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W W W. W C U Q UA D. CO M MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013

VOLUME 104, ISSUE 2

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Miss WCU 2013, Emily Sharp See story on page 2; more pictures page 12

Jessica Guzzardo/ Photo Editor


PAGE 2

News

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Clare Haggerty News Editor

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or 22 accomplished young ladies, they could hardly believe that this day had come. Finally, it was time to crown Miss WCU 2013. After weeks of practice, the night had finally arrived. The pageant contestants came from a myriad of majors and organizations. Contestants for Miss WCU 2013 were Molly Callanan, Melissa Christie, Haley Shutt, Devon Becker, Emily Desiderio, Mercedes Johnson, Nicole Vigilante, Elle Berry-Johnson, Margo Loggia, Samantha Gogets, Emily Sharp, Heidi Brooks, Caitlin O’Connor, Cassandra Thompson, Morgan Stewart, Julie Cramer, Stormy Milburn, Kim Bydlon, Deneen Friend, Tiffany Hundley, Ilana Berger, and Jenna Romansky. The pageant opened with an amazing rendition of the National Anthem by

Courtney Daniels. Daniels was followed by the Opening Production Number, a lively dance number that included all of the pageant contestants, as well as Miss WCU 2012, Alexis Stinson, who incorporated flag twirling into her performance. The next portion of the competition was a video that introduced each contestant. They were filmed at several different areas all around campus and used the time to introduce themselves, say what organizations they were involved in and explain their platforms. Some of the platforms were To Write Love on Her Arms, Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, The Arts in Action, and Restore the Shore. Next, the audience met the judges. The emcee of the evening was Robin Vitale, Mrs. New Jersey 2012. Other judges included Dann Dunn, who was recently named Philadelphia’s Best Director and Best Choreographer by the 2012 BroadwayWorld

THE QUAD NEWS

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Emily Sharp crowned Miss WCU 2013

Awards, and Courtney Thomas, Miss Pennsylvania 2010. The next portion of the pageant was the casual wear competition, which gave contestants the opportunity to show their personalities. Then, Miss WCU 2012 prefaced the talent competition by playing the piano and singing Elton John’s “Your Song.” The talent portion of the pageant included a gymnastics routine, several dance numbers, a standup comedy act, singing, a photography slideshow, monologues, and even a sword-twirling act. Not to mention, two different contestants accompanied themselves by using cups, which fans of the movie Pitch Perfect would surely recognize. After a brief 10-minute intermission, contestants graced the stage in their formalwear to answer questions about their platforms, their dreams, and West Chester University. Recognition of the 14 former Miss WCU titleholders followed, several of whom were in atten-

Molly Callanan and Emily Sharp wait anxiously to hear who will be crowned Miss WCU 2013.

Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor

Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor

All of the contestants dance together in the Opening Production Number.

dance. Next came special remarks from the mayor of West Chester, Carolyn Comitta, during which she offered hugs to students who wanted them, and gave Alexis Stinson a key to the city of West Chester. Stinson then stayed on the stage as a video played of her farewell presentation as she explained everything that she was able to accomplish in the last year. Finally, the top five finalists were announced in no particular order: Molly Callanan, Melissa Christie, Elle Berry-Johnson, Emily Sharp, and Ilana Berger. These finalists were then asked a question, some of which were “If someone were to write a book about your experiences at West Chester University, what would its title be?” and “What do you think are the three most important qualities to have in Miss WCU?” While the judges deliberated, emcee Robin Vitale received the Miss WCU Fan of the Year award for always supporting the pageant and visiting titleholders were recognized, women of all ages from all over the country. Finally, Stinson graced the stage again, this time with two

