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Quad

The

W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

VOLUME 105, ISSUE 4

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Bid Day 2013

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Photo by: Ruth Hochberg


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News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor

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n Sept. 27, the Sykes auditorium filled with students and faculty for a 9 a.m. presentation by Dr. Maura Cullen. Many audience members were still yawning and tightly clutching their coffees, but their eagerness to hear Cullen speak was apparent. The presentation, entitled “35 Things Well-Intended People Say That Widen the Diversity Gap,” was well advertised by its sponsors—a fact that contributed greatly to Cullen’s large Friday morning audience.

Clare Haggerty News Editor

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n Sept. 26, West Chester University’s Women’s Center decorated the campus with umbrellas to honor RAINN Day. According to RAINN’s website, or the Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network, RAINN Day is their “annual day of action to raise awareness and educate students about sexual violence on college campuses.” “The whole point of RAINN Day is to raise awareness about sexual assault and the violence that happens in society, but it’s a really difficult topic to talk about,” said Maggie Eder, graduate

Cullen received her Doctorate degree in Social Justice and Diversity Education at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. She has taught countless colleges and organizations to embrace diversity throughout her 25 years as a speaker. Her highly-acclaimed book, “35 Dumb Things WellIntended People Say: Surprising Things We Say That Widen The Diversity Gap,” formed the basis for her presentation to West Chester University. Cullen wasted no time in getting her audience awake and energized. She began the presentation by challenging the audience. She asked people to

THE QUAD NEWS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Dr. Maura Cullen educates WCU audience get into pairs. One partner had to make a fist with both hands, and the other partner had to attempt to separate the fist. After most people spent their time viciously prying apart their partners’ hands with force, Cullen announced that there was a simple solution: just ask. One member of the audience had simply asked her partner to open her hands, rather than resorting to physical methods. Cullen used this demonstration as a metaphor for our everyday attempts at communication. “We make things harder than they need to be,” she explained. “The most efficient way to get what you want is to seek cooperation and ask.” Cullen then spoke about how her principle applies to diversity. She noted that we “clump” with

people who think and look like us because we believe these people are the ones who have the least chance of getting offended by the dumb things we say. And, according to Cullen, we say a lot of dumb things. In order to break free from our clumps and reach out to other groups of people, we have to seek cooperation and ask questions. We have to admit that we do not always know everything. Most importantly, we have to admit that the things we say have unintended consequences. Cullen dove into a shortened list of the “35 dumb things” from her book. Statements like “That’s so gay” or “that’s so retarded” are all too commonly used among young people today. However, Cullen reminds us that these statements are

never meant to be compliments. Even if we say them without intending to do harm, we are sending a message that we do not respect the gay community and people with down-syndrome. Similarly, the statement “Some of my best friends are…” (fill in the blank) is our attempt at trying to prove that we are diverse and understanding. However, it sends the message that we think we can relate to a whole group of people just because we know one person from that group. It denies the uniqueness of everyone as a human being. Cullen kept the audience laughing throughout her presentation while still managing to get a serious point across: in order to promote diversity on campus and in our

WCU participates in RAINN Day assistant of the Women’s Center. “The reason we do umbrellas is so that people can take it as they go. We don’t want to force the conversation; people should talk about it at their own time.” The Women’s Center helped WCU participate in RAINN Day by placing white umbrellas painted with statistics about sexual assault and urging students to get and give verbal consent. The fact-covered umbrellas dotted the campus, with many of them being scattered throughout the academic quad and around other buildings like the Sykes Student Union. “I didn’t know what the umbrellas were about at first,” said WCU student

AJ Arcaini. “But it definitely made me curious enough to look into it.” “Sexual assault is really prevalent on college campuses, including West Chester,” Eder said. “We’re doing a lot to educate about sexual misconduct, but what we really want is to just make people more aware. People just don’t know how to talk about this stuff, and for that reason, rape and sexual assault cases have become too common, just because communication has broken down. We just wanted to make people at least a little more comfortable talking about it.” In an effort to help educate WCU students further about the importance of consent, the Women’s Center is host-

ing an upcoming Consent is Sexy program. Consent is Sexy is the theme of the Women’s Center for both the fall and the spring semesters, because the staff at the Women’s Center wants to stress the significance of giving and receiving consent so that students better understand what they individually are comfortable with doing. Students interested in learning more about Consent is Sexy or any of the other numerous programs offered by the Women’s Center can visit the Women’s Center on the second floor of Lawrence, or visit their website at wcupa.edu/ womenscenter. Clare Haggerty is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.

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lives, we must think before we speak and take responsibility for our words. To take a step in the right direction, WCU provided a flyer to attendees with many opportunities to learn about and embrace diversity on campus. Options include the following: scheduling a diversity 411 workshop by contacting Marcie Cohen at MC606396@wcupa. edu, becoming an LGBTQA Ally by signing up on the LGBTQA Services homepage, and becoming a mentor for the Office of Multicultural Affairs by contacting Querida Lugo at qlugo@wcupa.edu. The “WCU For All of Us” calendar on the Social Equity homepage also has a list of diversity events. Molly Herbison is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MH757997@wcupa.edu.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Laura Wayne Copy Editor

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n Sept. 24, Dr. Mary Buckelew and a community of interested West Chester graduate students and teachers gathered in the Phillips Autograph Library to witness a series of self-proclaimed, literary speakers through the sponsorship of the Pennsylvania Writing Literature Project (PAWLP) Author Series. Beginning in 1980, PAWLP remains one of the oldest and largest programs of the National Writing Project (NWP). PAWLP provides professional development, resources, and research to communities of those interested in literature education, while also working to improve the teaching of writing and learning in

THE QUAD NEWS

WCU hosts authors as part of PAWLP

schools and in the public. PAWLP believe that highquality educational experience should be accessible to all learners and students. PAWLP further supports educational improvement through structured leadership programs for all. The PAWLP Author series is entering its second year at West Chester University, now able to host more sessions than ever before. Through the series, students, teachers, and the public are invited to attend a variety of sessions intended to grow and expand their exposure to various genres of writing. Attendees are also given the opportunity to pose questions regarding the process of both self and professional publication. PAWLP hosts a series of such workshops and lectures throughout the semester, each session

centering on a different theme. This particular session was geared towards self-published and professionally published authors, focusing primarily on memoir writing. There were four authors in attendance. Each author spoke for approximately 10 minutes, sharing such information as their writing process, the inspiration for their works, the outline of each document, and their favorite excerpts from each piece. Authors shared a variety of literary documents used to compile their memoirs. Authors shared a multitude of items ranging from poetry and prose, to multi-genre pieces including photographs, passports, and birth certificates. Following the presentation section of the event was a question and answer session. Students and

Government shutdown looms ominously By Jessica Macay Special to The Quad

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n Sept. 30, the government resolution will come to an end with the risk of another government shutdown threat. House Republicans are fed up with Obamacare and have made it clear that they are attempting to defund the Affordable Health Care Act. If the House and Senate cannot come to an agreement before the Sept. 30 deadline, the looming shut down will become reality. With Obama in office as president, he has the power to veto defunding Obamacare, leaving citizens wondering why the defunding threat is occurring. The White House Twitter quoted Obama

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as saying, “Nobody gets to hurt our economy and millions of innocent people just because there are a couple laws you don’t like. #enoughalready.” The tweet was a frank response to Republicans’ support of defunding Obamacare. The last government shutdown occurred in 1995. All national parks were shut down, federal workers were placed on furlough and did not get paid during the shutdown, small business loans were put on hold, and law enforcement worked on IOUs. If the shutdown were to happen again, these problems would be the same for our current nation. “I believe we should stand our ground,” said

Senator Cruz on Fox News. Cruz made it clear that he does not support Obamacare and is willing to shut down the government for his belief. On the other hand, Cruz’s fellow Republican, Senator Marco Rubio, has taken the more cautious approach. “I don’t know of anyone who wants to shut down the government. The only thing we want to shut down is Obamacare.” Both Senators have their own way of campaigning for defunding Obamacare but that does not change the fact that a government shutdown will occur if they vote to defund Obamacare in the upcoming resolution. Jessica Macay is a fourth-year communication studies major. She can be reached at JM747402@wcupa. edu.

teachers enjoyed asking such questions as suggestions for informative memoir writing, what activities the authors do when they are not writing, how much money they make, and their process of writing. Because writing accurately from memory at an early age can be extremely difficult, an audience member questioned how the authors were able to differentiate between fact and fiction in their memoir writing. One author explained the importance of researching and asking questions from various relatives or friends who were also present. They stressed the importance of asking such questions sooner rather than later because the passing of loved ones can allow the details of many stories to be forgotten. When in doubt, one author

explained, the memory can be truer than reality. The host and director of the PAWLP series, Dr. Mary Buckelew states “the PAWLP Author series provides the authors and attendees with time to interact and ponder the art of writing together in an entertaining and edifying fashion.” The low-key yet professional atmosphere allows the authors to feel at ease sharing in their journey of creating such memoirs and pieces. The conversational setting further allows those in attendance to feel more interactive and open with the authors. Many of the students in attendance were graduate students from Buckelew’s graduate class. Of these students, many are well on their way to selfpublishing and professionally publishing their own

pieces of literature. Due in large part to the question and answer section, many of the students were able to interact on a more personal level with these authors, and share in the experience and difficulty of writing and finishing a piece. After facing some difficulty in completing a memoir, one student stated, “It’s inspiring to see the differences in approaches to memoirs… [this was] very powerful, and very inspiring.” Buckelew explains from experience that “attendees leave inspired and excited to write or read or both!” The session was designed to encourage and motivate students to write their own memoirs, and to write them sooner rather than later. One author who was much older, commented

N D R E I WS E W R

esearchers have recently confirmed that there are two species of mice that sing to avoid fights. The mice, both kinds of which live in Central America, have been caught on tape throwing their heads back and belting out songs in order to mark their territory and keep other mice from starting fights with them.

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n officer arrived on the scene in Florida after he got a call about a man whose hands were covered in cuts. As it turns out, the man smashed through his own windshield to get into his car after he’d been locked out of it -- because it was surrounded by alligators. The man was allegedly high on cocaine at the time of the incident. His reasoning was that insurance would cover the windshield, but his first priority was to get away from the gators.

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hocktoberfest, a Halloween-themed attraction in Sinking Spring, PA made headlines recently with the addition of a Naked and Scared haunted house. Patrons were encouraged to go through the house in the buff. However, this option has been revoked by request of the town of Sinking Spring, the residents of which are not enjoying the negative publicity. The proprietor of Shocktoberfest, however, hopes to bring Naked and Scared back for the whole season next year.

See PAWLP, page 4


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THE QUAD NEWS

Borough prepares for Chester County Day

PAWLP from page 3 on the importance of documenting one’s memoirs before it is too late. She encouraged everyone to take up a pen and paper and write down their own stories while they still can, regardless of whether or not they feel they have a story to tell. To quote Alex Haley, “Every time an old person dies, it’s like a library burning down.” One author added, “We all have stories to tell.” Now, it is a matter of whether or not you are ready to tell them. The next PAWLP series session will feature publishing in peer-reviewed journals, and the other will feature Young Adult Literature authors. The events are free and open to all students and the public. To find out more information about the PAWLP series and for dates and times of the upcoming sessions on campus, visit pawlp.org. Laura Wayne is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at LW738484@wcupa.edu.

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

By Shayma Hussain Special to The Quad

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ct. 5, 2013 will mark the 73rd anniversary of Chester County Day. The Women’s Auxiliary has organized the day featuring historical homes, architecture, art, landscaping, and antiques in the Northwest Quadrant of Chester County. The Chester County Day is the oldest House Tour in the nation. It is a tradition since 1936, drawing more than 3,500 people from across the United States and Canada. The day is one of the Women’s Auxiliary funded projects to better improve the Chester County Hospital. The proceeds of this year’s tour is going to the Chester County Hospital Emergency Department.

“We have a half million dollar pledge to remodel and enhance the emergency room,” said Debbie Harris, house committee chairperson. The Chester County Day House Tour has three areas of focus this year. It includes a walking tour of the Borough of West Chester, a tour of the Coatesville area and its historic steel industry, and finally a tour of the Ironmaster’s country in the vast Northwest quadrant of the county. Tourists can begin the day with the Chester County fox hunt, which is an optional participation that has been a Chester County Day tradition for many years. The hunt will start at 9:00 a.m. sharp at Warwick County Park on Route 23, Ridge Road in Warwick Township.

The Borough of West Chester was chosen as one of the “Best Old-House Neighborhoods for 2012” by This Old House, which is an American home improvement magazine and television series aired on the American television station Public Broadcasting Service which follows remodeling projects of houses over a number of weeks, according to their website. On the page of ThisOldHouse.com/bestplaces, West Chester was highlighted on several categories including walkability, easy commute, American heritage, and small towns. “The Chester County Day is a great opportunity for Chester County residents to volunteer, experience culture, spend the day with family and friends, and give back to

the community,” Harris said. The Day can be particularly special for the West Chester University students to help them understand their school town culture. “Whether they are art students or just interested in gardening, there will be something to fit your interests,” explained Cathy Martin, Chester County Day publicity committee chairperson. Tickets for Chester County Day cost $40 for the main tour; however, tourists may get VIP tickets. The VIP tickets cost $100 which included a preview private party on Sept. 28 attended by Chester County Day homeowners and VIPs, a car by Otto’s BMW to attend the tour, and a complementary picnic lunch

by Arianna’s Gourmet Café. To learn more about the Chester County Day Tour and to purchase tickets, participants can visit the Chester County Hospital’s volunteerism page or attend any of the several free public preview lectures and PowerPoint presentation of every home and landmark in the tour offered by the Women’s Auxiliary. A lecture is offered on Oct. 1 at 7:00 p.m. at the Chester County Hospital in the Mira Conference Room, and the more lectures are offered on Oct. 4 at 5:00, 6:00, and 7:00 p.m. at Longwood Gardens, and at 6:00 and 7:30 p.m. at the Chester County Historical Society Auditorium.

