award-winning principal of a Philadelphia book design firm. Well-known national and international publishers have utilized designs from her firm. During her talk, Glyder will be discussing the artistic choices behind specific colors in cover design and explaining the connection between book cover designs/ colors and the content of the books. An exhibit of enlarged book covers will accompany her presenta-

“Philadelphia is a difficult place to try a case,” Ryan explained. “The police and law enforcement is the enemy there.” When summoned for jury duty, 90 percent of people say they are less likely to believe a police officer’s word simply because he/she is a police officer. Ryan said when she came to Chester County the opposite was true and people were more likely to believe a police officer. This makes trying a case easier for Ryan, but she describes that her job is emotionally taxing. The details involved in child abuse cases can be graphic and hard to stomach. When she first started her job, she would often come home crying. Most of her cases in-

See JUSTICE page 13 tion, so the audience will be able to see the progression of the covers of a few classic books over multiple editions. As with the screening of “The Green Mile,” all are welcome to attend Kimberly Glyder’s color presentation from 3:30 - 5:00 p.m. in the Special Collections section (top floor) of the FHG library and have a look at the evolution and influence of color in book cover design. Color is everywhere: sometimes bright or startling enough to evoke close attention and sometimes dull or commonplace enough to fly under the radar. Noticed or not, all colors have an effect on those who see them, read them, or employ them. The upcoming events hosted by the English Club will open eyes to the theme of the “Year of Color.” Allison Cleary is a second-year student majoring in English writing education. She can be reached at AC780703@wcupa.edu.


MARCH 31, 2014 JUSTIC from page 12 volve victims admitting to child abuse after years of silence. Because of the time gap, Ryan deals with the task of trying to convince juries that the victim is telling the truth. Even if the time gap does not exist, many jurors want more evidence than molestation or rape cases can garner. Ryan explained that in 98 percent of rape cases, the victim has no physical signs on the body. Most cases are the victim’s word against the accused. Legislation has changed a bit in Ryan’s favor since the Sandusky trial in 2012. Before that case, a prosecutor could not call an expert to the stand to explain why people might react differently to abuse. Experts can now explain that a victim might keep quiet because they are embarrassed, afraid, or think the abuse was their fault. Ryan told the journalism class that as far as legislation goes, “Pennsylvania is one of the most arcane places to live.” The state’s laws are outdated when it comes to abuse cases, and it was one of the last to allow experts on the stand. Although Ryan faces difficulties, emotional turmoil, and low pay, she enjoys how she can help others as Deputy District Attorney to the Child Abuse Unit. Her grandmother who survived the Holocaust taught her that we are all members of a community, and Ryan works her hardest to help that community every day. Jill Heagerty is a third-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at JH760370@ wcupa.edu. She can be reached at jh760370@wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD FEATURES

Positive psychology proves more than a class that better grasp the lecture. The semester concludes with “P1” project, which is going out into the world (or the West Chester Borough)

By Angelica Russet Special to the Quad

Ever wonder how you could be happy? Or. what makes us happy? Positive psychology is more than just the study of happiness; it is the study of what is right in life and what makes our lives worth living. I took Positive Psych this past fall semester; I thought it would be an elective I could take and an easy 8 a.m. to get through. This class Photo By: Ilana Berger/Photography Editor exceeded all of my expectations; it was so much more than just posi- and applying these lessons. tivity. Gratitude, optimism, You may have noticed feland character strengths low peers giving out hugs, are all topics addressed handing out candy with inthroughout the semester, spirational quotes on them, along with assignments or entertaining puppies in

the academic quad, or even covering campus bathrooms and hallways with post-it notes reminding you to have a great day. These are all products of P1 done with the genuine intention of brightening someone’s day because “other people matter.” This semester it was no question as to which senior seminar class I was going to take. Applied positive psychology is a course devoted to putting into action all the of the lectures that were presented. The assignments were relatively familiar but

PAGE 13

with some adjustment. The semester project for the class was to raise money for a fundraiser of our choosing. There we were 20 acquaintances with five months until graduation, all trying to make it through one last semester. We agreed on the charity, “For Pete’s Sake,” a non-profit organization that assists adult cancer patients and their loved ones, allowing them to take a break from their illness and enjoy a weeklong expense-paid vacation. The question was then presented, how could we make a difference? Twenty strangers came together and created something much bigger than just a school assignment. We created a fundraising event that will take place at Alibis to support these families, on April 5 beginning at 2 p.m. A ticket includes open bar and food until 5 p.m. with raffle prizes, entertainment provided by a DJ, and side games with more opportunities to donate. All are invited

to purchase tickets in Sykes Student Union. This project began as a small assignment written on a syllabus; however, 20 people, people who never really knew one another from the start, came together and created this amazing event. No matter how much or how little money is raised, this event will greatly impact someone’s life. We were enlightened, shown, and taught that other people matter. Our happiness depends not only on ourselves but is reflective of the happiness of those around us. Both of the positive psychology courses I have taken have made a huge impact in my life, but more importantly the results of these courses have helped make a difference in other people’s lives. In the words of Ghandi, “Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.” Angelica Russet is a fourth-year student majoring in psychology. She can be reached at AR747812@wcupa. edu.

WCU English department will host English major career panel

By Jennifer Appell Special to the Quad Not sure what you want to do with your English degree? Tired of hearing comments about your future as a barista? Interested to hear about a few of the many careers that are available to students with a degree in English? Check out the annual “What Can You Do With an English Degree” alumni panel on Tuesday, April 1 from 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. in the Philips Autograph Library. You will be amazed at the wide variety of opportunities available for English majors. This annual event is organized in large part due to the efforts of Dr. Eleanor Shevlin. Through the English department’s

vast alumni records, Dr. Shevlin maintains contact with West Chester English major graduates and invites various alumni to visit the school each year to share their experience in the professional world to current West Chester students majoring in English. The diverse experiences of each of the alumni panel speakers in their post-graduation plans and career choices allows each individual to offer advice, guidance, and suggestions to current English majors and students interested in pursuing an English degree who might feel pressure from multiple facets to decide on a career. An English degree often has a stigma of being useless; however, Eng-

lish degrees offer much more than first meets the eye. An English degree enhances several highly marketable skills, including writing, communication, research, and critical thinking. These skills can be applied to nearly all fields, as the panel speakers will soon illustrate. Past speakers have found success in such feilds as business, law, education, and freelance writing. This year’s alumni speakers similarly come from diverse feilds. The panel will consist of such speakers as Casey Oscar, a System Support Tech Analyst for Boeing; Brandon Walcott, an attorney at the Law Offices of Brandon D. Walcott, LLC; Beth Kline, the

Director of Continuing Medical Education at the Institute of Musculoskeletal Science and Education; and Carla Hostetter, a librarian and published author. Each speaker will be given the opportunity to talk about their personal experience for brief segments, sitting along a table in front of the audience. Following the presentations, there will be an opportunity for those in attendance to ask the speakers questions about their career choices and, in turn, receive answers and advice from each of them. The Q&A session is also an opportunity to speed-network with the alumni speakers. Students pursuing an English B.S.e.d. major

are also encouraged to attend. Even those students interested in hearing more about what an English degree has to offer are encouraged to attend. The panel is sponsored by West Chester University’s Department of English and the Twardowski Career Development Center. If you are unsure about your future career path, or if you are just looking to explore new career ideas, make sure to check out the “What Can You Do With an English Degree?” alumni panel. You will be surprised at the opportunities that await you. Jennifer Appell is a third-year student majoring in English writing. She can be reached at JA773987@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 14

THE QUAD

MARCH 31, 2014 THE QUAD

SAC’s Mr. WCU competition Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

Viet MARCH 31, 2014

ooma iet

HOURS: Monday - Thursday: 11:30am to 10:00 pm Friday & Saturday: 11:30am to 11:00 pm Sunday: 12:00pm to 8:00 pm

kooma

Dine In / Make Reservations / Take Out

Phone: 484-947-5410 Web: www.koomarestaurants.com / www.koomaviet.com


Apply now for summer or fall 2014!

Haub has it.

Haub School of Business Did you know Haub has the largest selection of part-time graduate business programs in Philadelphia? Graduating seniors are encouraged to apply now and start as early as this summer.

MBA • Top ranked — U.S. News & World Report • Offered on campus and online or both • Self-paced — part-time or full-time options • Start now and take the GMAT later • GMAT requirement waived for Beta Gamma Sigma and Phi Beta Kappa members

Master of Science Programs Earn an advanced business degree in your specific area of interest.