backup singers, to play the piano again and sing “Hallelujah.” When she finished, the time had finally come to give awards. The Congeniality Award went to Emily Sharp; the People’s Choice Award, which was chosen by the audience, went to Elle Berry-Johnson. Mercedes Johnson received the Photogenic Award, and Elle Berry-Johnson won the Leadership Award. Melissa Christie received both the Academic Award and the Community Service Award. The Newcomer Award for a first-year contestant went to Margo Loggia, and Stormy Milburn received the Spirit Award. Jenna Romansky received the Non-Finalist Casual Wear Award for highest score in casual wear, and Haley Shutt won the NonFinalist Talent Award. Cassandra Thompson won both the Poise and Presence Award and the NonFinalist Interview Award. Finally, Ilana Berger won both the Platform Development Award and the Fan Club Award for the loudest cheers whenever she came on stage. “It was incredible [to win the Fan Club Award] because every time I walked on the stage, it seemed like

the whole concert hall was cheering for me,” Berger said. “The amount of love and support I received leading up to the night and throughout truly warmed my heart.” Finally, the time had arrived to crown Miss WCU 2013. Of the top five finalists, Melissa Christie was fourth runner up, followed by Elle Berry-Johnson at third runner-up and Ilana Berger at second runnerup. After it was announced that Molly Callanan was first runner-up, the crowd went wild with cheers for Miss WCU 2013: Emily Sharp, who had blown the audience away with a beautiful rendition of “I Dreamed a Dream” from the musical Les Misérables, and her platform was Mirror Mirror, “a program to make the best of the reflection you see in the mirror.” “If I ever find the words [to talk about winning Miss WCU], I promise to call you,” Sharp said. “It was simply a dream come true. I’m so honored to represent West Chester University.” Clare Haggerty is a second-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD NEWS

Zumbathon raises suicide prevention awareness By Joy Wilson Staff Writer

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onday evening from 9 to 11 p.m., more than 200 students arrived in the basketball court of the new Recreation Center ready to zumba. Students strutted their yellow clothing to support the event’s theme, “Celebrate Life.” Their goal was to raise awareness for suicide prevention. Elle Berry-Johnson, a fourth-year athletic training and communication studies major with a minor in criminal justice, and Miss WCU 2013 Contestant, partnered with the Recreation Center to organize the Zumbathon. BerryJohnson invited West Chester’s service societies, the Friars and Abbes, and all the sororities and fraternities on campus, along with the

Ilana Berger/Asst. Photo Editor

PAGE 3

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school’s radio, WCUR 91.7 The Curve, who deejayed the event. In fact, as well as dancing off calories and giggling with friends, sorority

sisters and fraternity brothers received community service hours for attending the Zumbathon. Zumba instructors, Sami, Kayla, and Erin each teach classes in the Rec Center, and took turns leading the routines for the Zumbathon. Students lunged, shuffled, and shook to songs like Pitbull’s “I Know You Want Me” and Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop.” The event was held in memory of those lost, which for Ber-

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Susan Leighton, Program Assistant 610.519.7137 • susan.leighton@villanova.edu ry-Johnson, included Mathew Pattley, of Trenton, NJ who served in the Pa. National Guard. Berry-Johnson also mentioned Crystal Krier, of Tullytown, Pa., whose name lives on with a group of Volunteers for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention who call themselves “Crystal’s Angels.” Participants hung pictures of their own loved ones on a memory wall BerryJohnson designated inside the basketball

court. Donations were accepted, though not pushed, and all proceeds benefited QPR Institute, which offers suicide risk assessment and risk management training, as well as a crisis hotline. Finally, at the end of the evening, BerryJohnson handed out pledges to all participants and read the inspiring words aloud. The pledge, written by Elana Benitez, proclaimed:

“I promise to love myself, but not just to love, but to honor. I promise to always look on the bright side, and have a hunger for happiness. I promise to ask for help when I need it, and not be ashamed. I promise to not put myself down, but to encourage myself to always be better. Finally I promise to respect and appreciate the life that I have been given.” Joy Wilson is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at JW794401@ wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD NEWS