By Sean Breen Special to The Quad

Donato and Como that they were taking money from the school. The release of the text messages to the public has created public displeasure. Community members actively spoke out, demanding the termination of both men. As for the overwhelming 6-to-1 vote, Dr. Tanya Thames Taylor was the only board member to vote against. Joe Dunn, James Fox, Bill Sweigart, Paul Johnson, Laurie Knecht, and school board President Neil Campbell were among those who voted yes. Two board members did not attend the meeting so they were conferencecalled into the conversations, but they were left out of the voting. Donato abruptly resigned from this Athletic Director position on Aug. 29, followed by the retirement of Como on Sept. 2.

Although both of these men are no longer working for the Coatesville Area School District, there has been and will continue to be an investigation by the Chester County District Attorney Thomas Hogan. “We had an investigation that pre-dated these texts and these phones,” Hogan said. “What then happened was we had developed sources during the course of the investigation, and one night, one of those sources called me up and said these texts have been discovered – there are racist comments, and in addition there are comments about skimming, we are afraid that these phones are going to be either destroyed or that they will never see the light of day.”

Shayma Hussain is a graduate student at West Chester University. She can be reached at SH627717@wcupa. edu.

Offensive text messages making waves

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n Sept. 24, the Coatesville Area School District Board voted 6 to 1 to accept the retirement of the Superintendent Richard Como and the resignation of the Athletic Director Jim Donato from the Coatesville School District. Donato and Como were using their school-issued cell phones to send racial and sexist text messages back and forth to one another. One word that was constantly tossed around during their conversations was the “n” word. As they should have learned from Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Riley Cooper, the use of this word is not accepted nor tolerated by the public. The conversation also included hints from

Sean Breen is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at SB718728@wcupa.edu.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

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Fall break quickly approaches at WCU

t may be only Monday, the first of five sure to be painfully long days of classes, exams, and due dates, but certainly I am not the only student looking ahead to Friday at say about 3 or 4 o'clock when the last class of the day finally wraps up and the beautiful 70-degree weather welcomes us to the weekend. The enticing fall-like weather is especially fitting this week as the campus amps up for fall break. I know, the break is technically only two days and the following Wednesday will sneak up far too quickly as usual, but still, the four-day weekend promises a healthy break from the stuffy walls of Main Hall. Though I am certain the rest of you are as pumped as I am, I worry for the few who may be uncertain how to make the most of the break. So just in case you do not have plans, or even more dreadful, you made plans to catch up on school work, here are a couple alternatives to fill your weekend.

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The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Joy Wilson Op-Ed Editor Colleen Cummings Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor Illana Berger Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Drew Schmitz Business Manager Andrew Miller Advertising Manager

EDITORIAL STAFF Jose Mestre Asst. Photography Editor Ryan Calpin Asst. Sports Editor

COPY EDITORS Stephanie Loeh Drew Drevyanko Laura Wayne Jeffrey Holmes

DISTRIBUTION Drew Schmitz Andrew Miller ONLINE EDITION Chris Wilwol FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Try venturing into Chester County. Though West Chester never fails to entertain, students should not miss the wealth of breathtaking scenery and fun fall events just a short car ride away. Get a few friends to pile in and wander out to Unionville this Submissions Policy weekend for their community fair which features the largest display of handcrafted Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the gifts, arts, and agricultural products in Chester County, not to mention petting zoos academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes and good food. 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be The local farms offer more fall fun with pumpkin patches, hayrides, and corn mazes. A few good ones include Hurricane Hill Farm in Coatsville, Wynnorr Farm in Glenn Mills, and the Marlborough Valley Corn Maze in Kennet Square. Flashlight mazes and haunted woods ensure entertainment for even the bravest among us. If barnyard animals are not your thing and you prefer macadam to cornfields, try checking out the Paoli Blues Festival and Street Fair on Saturday for some local music, food, and vendors. For the lucky ones over 21, the street fair also offers a newly added beer garden and Blues Pub Crawl. Of course, enjoy responsibly. Then go ahead and take Monday off to recover, or God forbid, do that last minute homework you have been putting off, because Tuesday kicks off West Chester's second annual Paint the Town Purple. Even if you do not sign up to volunteer to transform the town, at least attend the kick-off ceremony at Hotel Warner or gather after the window painting at Barnaby's for some great food. Then take a walk through town to check out the artwork and show some WCU pride before Homecoming. By then, hopefully the fall break will have refreshed us all, and the return to classes on Wednesday will be more comfortable than dreaded. Until then, happy fall break, WCU! - Joy Wilson Op-Ed Editor

sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright Š2013 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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THE QUAD OP-ED

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

New statue reminds WCU campus of Douglass’ legacy

By Jillian Jones Special to The Quad

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e have all seen it, the great blue marker which occupies the space between Main Hall and the Francis Harvey Green Library. The tall metal placard emblazoned with yellow lettering placed there by the state of Pennsylvania forever links our university with one of the most influential and important individuals of our nation’s history. The marker informs its viewership that it was on our campus roughly 118 years ago, where the abolitionist Fredrick Douglass gave his last public address. Though in the next few weeks, this marker will be out-shown, as another monument to Douglass is erected just across the quad. On Oct. 1 of this year, West Chester University

will unveil a statue honoring Douglass, just beyond the archway of the Phillips Memorial Building. The statue will depict a younger, almost college- age version of the abolitionist, reminding the students of this campus that every great leader and public figure, was once as young as we are now, and inspiring them to strive to achieve academic and personal greatness, despite whatever adversity they, as Douglass, face. The new statue and plaza will once again connect WCU with the iconic figure and shed light on Douglass’ affinity for the West Chester area. The statue also revisits Douglass' close friendship with George M. Phillips, the president of West Chester Normal School from 1881-1920, for whom Phillips Memorial hall is named. On Oct. 1 the two friends will share com-

Wcupa.edu

A digital representation shows students the plans for the new statue. pany once more, and the quad will house a stunning physical representation honoring the great leader along with his inspiring achievements. Douglass’ connection, and his lasting legacy has forever tied this university with the fight to abolish slavery, along with his quest to promote education and

social justice for all people, through the furthering of one’s education. Douglass’ legacy is not limited solely to the past; it is constantly at work on campus through the students and faculty who are members of the Fredrick Douglass Institute. The Institute is a valuable asset to WCU, as it encour-

ages students to be constantly open to the world of knowledge, while also inspiring students to use their thoughts and expression to seek change. The main four functions of the FDI on campus are to conduct research on multiculturalism and on Frederick Douglass, to establish opportunities for advanced study for public and private school teachers and for members of the academic community, to sponsor distinguished exhibits, lectures and library collections, and to collaborate with historical societies and other educational and cultural agencies. This work helps to ensure that Douglass’ legacy lives on through the students at West Chester, as we strive to further our education, and bring much needed change to the world around us, just as Douglass did from his

youth to his death. The new statue erected and dedicated on Oct. 1 will serve as a lasting reminder to the current and future students of WCU to always strive for excellence and to go beyond the expectations of society, so that we may create lasting change in this world as Douglass did. The ceremony will take place on Oct. 1 at 3 p.m. outside of the Philips Memorial Building, and is open to the public free of charge. For more information concerning Fredrick Douglass, his connections to West Chester, and the Fredrick Institute, visit their academic website, or visit their office on the fourth floor of Francis Harvey Green Library. Jillian Jones is a third-year student majoring in history. She can be reached at JJ761530@wcupa. edu.

Students appreciate support as they welcome families to WCU By Erin King Special to The Quad

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n a breezy summer day, standing at the bus stop ready for my first day of elementary school, I glance behind to take one last look at the people who will forever stand behind me— my family. Literally and figuratively, families are there to always be behind you, to be your backbone and support. Through thick and through thin, there is always something comforting about being able to glance over your shoulder and know that your family is there for you, and that they “got your back”. In a way, the words in that phrase “got your back” really come from those moments in a per-

son’s life where you turn around to get an encouraging look from your over-enthusiastic mother right behind you and it all feels okay; all negative thoughts vanish from existence and you know you have at least one supporter. When someone makes the commitment to “have your back” it is more than just being a complete supporter, it is a promise to always be there in times of need without judgment. Fortunately, the only people who are required to do those things are your family; they can never leave you behind. I really am a sucker for Disney animation and whenever I think about family the famous line from the movie Lilo and Stitch comes to mind,

“Ohana means family, family means nobody gets left behind. Or forgotten.” Not only does the quote make me miss my own family, but it also makes me appreciate the support and guidance they have given me throughout my transition into college. As a freshman, it is so easy to become overwhelmed and stressed and I am happy to say that my family has helped me get through all the struggles that I have faced thus far. I truly believe that it is vital to have your family’s support when you are in college. When I say support, I do not just mean financial support, but I also mean emotional support. Going to college is a huge change in lifestyle and there are emotional re-

percussions that come along with that. Having your family by your side means everything. From doing well in your classes, to feeling good about yourself, the emotional support that they provide is required to be the most successful version of yourself. Family weekend is here to give West Chester students a “pick me up” in the middle of the semester and to give them a chance to share their everyday lives with their family. I believe that every student should invite their families out and share the weekend with them because the support they provide is priceless. Erin King is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at EK800454@wcupa.edu.

Photo by Ilana Berger / Photography Edito

2013 Family Weekend orientation leaders pose in front of WCU ram.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

THE QUAD OP-ED

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Smartphones rob US culture of interpersonal connections

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By Drew Mattiola Special to The Quad

teve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. said in his commencement speech at Stanford University, “Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. Don't be trapped by dogma - which is living with the results of other people's thinking. Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.” Jobs was a man like no other. Beyond his years, he journeyed where no entrepreneur or tycoon had gone. From the ground up, Jobs single-handedly transformed the computer and consumer electronic industry into one of the most monumental mass media empires in the world. In his lengthy career spanning approximately 37 years, Jobs was widely renowned for his inconceivable contributions and revolutionary renditions made to Apple. After a heated power struggle with the board of directors, Jobs subsequently left Apple Inc. in 1985 to develop other computer platform companies. Jobs later returned to Apple as an advisor and eventually seized control of its operations as he nearly rescued the multinational conglomerate from bankruptcy in 1998. Jobs’ autocratic influence over Apple has often been cited as one of the greatest turnarounds in the history of business. While he was a highly competent inventor, he was a selfproclaimed philanthropist and he strongly emphasized learning, creativity, love, and humanity. Jobs spoke gallantly at of WCU ram. many schools and insti-

tutions to express these concepts, as he hoped to bring the stunning realization to the community that Apple’s products were design specifically with the intention to inspire and innovate. Jobs hoped to see Apple users become doers, believers, leaders and visionaries. He ultimately wanted to instill higher education and learning into his costumers as he pushed to steer the next generation into the fields of advertising and marketing, graphic design, computer science, entrepreneurship, and engineering. Jobs’ ingenuity and futurist mindset has fittingly established him as the charismatic pioneer of the personal computer revolution, and with that being said, he has carefully laid the groundwork for the communications industry. Despite his contributions to communications studies, it has become apparent that the smartphones and tablet devices have separated us as human beings more than they have brought us together. What’s truly dividing us from relating to each other is not Angry Birds, Facebook, Twitter or Candy Crush, but our unforeseen abandonment of the most essential tool to our lives. I am generally referring to our natural ability to communicate with each other through interpersonal conversation. Human speech and communication has gargantuanly evolved entering the millennium. Mankind has witnessed our message travel through various mediums. From Alexander Graham Bell’s benevolent contrivance of the telephone to Mark Zuckerberg’s sociallyadept Facebook, communication has come a long way from carrier pigeons,

telegrams and messenger horses. Thanks to newfangled instruments such the iPhone and Galaxy 4S, we have enhanced our ability to communicate over unimaginable lengths with just a click of a button. Although the telephone is the great equalizer of time and space, it has so recently deteriorated the very fabric of human interaction. While the smartphone is highly advanced and simply ahead of its time, its 4G capabilities have merely crippled our productivity as its needless software has become a great distraction to its obsessive consumers. Its universal popularity has, in fact, led to the decline of face to face conversation we are commonly associated to. Now before you quickly crumble up your issue of The Quad and curse me out for lambasting smart technology, allow me to make myself perfectly clear – I do not hate smart devices. In fact, I love smart technology. I happen to own an iPhone 4S and in my two years of ownership, it has done nothing but wonders. I am proud to say it has been one of the most accessible pieces of machinery I ever purchased. I enjoy using the iPhone and its advantages such as setting an itinerary, connecting with friends and family over social networks, communicating with others fast and efficiently, and comfortably listening to music in my travels. Unlike my peers, I consider myself an introvert as I try my best to keep my data usage to a minimum. The people I closely surround myself with such as my friends and family are far more integral than a heartless machine. That being said, smartphone users who fre-

quently abuse its usage and ignore their surroundings are primarily associated with the miscommunications we see in society today. Call me old fashioned, but when someone whips out their iPhone in the middle of a discussion, I find that unquestionably rude. Jobs designed this technology to better the consumer ultimately with the objective of developing successful optimistic individuals willing to take on the world. Jobs’ conception of the smartphone was created principally for users to communicate with others from great distances, gather substantial research and information through its internet capabilities, and lastly keep the user occupied during times of personal leisure. Instead, we enter a family restaurant in which we painfully witness an illprepared married couple with two or three children all glued to their tablet devices in unjustifiable silence only to resume conversation until their meal arrives. Not only do I view the following as poor parenting, but it is a prime example of inexcusable social behavior. When smartphones are regularly utilized, they create an array of problems. The purpose of going out with family and friends whether to a local diner or a bar is simply to enjoy each other's company. We go to places like Applebee’s primarily to engage in warm conversation, unwind with a tall beverage and half-price appetizers, and escape from our ever-tedious days at work. Unfortunately you cannot walk into a place of recreation without seeing some sort of a mobile device in plain eyesight. It is almost as if the smartphone users are so content on playing on-