• M.S. in Financial Services. Prepare for the CFP exam or broaden your overall business acumen in the growing field of financial services. • M.S. in Business Intelligence and Analytics. Fill the demand for professionals who can leverage organizational knowledge. • M.S. in International Marketing. Prepare for the global marketplace to learn about the world’s most dynamic business practices. • M.S. in Managing Human Capital. Become a strategic leader in your field. If you manage people, you are managing human capital.

Saint Joseph’s University | Haub School of Business | 5600 City Avenue | Philadelphia, PA 19131

sju.edu/business


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD

The Quad Crossword

Classifieds

VISIT WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE SERVICES

HOW TO PLACE CLASSIFIED ADS To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www.wcuquad. com, and click on the link for “classifieds.” Enter the wording of your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad with any major credit card. The rate is 30 cents per word, minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Deadline for placing classifieds is 11 a.m. on the Sunday before publication.

MISCELLANEOUS JAZZ PIANO AND JAZZ ACCORDION

8

1

6

2

3

Across 1 Business attire 5 Somewhat 9 Punches hard 14 Tolstoy’s “__ Karenina” 15 Jazz singer Horne 16 Packing rope 17 Hot spot connection 18 What gears do 19 Addition to a school, say 20 Noncash executive compensation 23 Siamese or Abyssinian 24 Solo in “Star Wars” 25 Seminary deg. 26 Dog tags, for instance 27 Close boxing match outcome 33 Part of a foot 34 Norway’s capital 35 Low soccer score 38 Aquatic plant 40 Work wk. end for many 42 “__ Lama Ding Dong”: doo-wop hit 43 Enter 46 Hurricane rescue op 49 Omnivorous Looney Tunes devil, familiarly 50 Folgers competitor 53 Greek letter between phi and psi 55 Airline approx. 56 Tee or blouse 57 Sandwich meat

PAGE 16

58 Randomly determined NBA draft choice 64 “Me, too” 66 Use a piggy bank 67 Overflow with, as charm 68 Prelude, for short 69 Hawaiian strings 70 Thief’s haul 71 Explosive experiment 72 Felt tips and ballpoints 73 Dumbo’s wings Down 1 Log cutters 2 Condo division 3 “Inside” facts, briefly 4 Meditative exercise regimen 5 Teardrop-shaped nutlike snacks 6 Answering machine cue 7 Part of MIT: Abbr. 8 South Seas getaway 9 Substitute (for) 10 “To thine __ self be true” 11 Ohio city 12 Work on dough 13 Titillating cellphone messages 21 Green Hornet’s sidekick 22 Extremely 27 Male deer 28 Game on horseback 29 Valid 30 Christmas toymaker

9

Taught by well known professional. Looking for serious intermediate and ad4 students. 9 2 First5lesson7 vanced free. 610.688.8863 or info@ 5 6 7 4 8 jamesdorchestras.com

WANTED 3 8 1

7

9

31 Gadget used on an apple SEEKING HISTORICAL 32 “__ the fields we go” 4 3 8WCU5EMPLOYEE 6 2 1 36 PC alternative DIRECTORIES 37 Relax in a hammock 6 from 9 1960 4 to present. 3 7 Will2 39 California’s Santa __ 1 41 ICU drips make copy, and return orig2 if you 8 wish 1 to9retain3 44 Poet whose work inspired5“Cats” 7 inal, 45 Director Preminger original. Will provide pre9 8 paid1 envelope 7 5for mail 6 for-4 47 Woman on stage 48 Bok __: Chinese cabbage 51 Consumes avidly 7 4 warding 6 2to: 320-4 9 E.3 Lan-5 caster Ave., Downingtown, 52 Take a stand against 53 Series of links 2 5 PA319335.1 610-329-1056 4 8 6 54 Lacks 59 Word before five or ten Difficulty level: Challenge - 12 60 __-steven 61 State known for its caucuses 62 Business bigwig 63 Gunpowder holders 65 “__ Doubtfire” Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers

The Quad SuDoKu

Solutions to the puzzles from our last issue

1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square. 8

1

4

9

2

5

7

3

6

6

2

7

3

8

1

9

4

5

3

4

1

5

9

7

2

9

3

6

7

8

4

5

5

8

9

2

1

6

3

6

5

4

8

7

2

1

7

6

3

1

5

9

4

4

2

7

9

6

3

8

8

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

7

5

6

2

8

9

2

9

8

4

3

1

7

EMPLOYMENT & JOB SERVICES !!! DRIVERS WANTED !!!

PENN OFFICE PRODUCTS 3 6is a local company looking for a RELIABLE 1 2driver to deliver within WC Borough and surrounding area on 4 5 Tuesday - Thursday morning 7 9 thru afternoon. GOOD driving record required, 5 8 w/ valid drivers license. Company 6 4 provided. Modvehicle erate lifting. Fun work 2 3 environment! Call 610431-0140 ask for MAC 8 McKinley. 1 or 610-4310140

9

4

7

8

9

5

3

1

6

2

7

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, dated 12/15/2013: Chief SERS investor withheld information about a $3,000,000.00 loss in a pension fund investment. Despite its outside managers, SERS has faced a growing gap between its assets and its expected pension payouts, which the state had to meet by increasing taxpayer contributions to the system - about $1 billion in 2013, more than twice the level of two years ago. That has prompted Corbett to refer to SERS as a “tapeworm” in his budget... When you separate from service at WCU, transfer your funds immediately, to a SIPC insured retirement account, by calling Vance Usher, Securities Service Network 610-329-1056 Check out our new website

wcuquad.com Now optimized for your smartphone and tablet!

2

3

5

7

8

1

9

6

6

9

3

1

2

4

7

5

5

8

1

7

3

9

4

1

4

2

6

8

5

7

6

7

8

1

4

2

9

9

2

3

4

5

8

6

4

6

9

5

7

1

3

© Philip A. Thompsen, Ph.D.

Difficulty level: Hard - 7

3

5

6

9

2

7

8

8

1

4

2

6

3

5

2

3

7

8

9

4

1


Ryan Calpin

Asst. Sports Editor

MARCH 31, 2014

Ryan Calpin

Asst. Sports Editor

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 17

Entertainment

Follow the Quad on Twitter! QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU @TheQuadWCU Conference call connects WCU student with Jason Bateman Joy Wilson Op-Ed Editor

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor

Drew Drevyanko Copy Editor

J

ason Bateman sim-

but delightfully Jeffply, rey Holmes described Copy Editor his expe-

Joy Wilson Op-Ed Editor

Adam Farence Op-Ed Editor

Dodge), it really made me Drew Drevyanko laugh,”Copy which Editor is one of the reasons why Bateman says he took on the project. With the lead character Jeffrey Holmes of Guy being a filthy, igCopy Editor norant jerk (a drastic dif-

tonal target of this character. So I went for it, and it was comfortable.” The film premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival and received great reviews, impressing many production

“If I could rub a genie bottle and get my wish, I would do what guys like Ben Stiller, George Clooney, or Ben Affleck do where they split their time between acting and directing.”

describes them as “very skilled people who barely get any attention.” After starring in recent comedies such as “Horrible Bosses,” “The ChangeUp,” and “Identity Theft,” it is refreshing to see

rience as a first time director with his new film, “Bad Words,” by welivefilm.com saying, “I’ve always Laura Wayne Laura Wayne wanted to do this… Copy Editor Copy Editor and it just kind of happened.” In a college conference call, Bateman answered many students’ questions about his new film and the transition from acting to directing. Bateman contrasted the two creative outlets by saying, “With acting, you’re trying to convince people you’re somebody different and with directing you’re trying to create a completely fake world for the audience, trying to shape an experience for the audience for two hours, with what they see, hear, and feel.” He goes on to say that directing is a “much more challenging and gratifying effort” and that he was excited to take on the responsibility. “Bad Bateman stars as Guy Trilby in “Bad Words,” which is also his first attempt at directing. The film was released on March 14, 2014. Words,” playing in theAnyone who’s been act- Bateman in something a aters now, tells the story ference from his beloved companies, which started of Guy Trilby (Bateman), a role of Michael Bluth in a bidding war between ing since the age of 12 def- bit smarter, darker, and 40-year-old middle school Arrested Development), distributors. Focus Fea- initely deserves a change more risqué; something dropout who finds a loop- Bateman described the tures, who was Bateman’s of pace in their career. that pushes the envelope hole in a national spelling decision to cast himself as first choice anyway, ended Bateman said his oppor- a bit more than he is used bee and enters as an adult the star instead of finding up taking the film under tunities as an actor and to. He wanted to make to seek revenge for losing the right person by say- their wing. As far as di- having a “great seat” on something like Being John ing, “It would lighten my recting, Bateman said he the ride of Hollywood let Malkovich, a film that is a many years prior. “I share the same dark work load by not having would do it full time if he him see how incredibly “cocktail between eccensense of humor with this to direct a lead actor, es- could (Don’t leave us yet complicated it is to make tric people and absurd sitscript (written by Andrew pecially with this specific Michael Bluth!). He said, a movie as a director, and uations that is a drama to