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

RD NEWS I E W

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four-week-old baby in London, England, is recovering in hospital after a fox attack. The child was asleep when his mother heard a scream, then a heavy thud, as the baby was dragged to the floor.Reports say one of the boy’s fingers was bitten off and had to be re-attached by surgeons. In response to the startling attack, London’s mayor, Boris Johnson, said more must be done to tackle the problem of urban foxes. ix contestants sat on giant blocks of ice during the annual ice pole-sitting contest in Northern Sweden on Friday. Braving temperatures down to -18 F, the contestants were only allowed to come down for ten-minute toilet break once every two hours, during their 48-hour ordeal. man has recently invented a dress that is getting a rise out of the fashion world. The dress will become transparent when the wearer is sexually aroused - or whenever their heart rate increases, which could happen while dancing, eating, or even witnessing a car accident.

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Students hold candlelight vigil for Sean Casey On Tuesday, Feb. 5, WCU students received an email that a fellow student had contracted bacterial meningitis. The following Thursday, students received a second email informing them of the death of the same student. Sean Casey, a third-year student, was a member of the Honors College and the College of Visual & Performing Arts. He was a well-liked, accomplished student, and he will be deeply missed. Friends and fellow classmates of Casey organized a candlelight vigil to be held outside of the Sykes StuJessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor dent Union on Thursday night in his honor. Many students came out to show support for the loss of a friend, classmate, leader, and fraternity brother. “The loss of a student touches everyone on the campus, and I know that Sean and his family will be remembered in our thoughts and prayers in the days ahead,” said university President, Dr. Greg Weisenstein. “We extend our deepest condolences to the Casey family and all of Sean’s friends and classmates during this very difficult time.”

Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor

Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD NEWS

WCU hosts spring Organization Fair

Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor

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n Feb. 6, Sykes Student Union held the spring Organization Fair. The Sykes ballroom was filled with students representing their groups, clubs, and causes. As always, it was a great display of the diversity in West Chester University. It was great opportunity to walk around and interact with everyone there. One of the most noticable things was the many fraternity and sorority tables. Although the Greek life organizations had a large presence in the ballroom there was still room for other tables. There were many different clubs

to learn about, such as the American Market Association, Students for Life, and Muslim Student Association. Each of the tables had something special to show and each was manned by its own enthusiastic student. Of course some of the more memorable tables gave special treats to those who would come by. Notable was SAC, which handed out free soda. Although the treats are always good, it is important to take in the message that each table is giving out. It shows the commitment that the group has to man a table all day in order to get more people to learn about the organization. Walking through the event table by table provdes one interesting

view of the event, but participating behind one specific table provides another perspective, as well. Being part of an organization and working at one of the tables can give students a chance to see the fair from the other side. It is sometimes difficult to reel people in to give them information about the group in question, but to do it is very rewarding, This is an important event because it gives students the chance to be involved. Many of the students in attendance in the ballroom were freshmen. They were just beginning their second semester. Since they had gotten their feet wet with college life during the fall semester, it is only natuPhoto Joy Wilson ral tobywant to see what

else there is out there for them. This is the opportunity that the organization fair gives. Of course, this is not only open to freshmen. Anyone who wants to get involved is welcome at future involvement fairs. For students who missed this organization fair, the best way for them to get involved is to create an account on OrgSync by going to orgsync.com/login/ west-chester-universityof-pennsylvania and selecting the “Register Now” option. There are over 250 organizations linked to West Chester University’s OrgSync. It is never too late to try something new. Jack Barnett is a fourth-year student majoring in history and political science. He can be reached at JB723722@wcupa.edu.