line games and updating their Facebook statuses that they lose touch with reality. If people are so hooked on their smartphones and do so choose to neglect their friends, why even bother to go out in public? Why even show up for an night on the town if you can’t keep your phone in your pocket? The fact of the matter is as long as the smartphone remains a hot commodity, users will never surrender their devices for the sake of their company. The overall appeal of smartphones may stem from its flashy appearance and convoluted embodiment. Unlike standard cellular devices, smartphones are strikingly complex to outsiders. While its touchscreen functions are state of the art, the 4G device is self-indulging. The smartphone not only has a long obnoxiously-large screen, but it is encompassed with mindless applications designed specifically for entertainment purposes. To the smartphones’ credit, entertainment is a component extremely important to our livelihood. It keeps us stimulated when we are bored out of our skulls, it provides with a source solace when we are alone, and finally, it allows us access to the internet with great ease as the World Wide Web is a haven of scholarly knowledge and groundbreaking news. The entertainment aspect of the smartphone, however, can be improperly utilized when a group of patrons at a bar decide to play Angry Birds instead of focusing on the conversation conducted by another individual. In numerous ways, smartphones are widely considered a “cop-out” in regards to social events and gatherings. The conven-

tions of the smartphone may be the epitome of antisocialism. The investment of the smartphone is purely time-consuming as it compares to the graphic nonsense found in video games and reality television programs. In the 1986 film, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, the titular character played famously by Matthew Broderick exclaims, “Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” Broderick’s character strongly correlates with the adolescent spirit we have come to recognized in ourselves time after time. The people who get up bright and early and begin their day looking at the glass half full, who arrange an evening at an authentic Italian bistro for a bottle of wine and good company, who attend parties and sporting events to support their heroes and loved ones, those are people who come with zero attachments. The more time you spend fiddling with your phone the more you miss out on life. If we were to erase our applications altogether, we would have basic cellular phones used only to make calls. The absence or disablement of the smartphone application would certainly become an eyeopening experience. Dr. Philip Thompsen of West Chester University’s communications department suggested that his class should consider the option of going cold turkey for a day to understand their habits. If we cut down our usage and shift our focus towards alternative sources of entertainment such as sports and games ,maybe we could improve our methods of interpersonal communication. Drew Mattiola is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RM814408@wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD OP-ED

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Anti-Obamacare ad perpetuates rape culture in United States Clare Haggerty News Editor

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he Senate approved a budget bill on Friday that gives full funding to Obamacare, President Obama’s plan to get the United States one step closer to universal health care. According to their website, ObamaCare is “the new health care reform law in America, increasing the quality, availability and affordability of private and public health insurance to 44 million uninsured in order to curb the growth in healthcare spending.” To say Obamacare is controversial would be a serious understatement. Obamacare has many congressmen on the edge of their seats. U.S. Representative John Fleming of Lousiana even said that Obamacare is “the most dangerous piece of legislation ever passed,” some-

thing which President Obama mocked publicly in a recent speech. Obamacare is a good thing. We need to do something about health care. Anyone who thinks we should just leave people to fend for themselves when it comes to medical bills just doesn’t pay attention. We have to do something to help the people who have medical bills they can’t pay, because it can happen to anyone – your

insurance – but not use it for the most part, because overall, we’re healthy. Our payment will therefore keep health care premiums low for everyone, even people who are really ill or elderly and use it all the time. Many people are outraged at the thought of this. How dare they expect us to pay for Csmonitor.com other people when we don’t even need parents, my parents, your health care! But I have cousins, my sister, and two things to point out: the list doesn’t stop there. what is social security if Even as an Obamacare not exactly the same idea? supporter, I can see the We have money taken out drawbacks. Obamacare’s of our paychecks to help main target audience is keep retirees afloat. In adhealthy people between dition, what if you do need the ages of 18 and 34 – in a insurance? What if you word, us, or “the young in- get in a car accident, or vincibles,” as we’ve come you need a tonsilectomy? to be known. We hold the Then what? key to helping Obamacare One of Obamacare’s flourish. The program leading opponents, rightneeds healthy people to wing organization Genbuy and pay for health eration Opportunity that

Employers to visit career fair By Ashley Cantasano Special to The Quad

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he Fall 2013 Career Fair will take place Wednesday, Oct. 2 in Sykes Ballroom from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is open to all majors. During that time, you will have the opportunity to meet with over 60 businesses, all of whom want to talk to you! These employers are looking for employees to fill their full and part time job positions, as well as internships. To help prepare for this event, the career development center is holding "Event Prep Workshops" on Tuesday, Oct. 1 at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. in Lawrence 225. Bring your resumes! Employers are at

West Chester University for a reason - they want to hire West Chester University students. Because of this, the career fair is a wonderful opportunity for college students. You are able to meet potential employers in a less nervewracking setting than an interview. However, it is important to remember that your interview does not begin when you walk in the office door; it begins the second you meet your potential employer- like at an event such as, say, a career fair. An employer’s first impression of you is crucial, so it is important to look the part. Do not wear sweats. A buttondown shirt, tie, dress shoes, and dress pants should suffice for the gen-

tlemen. Perhaps a suit if you're feeling ambitious. As for the ladies, the options vary a bit more. Slacks, blouses, blazers, heels, flats, etc., are all in the range of possibilities. If you choose to wear a skirt or dress, it is important to remember kneelength and not skin tight! For more information on the WCU career fair , a list of businesses that will be attending thsi year, and information on events and recources to prep for the fair, visit http://www. wcupa.edu/_services/stu. car/. Remember, it is never too soon to start planning for the future! Ashley Cantasano is a second-year student majoring in Communication Studies. She can be reached at AC784683@wcupa.edu.

is tied to a couple of billionaire businessmen, has launched a six-figure campaign to coerce “the young invincibles” to opt out of Obamacare. One of their primary steps so far has been to release two ads – sexist ads, if I may point out, since we’re broken up into boys and girls like pre-k. The boy and girl versions depict a prostate exam and a pelvic exam, respectively. In both ads, the doctor sets up the patient to begin the exam before unceremoniously leaving the room. Then a terrifying representation of Uncle Sam makes an appearance. I admit that I’m biased because of my gender, but I found the girl ad is particularly horrifying, because Uncle Sam pops up between the girl’s legs, pinching a pair of foreceps menacingly. Not only are these ads a tasteless excuse for advertising, but these kinds of representations are also exactly the kind of things

that perpetuate rape culture. It’s clear from their horrified expressions that neither the man nor the woman in either commercial consented to the nature of this particular exam. The ad then cuts to a black and white text that reads, “Don’t let the government play doctor. Opt out of Obamacare.” The Generation Opportunity ads were an attempt to make a joke out of the big choice coming to us while at the same time shocking people enough to learn more about Obamacare, but what they ended up doing was disturbing and disgusting for too many people to count. If the intention of their rape-validating ad was to make me curious enough to learn more about Generation Opportunity, they succeeded in doing so – so I can warn other people about their absurd antics. Clare Haggerty is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.

Smokers may consider e-cigs

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By Alyssa Cappola Special to The Quad

here are many pros and cons to almost anything in life. The newest debate is about electronic cigarettes, also known as e-cigs. An ecigarette is an electronic battery powered device filled with a liquid nicotine that is dissolved in water. Many of these electronic devices look exactly like a cigarette: the same shape, the brown colored filter, and a red glowing tip. Others take on a different look. Either way, when one takes a puff on an e-cig, the battery heats up the nicotine, which creates a vapor that is inhaled into the lungs, giving the sensation of smok-

ing, without a cigarette. There are many pros to purchasing such a device if you are trying to quit smoking. You can smoke an e-cigarette almost anywhere. Because there is no smell, and no ash, it does not offend anyone, and therefore, you are able to smoke it where you please. While e-cigs can be a couple more dollars than an actual pack of cigarettes, they are designed to help you quit and save money in the long run. Unfortunately, e-cigarettes lack proper labeling for disposal and health regulations, and a leaking e-cig can be toxic. Also, there are many other chemicals in these devices, and even though it is water vapor, you are still in-

haling smoke, which is not good for your lungs. Since the e-cig can be smoked anywhere anytime, there is the chance of smoking it more times a day, further affecting your health. If you are interested in quitting cigarettes, do what you feel is best for you. If you decide to try the e-cig, then make sure you consult a doctor or do your homework to check out all of the pros and cons, and decide which kind would be best for you. There are many forms of support to help quit smoking! You just have to go out there and find them, and stay strong! Alyssa Cappola is a third-year student majoring in marketing. She can be reached at AC756570@ wcupa.edu.


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SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

THE QUAD OP-ED

PAGE 9

Polls offer insight into American feelings on Obamacare

Joy Wilson Op-Ed Editor

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he polls on Obamacare have been telling us for quite some time now that the president's crown jewel is somewhat less than popular among many. Even as it officially kicks in tomorrow, Oct. 1, many GOPers are still fighting the law as though it were still in question, even going so far as to threaten complete government shut down. Whether you prefer Fox News or CNN, certainly you have heard some negative feedback. US House Representative from Louisianna, John Flemming, pronounced Obamacare “the most dangerous piece of legislation ever passed.” Generation Opportunity has graced our generation with one of the creepiest political ads modern media has seen, and thanks to Senator Ted Cruz, we have even gotten Dr. Suess' insight on the subject. Yet, as the polls count on, the public's opinion on the issue has actually gotten fuzzier. In fact, just last week, a CNBC poll exposed a curious division in opinion on the law. Pollsters found that when they referred to it as “Obamacare,” reactions were far more extreme than when it was given its true name, the “Affordable Care Act” (ACA). Even more frightening, while 30% of respondents said they did not know enough about the ACA to give an opinion, only 12% said the same when asked about Obamacare. Clearly the remaining 18% who did not know that the Affordable Care Act and Obamacare are one in the same are plenty informed enough to make sound judgments. Indeed, this is one of many polls

that sheds light on the lack of informed opinions and plethora of ignorant ones. The majority of Americans not only do not understand the law, but according to one poll, they do not even know it is coming. In mid-September, a Kaiser Family Foundation poll revealed that only 12% of the working-age uninsured (those people most affected by the law) knew the insurance exchanges were launching in October. Despite the huge fights in Congress and the president's push to convince people to sign up over the next six months, those people most affected are also most unaware. If the reform works as planned, 14 million uninsured Americans are expected to find comprehensive coverage by 2014, with millions more following suit over the next decade, but all this depends on consumers using the exchanges to shop for coverage and find out what benefits and financial assistance they qualify for under the new law. So the question remains, how will uninsured Americans find their fit in the reformed healthcare system if only 12% of them know it is coming? The same survey found that 51% of Americans felt they did not understand the law well enough to know if or how it would effect them and their families. Yet all this confusion surrounding the healthcare law really isn't new. Way back in June 2012, a Reuters/Ipsos poll discovered that despite opposing the healthcare law, most Americans actually support its main provisions including allowing young adults to stay on their parents plans, requiring companies with more than 50 employees to provide health insur-

ance, and stopping insurance companies from denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions. Chances are, this majority of Americans has no idea that all those provisions are part of the law. So what do Americans know about Obamacare? Certainly the most renowned provision is the requirement for people to obtain health insurance or else be subject to a tax penalty. However, the missing links that leave most outraged at this controversial section are firstly that those unable to afford health insurance qualify for government assistance and secondly, that this provision makes it possible for better, more comprehensive health care for more people. In other words, this stipulation supports the other provisions that Americans so clearly favor. Beyond this single controversial Obamacare fact, Americans not only know very little about what is in the law, but they also continue to believe false-

hoods perpetuated by the law's opponents. Many believe the blatant fictions that the law reduces Medicare benefits, that undocumented immigrants receive money for health insurance and that “death panels” will determine the end of Medicare beneficiaries’ lives. Many also fail to recognize that the law does not include a public, government-run insurance system since Congress rejected the proposal. The CNBC poll mentioned earlier found some more interesting opposition to GOP talking points. Only 3% of Americans said they had hours reduced and only 3% said they lost private health coverage, and though 20% did claim that their premiums are higher, experts tell CNBC that there is no practical way this could be true, and that these respondents are likely only responding with bias do to what they have heard about the law. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius assured insured

Americans, “Your patient protections are already in place. Nothing changes in this new market. This is really about the folks who've been outside the market and paying a lot more to get in.” Meanwhile, some extreme Republicans in Congress have not wasted time jumping on public doubts and misconceptions, attempting to de-fund the law entirely, but these tea party activists should take a measured step back before being too brazen. The same polls showing public doubt about the law seem to contradict the negative sentiment when 50 to 43, Americans believe that Congressional Republicans should accept Obamacare as law of the land according to a Bloomberg poll from last week. A New York Times/CBS News poll from the same day found that 56 to 38, Americans prefer upholding Obamacare over defunding it. The polls have spoken loud and clear, though Americans may not know much about the

ACA, and though they doubt it very much, they do see the need for change. So, why all the negative feelings toward Obamacare? Perhaps it is the still very prevelant fear of Socialism left over from the Cold War. Perhaps the persistent fear of government-run healthcare fueled by Canadian horror stories still reigns despite the very popular Medicare. Perhaps the peculiar deal-or-die individualistic culture of the United States that sees itself as overwhelmingly Christian, but refuses to embrace a social safety net that reflects those values, still hinder action. Or perhaps it is nothing more complex than the fear of the unknown. Either way, it is your democratic perogative to decide whether or not you support this new healthcare reform, but please, before you decide, at least get the facts. Joy Wilson is a fourth-year student majoring in communications with a minor in studio art. She can be reached at JW794401@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 10

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Entertainment

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Follow the Quad on Twitter! @TheQuadWCU QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU Local band, Scuzbot, looks Fall television schedule to expand audience promises an array of emotions

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Janice Rabian Special to The Quad

inding new forms of entertainment is easy in a college town; one does not have to look too far for something new. It became apparent to me in my first month in West Chester that this community loves a good local band. Stickers paint the town promoting bands and I am never in short supply of fliers announcing new local lineups. In particular, one sticker with a picture of a robot and the name Scuzbot caught my eye the other day. Scuzbot, a punk rock band, gets their name from an episode of the Comedy Central show “Futurama.” The band was not officially formed until 2010, but the group

members grew up playing music together. Jon Lucas rocks out on the drums, while Mitch Koehler keeps the rhythm on the bass, and Ryan Rispo and Tyler Marie take guitar and vocals. The band draws influences from other groups like Saves the Day, Devo, and Boatrocker, but writes most of their own music. Mitch Koehler, the band’s bass player and a student at WCU, says, “We’ll do some covers here and there. We actually cover The Toadies ‘Possum Kingdom’ on Philadelphia’s Radio 104.5 WRFF a couple years back when we first released our Shapes and Trends EP.” The band’s more recent original songs have been their main focus, as they work on writing their new album. “We have like ten

new songs we’ve been perfecting since last year,” says Koehler. The band ultimately plans to tour the world, hopefully beginning with an east coast states tour this summer. Keep an eye on fliers being posted around town, the band’s next appearance is in West Chester on Oct. 11, at a location to be released. They will be playing alongside other local performers. Information for future shows will be posted on the band’s website, Scuzbot.com. Interested in getting a preview before the show? Scuzbot’s music can be streamed from their website or you can check out the band on their Facebook page.