everyone inside the movie.” He also went on to praise directors like Paul Thomas Anderson, Spike Jonze, David O. Russell, Alexander Payne, and the Coen brothers. Bateman said he connected with the topic of the film because in grade school he lost in the first round of a spelling bee, failing to spell the word “answer”; “It was that tricky little ‘W,’” but he went on saying, “I’m a decent speller, I’m better than my wife…which is all that matters.” Bateman explained how proud he was of the film and himself with the fact that he was able to keep his head on straight during such a hectic, brand new experience. “Bad Words” is an off the wall, black comedy that reveals Jason Bateman’s skills as more than just an on-screen average Joe. This is one of the most impressive directorial debuts in years, and we can be sure to expect big things from Bateman as he continues his new creative outlet with the upcoming project, “The Family Fang” which is in preproduction. His desire to inspire and oversee both behind and in front of the camera is evident with the witty humor and complex storytelling within the film, as we see Bateman at one of his all time best. Drew Drevyanko is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at AD739888@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 18

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

MARCH 31, 2014

Ad Specia


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 19

No Second Chance talks about latest record and U.S. tour Adam Kelly Special to The Quad David from the UK hardcore band No Second Chance took a few minutes out of the band’s schedule to answer a few questions about their upcoming record and second US tour, which lasts from April 18-29 with a stop in Phoenixville on April 20th. The new album Burden of Life is to be released through Eulogy Recordings on April 29th. Adam Kelly: We’ll start with the obvious, what’s your name, where are you from, and what band do you play in? David Haddock: I’m Dave, I’m originally from London, UK and I’m the guitarist in No Second Chance. AK: For those who’ve never heard of the band or listened to anything like it, how would you describe your sound? DH: We’re essentially a band playing a dark and often metallic blend of hardcore, mixing up the fast with the heavy on a frequent basis. Certainly for fans of aggressive and to-the-point hardcore. AK: Last year you

guys put out Face Real- record and we worked toity, which was one of the wards that. For Face Reheaviest and most unre- ality we had only two guilenting EPs I heard in tars to choose from and for 2013. To me, it was a big Burden Of Life we had six step up from the debut and we used a brand new full-length Never End- drum kit on this record ing Fear in terms of songwriting, rucktion.com production, and I think the vocalist change was a positive occurrence. How did you guys approach trying to top that release with a new fulllength? DH: You always want to do the best you can on a record with the time and finances available (certainly that’s the case with us anyway) and we made a few changes this time around for the full length; not so much in the way we that’s a way better stanwrite or that side of things dard than what we used but more so a few instru- before. We’re happy with ment-related things and what we’ve come out with. AK: What are some of the mastering we didn’t feel was where we wanted the bands and guitarists it on the last couple of that inspire you to create records. The studio and music? DH: Hard to put it engineer change for Face Reality opened our eyes to down to a few really besome areas that we felt we cause I’m influenced both could improve for the next directly and indirectly by

BABYSITTER NEEDED 18 year old autistic teen $15.35/hour Monday and Friday afternoons 3:30pm – 8pm Saturday and Sunday afternoons 4pm – 8pm Downingtown home, north of Exton off Rte #100 Dressing and potty training, recreational activities, feeding meals, teen is non-verbal, owning a car is necessary

Sandy Lyons 610-804-7535

so many different genres and bands. I got involved in So-Cal type skate punk before I got into hardcore and metal and the first hardcore bands I heard were bands like

Ensign, Bane and American Nightmare – I guess those bands seemed like a fairly natural transition from punk to thrashy-type hardcore and then into heavier styles of hardcore. It changes almost weekly, but lately I’m really digging Downpresser and Expire type stuff lately which I think reflects in places on Burden Of Life. AK: For the guitar/ gear nerds such as myself, what gear did you use for the recording of Burden of Life? DH: For guitars we used ESP LTD guitars (EC331 & EC401) doubled up, first side was through a Peavey 6505 through a Marshall 1960A Lead Cab and then the second side was through a Mesa Dual Rectifier through a different 4x12 Marshall Cab. We also had a couple of SG’s, plus an Ibanez and a Slash Signature Gibson Les Paul, but ended up sticking with the ESP’s for a whole host of reasons. For bass we used an Ibanez K-5 through an

Orange bass terror head and sans amp through a Peavey 4x10 cab. Drums were on our new live kit which is made by Brazilian company Odery, quite new to our shores but they are making some insane kits and that made a huge difference on Burden Of Life. Cymbals were a Turkish company called Murat Diril. AK: I got to see No Second Chance at a small venue in Phoenixville last year. This particular one was your first US show and it was a bit odd in that all of the other bands were pretty mediocre punk bands at best and you guys had almost literally just got off of the plane. That probably wasn’t the best first taste of America, but what was the coolest thing you got to do in the US? DH: Yeah that was one of the hardest shows to play for us straight off a plane, luckily the shows got better. Haverhill, MA and Syracuse, NY were pretty insane shows but even the not so good shows were a new experience for us and we met a lot of new people and made friends along the way. All of it was cool but personally one of the coolest things I think we did was on the last couple of days before coming home when we stayed with Mitts Madball [guitarist of New York Hardcore legends Madball] and he basically gave us a true New Yorker tour of Manhattan and we took

a couple of band pictures there – kind of seemed a bit surreal that we were standing in Times Square having just finished a tour and quite hard to put the feeling into words, but I guess anyone who’s been in a touring band and found themselves in an unlikely place a long way from home might know the feeling. AK: Burden of Life is coming out April 29 on Eulogy Recordings, which is a pretty well-known and dare I say legendary label in hardcore. How did you get hooked up with them and how does it feel to put out a record on a label that a band you covered was on (Black My Heart)? DH: It’s pretty amazing, a lot of Eulogy bands have been in our CD collections through the years so to be part of the illustrious family is cool. We just started talking pretty much as Face Reality dropped on Rucktion Records in the UK and it went from there, John is really good to work with. Part of our determination to go one up on the production of the full length was the label’s history. AK: Where can all of us in Pennsylvania catch a No Second Chance set? DH: We’ll we’re back in PA next month on April 20th at The Polish Club in Phoenixville and hopefully a more solid line-up this time round! AK: Thanks for your time Dave, is there anything else you’d like to say that we didn’t cover? DH: We’re on the road in the US April 18-29. with Drowning from Chicago and Triumph Over Shipwreck from El Paso. Keep an eye out for more details on that very soon! Adam Kelly is a student at West Chester University. He can be reached at AK820454@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 20

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

MARCH 31, 2014

“Metal Gear Solid” franchise releases latest game in saga

G

Rob Gabe Staff Writer

amer buyers have been understandably divided on shelling out nearly full price for creator Hideo Kojima’s stealth-based, franchise sequel, “Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeros.” As it stands, the game is actually a prologue to an even bigger title that will most likely be released in the first quarter of 2015 called “Metal Gear Solid: The Phantom Pain.” Initially accused as a glorified demo and cash grab by Konami, Ground Zero’s was given a $39.99 price mark before it was lightly cut down to a mere $29.99 due to public disapproval. Thurs., March 18, Ground Zeros was released in both for physical retail for $29.99 and digital download for $19.99. Standing as a sequel to both “Metal Gear Solid: Peace Walker” and the remarkably revered Coldwar epic “Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater” (the peak of the series), the narrative follows fallen hero “Big Boss/Snake,” voiced by “24’s” Kiefer Sutherland, a disavowed American solider who is deceived by his country and in result, forms a private military off the coast of Colombia known as Militaires Sans Frontières (Soldiers Without Boarders). Your mission is to extract “Chico” & “Paz,” two of Snakes former associates who served under his private militia and are now being interrogated in a heavily guarded Cuban base called “CampOmega.” Their captor is a horribly disfigured man of unknown origin who claims to have a history with Big Boss. Getting the bad out of the way first, the rumors are true, most sources have confirmed Ground