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PAGE 6

Op-Ed

THE QUAD OP-ED

QUADOPED@WCUPA.EDU

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It is cold outside, but not cold enough

am sure at one time you have complained about how cold it is outside. I know I have. Personally, I have been bundling up all week. It was only until lately that it dawned on me, perhaps it is not yet cold enough. Bare with me, because this is not going to be a climate change lecture. What I am worried about is a lack of snow. By this I mean real snow and not this rainy slush we have been getting. If you are an old geezer like me, then you would remember the huge snowstorm we had in 2010. It was great with no classes a snow covered campus, and lots of free time. I remember sitting comfortably in my dorm, watching movies and only leaving to eat or play. The residential quad was filled with snowmen and snow forts. Snow fights sporadically broke-out on campus. If you were brave enough you could have ventured to South Campus to sled down the hills. I know I was not bold enough to make the trek all the way down there. I do not want to get too nostalgic, but those were really the days. All I really want now is a good snowstorm, which has eluded this college for the last two years. Hopefully we will get lucky with just one more mega-snowstorm this semester. This may be highly unlikely, but a man can dream. -Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor The Quad

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

The Quad The Student Newspaper of West Chester University 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 610.436.2375 | quad@wcupa.edu | www.wcuquad.com

Kenny Ayres

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Clare Haggerty News Editor Jack Barnett Op-Ed Editor Samantha Schaule Features Editor Molly Herbison Entertainment Editor Joey Samuel Sports Editor Jessica C. Guzzardo Photography Editor BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Erica Brooks Business Manager Kellyn McNamara Managing Editor

EDITORIAL STAFF Ilana Berger Asst. Photography Editor Riley Wallace Asst. Sports Editor

COPY EDITORS Colleen Cummings Stephanie Loeh Laura Wayne

DISTRIBUTION Daniel Colon Stephen Hood ONLINE EDITION Patrick Thomas FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumni. We do not accept submissions from members of the community who are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,000 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers Copyright Š2013 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the editor-in-chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, studentrun newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,000. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and, although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our website at www.wcuquad.com. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our website at www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


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FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD OP-ED

Chester County Historical Society’s new events By David Reinfeld Special to The Quad

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lack History Month is an important time at the Chester County Historical Society, which focuses on all aspects of history throughout the area. Many aspects of its exhibits and programs highlight the history of the local African American community, including the newest exhibit at CCHS, “On the Edge of Battle: Chester County and the Civil War.” The exhibit examines life in Chester County during the bloodiest war in our nation’s history. The featured display focuses on the hopes, struggles, victories and losses of local men and women living in Chester County at the time of the Civil War. When you enter the Chester County Historical Society to visit “On the Edge of Battle,” you will receive a “character card” that tells the first part of one of twentyfive individuals’ stories. The cards include Richard Adams, a member of the Third “U.S. Colored Troops”; Henrietta Cummings, who was born into a free black family

and was proposed to by her love before he enlisted; and Joseph Jones, a member of the first black regiment of the war, the 54th Massachusetts. Visitors to the exhibit gallery can search for their ancestors in a database of over 6,000 residents Chester County residents who served in the war. Up until the opening of “On the Edge of Battle,” only 112 records about Chester County African American soldiers in the Civil War were compiled. Now, through research by Archivist Cliff Parker and photo archivist Pam Powell, the database includes 925 African Americans. CCHS is also proud to present Family Day on President’s Day, Mon. Feb. 18 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. An important component to Family Day is a special kid-friendly presentation by Jen Bryant, author of “A Splash of Red: The Life and Art of Horace Pippin.” Pippin, acclaimed 20th century African American artist, was a native of West Chester. Bryant’s new children’s book brings his story to life through vivid

imagery and stories. Another initiative of the Chester County Historical Society is the ‘Horace Pippin Traveling Trunk” program. These “trunks” are filled with materials and activities that engage and inform students on important points in our history, including early settlement, the American Revolution, the Underground Railroad, and the Civil War. These “trunks” are wonderful education resources, now used in a variety of educational settings. On Feb 27, the US Airways’ African American Diversity Network (AADN), one of the company-sponsored employee Business Resource Groups that encourages an inclusive workplace through networking and development, has chosen the “Horace Pippin Traveling Trunk” to be displayed for over 600 employees at the Philadelphia International Airport. The Paoli Public Library, as well as a group of homeschoolers, will be using “Underground Railroad Traveling Trunk” during the month