Julie Singer Staff Writer

Not only is Fall my favorite season because of the beautiful weather and leaves, but it is the time when all of my favorite shows make their season premiers. While this may impact my schoolwork and studying, I cannot ignore the return of my favorite shows. Online websites like Hulu and Netflix offer episodes from past seasons to catch up on. I am ecstatic about the return of “Homeland.” After getting my wisdom teeth out last winter break, I finished the first two seasons of “Homeland” within a month. The show follows a CIA agent Janice Rabian is a first-year student who falls in love with a majoring in Theatre. She can be POW, even though she reached at JR808460@wcupa.edu. believes he was “turned” while prisoner and now threatens the security ign.com and safety of the U.S. For those of you who are a fan of “Homeland” and are anxiously awaiting its return just like I am, here is what to expect: We were left off in the season finale with a shocking explosion from a bomb that was held in Brody’s car that killed everyone at the VP’s memorial, except for Carrie and Brody. She helped him escape the country, but now does not know whether or not to believe that Brody was set up. Saul will now be the director of the CIA Claire Danes and Damian Lewis star in Showtime’s “Homeland.” The show is one of many popular series and we will start to see

returning to primetime this fall.

how the investigation of the attack unfolds. While “Homeland” keeps me on my toes and makes me excited to see what will happen next, I resonate with the reality and veracity of the storyline of “Parenthood.” The show follows three generations of the Braverman family, who are put through trials and tribulations that are relevant in today’s day and age. For example, the Bravermans have gone through break ups, cancer, car accidents, miscarriages, adoptions, scandals, major fights, and more. However, they always seem to push through the hard times together as a family. I love how real the family seems, and I can only imagine how the rest of the show’s dedicated fans can relate to the Bravermans. While the Braverman family seemed to have ups and downs every week, they finished season three off on a happy note. I am looking forward to seeing what the Braverman family has in store for us on season four. According to dictionary. com, revenge is “retaliation for injuries or wrongs; vengeance.” ABC’s soap opera “Revenge” lives up to its name. Based in the Hamptons, the show follows Emily Thorne’s return to her home with a new identity. Her goal: to avenge her father’s death. She plans to take

down the Graysons, a rich and powerful family, who framed Emily’s father for a crime he did not commit, and who was responsible for his murder while incarcerated. For two seasons, her childhood love did not know who Emily really was, and the season finale ends with the big reveal. Will Emily and Jack finally be together? Will the Graysons find out Emily’s identity? While thriller, suspense, and gore movies freak me out, the thrilling storylines of “Law and Order SVU” keep me at my feet each week. I love the dedication and perseverance of the detectives as they do everything they can to solve each case, even if that means putting their lives in danger. This season will unfold with Detective Benson held at gunpoint. While the stories in the show make viewers realize how insane this world is, it reassures that there are endless individuals dedicating their lives to protecting and defending us. It is going to be a great season for my favorite TV shows and I cannot wait to see all of the drama unfold. Do not hesitate to pick up on a new show to watch when you take breaks from studying (it is a good reward). Julie Singer is a second-year student majoring in both special education and middle grades education. She can be reached at JS 781397@ wcupa.edu.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

“Grey’s Anatomy” returns with drama and suspense Keeley Gould Special to The Quad

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s advertised, the season ten premiere of “Grey’s Anatomy” was a thriller that had its audience on the edge of their seats. With news breaking a few weeks ago that one of the main characters, Sandra Oh, who plays the infamous Cristina Yang, was leaving the show after this season, fans are wondering how they are going to wrap up her character. This season premiere did not disappoint in the slightest. It was a continuation of last season’s finale that left fans wondering, “Who will survive?” As faithful “Grey’s Anatomy” fans know, at the very last minute of season nine’s finale, Richard Webber’s life was hanging in the balance after getting shocked in the basement. “Grey’s” fans had to wait months to know whether the former chief and respected surgeon would survive, and the answer finally arrived. However, in “Grey’s Anatomy” fashion, it took almost the whole episode to figure out who survived. At the beginning of the episode, everyone at the hospital was wondering where Richard was, including fellow surgeon and good friend, Miranda Bailey. Bailey had to make amends with Richard because in season nine, she stopped speaking to him. Bailey told Ross, who is an intern, to go find him, but instead, Ross sent his fellow intern, known as Mousy, down where she became electrocuted as well. “Who will survive?” Well, towards the end of the episode, we get the

answer, and “Grey’s Anatomy” tricked us yet again! The previews for the show made fans believe that the beloved former chief had passed away with Derek Shepherd tear-stained face. This was not the case though, with much relief to the fans. Poor Mousy did not survive the surgery performed by the great Derek Shepherd. Richard Weber is not out of the woods yet. He has a long recovery ahead of him, but thanks to Meredith Grey, he is alive. Richard chose Meredith to be his medical proxy after his wife Adele passed away. Meredith had a baby and major surgery in the season nine finale, so her head may not be in the best place to make major life decisions, but hey, Meredith Grey is not going to let anyone die on her watch. As if the former chief almost dying is not enough, there is the Arizona and Callie drama. In the last episode of season nine, Arizona cheats on Callie with a surgeon. This was a huge surprise to all the fans because Arizona and Callie were finally on the mend from the plane crash drama. Callie finds out at the end of season nine when she sees that Lauren is wearing Arizona’s scrub top that has her wedding ring pinned to it. Callie gets revenge on Arizona in the opener of season ten by announcing to all their friends that Arizona cheated on her. That creates a lot of awkwardness, but Callie does not stop there. She will not speak to Arizona and then takes it even further by moving out of their apartment with Sophia, their baby with-

out telling Arizona. She only went to Meredith and Derek’s house, but it made the viewers wonder if they will survive. Then there is April and Jackson. Personally they are one of my favorite “couples.” Jackson and April have had a rollercoaster type of relationship. One minute, they are friends, and the next minute, they are hooking up, and then April does not want Jackson anymore. April actually ends up getting engaged to a paramedic, but she still has feelings for Jackson. In the season opener, April told Jackson that she wanted him, but Jackson rejected her because he is sick of getting tossed around. Then at the end of the episode, April tells her fiancé that she wants to marry him, so I guess audiences will have to wait and see what happens. In the season opener, it is not looking good for Cristina and Owen’s relationship. Cristina and Owen are another couple who have had quite the roller coaster relationship. They were married, then got divorced, then got back together, and now their relationship has ended yet again. As a “Crowen” fan, I really hope that for Cristina Yang’s sake, she ends her time at the Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital on a positive note. Who knows what is going to happen next in the coming weeks at the hospital, but knowing the Grey’s writers and the characters at the hospital, it is going to have us all on the edge of our seats. Keeley Gould is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at KG 787739@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 11

“Prisoners” excels as topnotch crime thriller Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

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n his English-language film debut, Canadian director Dennis Villenueve has struck gold with his elaborate, gripping crime thriller “Prisoners.” Hugh Jackman stars as Keller Dover, a religious, simple Pennsylvania carpenter, and Terrence Howard plays his neighbor Franklin Birch, whose worlds are ripped apart on Thanksgiving Day when their daughters Anna and Joy go missing while playing outside after dinner. Detective Loki (Jake Gyllenhall) is the officer assigned to the case, which becomes more unclear and disturbing as it progresses despite the early apprehension of a suspect—Alex Jones (Paul Dano), whose role is unknown, yet seems overwhelmingly important. As the investigation turns to a statewide search, new discoveries are unearthed, new characters are introduced, and the case that seemed ready to be broken within a day takes turns deeper and deeper into the maze.

“Prisoners” keeps several stories open at once, including the police investigation, Dover’s and Birch’s personal quests to find their daughters, and the anxiety their families struggle with as they await news on the whereabouts of their loved ones. The movie touches on some very deep and realistic emotions, which show the vulnerability of the characters and the reality and plausibility of the situation. The determination and subsequent rage of Dover, the frustration of Loki as he attempts to tie together several leads, the increased anxiety and depression amongst the family members, and the silence of Jones while in questioning all combine to make the movie seem as if it could easily happen in real life, making it all the more riveting. The movie is put together in such a way that, as a viewer, one can feel a wide range of emotions for all characters, including disgust toward Dover and sympathy toward Jones, which is something highly unusual for a movie with fairly clear cut “good guys and bad guys.” Several elements present in this movie offer

strong comparisons to the appealing factors of other popular crime thrillers and series. The dark, predatory world Loki has to search through, and the eerie and sometimes sickened individuals he meets are reminiscent of the popular nineties thriller “The Silence of the Lambs”, along with the subtle gore and psychologically compelling characters that give “Prisoners” the suspenseful feel of an extended “Law &Order SVU” episode. Another aspect of the movie, which may fly under the radar but should not be unnoticed, is the superb acting of Gyllenhall. The 32-year-old actor is no stranger to large roles, but took this one with exceptional talent and persuasion. The small things he brings to the table such as his nervous tics and blinking when he was enraged, and his heartfelt reactions to new revelations make him stand out exceptionally as a dramatic and seemingly real character. “Prisoners” was not without certain flaws, however, albeit they were minor. There were some

See Prisoners on page 12

variety.com

Jake Gyllenhall and Hugh Jackman deliver powerful performances in the crime-thriller “Prisoners.”


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Review It! with Anthony Micalizzi

Anthony Micalizzi Special to The Quad The Family (2013) Director: Luc Besson Writer: Luc Besson Genre: Action, comedy, crime Stars: Robert De Niro: Fred Blake Michelle Pfeiffer: Maggie Blake Dianna Agron: Belle Blake Tommy Lee Jones: Robert Stansfield Rating: R Grade: D Fred Blake spent his entire life as a mobster until one day, he “rats” them all out to the cops. In lieu of this, the mob puts a hit out on him. As a result, Fred Blake and his family are given new identities and a new home. Now they are traveling throughout France and trying to stay hidden so the mob does not find them. That becomes very difficult for a family of Italian-American gangsters. Being a big Robert De Niro fan, “The Family” was a must see. Skeptical from the beginning due to an unusual plot, I proceeded to watch regardless. Unfortunately, I wish I had not made that

decision. Robert De Niro had an equal role with the rest of his family taking the focus and importance off of him. In addition, everything seemed too fake, lacking any sense of reality or what would happen in a real life situation. Finally, the movie seemed as though it was trying too hard to be a modern day mobster movie. Other than a few chuckles, the movie lacked excitement and was not worth watching. With plenty of fantastic mafia movies, stay away from this one. The Notebook (2004) Director: Nick Cassavetes Writers: Jeremy Leven but based on the book by Nicholas Sparks Genre: Romance, Drama Stars: Ryan Gosling: Noah Rachel McAdams: Allie James Marsden: Lon Hammond Kevin Connolly: Fin Rating: PG-13 Grade: A In an attempt to brighten the day of an older lady (Allie) at his retirement home, Duke tells a story of a couple from the 1940’s. The story is about two teenagers experiencing a summer romance

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Album review: Drake’s “Nothing Was the Same”

and their lives after. Noah and Allie come from two different lives. Noah is a poor, yet passionate southern worker, and Allie is a well-educated student from a very wealthy family. Their love faces many boundaries keeping them from ever being together. Dramatic, suspenseful, and full of romance, “The Notebook” takes the cake for the best of its genre. Hooked from the start, viewers become engulfed in this young love story plagued by obstacles. This film has a fantastic plot along with an equally great cast. Although sappy at times, it goes unnoticed due to the intense drama. Without any action or comedy, this can be hard for some guys to watch. Nevertheless, it has people wishing for the same type of love as Noah and Allie’s. Unfortunately for guys, it happens to be the same movie that causes girls to look for a guy exactly like Noah/Ryan Gosling. Grab your special someone, cuddle up, and enjoy this fantastic love story. Anthony Micalizzi is a second-year student majoring in history. He can be reached at AM787857@wcupa. edu.