Zeros, depending on the way the user plays it, can be beaten in under a measly two hours. The good news is that it hardly matters. In addition to multiple Side Ops at the players disposal after they’ve finished the campaign, Ground Zeros comes chock-full of imaginative paths and diversified strategies to completing your goals. Can’t find your way into an enclosed area of the headquarters? Start using your brain and get creative, as there are numerous ways for tasks to be accomplished. Surrounded in torrential downpour at a prison facility enclosed by steep mountains, “Camp-Omega” is an ample estate that offers never-ending exploration among its routine, maximum-security lockdown. Every nook and cranny can be searched to the most minuscule sectors and that is where the meat of the game lies. I’m indecisive on whether it can be classified as a sandbox or open-world game, but the remodeled Guantanamo Bay lookalikes hub space is sizable and impressive. Surveillance and enemy AI is more challenging then it’s ever been. The days of hiding in plain sight to thickheaded, blind patrol guards are gone. They’ll now spot you over an extensive stretch from painfully radiant watchtowers and glowing searchlights. Expecting them to be somewhat oblivious as they’ve been in past releases, when I snuck up behind a patrol guard too fast to knock him out, I was startled when the enemy turned around at the sound of my footsteps and called for back-up faster then I had time to tranquilize him. The sound of sirens and the compound alarms

was equally nerve-wracking. Once you’re spotted, good luck alleviating your presence to an unalarmed state or even surviving for that matter. Snake also has a number of bondesque gadgetry in his arsenal, all made easily accessible by the new inventory system. Taking a few hints from Peacewalker, Ground Zero’s follows a similar configuration in control scheme that differs from its predecessors. This is the second title Kojima has put out under the new cross-platform Fox Engine, and wow does it look phenomenal. If you want to experience the best bang for your buck, the PS4 console is unquestionably the superior version. Rendered in 1080p and running at 60 frames per second, the textures are cleaned of impurities and the game flows in marvelous fashion. Kojima has even praised the PS4 saying “Since it does it a little better than other hardware, the image quality of the PS4 is the most beautiful. It’s the closest to the photorealistic quality we are aiming at.” The Xbox One takes a respectable second place, with the latter two lastgen consoles getting an understanda b l e downg r a d e mostly seen in draw distances. Series newcomer Kiefer Sutherland is justifyingly fitted for

the tortured mercenary role of Big Boss. Any naysaying skepticism fueled by Internet speculation was eased upon hearing the man perform. While the voice of David Hayter will always be “Solid Snake,” Kojima has chosen the right moment to draw a line, making the distinction that they are separate characters entirely. In addition to providing some astounding facial animations that wholly fulfill the notions of what it means to be next-gen, Sutherland’s voice acting left me with no complaints, other a slight disgruntlement that he was only given so few lines. However, there are a few glaring omissions and minor gameplay nuances within Ground Zero’s that can’t go without being addressed. The new regenerating health system is over-simplified and insulting. Rations, which were once was a series staple, have been discarded for familiar, overconventionalized scheme regularly observed in Call of Duty and other dull first-person military shoot’em ups. The health

system is the most urgent issue Konami must devote their focus on before the release of “The Phantom Pain.” Codec Calls are also missing. Alternatively, players will be fed Intel through spontaneous moments of conversation by second chief in command, Kaz Miller. It just doesn’t feel right. Furthermore, a slow-motion feature in which the player has time to react before the enemy spots him and goes on alert has been implemented. It makes the game significantly less challenging, but can be easily removed by switching it off in the under the options setting. And the final jarring exclusion, the legendary cardboard box is nowhere to be found! These headache-inducing alternations are made more bearable by how strong the rest of Ground Zero’s holds up. New features include; Rondevueing to a called in chopper that air lifts the player from the mission area, vehicle transpiration, progressive CQC combat and newly implemented stealth mechanics such as jump/dodge that’s so cool players will find it hard

to keep their finger off the button. Clearly just a smaller fragment of a substantially larger project (“The Phantom Pain”), Ground Zero’s is a short, but sweet taste of good things comes. Its quality over quantity exhibition will be a fulfilling experience to long-time series veterans, that’ll tide them over for the time being. With several contrasting tactical approaches to take for both the main storyline and Side Ops, there’s enough here to keep even the most hardcore gamers occupied for a good deal of time. Its convoluted political conspiracies continue to add on to the Metal Gear Solid mythology. All of cut-scenes are gloriously cinematic and lengthy as they’ve always been, with the concluding final half an hour taking a much darker, more provocative storytelling tone. Some may feel they’ve opted into a raw-deal with in regards to the price tag, but the majority of players will find their money and time well spent. Rob Gabe is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RG770214@ wcupa.edu. gearnuke.com

Anth S


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD

Review It!: “12 Years a Slave” and “American Hustle”

Anthony Micalizzi Staff Writer

T

his week, Anthony reviews a 2014 Oscar-winning picture and an Oscar-nominated picture. 12 Years a Slave (2013) Writer: John Ridley Director: Steve McQueen Genre: Drama Stars: Chiwetel Ejiofor as Solomon Northup, Dwight Henry as Uncle Abram, Bryan Batt as Judge Turner, Kelsey Scott as Anne Northup Rating: R Grade: A

Solomon Northup was a free man from upstate New York. He was well respected, had a family, and had a good paying job. Unfortunately, slavery still existed and many other people didn’t take well to a free black man. When his family was away, Solomon took a job playing the trumpet for extra money. The job was in Washington DC where

racism was prominent. Little did he know he was tricked by a couple of con artists. They stowed him away with other free black people until they were beaten enough to not say they were free. After, they were sold into slavery and became slaves. Solomon went through pain, heartache, and despair. He went through more hardships in 12 years than any person should in a lifetime. Towards the end of his time as a slave, all hope was lost and we may never see his family again. “12 Years a Slave” is a brilliant movie. It depicts all of the horrors people had to endure in slavery. The story of Solomon Northup is told beautiful in this Academy Award winner for best picture of the year. It is a must see for everyone. The acting is phenomenal, but the cinematography is even better

depicting the time period perfectly. At times, some scenes are very graphic making it hard to watch and there is a lot of cursing all throughout the movie. Nevertheless, it is one of the best films made about the hardships of slavery and deserves the award for best picture. Sit back and watch the triumphant story of Solomon Northup and how a free black man endured 12 years a slave. American Hustle (2013)

Writers: Eric Warren Singer & David O. Russell Director: David O. Russell Genre: Drama/Crime Stars: Christian Bale as Irving Rosenfeld, Bradley Cooper as Richie DiMaso, Amy Adams as Sydney Prosser, Jennifer Lawrence as Rosalyn Rosenfeld Rating: R Grade: B+

Irving Rosenfeld had a very satisfying life. He had a beautiful wife and child, a very seductive

assistant, and a very successful business conning people out of thousands of dollars. Everything was great until a wild FBI agent, Richie, caught him and forced Irving to use his expertise. He wanted to catch white collar criminals. He forced Irving and Sydney to help him take down one of the most powerful criminals and a person too unreachable by the FBI, the mayor of New Jersey. Irving needed to devise a plan for his biggest con ever. He needed to deceive the FBI, a group of politicians, the mayor, and the mafia in order to save his life. “American Hustle” was nominated for best picture in this year’s Academy Awards and rightfully so. The movie had a fantastic cast top to bottom full with stars who put on a fantastic performance all around. In addition, the script is very unique

and is very similar to a Scorsese film with narration over various scenes. It mixes a good amount of humor in an otherwise serious film. Viewers get sucked into the story with its various plot twists. The movie tends to get a little confusing at parts but the narrations try to clear up anything questionable. All and all, “American Hustle” is a must see. Enjoy as Christian Bale attempts to pull

PAGE 21

off the biggest con imaginable to a wide variety of characters. Movies to Watch: Academy Award Winners: “Frozen,” “The Great Gatsby,” “Gravity” Academy Award Nominations: “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “Captain Phillips,” “Star Trek Into Darkness” Anthony Micalizzi is a secondyear student majoring in history. He can be reached at AM787857@ wcupa.edu.

cnn.com

“12 Years a Slave” won Best Picture at the Oscars this year. Lupita Nyong’o also received the award for “Best Supporting Actress.”

DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE

GET AHEAD THIS SUMMER! TAKE CREDIT CLASSES • Jump

start your college degree

• Lessen • Earn

your fall course load

credits to graduate on time

• Easily

View our Summer Schedule

delval.edu/summercourses Registration opens April 6, 2014

transferable to your college or university

• Taught

by full-time faculty and industry experts

We offer: • Daytime, • Six-week

evening and online options and 12-week terms

For more information OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION

215.489.4848 | conted@delval.edu

DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE

700 E. Butler Ave. | Doylestown, PA 18901


PAGE 22

Sports

THE QUAD

MARCH 31, 2014

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Golden Rams’ season comes to an end Ryan Calpin

Asst. Sports Editor

to try and push the ball on offense, and IUP was going to try and grind it out and play a slow, physical game. The team that could control the pace would definitely win the game. Unfortunately for the Rams, the Hawks controlled the pace of the game, making it physical like they wanted to and were really a problem on offense. If you needed one stat that would tell you that IUP controlled the pace, just look at

points. For the star of the team to only score four points and the game still be very competitive shows that West Chester is a very good team. Yes, IUP controlled the pace of the game. However, West Chester adapted to that pace and game style, and gritted it out for 40 minutes, and were right there at the end of the game. In the first half, IUP went into the locker room with a 37-31 lead, with each team shoot-

the line 18 times in the first half and cashed in he West Chester on 15 of those, which put men’s basketball West Chester’s players season came to in severe foul trouble. a close in the opening Shannon Givens, Matt round of the NCAA DiWiseley, and Ryan McKvision II tournament on eaney all had two fouls March 15, when they fell at halftime. The sole to the Indiana of Pennbright spot for the Rams, sylvania Crimson Hawks and the thing that kept 75-68. them in the game was Both teams were comR.J. Griffin, who had 14 ing into the game off a points at halftime, while loss. The Crimson Hawks hitting three big were 23-4, wcupagoldenrams.com three-pointers, incoming off cluding one at the an upset buzzer that cut loss in the it to a six-point quarterfigame. nals of the In the second PSAC tourhalf, the Hawks nament made the necesto Mercysary adjustments, hurstand and Griffin strugWest Chesgled getting open ter was and only had 20-9 comtwo second-half ing in lospoints. However, ing to East senior Shannon StroudsGivens stepped up burg in with 18 huge secthe PSAC ond-half points. ChampionYet again, the ship game. Rams got in foul This was trouble which the first sent the Hawks to matchup the line 28 times, between but this time the Golden they missed 11 of Rams and Junior Cory Blake hits a jumper in the opening round of the Division II tournament, however, the those free throws, Crimson Golden Rams fell to IUP 75-68. which allowed Hawks. West Chester to IUP had creep into the one of the best defenses game in the game’s final in Division II, and West senior Troy Hockaday’s ing 39 percent from the minutes. Chester had one of the stat line. In his final field; the difference in In a game where West better offenses. The key game, Hockaday strug- the first half was free Chester only led once, throws, and foul trouble. gled from the field shootto this game was pace. with nine minutes left West Chester was going ing 2-9, only scoring four The Crimson Hawks got in the first half and

T

ley, and returning from injury will be Eddie Mitchell. They will also be bringing in around seven to eight guys in the fall that will help them be even better next year. With the team losing main ball handlers and scorers Givens and Hockaday they will really have to rely on Blake, Wiseley, and Mitchell to pickup the slack. They are hoping that the new guys and returing players such as Doug Macarone, Ben Mingledough and Eric Frans will help lighten the load on those three players. Head coach Damien Blair will be entering his seventh season with the team and he will be looking to improve on his already stellar resume. Blair has compiled a 111-57 record in his six years, and was the fastest West Chester coach to reach 100 wins. He has also steered the Golden Rams to back-to-back 20 win seasons, something that the great, flashy guard never did while playing at West Chester. Coach Blair, and the rest of the coaching staff, along with the players, are all hoping, and expecting to do good things next year. With the leadership of the guys returning, and the new guys that will be entering Blair’s system, the Golden Rams basketball team will only go up from here, and will look to get revenge of East Stroudsburg next seasson, along with the goal of winning the PSAC championship, and the ultimate challenge, the NCAA Divsion II tournament, in which, of course, they fell this year to IUP, 75-68.

wcupagoldenrams.com

IUP dominating in free throws, rebounds, field goal percentage, and assists, for West Chester to be only down one point with two and half of a minute to go was a gift in its own. However, you have to give it to the Rams for sticking with it in a game where they did not play their best basketball, and having a chance to win it at the end. With 24 seconds left, West Chester was down 71-68 and IUP was inbounding the ball underneath the basket. The Hawks tried to throw the ball in around half court, but Givens intercepted the pass, and unfortunately, he stepped in the front court, then took the ball backcourt due to his momentum. He then again took the ball in the front court, causing a backcourt violation, and ending West Chester’s chances of winning, as the Crimson Hawks made their free throws, and sealed the deal. For West Chester, this ended their season, and ended the great careers of seniors Troy Hockaday, Shannon Givens, Tom Sharkey, R.J. Griffin, Ryan McKeaney, and Rasheed Wilkins. You have to be proud of the great effort they have given throughout the season. As for next season they will turn to Cory Blake, Matt Wise-

Ryan Calpin is a second-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalisim. He can be reached at RC784188@wcupa.edu.

Wo

By S


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 23

Women’s lacrosse drops nailbiter to Mercyhurst in overtime By AJ Arcaini Staff Writer

T

he West Chester University women’s lacrosse team entered the season ranked No. 7 in the country this season and second in the PSAC conference after an impressive 2013 campaign. The Rams finished the 2013 season 15-4 (10-1 PSAC) and a PSAC championship after defeating nationally ranked Lock Haven. WCU looked to continue their 2013 success into the 2014 season as they began on March 16 at Queens College in Charlotte, N.C. In their season opener, the Rams came from behind to defeat No. 12 ranked Queens College 6-5. Freshman Olivia Martin scored three goals for the Golden Rams in the victory, all coming in just a four-minute span. Sophomore Hannah Cowan scored with five minutes remaining in the contest to give the Rams the lead, but Queens College quickly struck back to tie the game 5-5. Cowan found the back of the cage again with only 45 seconds left to give WCU a 6-5 lead and an opening-day win. Senior goalkeeper Jess Henderson made 10 saves in the win. WCU did not have to wait long to return to the field. The next day, the Rams faced off with Newberry College in Newberry, S.C. The Rams dominated this game by a score of 18-5.Junior Sarah Dennison scored five goals and added an assist in the dominant victory for WCU. Senior Jordan Heidelbaugh registered three goals in the win while Ashley Pyle, Erin Eckert, and Martin each added their own two goals. The game began with a 1-1 tie, but