of February because of its specific link with the black community during the time of the Civil War, and its focus on the Underground Railroad in Chester County. “On the Edge of Battle: Chester County and the Civil War” is open during CCHS’s public hours of 9:30 to 4:30, Wed through Sat. To find out more or to arrange a group tour or a rental of traveling trunks, please visit ChesterCoHistorical. org or call 610.692.4800. Our deepest gratitude to DNB First, Pennsylvania Humanities Council, the Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation, the Fox Chase Bank Charitable Foundation, the Haverford Trust Company, the Chester County Conference and Visitors Bureau Foundation, Jimmy Duffy Catering, Dr. Florence K. Williams, Fig® West Chester, and the Quaker City Foundation for their support of our exhibit. David Reinfeld is the Vice President of development at the Chester County Historical. He can be reached at Societydreinfeld@ chestercohistorical.org.

PAGE 7

Weekly Comments

President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has expressed interest in direct negotiations with the United States of America over its controversial nuclear program. This is a positive step forward towards a peaceful solution between our country and the Islamic Republic. President Ahmadinejad does have terms for the possible negotiations. He declared that if he were to talk, the United States would have to take off its “dishonorable pressure” on the Middle Eastern nation. These comments most likely came in the light of Joe Biden’s recent comments. The vice-president said that he would be open to direct talks with Iran. This is a positive step forward, even though a peaceful solution being found is obviously going to be difficult. The U.S. is unlikely to lift sanctions on Iran and Iran is unlikely to negotiate while they are still under sanctions. This creates a stalemate difficult to break. There is a big misconcenption of Iran. Whenever people talk about the Islamic government of Iran, they bring up President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. He is the face of Iran, giving speeches in the U.N. and making some very bold statements. However, to think that President Ahmadinejad is in charge is very misleading. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is the Supreme Leader of the nation. The Supreme Leader and his council can strike down laws they do not approve. President Ahmadinejad is a figurehead to hide the conservative Islamists that truly run the country. Now on Netflix you can watch the new show “House of Cards.” Although Netflix has many shows online this one is special because the show is made by Netflix and only shown on Netflix. This developmeny is a big step forward for the industry. This is not the first original series the company had; there is also the wacky series named “Lilyhammer” about a mafia man on the run in Norway. This one has had the most fan-fare because it has respected actor Kevin Spacey as the main character. The series is actually a remake of a British miniseries starring Ian Richardson (also available on Netflix). Netlfix could get into the HBO, Showtime, FX, and AMC territory of original series. A big boost may be in store for the already profitable company. More series are on the way including the highly anticipated revival of the cult series “Arrested Development.” Netflix knows in this age that a business must constantly evolve and change. The people in charge of Netflix know if you keep with the status quo could be disastrous. Just look at Blockbuster. Netflix has big plans and I would suggest that you look out for them in the future.


PAGE 8

THE QUAD OP-ED

The study of history is integral to our lives

By Adam Farence Staff Writer

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istory, in its simplest terms, is the collection of events that have gone by. History is everything that has happened in the world, whether it happened to us individually, to our friends, to others, or even to everybody. History makes up the very nature of everything, and has been a part of everything in existence. I have met some people in my life who could not care less about history, with the mindset that something in the past that has outlived its usefulness is no longer needed. Little do these misguided people know, history has played a large part in shaping their lives and will continue to do so, therefore, studying history is of the utmost importance. There are many types of history. The kind most people think of is the famous men and women in the past who have facilitated great events in our world. However, the kind

that I believe we will find more useful is the history of ourselves and our social world. Take, for example, a person who goes to apply for a new job. What is one thing any potential employer asks when examining a potential employee? That would be employment history. Employers use history to make educated choices regarding their work force; who to let in, and who to let go. Granted, this is not the first thought that comes to one’s mind when thinking of history, but it is history nonetheless. In court rooms, an examination is always made oof the individual’s is on trial, they always examine his criminal history (or lack thereof) to be used as evidence either for or against the accused. In fact, the entire case revolves around the history of a single person (or persons) at a certain point in time. Even from an athletic standpoint, practice history determines how ef-