Jeffrey Holmes Copy Editor

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n his third fulllength outing, Grammy-winner Aubrey Drake Grahm boasts personal growth and aural expansion on an LP that does not feel like he has ventured past his “Take Care” days of 2011. He revisits his bitter obsession of love lost on many tracks like as he did on “Take Care” only to intersperse them in a presentation characterized by his other struggles, such as financial and family troubles. While there is a noticeable improvement in Drake’s clean singing, the more noticeable lack of focus, both lyrically and in songwriting, marks “Nothing Was the Same” as the Canadian rapper’s weakest effort to date. The single “Started from the Bottom” grabs listeners with its piano loops and tinned snare that lay nicely under its sample of ambient artist Bruno Sanfilippo. The arguably un-Drake aspect of the track is where Drake ventures lyrically; a passionate lyricist presents arguments with his uncle over who is driving the car as his struggle. A listener must wonder, “Do

Prisoners continued from page 11

hollywood.com

De Niro plays a former mobster in“The Family,” but the film does not allow him enough time to shine.

loose ends that were left untied concerning certain characters that left you wondering “wait, who was he?” or “what was this person’s relationship with this character?” They were more of nuisance flaws, completely innocuous to the plot itself but that still left you thinking

other lines about getting into squabbles with his mother ‘every month’ depict a man who started from the lowest of lows?” His past two records were acclaimed for his honest lyricism, and other cuts from “Nothing” depict the bitterness of breakups like “From Time,” where Drake namedrops an ex named Courtney in a move that is more than sure to mortify her. However, other cuts like “Tuscan Leather” feel like nothing more than Drake belting his own buzzwords like “yolo” about the new, self-proclaimed Dizzy Drake which meanders about, never achieving a lyrical focus. Many of the tracks struggle from an interesting exposition only to find themselves lacking development. “Own It” finds Drake’s singing greatly improved from past endeavors, sounding fuller and richer than ever, but his progress is cut short by the composition’s inability to find a solid cadence. “Connect” has Drake rap-singing like a Pink Friday era Nicki Minaj, minus the British cockney, of course, but suffers the same simple fate of feeling like it never goes anywhere sonically. As a whole, much of the album is marred by generic

beats and an almost skeletal sense of instrumentation. This would appear to place a focus on Drake’s voice and lyrics, which would not be an issue if he maintained a consistent focus not so much on himself, but of himself, as he falls folly to the indecision of exactly what image he wants his listeners to have from him. Is he honest and heart-broken, or is he jaded from his start from the bottom? “Nothing” leaves that question unanswered. While the man himself is stuck on the past, the main weakness of “Nothing Was the Same” is not the honest lyrical content, it is the flat instrumentals that fail to captivate Drake’s listeners. The image of a clean-cut, sentimental man spitting game from his heart and not from his head or wallet is enough to pique the interest of a new listener’s ear, but the generic trap-esque beats in conjunction with the little-to-no variability in composition and perfunctory songwriting will drive them away shortly afterward.

about how easy they could have been to correct. Regardless of the minor flaws, “Prisoners” is an exemplary crime thriller and drama. Despite its length (153 minutes) it hits you with a never ending combination of trepidation, uneasiness, and shock as you submerge yourself into the deep twists and leave yourself vulnerable for a wide ar-

ray of emotions that are sometimes felt all at one time. “Prisoners” is a truly transcendent movie, and is deserving of very high marks for a film within its genre.

Jeffrey Holmes is a second-year student majoring in Secondary English Education. He can be reached at JH791223@wcupa.edu.

Kenny Ayres is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 13

“Big Bang” starts its seventh season with a two-parter

Elizabeth Thomas Special to The Quad

which they are not particularly proud of because Penny, the usual object of V’s number one commost skelmen’s affections, was not edy, “The Big Bang trumentawith them. Theory,” is back for ld appear The second episode, on Drake’sits seventh season, which “The Deception Verificapremiered last Thursday, cs, which tion,” begins with a surn issue ifSept. 26. The premiere ofprise return from Leona consis-fered not one, but two epiard, who arrives home a o much onsodes for an entire hour of few days early to spend comedy. All of the main himself, as time with Penny (withhe indeci-cast members returned, out telling Sheldon). including Johnny Galecki hat image When Sheldon suspects steners to(Leonard), Jim Parsons that Penny is cheating Is he hon-(Sheldon), Kaley Cuoco on Leonard, he and Amy broken, or(Penny), Simon Helberg barge into her apartment (Howard), Kunal Nayyar m his start and find that Leonard has m? “Noth-(Raj), Melissa Rauch (Bernadette), and fanpop.com been home. Shocked that t question Leonard did not tell him, Mayim Bialik (Amy). Sheldon decides not to Show creators n himself believe anything he says. past, theChuck Lorre and Meanwhile, Howard acBill Prady have reof “Nothcidentally absorbs some me” is notally developed the of his mother’s estrogen characters in the al content, cream, and the side efnstrumen-past few seasons by fects are nothing short changing their idiocaptivate of hormonal and hilaris. The im-syncrasies and havous. However, his new ing them overcome cut, sentiestrogen-fueled sensiting gamepersonal challenges. tivity manages to mend By the end of seaand not the friendship between r wallet isson six, Leonard and Leonard and Sheldon. the inter-Penny’s secure relaIt is safe to say that ener’s ear,tionship is put to the the first two episodes The seventh season of “The Big Bang test as he leaves for rap-esque ction witha four-month expedi- Theory” premiered on Sept. 26 on CBS. make season seven a promising one. There will variabilitytion to the North Sea and per-to do research for Stephen ries that because Leonard be much for the writers riting willHawking. Johnny Galecki is having a good time on to explore with Raj’s new ay shortlyremarked in a CBS promo, the ship, he will not miss behavior, and CBS has announced that Lucy, his “Leonard and Penny are her. There are two subplots love interest, may return. in a great place, probably better than they ever have in this episode. Raj’s un- Despite Leonard and been. Their insecurities fortunate breakup with Penny’s worry about their are not on the surface, so Lucy has caused him to separation, their relationcond-year stuthey can give each other a see her face everywhere ship stood the test of time, ndary English he goes. To cope with this, a hopeful tone which suge reached athard time; they can tease he tries speaking to wom- gests it will continue on. . each other.” In season six, Sheldon is en at the university, an The pairing between Beraction now possible after nadette and Amy seems to that arestill socially awkward as recently overcoming his be a preview for what lies ever, and while his quirks all at one selective mutism. Origi- ahead as the next episode persist and his relation” is a truly nally intending to attract features a scavenger hunt ship with Amy moves at a ovie, and a woman, he instead has a with new pairings like glacial pace, he has menvery high real conversation with the Bernadette and Leonard, tioned to her, Penny, and within its Leonard that he has not human resources man- which should be interestruled out the possibility ager, Mrs. Davis (played ing as the characters get of a physical relationship by Regina King), who is a to know each other in difwith Amy, a giant step for recurring character since ferent ways. CBS has also Sheldon. Raj’s inability season six. Lastly, Berna- mentioned that Leonard’s h-year studentto talk to women without dette and Amy bond at a impassive mother, played cation studies. science convention after by Christine Baranski, alcohol, a behavior prest KA739433@ ent since season one, was men buy them drinks, will also return. All in all,

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finally broken in the finale of season six after his girlfriend, Lucy (played by Kate Micucci), broke up with him. With these developments in place, the seventh season picks up where season six had left off. Episode one, “The Hofstadter Insufficiency,” begins with Sheldon and Penny missing Leonard while he is away at sea. The two bond over the course of the episode by playing chess and sharing secrets, while Penny wor-

season seven is shaping up to be a good one with more character development and hilarity along the way. As for how long the show will run, it is indefinite for the moment. In 2011, the show was renewed for three years up until season seven, but so far, there has been little news of a season eight. However, the cast and crew are so pleased with the show’s success and deeply involved in the characters that they cannot see it ending anytime soon. “The Big Bang Theory”

has had quite a successful run since its first season, accumulating four Primetime Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe. Jim Parsons recently won his third Emmy for the role of Sheldon Cooper on September 22nd at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards. “Part of me thinks this show could go 11 or 12 years. We seem to be a bit of an anomaly in that we’re holding on to a sizeable audience, and it doesn’t fluctuate,” Parsons told Emmy Magazine. Multiple guest stars have been recruited for

the show including Howie Mandel, Bob Newhart, Margo Harshman, and even world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking. With an audience of 20 million (first reached in season six), a dedicated cast and crew, and a plethora of famous guest stars, it is likely that many more seasons will follow. “The Big Bang Theory” airs every Thursday night at 8 p.m. on CBS, and any missed episodes can be viewed on their website, www.cbs.com. Elizabeth Thomas is a third-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at ET797801@wcupa.edu.

Celebrities born this month: Adam Sandler Joshua Shapiro Staff Writer

M

aking people laugh was never a problem for Adam Sandler. A class clown throughout his formative years, there was no doubt he understood the art of humor. At the age of 17, his brother persuaded him to jump on stage at a Boston comedy club. Luckily, the crowd loved his material, and Sandler seemed to have struck gold. It was only a matter of time before his natural ability to leave people in stitches would blossom into a brilliant career. A Brooklyn native, Sandler was born on Sept. 9, 1966 to Stanley and Judy Sandler. Both of his parents are of Rus-

sian Jewish descent, and Sandler would later use his religious background as the basis for some of his funniest material. Five years after his birth, the Sandler family moved to Manchester, New Hampshire where he and his siblings attended grade

ing in Los Angeles he was offered a position as a comedy writer for Saturday Night Live. The gig with SNL proved to be his big break, as he soon landed his first film roll in the hilarious comedy, Billy Madison. Following a successful debut on the big screen, Sandler apforbes.com peared in several other box office hits including popular titles such as “Happy Gilmore,” “The Wedding Singer,” and “Mr. Deeds.” Now 47, Sandler doesn’t appear to have any desire to throw in the towel. He is currently working on filming “The Familymoon,” school. Sandler went on to which is set in South Afenroll at New York Uni- rica and co-stars his longversity, graduating from time friend Drew Barthe Tisch School of the rymore. Sandler’s latest arts in the spring of 1988. project is projected to hit P o s t - g r a d u a t i o n , theaters in May of 2014. Sandler made the move Joshua Shapiro is a third-year to Los Angeles to pursue student majoring in English and his dream of becoming an education. He can be reached at actor. It was while work- JS762110@wcupa.edu.


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SEPTEMBER 30, 2013


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THE QUAD

The Golden Rams Marching Band

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Sorority Bid Day 2013

Jose Mestre/Asst. Photography Editor

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

PAGE 17

versities in the Pennsyl- embarking on a new life to riches. It is the story vania State Universities after escaping slavery, of a former slave, his esSystem have institutes. so students could ponder cape from enslavement, The artist commis- their own lives.” and rise to a leading abosioned to create the I think one of the most litionist of his day. This statue is a former pro- positive things about statue is a universal fessor of art in sculpture this monument is the symbol because it repreand current member of chance for students to sents someone that came WCU’s art department, reflect about their own from humble beginnings, Mr. Richard Blake. lives. While talking to something that everyThe artist stated that Blake and other faculty body can relate to in creating this statue in- around campus, I could some degree. volved an ancient tech- not help but reminisce This is a watershed nique in sculpture that about my own education year to dedicate the Dou“defied all the modern growing up glass statue. The Ameriforms.” Blake said, “The Another statue that can people have gathered process involves creat- Mr. Blake has created in a March on Washinging a smaller model to is a sculpture of Martin ton for the second time to be approved, which is a Luther King Jr., which celebrate freedom and to French term known as a is on display at the Uni- mourn injustice. It was ‘maquette,’ then form- versity of California, especially interesting ing the 7-foot-2-inch life Fresno, Cal. Many stu- to listen to people’s acsize clay figure that took dents and faculty prob- counts that participated about a year. Finally, ably heard excerpts of in the original march. tivist up until his death. first donors was former the clay molding was King’s “I have a Dream” One of those persons was Douglass was a regularly mayor of West Chester, sent to a foundry to be speech in the news, and U.S. Rep. John Lewis of enrolled member of the Clifford DeBaptiste. The cast in bronze which took this year marks the an- Georgia who said, “We niversary of the 50th must stand up and fight National Women’s Suf- place where the statue another three months.” The statue March on Washing- the good fight, for there depicts Dou- ton. King reminded us are forces, there are peowww.wcupa.edu glass hold- of the meaning of the ple who want to take us ing a cane in Declaration of the Inde- back.” his left hand, pendence, “Black men, Douglass stood up to stepping for- as well as white men, injustice and fought for ward. “It was would be guaranteed the freedom even though important to unalienable rights of lib- it probably was mpt show Doug- erty, life, and the pursuit the easier life. Now he lass in move- of happiness.” stands, all 7 feet and ment--not However, talking to 2 inches of him, in the static,” said Blake about the intrin- same place he made his Blake. Also sic meaning of the Doug- last appearance and in his right lass statue was interest- delivered his speech hand is a bro- ing. Blake said that the “Against Lynch Law”. ken rope.“The meaning of the statue The broken rope Dougrope is an an- should not be solely the lass holds in his hand is cient symbol issue of civil rights, but a reminder of our past, of bondage, more importantly, the is- but also the promise of but because sue of the human condi- the future. it’s broken tion. Joe Olmstead is a student at represents The Douglass statue West Chester University majorhis emancipa- will be such a strong ing in English writings with a tion,” Blake symbol because it is the minor in journalism. He can be at JO602644@wcupa. said. portrait of the life of a reached edu. WCU faculty breaks ground for Fredrick Douglass statue Blake de- man that went from rags cided to cre“Douglass stood up to injustice and fought for ate a younger scholarly frage Association and will stand on campus is freedom even though it probably wasn’t the of he spoke at the Women’s being named the Clifford version D o u g l a s s National Council on Feb. E. and Inez E. DeBapeasier life. Now he stands, all 7 feet and 2 stu20, 1895. He died of a tiste Plaza. A ceremony that heart attack that same will be held at 3 p.m. on dents could inches of him, in the same place he made his last to. night at the age of 78 at Oct. 1, 2013 to dedicate relate Blake said, appearance and delivered his speech ‘Against his home in Washington. the statue. WCU is one of the “I chose to The Frederick DougLynch Law.’ The broken rope Douglass holds in universities in depict Doulass Institute started a first comcampaign to raise money Pennsylvania to start glass his hand is a reminder of our past, but also the for the statue over two an institute in honor of ing north at an early age years ago. One of their Douglass. Today, 14 uni-

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Frederick Douglass Statue Ceremony Statue to be unveiled Oct. 1 at Phillips Memorial Hall By Joe Olmstead Special to The Quad

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am sure many students and faculty have noticed the cordoned off construction site walking around campus this fall by Phillips Memorial Hall. If you have enrolled in any African and African-American English courses, you’re probably aware of the reason for this construction site. All the buzz is about a life-size replica statue of the abolitionist Frederick Douglass that is going to be erected at this site. Douglass was a former slave in the mid-nineteenth century in the south that escaped to the north. He became an authority in the abolitionist movement and gave his last public address at West Chester University on Feb. 1, 1895. However, after Douglass resigned from public life he continued his work as orator and ac-

promise of the future.”