Chester was not Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor enough to hold off BU, as the Rams fell for the first time in the 2014 season, 15-14. WCU exploded out of the gates, taking an early 6-1, but Bloomsburg fired right back. West Chester continued to fight, taking a 12-10 lead in the second half, but the Huskies bounced back yet again, tying the game at 12 with 10 minutes remaining. Bloomsburg went on a three-goal run, and WCU never recovered, falling for the first time this season, 15-14. Cowan, Dennison, Heidelbaugh, and freshman Kelsey Gumbert each added two goals in the Senior Jordan Heidelbaugh tosses a shot on net in Fridays contest. loss for the Rams. WCU ventured the Rams adding 10 points Friday’s game against Mercyhurst goalie Rebecca to Kutz- on two goals and eight as- Slippery Rock was a close Muscella to secure the win t o w n sists in a 22-3 dominant contest, with WCU finding for the Lakers. Cowan regU n i v e r - win for West Chester. the winning end 10-8. Cow- istered another six goals, sity on Heidelbaugh, Cowan, and an scored five goals while giving her 11 goals in the T u e . , sophomore Erin Scheno Eckert added four to lead past two games. Cifelli March 25 each added three goals the Rams to Victory. The also registered seven more to face off while Eckert and Gumbert Rams forced 21 first-half points to add to her impreswith the added two a piece. Hender- turnovers to control the sive point total on the seas t r u g - son made five saves in net defense side of the game, son. The loss sits the Rams g l i n g and freshman Courtney which helped control the at 5-2 on the season and 2-2 K u t z - O’Connell made her first game. The 10-8 victory was in the PSAC. t o w n collegiate appearance in a good start to a four-game West Chester does not G o l d e n the last 10 minutes, record- home stand for the Rams, have to wait long to get B e a r s . ed one save and allowing who faced off the next day back into action. Tuesday, After a one goal. against Mercyhurst Uni- the Rams will face off with tough West Chester hosted versity. PSAC rivals Millersville P S A C the Lax4Life fundraiser at WCU faced off against University at Vonnie Gros loss in Vonnie Gros Field, starting Mercyhurst on a rainy Sat- field, and Friday against Blooms- on Fri., March 28 against urday afternoon, in a down- PSAC powerhouse Lock burg, the Slippery Rock University to-the wire game, which Haven University. The R a m s and Saturday against Mer- resulted in the second loss Rams will look to bounce looked to cyhurst University. for the Rams this season, back from the tough overrecover Lax4Life is a national 11-10. Mercyhurst’s Regan time loss and continue to and get campaign to help raise Kaestner found the cage build on what is already, Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor A West Chester forward attacks the opponents net in a back on awareness and support with 19 seconds left in OT yet another successful seatrack in for child and young-adult to seal the late victory for son in the making. match-up with Slippery Rock. the Tues- suicide prevention, West Mercyhurst. AJ Arcaini is a second-year student day af- Chester University is lucky Cowan recovered a loose majoring in communication studies burg Huskies in Blooms- ternoon contest. enough to host the fund- ball with seconds remain- with a minor in journalism. He can Cifelli posted another raiser this season for the ing, but a last-second at- be reached at AA788494@wcupa. burg, Pa. Unfortunately, the strong play of West excellent performance for PSAC conference. tempt was blocked by edu the Rams exploded with seven straight goals to take control and never look back. After the impressive spring break road trip in the Carolinas, the Rams returned home for their home opener on March 20 against Saint Thomas Aquinas College. The Rams came out slow, surrendering three early goals and falling behind 3-2. WCU battled back though and controlled the rest of first half, holding a 7-3 lead at the midway mark. Nine second-half goals gave West Chester the lead they were looking for and eventually the win. Freshman Dina Cifelli netted two goals and assisted five others for a game-high seven points. Dennison was impressive yet again, adding six goals for the Rams. After three non-conference games, West Chester finally opened up in PSAC play against the Blooms-


PAGE 24

THE QUAD SPORTS

MARCH 31, 2014

Lady Rams inconsistent to start the season By Dylan Harrison Special to The Quad

W

Golden Rams never looked back from there. Hayley Bollinger finished the game off in the sixth with a three-run homerun, putting West Chester up 10-0, ending the game due to the eight-run rule. The Golden Rams improved to 8-4 on the year. West Chester kept the momentum going the following day on March 15, with a pair of wins against Merrimack and Saint Michael’s College. The bats stayed hot early for the Golden Rams, getting out to a 5-0 lead over Merrimack in the fourth, before eventually winning the game 7-4 behind the starting pitching performance of Murl, who improved to 3-1 on the year. In the second game of the day, the Lady Rams’ bats exploded for a 19-1 win in five innings over Saint Michaels. West Chester scored 10 runs in the first, behind four RBIs for Jessica Shuck, including a two-run homerun and a two-RBI triple. Megan

the win in the circle. The Golden Rams moved to 10-4 on the year after the pair of victories over Merrimack and Saint Michaels. After starting the Florida trip out 4-0, the Golden Rams suffered their first loss of the trip on March 17 to the University of Sioux Falls. After falling behind 5-0 after five innings, the Golden Rams attempted a comeback, scoring two runs in each of the final two innings, including a two-run home-run by Kelly in the seventh. The four runs were not enough to overcome a strong Sioux Falls team, and the Lady Rams lost by a final score of 5-4. Kim Murl picked up the loss for West Chester. The Golden Rams continued to struggle in a pair of games on March 18, losing both of their games to Saint Leo University and Minnesota State University. After getting off to a great start in Florida, the West Chester offense was held to just one hit by a trio of Saint Leo pitchers. Erb suffered

est Chester University softball team capped off an up and down 13-game stretch in the past two weeks, including nine games in Clermont, Fla., by splitting the doubleheader against Kutztown on Thursday. The Golden Rams(6-4) started their nine-game road trip on Friday, March 14th against Northwood University of Michigan(9-6). Behind a complete game for pitcher Kim Murl, who improved to 2-1 on the year, WCU was able to defeat Northwood by a final score of 2-1, despite only managing a pair of hits, both by J.P Norris, who was coming off a week where she was named PSAC East Player of the Week. Down 1-0 in the top of the sixth inning, Megan Kelly drew a bases-loaded walk and Murl added to her performance wcupagoldenrams.com with some offense of her own, batting in Sarah Walasavage on a ground out for the game-winning run. The bats came alive for the Lady Rams later that evening in a dominant 10-0 six-inning win over New York Tech(0-1). Micaela McSpadden improved to 4-0 on the year The Lady Rams cheer their teamates on in a 5-2 victory against Kutztown after picking up the win in the circle, allowing five hits Kelly added three RBIs for the loss for the Rams, aland zero runs in four in- the Lady Rams, and Mc- lowing four runs and seven nings. Katie Erb closed out Spadden and Kelly Ander- hits in three innings, and the game for the Rams, al- son each added two RBIs of the Golden Rams went on lowing one hit. Jillian Mur- their own to help balance the lose by a final score of ray started off the scoring out the offense in the im- 7-0. In the second game, West in the second inning with pressive win for West Chesa two RBI double, and the ter. Sara O’Dell picked up Chester suffered a heart-

breaking loss to Minnesota against Lock Haven UniState, when Erb gave up versity(5-10) on March 22. a walkwcupagoldenrams.com off home run in the bottom of the seve n t h inning in her complete game. Ali Vavala had the lone run for the Golden Rams in the 2-1 loss. W e s t Chester moved to 10-7 on the year. West Chester closed In the first game, Murray out its Florida trip dur- blasted a pinch-hit, walking spring break by split- off, three-run homer to lift ting a pair of games with the Golden Rams to a 4-2 the University of Illinois victory. McSpadden picked up Springfield and University of Minnesota, Crookston on the win in relief to go 6-0 March 19. The losing streak on the year. In the second continued in the first game game of the double header, against Illinois-Springfield West Chester got out to a with the Golden Rams fall- 4-2 lead after four innings, ing 11-4. West Chester dug but Lock Haven came back themselves in an 8-0 hole with four runs in the fifth after three innings, and it and handed WCU a 6-4 was too much to overcome loss. West Chester(12-9, 1-1) after a trio of pitching from Murl, Erb, and McSpadden played its second pair of struggled with Erb picking PSAC games with a douup the loss and moving to bleheader on the road at Kutztown(6-11, 0-0) on 2-4 on the year. Coming off a four-game March 27. Trailing 2-0 in losing streak, the Golden the fourth inning of the Rams needed to finish their first game, Norris hit a solo Florida trip on a high note, homerun to cut the lead and they did just that, clos- in half, and West Chester ing their trip out with a went on to score four runs 9-0 win over Minnesota- in the fifth, behind an RBI Crookston later that day. double by Erin Quense. Erb pitched five inMcSpadden pitched a stellar three-hit complete nings of scoreless relief game, improving to 5-0 and picked up the win in on the year. West Chester the 5-2 victory in the first closed out its Florida trip game. In the second game with a record of 11-8 on the of the doubleheader, Kutztown scored two runs in year. West Chester(11-8) the bottom of the fifth, opened its PSAC play at bringing the game to a 2-2, home with a doubleheader and that’s the way things

stayed until West Chester scored in the top of tenth. Kutztown tied the game in the bottom of the tenth off a catcher’s interference and won on a bases-loaded walk-off single to top West Chester 4-3. Erb suffered the loss in relief for the Golden Rams, who moved to 13-10 overall and 2-2 in PSAC play on the year. Saturday’s doubleheader at home against Philadelphia University was postponed, so that West Chester can make up its conference doubleheader, and no make-up date has been announced. West Chester looks to get some sort of consistency going into the upcoming games, after the stretch of 13 games which featured a four-game winning streak and a four-game losing streak. WCU is 10-1 on the year when they score five or more runs, and McSpadden is a perfect 6-0 on the mound. The Lady Rams have an action-packed week ahead of them, with doubleheaders against Millersville University on March 30, Mansfield University on March 31, Shippensburg University on April 1, East Stroudsburg University on April 4, and finally back at home against Bloomsburg University on April 5. Dylan Harrison is a second-year student majoring in communications with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at DH785892@ wcupa.edu

By Mi S


MARCH 31, 2014

THE QUAD SPORTS wcupagoldenrams.com

W

est Chester pitcher Matt McAllister, and the rest of the Golden Rams pitching staff have helped them become a strong contender in the PSAC. Through a rain and snow filled season

PAGE 25 thus far, the Golden Rams hold a 3-3 record in the PSAC, and a 10-6 record overall. In particular, McAllister had a very strong game against Kentucky Wesleyan in which he threw a complete game shutout,

where he struck out nine batters, and only allowed three hits en route to the Golden Rams 12-0 victory. To read more about the West Chester baseball team, please read the article below written by Michael Murphy.

Athlete of the Week: Hannah Cowan

wcupagoldenrams.com

This week’s athlete of the week is women’s lacrosse player Hannah Cowan. Cowan scored a combined 11 goals in two games over the weekend.She also registered three assists in the win on Friday.

Golden Rams strike out at Bloomsburg, lose doubleheader By Michael Murphy Staff Writer

A

fter sweeping Kutztown last weekend, West Chester University baseball finally cracked the top ten in the National Collegiate Baseball Writers’ Association (NCBWA) for Division II baseball. With that being said, one would hope that the Golden Rams would not rest on their laurels and look to advance from the number eight spot they currently occupy. They would not help their cause as they dropped both games of a double header on Thursday to Bloomsburg. In game one of the double header, Bloomsburg put on a show, slaughtering West Chester 10-2. However, offense was not the big story in this one. Bloomsburg’s

starter Casey Cooperman shut down West Chester’s offense as he went the distance en route to getting the win for his ball club. All of his hits allowed were singles except for the home run he surrendered to Justin Roman in the sixth inning. By that time it was too late for West Chester to stop the senior pitcher who had dominated them the entire day. Cooperman went seven strong innings, allowing seven hits, two runs, and one walk. Cooperman struck out seven Golden Rams and induced two double plays. Cooperman certainly received plenty of help from his offense as Bloomsburg scored in every inning except for the third and sixth innings. West Chester used three pitchers and not one

of them made it past three innings on the hill. Despite the tough loss in game one, West Chester was looking for that spark in game two. They would not get that spark. Instead there would be more of the same as Bloomsburg once again shut down West Chester and took game two 5-1. West Chester’s team captain Fred Breidenbach took the hill in the night cap. Breidenbach and Bloomsburg starter Tyler Hill would go inning for inning, as both starters went the distance for their ball clubs. Hill would get the best of Breidenbach as he followed up Cooperman’s performance with a complete game of his own. Needless to say, Bloomsburg’s bullpen was given an unofficial day off.

Hill’s line was seven innings pitched, while allowing six hits, one run, and three walks. He struck out only three, as most of his outs were recorded as fly outs and ground outs. West Chester had opportunities to capitalize on offense, but failed to score as they left nine men on base in the game. They stranded three men in the top of the seventh as they looked to dig themselves out of a 5-1 hole at that point. Despite the loss, Breidenbach threw a good game only giving up five runs, only three of them earned runs. “For me I believe the approach was quality all game,” said Breidenbach. “However, there were a few pitches execution-wise I would like to have back that would have helped minimize some damage es-

pecially with two outs.” Breidenbach’s line was six innings pitched, five hits, five runs, and one walk. He struck out three batters in his loss which makes his record now 1-3. West Chester certainly had their work cut out for them as they entered this game. Bloomsburg is a competitive school in the PSAC which means games like this past Thursday cannot happen often. The Golden Rams struggled in all facets of the game, whether it was pitching, offense, or defense. Head Coach Jad Prachniak stated earlier this season that there will be games like this, in which the offense struggles one day, and the defense the next, or both the offense and defense will struggle at the same time. It is all about consistency.

“Overall we have discussed putting together better at-bats and maximizing our opportunity,” said Breidenbach when asked about the offensive woes against Bloomsburg. Hopefully this double head was just a bump in the road for a West Chester team that is looking to return to their 2012 Division II national championship form. Every great team sees ups and downs during the season, there is only one thing the Rams can do about this loss: learn from it. West Chester will have another shot at evening the score with Bloomsburg on Monday afternoon starting at 1p.m. and 3p.m. Michael Murphy is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at MM802071@wcupa.edu


PAGE 26

THE QUAD SPORTS

Men’s tennis gets served

Lady Rams place second at championships By Lauren Bilenki Special to The Quad

W

est Chester University’s women’s gymnastics team finished in a tie for second place with Southern Connecticut State University at the 31st annual ECAC Division II Championships Sat., March 22 inside Sturzebecker Health Science Center. The ECAC Division II conference consists of three schools: West Chester University, Southern Connecticut State University, and Bridgeport University. Bridgeport University captured its sixth straight and 17th overall championship with a team score of 192.875. WCU and SCSU shared second place with identical team scores of 190.250. This marks the first time the Golden Rams placed second at the championships since joining the ECAC Division II field. Three Lady Rams have been honored with end of the year ECAC awards. Freshman Majesta Valentine was named ECAC Rookie of the Year. Five times throughout the year Valentine was named Rookie of the Week by the league office. Along with this prestigious honor, Valentine finished second in the all-around competition with a 38.375, first on the balance beam scoring a 9.750, and placed third on the floor exercise (9.775) and vault (9.750). Senior Emily Seigel was named ECAC ScholarAthlete of the Year. Seigel has maintained a 3.833 cumulative GPA in her time here at West Chester University. She will graduate in May with a degree in Early Childhood Education and a minor in Literacy. At the ECAC championships on Saturday, Seigel positively completed her final home

meet at West Chester. She placed sixth on beam with a 9.675 and led the Lady Rams to the top score with a 47.900. Seigel’s 9.575 on the uneven bars was good for seventh place on the event. Sophomore Meghan Brannon earned the title of Specialist of the Year for her performance on the uneven bars, where she averaged a 9.64 on the season. Brannon has proven to be extremely consistent and reliable for the Golden Rams on the uneven bars. The championships were an overall team effort. WCU Gymnastics topped the 48-point plateau for the fourth time this season on the floor exercise. Behind Valentine, senior Paige Griffin finished in a sixth place tie with a score of 9.725, Emily Harrison scored a 9.575, Stephanie Plaugher had a 9.55, and Kirsten Torres and Seigel each scored a 9.525. WCU finished out their ECAC championships on the balance beam. The team had a strong performance that helped them capture the tie for second place in the team competition. Lindsay Knapp was fifth with a 9.75, Cecelia Lorenzen scored a 9.4, and Melissa Prisco added a 9.375. After an excellent end of the season championship, the Rams will be sending five gymnasts to Collegiate Nationals on April 12th at Brown University. Brannon qualified on the uneven bars, Knapp qualified on the balance beam, freshman Selena Swanger qualified on the vault, Seigel will be competing on the uneven bars and balance beam, and lastly Valentine will compete in the all around competition. Lauren Bilenki is a third-year student majoring in accounting and finance. She can be reached at LB759145@wcupa.edu

Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor

T

he West Chester men’s tennis team had a rough threeday stretch, dropping three matches in a row over the course of said three days. The three losses damaged the Golden Rams’ record, as they now sit at 3-5. West Chester’s first loss took place on March 18, where the Rams traveled to Florida Southern College in Lakeland, FL. The Rams’ fought valiantly, but FSC was too strong to overcome, beating the Rams 9-0. The Rams lost all three doubles competitions, as well as six singles competition. The next day, West Chester trekked to Tampa, Fl. to play against South Eastern University. Though the Rams put up another admirable effort, it was not enough once again, as SEU defeated West Chester with a final score of 7-2. The wins came to the doubles team of Lars Kristiansen and Jimmy Aridas with a final score of 8-6, and J.J. Cooke in singles competition, where he defeated his opponent 6-1, 6-1 in straight sets. On their last day in Florida, the Rams traveled to St. Petersburg to face off with Eckerd College. The Rams, unfortunately enough, could not bring home the win, suffering the same defeat as they did at FSC, losing 0-9. Rams’ players Jared Howatt and J.J. Cooke

played notably well, but could not put Eckerd away. The loss ended West Chester’s trip to Florida, but there is still plenty of time to recover for the Golden Rams. West Chester’s next matchup will be at home, where they will go against the University of Sciences in Philadelphia on March 18. The school is a tough matchup for the Golden Rams, as they currently sit on a record of 4-1. Following that matchup, West Chester will next be going on the road, taking on Bloomsburg University. The matchup, which takes place on April 1, should be an easier task for West Chester, as their rivals currently own a 1-6 record. They recently won their first match of the season, defeating Daemen College (N.Y.) 8-1. The Golden Rams then go on a four-game streak against fellow opponents in the PSAC Conference. The Rams will host Mercyhurst University and Edinboro University on April 4 and 5, respectively. The Rams then go on the road to Kutztown University on April 9, finishing off by playing Millersville University at home on April 10. Their remaining schedule is far from easy, but the Golden Rams must win if they want to stay alive in the PSAC Conference. With the team now about halfway through the season, West Chester will have to make strides sooner rather than later. Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu.