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THE QUAD FEATURES

Dr. Schugar emphasizes interest in campus life

Teacher feature on professor in literacy department By Julie Singer Staff Writer

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r. Schugar is an associate professor in the literacy department in WCU’s College of Education. She achieved her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate degrees from the University of Maryland.

Her Bachelor’s degree was in elementary education with concentrations in science and English. Her master’s and doctorate degrees were both in curriculum and instruction with a focus on reading education. This is Dr. Schugar’s sixth year at West Chester. “I knew immediately

upon arriving on WCU’s campus that I wanted to work here. The students I met on my first visit were so motivated and eager to learn - and nothing has changed in my time here on campus. I am inspired every day by my students’ energy and their commitment to teaching literacy,” Schugar said.

Launch your international career through Peace Corps service. PEACE CORPS AT WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY Wednesday, Oc tober 2 Sykes Student Union building INfORmATION TAbLE 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. fall Career fair INfORmATION SESSION 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Room 225 Learn more from WCU Recruiter becky morrison rmorrison@peacecorps.gov

Peace Corps

peacecorps.gov - 855.855.1961

Besides her work at WCU, Schugar taught reading education courses at the University of Maryland while working on her master’s degree and doctorate degree. Schugar realized that after taking undergraduate coursework toward becoming a geneticist, her passion for working with children was much stronger. “I taught second grade for two years in Montgomery County, MD before going back to Maryland for grad school, and it was then I decided that my dream job would be to work with future teachers in a college setting,” Schugar said. “Borrowing” teaching styles from her college mentors, Dr. Schugar said that she loved how her mentors challenged her as a student to take risks. There is no shortage in the reward that comes from teaching for Dr. Schugar. “I love the relationships I have been able to build with my students both in and out of the classroom. I learn as much from my students and the experiences they are having out in the field as I hope they are learning from me in the classroom,” Schugar said. As the faculty advisor for Alpha Upsilon Alpha (AUA), the reading minor honors society, Schugar thoroughly enjoys being able to work with her students

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

“[College] is a place for you to learn more about yourself as an individual. Take the opportunity to spend time on campus outside of the classroom. It is important that you use this time to figure out what unique contributionos you will be able to offer society once you leave campus.” outside of the classroom by volunteering for organizations and attending professional events together, according to Schugar. “It never ceases to amaze me how well my students juggle their coursework and jobs, while providing such important (and timeconsuming!) service to the community,” said Schugar. Dr. Schugar said that her biggest academic achievement was an article she co-wrote with a colleague and her husband in a journal called “The Reading Teacher.” After doing research with students’ comprehension of texts on iPads, Dr. Schugar found it rewarding to share the three authors’ thoughts with the larger academic community. Although she spends a lot of her time teaching, Dr. Schugar has a passion for crafting and spending time with her children. “I am an avid DIY-er and am definitely of the mindset: ‘Why buy

it when I can make it for less?’” Schugar said. Something that students and faculty may not know about Dr. Schugar is that she was on the crew team during her undergraduate career. “We would head to practice around 5 a.m., and I would often rush into my 8 a.m. classes still dripping with water from the river because DC traffic was so difficult to maneuver,” Schugar said. Schugar believes that college is about more than just academics. “It is a place for you to learn more about yourself as an individual. Take the opportunity to spend time on campus outside of the classroom. It is important that you use this time to figure out what unique or important contributions you will be able to offer society once you leave campus.” Julie Singer is a second-year student majoring in special education and middle grades prep with a concentration in reading. She can be reached at JS781397@wcupa.edu.

Interested in writing a travel story for the Features section? Email quadfeatures@wcupa.edu


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THE QUAD FEATURES

Trying to figure “it” out Summer days of a college student By Emily Durkin Special to The Quad

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inhale; my brain goes light as hookah fills my lungs. I exhale and my mouth fills with the taste of blueberries. I feel euphoric, the air is so warm, and I’m realizing how much I missed South Jersey. We’re sitting on my front porch enjoying the second half of the day, feeling invisible as saxophone pumps through the speakers. The conversation is a long, winding road that, I think, is leading us somewhere. Beginning on unfair taxation and irrational beach taggers and ending up somewhere around here: “Where am I going with my life? I need to figure ‘it’ out. I’m going into my fourth year of college and still have no clue where to go from here.” “Let it happen,” Anna replies. Anna looks like Brooke Shields, in that one 80’s movie about those kids who wander around naked and learn to live off the Earth, but she has the mind of Jane Goodall and the attitude of Joan Jett. She didn’t explain, and I didn’t ask; it was such a simple statement. It took me three months to understand what she had really meant. We pull up to Yesterday’s, a small bar that had been fined earlier in the summer for serving overpriced hangovers. These restaurant-bars right out of Ocean City are always filled with a mixture of townies and tourists. It’s decorated how I imagine Jimmy Buffet would decorate a home-office. The walls are painted a warm blue all the way up to the high ceilings, there are

various types of mounted fish on the walls, surfboards, and signs with clever sayings like “It’s five o’clock somewhere.” As we find a parking spot, we can already hear the boys playing a cover of a Talking Heads song. Were all laughing and dancing up to the back deck. Roxy’s dancing and letting the music take her. She’s completely content, refusing to live anywhere but in the present. She has the same presence of Penny Lane in Almost Famous, she’s lighting up the room. She looks just like her too, she’s stunning; long blonde waves covered in a layer of sea salt, sun-kissed skin, the evidence of long bike rides and countless days spent on the beach, and big blue eyes that take in everything more precisely than any camera lens ever could. If it wasn’t for those big eyes, you would think she was born blind. She is so humble and never quick to judge, making friends whereever she goes. She wears Grateful Dead lyrics permanently on her ring finger, a reminder of her dad. She’s not really sure where she’s going, and that’s exactly how she likes it. She’s 21, so she wants to travel the world and live like a gypsy. She’s determined to graduate with a degree in hospitality and tourism management. She’s wise beyond her years and works hard at her classes. She wants to escape, but is no rush to “figure ‘it’ out.” “Psycho killer, qu’est que c’est, fa fa fa fa fa fa fa fa fa far better…” were singing every word of the Talking Heads with them. The three of them started

eled, met new people, made new connections, surfed, saw from other perspectives, and grew. She never had a plan. She’s laughing and head banging to the music, her curls are flying everywhere. “How’s New York?” “I’m moving to L.A.!” She goes on to tell me about the company she works for and how she helps to manage various “small” music producers, going on to list huge names that her company has worked with. “I hear you’re attending my alma mater now?” “Yea. Turns out Philadelphia and fashion just wasn’t for me.” “What are you majoring in now?” “I’m studying econom-

the band as a joke, calling it “Peanut Butter Lovsicle,” practicing in their friend’s grandmother’s garage and at their own house parties. They all went to school, they thought they knew what they wanted to do with their lives; they thought they had “it” figured out. Somewhere along the way though, they got serious, got really good, moved to NYC, toured in London, and are now talking to labels. They used to work at the surf shop, shifts Photo by Emily Durkin would fly by with them, positivity and laughing at mistakes and bad situations comes naturally. They take on life as it comes. I’m talking to their mom and sister, Jamie. They tell me how hard they’ve been working; how great they’ve been doing. J a m i e moved to New York with them to pursue a new adventure. After graduating from West Chester, she managed the surf shop up until she was 30. She was paid extremely well, trav-

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 ics.” I give her a nervous look and start laughing. “I have no idea what I wanna be when I grow up.” “I think I studied political science. No, it might have been geology.” She’s laughing. “I’m 33 and I still don’t know what I wanna be when I grow up.” The boys play their last song while I manage to locate a ride. I climb into the backseat of Shawn’s hatchback, and were off. The four-door is overflowing with bodies. We’re not ready for the night to end quite yet. I’m smiling so big that my cheeks are going numb, muscles ache. The wind is tossing dirty curls into my eyes. My breath tastes of stale pineapple and ginger ale.

If only I could bottle this scent of vanilla, cigarettes, and salt water that has sunken into my skin. My nose fills with the breeze coming off bay and I’m beginning to understand what Anna had meant. These past three years of college, I’ve been looking for something that was meant to find me. I’ve been planning, stressing, thinking into the future, but the best opportunities happen in the present. Someone turns up the music, and we all begin howling, preaching, slurring the words: “You spend the first five years trying to get with the plan and the next five years trying to be with your friends again.” Emily Durkin is a fourth-year student. She can be reached at ED797328@wcupa.edu.


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

WCU Slow Food: always a seat at the table

THE QUAD FEATURES

New club seeks out members to join them in pumpkin picking, shopping at the farmers market, and healthy food choices By Rachel Alfiero Special to The Quad

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t seems more than safe to acknowledge that Americans are fully engaged in a health trend. Organic produce, glutenfree, no GMOs, you name it, and this country will jump on the chance to try it out. The health craze is not just for the average health conscious person though. It is slowly, but surely, transcending all age groups and reaching people who are totally unaware of the whole lifestyle. Recently, West Chester University has joined the phenomenon with its newest club, Slow Food. Founded in September 2012 by seniors Jena Wood and Danielle Hamilton as part of a Capstone Project, Slow Food has just recently (April of this year to be exact) become an official organization. The current executive board members include President Lauren Ashley McCorkle, Vice President Tasha Buckley, Secretary Christine Farinella, and Treasurer Bobby Leonard. Dr. Lynn Monahan rounds out the team as primary faculty advisor. Currently, the club is in the process of becoming part of the bigger branch,

Slow Food USA. Slow Food USA is a national organization that strives to promote the “farm to table” lifestyle by educating people on local produce and ways to get involved and volunteer with local farmers and growers. Their slogan, “Good, clean, and fair” offers a quick perception of their in-depth and powerful mission. There are more than 170 local chapters and 40 campus chapters in cities all over the U.S., and even a branch in Philadelphia. Their website, www.slowfoodusa.org, offers chances to donate to the Slow Food cause, participate in local events, and even check out employment opportunities. Nothing like this existed on campus before Slow Food was formed.The Student Dietetics Association had similar qualities, but was only open for nutrition ma-

jors. Slow Food was created to include all people who have a passion or interest for sustainable, local food. There are no requirements or rules to become a member. It is that relaxed, “come on your own terms” kind of attitude that melds perfectly into the Slow

Food philosophy. Vice President Tasha Buckley said of the club that it is all about good, happy vibes. It is that positive, “we are all in this together” kind of feeling that has attracted an eager and fervent group of students to join. The weekly meetings, which are held on Wednesdays at 6 p.m. in Brandywine Hall, take on a very democratic sensibility once they get underway. Members and executives become one in the same, and while healthy (and somewhat out-there) snacks like chia seeds are being distributed amongst the room, everybody contributes his or her ideas to what the club should participate in. So far, Slow Food members have already viewed the 2012 documentary film, Hungry for Change, and have also gone apple picking at Highland Orchards. Later on throughout the year, Slow Food is planning to show more

PAGE 21 documentaries that relate to hunger issues, go on pumpkin picking excursions, and take walks to the local Grower’s Market and Artisan Exchange. Since Slow Food is a relatively new club, it still has some obstacles to overcome in order to flourish. Unable to apply for a budget until next year, the club will have to rely on fundraisers to boost the monetary supply. These minor inconveniences aside, Slow Food has big plans for the immediate and not so immediate future. First and foremost, the executive board members want to spread awareness to the whole campus about the benefits of the lifestyle, and eventually build an entire Slow Food community at West Chester. It will all start with the little changes, like developing relationships with neighbors, farmers, growers, and the community. Being a member of the Slow Food community allows one to be a part of

something bigger. The connections and friendships that can be gained are not only crucially valuable, but also innumerable. If you are interested in becoming a member of the best new and sprouting club to hit WCU in years, then there is no doubt that Slow Food is the perfect fit. Sign up on OrgSync to get updates on everything from meeting times and places to event information. You can even “like” their page on Facebook. As quickly as the health food craze has taken over America, it will surely stay around for many years to come. Joining in on the movement can be as simple as joining the new and incomparably vibrant Slow Food organization. And don’t worry, there’s always enough room at the table. Rachel Alfiero is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at RA806657@wcupa.edu.