MARCH 31, 2014

By G Speci


MARCH 31, 2014

Men’s track dominates Cecco shined during this track meet. He finished first within the men’s high jump with a distance of 1.90 meters and finished first in the men’s triple jump with a distance of 12.86 meters along with a wind gust of 1.4. DeCecco, sophomore from Mechanicsburg, Pa., is enjoying much success with the track team this season. Before kicking off the

THE QUAD SPORTS

lin Mascola and freshman Colin Vannicolo. Despite finishing in the middle of the standings, Mascola and he West Chester UniVannicolo placed in almost versity’s men’s track every men’s event. and field started their Events in which Masoutdoor on March 22 at the cola placed in: long jump Golden Rams Invitational heptathlon (5th), shot put in West Chester, Pa. in heptathlon (1st), pole vault John A. Farrell Stadium. It Heptathlon (6th), 1000-mewas a breezy and warm day, ter run heptathlon (5th) with a high of 65 degrees. and high jump heptathVarious schools were in lon (4th). Events wcupagoldenrams.com attendance that range in which Vannicolo from Neumann, Lincoln, placed in: 60-meImmaculata, University ter dash heptathof Scranton, and other collon (7th), long jump leges. heptathlon (8th), The men of WCU’s high jump heptathtrack team finished first lon (6th), 60-meter in the 110 meter hurdles. hurdles heptathlon Five Golden Rams fin(4th), 60-meter dash ished within five of the top heptathlon (7th). 12 spots. Coming in first Shippensburg finplace was Mark Van Teyished first and won ens. The sophomore finthe championship ished with a time of 15.26. with a total of 211 Ryan Heimbach and Miles points while BloomsRansom of West Chester burg finished last finished second and third in 11th place with a place respectively. The total of eight points. men’s track and field team Runner-ups behind also finished first in 100- Joseph DeCecco, sophmore for the Golden Shippensburg were meter-dash, as well. East Shroudsburg Alex Foulke, junior, fin- Rams’ men’s track and field team, has been in second place with outstanding as of late. DeCecco won many ished first out of 41 contesa total of 109 points tants with a time of 11.17. events recently, including the high jump, as and Slippery Rock Ricky Bruno finished secwell as the triple jump. in third place with a ond behind Foulke with total of 100.50. This a time of 11.20. However, outdoor season, the men’s was Shippensburg’s fourth Ricky Bruno also finished track and field had wrapped consecutive back-to-back first in the men’s 200-me- up their indoor season with titles in the PSAC indoor ter dash out of 45 other the PSAC Indoor Track track and field championcompetitors. Other Rams & Field Championship on ship. who placed in the contest March 3rd. West Chester As the Golden Rams Inwere Foulke (4), Heimbach ended up finishing in sev- vitational came to a con(9), Gabriel Logan (15), and enth place out of 11 schools. clusion, the Rams finished Van Teyens (18). They accumulated a total of first in eight events last West Chester’s men fin- 34.5 points over the course Saturday. Sophomore Joe ished first in eight events of a two-day meet. DeCecco won two events: at the Golden Rams InDuring that meet, the the triple jump and the high vitational. Those events Golden Rams had finished jump. Now West Chester were the 4x100 relay, 100 the 4x400 relay with a time will get ready and prepare -meter hurdles, 100-meter of 3 minutes and 21 sec- for their next track meet in dash, 400-meter hurdles, onds, which was the NCAA Towson, Md. at the Towson 200-meter dash, 4x400- me- provisional time. Fresh- Invitational. After that, the ter relay, high jump and men Ghassan, Dix, Shawn men’s track and field will the triple jump. In five of Young, and Upperclassmen have another meet in Millthose eight events, WCU Foulke and Nick Drozd ersville, Pa. on April 5 at the won by a large margin. As placed fourth overall for the Millersville Invitational. a whole team, West Chester Rams in the 4x400 relay Gabe Smith is a second-year studetn finished first in the 4x100 event. majoring in communication studrelay and 4x400 relay with Two members that really ies with a minor psychology minor. a time of 42.25 and 3.21.83, stood out during the indoor He can be reached at GS783203@ respectively. Joseph De- meet were sophomore Col- wcupa.edu.

By Gabe Smith Special to The Quad

T

PAGE 27

Phillies’ season looks bleak Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

I

t could be a long year for the Phillies’ nine. That does not mean that it will, but as the Phillies take the field for their opening series against the Texas Rangers, there is not exactly a burst of optimism. The team that once dominated the National League and monopolized national media attention has receded back into the shadows with two straight sub-par seasons. For a variety of factors, 2014—which originally was thought to be a possible resurgence year for the Phillies—does not look very promising. It started with a free agency period in which the Phillies made less of a splash, and more of plop. In what was supposed to be a building block of sorts for the team, the Phillies came up empty handed in terms of difference makers. Back-up players such as Reid Brignac, Will Nieves, Bobby Abreu, Tony Gwynn Jr. and Jayson Nix were all signed around the Phillies’ biggest offensive free agent pick up of the winter—a 36-year old Marlon Byrd, coming off a career year with the Mets. They made better progress signing pitchers—inking veterans A.J. Burnett and Roberto Hernandez—but it hardly matters. With the exceptions of Byrd and Burnett, these are not difference makers. Some of them did not even make the Opening Day roster. Even those two signings, though solid, are not huge. What the Phillies did

this offseason appeared to be worked around the notion that their regulars were going to be healthy and were going to produce. And that, ultimately, is what is causing the doubt going into the 2014 campaign. Start with injuries. Roy Halladay retiring left a hole in the rotation that would have been filled with a guy like Burnett. That would have made a starting rotation of Cole Hamels, Cliff Lee, Burnett, Kyle Kendrick and then either Jon Pettibone, Roberto Hernandez or Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez. On paper that is an exceptional rotation. The only problem is half of those pitchers are injured. Hamels was shut down early in Spring Training due to shoulder fatigue, and will likely miss the first month of the season. Pettibone, who missed the last part of the 2013 season with shoulder soreness had recurring symptoms and was shut down, and Gonzalez, in addition to not nearly being ready to pitch in the Major Leagues as evident by his first few games, is currently on the 60-day disabled list with? You guessed it, shoulder soreness. So the rotation is just a shell of what it could have been right now. Hamels will be back and the top three will be intact, but a month is a long time to ride two, maybe three established starting pitchers and expect to win. To do it, the offense would need to drastically improve from 2013, when the Phillies hit .248 as a team and finished 27th of 30 teams in runs scored.

Spring Training was not a great indicator that those numbers would be any better. The team is still built around the core that led them through the early and mid 2000s—Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard, and Chase Utley. They are the big guns. The statistics prove that the Phillies are much more successful when they are in the lineup and producing. For the first time in a long time, they all appear to be healthy. But healthy does not mean being productive. Howard and Rollins both tied for the team lead in homers in Spring Training with three, but it is a misleading stat. Those home runs came within the last week of training, and their other numbers show how dismal they were during the spring. Howard finished with .227 average, which was best of the three. Rollins was benched for three straight games for his apparent lack of leadership, and finished with a paltry .173 average and .271 OBP, and Utley managed to pull his average up to .217 with a strong final Spring Training game. Not what the team needs from its core. Of course, it is just Spring Training and putting stock in spring stats is foolish. But the lack of performance, health, motivation and urgency early on certainly is something to be concerned about, and it could translate into the worst year the Phillies have had in quite some time. Kenny Ayres is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa.edu.


Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Sports

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Women’s lacrosse breaks even in weekend doubleheader at home- Page 23

Quad 106-07  

The Quad Issue of March 31st, 2014

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you