Grab campus events by the horns


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The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

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Sports

THE QUAD SPORTS

Other wide receivers also made multiple plays on the day for the Golden Rams, including Shannon Mayer, Adam Dempsey and Tim Brown. They finished with 43, 35, and 13 yards, respectively. Full back Jared Bonacquisti also had one catch that went for nine yards. This wide receivup hope in leading the multiple carries in the ing core, time and time Rams back against the upcoming weeks for West again, makes big plays when they matter most Kutztown Golden Bears. Chester. for West It was an impresChester. sive performance In a game from the starting that went quarterback, and down to one that fans will the wire, remember for a long the Goldtime to come. en Rams Up against mulcould not tiple defenders all have won day, running back without Rondell White failed the relito break 100 yards able hands for the first time on of their rethe season, rushing ceivers. 19 times for 51 yards On the and a touchdown. defensive White did most of side of the his damage through ball, many the air, catching big plays eight passes for 72 were given yards and the aforeto the Goldmentioned gameen Bears, winning touchdown. but at the Defenses can try end of the to stop the run all game, the they want, but nevG o l d e n er underestimate Rams’ deWhite’s receiving fense was skills. He is plenty the one capable of catching that came the ball from Mcout vicCartney, as proven torious. by this week’s game Kutztown’s and games of the Sean McCartney helped keep the Golden Rams chances alive q u a r t e r past. White might not have been able against Kutztown University, beating them 22-21. McCart- back Alec W e r n e r ney was 25-42 for 383 yards and two touchdowns. to run for his fourth and wide 100-yard effort on receiver the season, but there is no cause for conMcCartney could not Brett Fox gave the decern here: White is still have made his plays fense all that they could this offense’s best player, without his wide receiv- handle, but Werner’s four and will continue to help ers, and they stepped up interceptions ultimately the Golden Rams out in a major way for their cost Kutztown this game. Two of those intereach and every game. quarterback. Starting White also chipped in wide receivers Tim Key- ceptions, including the with two returns for 45 ser and Erik Brundidge game-sealing pick, came yards, while Brandon gained 108 yards and from defensive back AlMonk took one return 103 yards, respectively. Hajj Shabazz. Though for 27 yards. Monk, who Keyser had six recep- Shabazz and the rest of had a tremendous game tions and a touchdown, the defensive backfield last week, was not a fac- while Brundidge had the had trouble stopping tor this week for the of- longest catch of the day, Brett Fox (13 catches for 190 yards and a touchfense, but he should get going for 44 yards.

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

West Chester rallies back, wins 22-21 Oliver Suskin-Santarelli Sports Editor

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Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

n one of the most intense football games West Chester has ever been a part of, the Golden Rams made a comeback in the final seconds of a classic faceoff, beating Kutztown University with a final score of 22-21. With the stands packed full of Rams fans for the annual Family Day, No. 17 West Chester did notplay their finest game of the season, but when it was all said and done, head coach Bill Zwan’s crew made an unbelievable comeback when all hope looked lost. The win is West Chester’s fourth straight, and they remain undefeated on the season thus far. Quarterback Sean McCartney deserves much of the credit for driving West Chester’s offense on their final drive. McCartney did not play his best game of the season, going 25for-42, throwing for 383 yards, two touchdowns and two costly interceptions. However, on the Golden Rams’ final offensive drive, McCartney was able to make multiple clutch throws down the field, ending with a 10 yard pass to running back Rondell White. Even in the face of adversity, McCartney never seemed to give

PAGE 23 down), Shabazz was able to pick off Werner’s final throw of the game to bring home the win for West Chester. Shabazz also had three tackles (all assists) on the day. Linebacker Drew Formica and defensive back Shawn Krautzel had the other two of Werner’s interceptions. Formica had six tackles on the day (three solo, three assists), while Krautzel had five (four solo, one assist). Notably, Krautzel also made one of the biggest plays of the day on special teams, blocking Golden Bears’ kicker Andrew Deutsch’s only field goal attempt of the day. Leading the team in tackles this week was linebacker Ronnell Williams, making an eyepopping 15 tackles overall (seven solo, eight assisted). Fellow linebacker Mike Labor had the second most tackles on the day, finishing with a solid 10 total (four solo, six assists). Labor also chipped in with one-anda half sacks, as well as a pass breakup. Defensive end Eric Edwers had his best game of the season, wrecking the Golden Bears’ offensive line for six tackles (three solo, three assists) and two-and-a half sacks on the day. Kayo Bakare, another defensive end, had a great day on the field, racking up three tackles (two solo, one assist) and a sack. Defensive linemen Andrew Cohen and Anthony McCloskey chipped in with half a sack each, bringing the defense’s sack total to six on the day against Kutztown. Other notable defensive players include defensive back Blaise Schieler having six tackles (five solo, one assisted), and defensive lineman Demrick Cook having four tackles (two solo, two assisted) on the day.

This was the defense’s biggest test yet against an opposing offense, and though it was not their finest 60 minutes, the Golden Rams’ defense deserves much credit for hanging in there and solidifying the win for West Chester’s team. The defense let up big plays against Kutztown, but never stopped trying throughout the contest, giving their full effort until the final plays of the game. Another important factor in the Golden Rams’ victory was the loyal amount of Golden Ram fans in the stands. With pink shirts covering the home team’s bleachers from end to end, fans, friends, and families roared and screamed for their home team at Farrell stadium. The win made it that much sweeter, as the stands were packed until the very end of the game, with everyone on the edge of their seat. West Chester’s next contest does not get any easier, as they play California University of Pennsylvania’s Vulcans, who are 3-1. In fact, in week two of this season, the Vulcans played the Golden Bears, and beat them easily with a final score of 45-10. The Vulcans have also beaten Hillsdale College and Edinboro University to start off their season. They’re 1-1 when playing away from home. The Golden Rams’ will be home for their game against the Vulcans, battling at John A. Farrell stadium once again. With the Rams’ hard-fought victory over Kutztown, you can bet that West Chester will be determined to continue their winning streak, extending it to 5-0. Oliver Suskin-Santarelli is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at OS753461@wcupa. edu.


PAGE 24

THE QUAD SPORTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

West Chester sits atop PSAC standings with shutout win at ESU Ryan Calpin

Asst. Sports Editor

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he men’s soccer team was coming off a double overtime scoreless tie against Bloomsburg. The only game that the Rams had this week was a divisional matchup at East Stroudsburg University. East Stroudsburg has struggled so far this year, and was 0-51 going into the game against West Chester. West Chester knew this was a game that they had to win. They also knew that if they did win, they had a shot at sitting atop the PSAC standing for the first time all season. The game against East Stroudsburg was held on

Tuesday at 6:30. The Rams were ready for a nice evening game and it was a tough, scoreless battle for the majority of the first half. That is, until Connor Malarney took a cross from Roberto Silva in the 36th minute and pushed it past the East Stroudsburg goalie, Callum Hampson, making the score 1-0. It remained 1-0 at the half. In the second half, the Rams got firing right away. Just 42 seconds into the second period, freshman Miguel Ross netted his second goal of the year. The West Chester defense took it from there, not allowing a single goal. Ryan Schultz only had to save one shot, as only one of East Stroudsburg’s nine shots was on goal. That

win was the third for the Rams as they improved their record to 3-2-2, and 3-1-1 in the PSAC, as East Stroudsburg failed to record their first win and fell to 0-6-1, and 0-3 in PSAC. Also with that win, the Rams put themselves atop the standings with 10 points, which is one point more than Seton Hill and Mercyhurst. Schultz recorded his second straight shutout effort, and Connor Malarney took five shots, and three of them were on goal. Next up for West Chester is a nonconference game on Wednesday at Wilmington University. Wilmington University is 6-2, and 3-1 in their conference. They were No. 13 in Division II soccer before their loss to Chestnut Hill in their last

matchup. So this nonconference game will be good for West Chester to see what they can doagainst a good team like Wilmington University. After that matchup, they go back home and face Shippensburg on Oct. 8 at 3:30, which is a conference game for the Rams, and it should be a good one. Shippensburg is 3-2-1, and they are coming off a tough loss to Mercyhurst. This will be a game that the Golden Rams need to win if they want to stay atop the PSAC standings. West Chester has really seemed to find their groove, as their last four games have earned them a 3-0-1 record. New coach Michael Benn appears to have put it all together and they can only hope that it is only going to

get better from here. In the remaining 11 games, six of them are against PSAC opponents and of those six opponents, five of them are over .500. The big game of that stretch is against Seton Hill, who is 6-1, and that matchup is to be held on Oct. 19th at home. For the men this season it has been a contribution from the entire team, however in one statistical category someone has really been shining, and that person is Connor Malarney. Malarney, who is a senior, has six goals on the season, which is four more than the next closest scorer, freshman Miguel Ross. Besides Malarney being way ahead in goals scored everything else is very even. Ross has two goals, and four other

Rams have one goal a piece. Dan Venuto, John Frederick, Christian Benner, and Cameron Scott are the four Rams with one goal each. Also assist wise all the Rams are even in that category as well. Roberto Silva has two assists and then there are six Rams with one assist each. With this balanced attack West Chester can really do some damage to opponents that can not handle more than one option of scoring. Usually teams only have one or two players that control the offense, but like stated above, West Chester has numerous opportunities. Ryan Calpin is a second year student majoring in communications studies with a minor in jounralism. He can be reached at RC784188@wcupa.edu.

Lady Ram’s take down No.15 team in the country, 1-0 By Corey Fink Special to The Quad

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est Chester’s women’s soccer team continues their four-game winning streak with a pair of 1-0 victories over No. 15 East Stroudsburg and Philadelphia University this week. This past Tuesday, the women’s soccer team went on the road to face No. 15 East Stroudsburg in hopes of extending their win streak to three consecutive games, surpassing the .500 mark since the first game of the season. In what was a close game for the Rams, they finished the first half in a 0-0 tie with both teams nearly even in shots. In the second half, the Rams came out with a good amount of scor-

ing chances until junior Cara Deola scored her first of the season, assisted by Lexi Brown to put West Chester up 1-0 midway through the half. This goal would be all the Rams needed as freshman goaltender Alex Srolis would go on to pick up her second win and shutout of the season. “It was a fight the entire game. We came into the second half with no score on the board and knew we had dig deep to give us the go- ahead goal. This win was huge for our team momentum-wise. After having a few losses earlier in the season, it was good to get this win under our belt, especially against a strong opponent. Moving forward, this gives us a lot of confidence, but we need to keep

working hard as a team, each practice needs to be competitive, and we need to push each other to be the best we can. Our success will come from how cohesive we are as a team,” said senior foward Marie D’Angelo. On Saturday of this past week, the Lady Rams were still riding the momentum of their 1-0 victory when they traveled to Philadelphia University for their first non-league match of the season. Just like their previous match, they found themselves in a close game until junior forward Dana Hunt scored the only goal of the game and her second of the season. This would lead the women’s soccer team to their fourth straight victory. Alex Srolis was credited

with her second shutout in as many games giving her a total of three on the season. The Lady Rams improved their record to 5-3, and find themselves tied for first in the PSAC with five wins on the season as they look to continue this streak of success when they host Indiana University of Pennsylvania this Wednesday at 1 p.m. With a competitive attitude and character to win close games, the women’s soccer team looks to continue on a winning pace throughout the second half of their season that will push them towards a playoff birth. With a tight team defense and timely scoring, along with a solid pairing in net, the Lady Rams look as if they are once again

gearing up for an exciting second half and a deep playoff run. The next time the Lady Rams are in action is against IUP at home on Wednesday at 1 p.m.IUP is 4-4-1, but have lost some really close, tough games. They are in a little bit of a slide losing three of the last four games, with the other game in between there being a tie against Mansfield. After IUP they play at Clarion on Saturday Oct. 5. Clarion is 3-3-2 and they are also in a slide, losing two games in a row. Whereas West Chester’s next two opponents are struggling as of late, the Lady Rams are on a tear, winning four in a row.Three of those four wins were shutout wins, outscoring their oppo-

nents 5-1 in the four game stretch that displayed their dominance. The reason the Rams are on a winning tear is because of the balanced attack that they have had lately. They have eight different scorers, led by Cara Deola with three goals. Everybody else, with the exception of Carly Yost, who has two goals, has scored one goal for the team. This balanced scoring effort, along with stellar defense, and superb goalkeeping from Alex Srolis and Madi Mitchell, have the women looking to continue their dominance, and put the rough start to the season behind them. Corey Fink is a third year student majoring in communications studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at CF794229@wcupa.edu

By Mi Speci


SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 25

Women’s golf bound for success Pirates finally have playoff berth

e goal a By Michael Murphy uto, John Special to The Quad Christian Cameron ver the span of the our Rams past two weeks, the ach. Also West Chester womthe Ramsen’s golf team has compett categoryed in the Michael Corbett rto SilvaFall Classic (September and then15-16) and the Clarion ams withInvitational (September 22-23). The Michael Coranced at-bett Classic took place in ester canClymer, N.Y. The par 72 e damagecourse posed a challenge that canfor the squad. After day ore thanone of the tournament, scoring.West Chester stood at only have10th out of 17 teams in the yers thattournament. West Chester ense, butset a personal record on ove, Westthe first day, having every numerousgolfer shoot under 90 for the first time in the team’s second yearhistory. n communi- One of these standout a minor ingolfers on day one includbe reached ated Gabby Couture who led du. the Lady Rams with an 83 on the day, placing 18th individually. Her remarkable 39 on the back nine helped her secure this spot. Freshman Taylor Daskivich stepped up for the team the four and turned in an 86 on day that disone. Both Katie Clark and minance. Ashley Teufel were not too he Rams far behind Daskivich, as ng tear is they turned in scores of 88. balanced Junior Nicole Cavalcante hey have signed for 89 to ensure the hey have team would be below 90 for scorers, the day. As a team, West eola with Chester shot a combined verybody 345 on the first day, not exception far behind the leader Ganwho has non, who scored 316, and s scored Mercyhurst, who shot 323. he team. Day two would bring scoring good fortune to the team with stelas they eliminated 11 d superb strokes off their first round om Alex score as they moved up to di Mitchfinish 9th out of 16 teams women in the tournament. What nue their was more miraculous d put the about this final day of the the seaClassic was that the team m. shot under 90 on back-tord year stu-back days. A feat that has communica-never been accomplished a minor in be reached atin the school’s history until this tournament. The du Rams were once again

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lead by Couture who shot 82 on day two and had a 36-hole score of 165. However, Couture would be topped by her Freshman teammate Clark who shot a career low 80 on day two. Clark shaved 8 strokes off her day one score as she went only eight over par on the day. She would finish three strokes back of Couture with a combined score of 168. Fellow Freshman Daskivich stayed consistent as she shot 86 on both days. Daskivich would have an overall score of 172 for the 36 hole tournament. Teufel would improve her day one score by two strokes as she shot 86 on Monday and posted a 174 for the tournament. As a team, the Rams shot a 679 on the tournament. The day two score of 334 was the third lowest in school history. This is also the first time the team has shot under 340 since April of 2012. The Rams may have not come out with the win in this tournament, but they are certainly looking up as they headed into the Clarion Invitational. The Clarion Invitational took place last weekend as the Golden Rams looked to build upon their success of the Michael Corbett Classic. This two- day tournament was held at the par 72 Clarion Oaks Golf Club. After day one, the Lady Rams were sitting in seventh place out of 14 other schools. The conditions for day one were very harsh, as the temperature hovered in the low 50s. To go along with the cold temperatures, rain also factored into this equation, making it not the ideal day for golf. However, Couture would have no problem leading her squad, as she shot an 83 on day one and duplicated her back nine score of the week before with a standout 39. Freshman Daskivich scored

an 88 on the day. Fellow freshman Clark would sign for a 95 on the day. Junior Cavaclante shot a 91 on day one. Rounding out the group would be Teufel with a 96. With better weather came better rounds from the Golden Rams golfers as they seized the opportunity on day two. The team shot a combined score of 345 on day two, as they shaved 12 strokes off their day one score. Couture, as expected, led the squad once again with an 81 on Monday, shaving two strokes off her day one score. Couture would post a solid 164 for the tournament, and tie for eighth place in the individual scoring for the tournament. The Rams are defiantly a day two team as everyone followed Couture and lowered their scores from day one. Daskivich shaved three strokes off her day one score by posting an 85 on Monday. She would finish with a combined score of 173. Daskivich would tie for 25th overall in the individual scoring. Cavalcante put up an even 90 on day two, one stroke better than her previous score. She would finish with 181. Clark bettered her score on day one by 6 strokes as she signed for an 89 and an overall score of 184. The team is off until the first weekend of October when they will compete in the Kutztown Fall Invitational. This team looks like it is poised for success in these up and coming matches. This team shows confidence in day two of tournaments consistently. If they are able to put up those types of numbers on day one, then they will certainly be a dangerous team. Michael Murphy is a first-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at MM802071@wcupa.edu

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By Evan Smith Staff Writer

was notorious for all the wild pitches he threw with the Yankees) is 9-11 with a 3.39 ERA and 203 strikeouts. Moreover, their young pitchers have been doing their part too, as Gerrit Cole and Jeff Locke have put up respectable numbers. It is not all about how a team starts the game, though. It is how they finish. The bullpen has been a crucial component for the Pirates’ winning games this year. Jason Grilli has emerged as one of the better closers in the league, as he has 32 saves

he Pittsburgh Pirates are all too familiar with losing. In fact, it has become somewhat of a tradition for the team, as they have had 20 straight losing seasons. To put that into perspective, the majority of current college students have not witnessed a single winning season for the Pirates. The last time they compiled a winning season was in 1992, when they had a pre-steroid era Barry Bonds, and were still in the NL East www.post-gazette.com with the Expos, Phillies, Mets, Cardinals and Cubs. That was until several weeks ago when they earned their 81st win, ensuring that the trend of losing seasons would be put to a halt. Not only have they surpassed expectations by having a winning season, but they have with an ERA of 2.76. Grilli, captured a playoff berth as a relatively unknown name well. Last year they made in the baseball world prior to tremendous progress as a this season, earned himself team, where it looked like a spot in this year’s All-Star they would have a legitimate game. Although, he injured shot at being in contention – his forearm in July, and has that is until the wheels fell missed significant time as off, as they ultimately fell a result, he has returned to short of that goal. This year the closer’s role, where the has been a different story Pirates expect him to pick however. Everything has up where he left off. seemed to click, and when From a hitting perspecall cylinders are firing at tive, the Pirates have made the same time in baseball, a huge splash this season. this makes for a dangerous Led by Pittsburgh’s “chosen team. The Pirates pitching one” Andrew McCutchen, has been nothing short of the Pirates have been able stellar. to anchor the ship around Leading the rotation have him. McCutchen burst onto been veterans Francisco the scene in 2009 and has Liriano and A.J. Burnett. been touted as the one to Both solid pitchers at one save the franchise. When point in time, many had expectations are high, it can speculated that they were sometimes be hard to live up past their primes; that to them, but not for Andrew they had nothing left in the McCutchen, who has surtank, as the last few sea- passed expectations. At the sons would seem to indicate. young age of 26, McCutchen However this year has told has put up MVP caliber a different tale. Liriano has numbers in each of the last a record of 16-8 with a 3.02 four years, and this year ERA, while Burnett (who has been no different. Mc-

Cutchen, who is a five-tool player is batting 318. With 20 homeruns, 83 RBI’s and 27 stolen bases. Other players who have stepped up big include, Pedro Alaverz, Sterling Marte, Jordy Mercer, among many others. Alaverz is a powerful force in the middle of the lineup, as he has accumulated 34 homeruns and 97 RBI’s thus far. In addition to the bats that were with the team the whole year, the franchise felt they needed to bolster their lineup. Therefore, they added veteran hitters Justin Morneau, Marlon Byrd, and John Buck, as all of them have made key contributions, and will look to do so in the postseason. The first round of wildcard games, which was a new format last year, will be played on October 1st. The Pirates will be taking on their division rival in the NL Central, the Cincinnati Reds. This is the second year that has had 10 overall teams make it to playoffs, as opposed to the eight that it was in seasons prior. Last year’s one-game playoff in the NL was surrounded by a storm of controversy, as a blown infield fly call cost the Atlanta Braves the momentum and runs against the St. Louis Cardinals. This is why they should expand the onegame playoff into a best two out of three scenario, so the hard work that these teams put in all year does not just vanish on one blown call. The Pirates have a shipshape crew and will look to build on what they have done all season. So playoff teams beware, because the Pirates are a viable contender, and will have you walking the plank in October if taken lightly. Evan Smith is a fourth-year student majoring in political science and minoring in communications. He can be reached at ES777403@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 26

SEPTEMBER 30, 2013

West Chester keeps rolling, prepares for East Stroudsburg

By AJ Arcaini Special to The Quad

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THE QUAD SPORTS

here is a saying in sports, “offense wins games, but defense wins championships.” If this saying holds true, the West Chester University women’s field hockey team will have no problem contending for their third national championship. The defensive play of the Rams has kept the engine burning, and is a huge component to yet another successful start to the season. The Rams started conference play this week with their first Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference game against Indiana University of Pennsylvania on Friday night. Last time the Rams and Crimson Hawks met, an overtime goal from Nancy Stehman was the difference

maker for West Chester in a win. Friday would be another tough challenge for both teams. Friday afternoon featured WCU and IUP facing off yet again, but this time at Vonnie Gros Field, where West Chester holds a 2-1 record this season. The teams took the field, the whistle blew, and the Rams began what would be a 70-minute battle. Just two minutes into the game, West Chester had its first strong opportunity on two shots coming from juniors Kelsey Cheek and Hannah Davies. Both shots were blocked away, as the score remained 0-0 early in the contest. The Rams then struck first, 13 minutes in. Senior Kelsi Lykens scored her sixth goal of the season, coming right after a penalty corner. Lykens goal gave the Rams a 1-0

lead early in the first half. As both teams continued to work through the first half, the West Chester defense shut down mostly all of IUP’s chances. With 17 minutes left in the half, IUP junior Paige Mosner struck on what would be IUP’s only shot or goal. The score changed to 1-1, which stuck through the first half. Second half play began and West Chester did not take long to strike back. After five penalty corners coming just minutes into the half, junior Hannah Davies found the back of the net to give West Chester a 2-1 lead. This was Davies’ first goal of the season and first goal of her collegiate career. West Chester would threaten again a few times, but the dominant defense play of the Rams

would eventually seal the win. IUP only had one shot on goal through the entire game, proving the Rams’ defense to be stronger than ever and giving WCU a 1-0 start in their PSAC record. “We believe in team attack and team defense, so good defense starts all the way up with our forwards and works its way back to our goal keeper Audree Bonavita,” Lykens said. This team defense Lykens spoke of is definitely giving the Rams an edge against many teams and is a key variable to their success. West Chester’s next challenge came against Seton Hill University on Saturday afternoon. Seton Hill University is a new addition to the PSAC this year, and this would be the first game ever played between WCU and SHU. Seton Hill entered the game with a 3-5 record and 0-1 in PSAC play. The Rams completely dominated the first half of play, scoring five goals without allowing a single shot on goal by Seton Hill. Cheek, Da-

vies, Alexis Versak, Stef Pirri and Lauren McGinley scored first half goals. West Chester came out firing once again in the second half with early goals by Cheek and sophomore Alayna Brown, increasing the lead to 7-0. SHU finally struck 20 minutes into the second half on a goal from freshman Alisha Bell. The Rams would not wait long to counter, with two more goals. First came a goal from senior Lykens with 12 minutes left, raising the score to 8-1. Next, sophomore Morgan Hagner found the back of the cage, scoring her first collegiate goal. Two late goals for SHU would make the score 9-3, but a late goal from freshman Marnie Kusakavitch would seal the Rams’ 10-3 win. A powerful offense showing and more dominant defense play resulted in a West Chester win raising their record to 6-2 and 2-0 in conference play. As the week ends, the Rams seem to really be catching their stride

and playing to full potential. Their defense looks unbreakable and the offense is thriving. West Chester’s next opponent is East Stroudsburg, who they have already dominated in an 8-1 victory earlier in the season. Further down the road for this team include games against Shippensburg University, Ursinus University and Millersville University. Notably out of the three, the Shippensburg Red Raiders, the No.1 ranked team in the country for Division II field hockey, handed the Golden Rams their first loss of the season back on Sep. 10th, with a final score of 4-2. Needless to say, this squad will want their revenge on one of their fiercest rivals in what should be a great game. Will the Rams stay on their hot streak? The odds seem strong for this next week of conference play. AJ Arcaini is a second-year student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AA788494@wcupa.edu

Athlete of the Week: Hannah Davies

Kelsi Lykens takes the ball up field against the IUP Hawks in Friday’s 2-1 victory. Lykens had four shots on goal, and her sixth goal of the season to help the Rams win. The Rams are now 6-2 on the season.

wcupagoldenrams.com

Ilana Berger/ Photography Editor

Hannah Davies had two goals in the past two games, and an assist. The two goals for Davies was the first two goals of her collegiate career. She helped the Rams go 6-2 on the season.

Vol

By St Speci


Volleyball’s unbeaten streak ends By Stephen Gallo Special to The Quad

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he West Chester women’s volleyball team sees an eightgame winning streak end as they opened up PSAC competition. With a double-header on both Friday and Saturday, the Lady Rams received their first two losses of the season against Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and Gannon University, both losing three sets to one. Not only did they lose their first matches of the season, they also lost stand out freshmen, Annalee Halbert, to injury in the first match against Edinboro and did not play against Gannon. Tori Hutchinson and Mandy Flynn stepped in to split the starting setter duties in attempt to make up for the stellar player lost when Halbert went down. Hutchinson had 22 assists between the two matches and Flynn recorded 25 to her credit. Friday also saw the return of junior hitter, Julia O’Brien, after a two week absence from the starting lineup. O’Brien took her place as lead of the offense with a total of 18 kills on the day. Paige Thommas also continued her steady play contributing to the offense adding 12 kills herself between the two matches. Callie Krajcir led the team defense with 42 defensive digs on the day, 20 against Edinboro, and 22 against Gannon. Tyler Schaefer added to the defense against Gannon as well with 21 defensive digs. The Golden Rams continued their road trip on Saturday with two matches against Slip-

pery Rock University and Mercyhurst University, where they lost the first match against Slippery Rock three sets to none (25-18, 25-18, 25-22), falling to 8-3. The second half of the double-header saw the Golden Rams receive their fourth loss of the season. Mercyhurst defeated the Rams three sets to none (25-10, 2520, 29-27), as well. WCU failed to win one of their PSAC crossover games this past weekend, but look to end their losing streak on Tuesday against Georgian Court University. The Lady Rams will hope to get their first PSAC win on Friday against Shippensburg University, or Saturday against Millersville University. Though the Ram’s have finally been defeated, four times in a row none the less, do not fret: this is still one of West Chester’s best sports team, and they are determined to right their wrongs, continuing their winning ways once again. Georgian Court University is currently sporting a record of 4-7, which is half the amount of wins that the Lady Rams posses on the season thus far. With solid play, the Lady Rams should have no trouble putting them away. Head coach Kassie Bellaver and assistant coach Jill Holdren surely have their work cut out for them in terms of turning this team around, but if there’s any team that can do it, it’s the volleyball team. This is a group of passionate teaammates with great chemistry, a strong sense of determination, and poised to fix their wrongs and continue their success soon enough. Stephen Gallo is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at SG 749536@wcupa.edu


Comeback win in final minute keeps Rams undefeated Page 23

Jose Mestre/ Asst. Photography Editor

Sports

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Quad 105-04  

The Quad issue of September 30, 2013

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