fective an athlete will be in the field. The more experienced an athlete is, or in other words, the more history he or she has to draw from, the better judgments will be made during the game. With our friends, we all have that one friend that shows up 30 minutes late, therefore we tell him or her to arrive 30 minutes before we are supposed to go anywhere. Or how do we decide to trust people with sensitive secrets? Who in the past has honored a promise to keep something quiet, and who has not? Here, we utilize the history we know about our friends. Whether we realize it or not, we use our past experiences to make decisions and educated guesses on what our next move should be. Another major use is determining who we should spend the rest of our lives with. People prefer not to spend time with others who have proven to be a bother or troublesome. From a psychological standpoint, our history defines much of who we

are, aside from what is instinctively hard-wired into our brains; we learn through our past experiences, our history. History makes up everything around us, from great and powerful changes in the world to the interactions of our daily lives. To completely disregard history inevittably destines one to the same mistake twice. Without history, how would we know who to hire and who to fire? How would we know what to examine during a court case? How would we know what friend we should tell to arrive 30 minutes early? Who to trust? And above all else, who to marry? History is powerful; history is a part of everything imaginable. To revisit the old question: “Why should one study history?” The answer, quite simply, is: “How can one not?” Adam Farence is a second-year student majoring in history. He can be reached at AF764146@ wcupa.edu.

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Editor’s Note

As a history major it is always important to realize the importance of remembering and studying history. There are a plethora of lessons to be learned from the past. For example we are currently in dire relations with the Islamic Republic of Iran. This is because they are developing a nuclear program. People are fearful of opening up to Iran. They think that Iran will play us for fools and use negotiations to stall for time. There are lessons to be learned from history that could be applied here. First you could look at Neville Chamberlain. He appeased Nazi Germany by giving into their demands. He thought that appeasement could bring peace. Obviously he was wrong, and World War II followed. However, this should not discourage people from the peace process. After all, President Richard Nixon had successful negotiations with Mao Zedong in China. Many people say we cannot talk to Iran because they are too extreme and militant, yet Mao Zedong was not known for his political moderation. This is a man that bragged about killing intellectuals and at one point welcomed nuclear war. Despite his views, in his old age he realized that he had to make a deal with the United States. You could also look at Egyptian President Anwar Sadat’s historic visit to Israel. These countries were mortal enemies, this visit cultivated into a peace treaty. Knowing past successes and mistakes in history can help you take on the present. We can always get an example from history to understand current events.

There are crucial repercussions of having no discussions in the classroom By Evan Smith Special to The Quad

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oring! This word can describe a mutual feeling amongst students when they feel their teacher engages in a lackluster lecture. As I gazed upon the dimensions of the classroom, the dull look on everyone’s faces told the whole story. After attending my fair share of classes, I found myself more intrigued with professors who would constantly spark a class discussion, as opposed to the ones who would just lecture. A class discussion allows for students to express their opinions and thoughts that pertain to the class

topic. Professors who only commit to a tedious lecture often find their students restless and worn out. Obviously a visual, such as a PowerPoint, video, or a gallery of photos would compliment a lecture well, as opposed to the strict use of the nostalgic chalkboard. Many teachers at West Chester University use these props to help guide students effectively and explore topics more in depth. Dr. Michael Sandel, a professor at Harvard, has been highly praised for his method of teaching, which incorporates engaging debates that keep students alert and informed. Sandal’s class

has a remarkable number of students enrolled in his course each semester, which in 2007 set the record for students in a single class at Harvard, with 1,115, a reflection of Sandal’s teaching routine. This model serves the purpose of reaching students and would be a great structure to emulate. Furthermore, his series in which he teaches his classes about philosophy is called “Justice” and can be found on YouTube. According to Resource Area for Teaching, after 15 years of a meta-analysis of 57 studies, which had an accumulation of 13,000 students in 1,000 classrooms, the research foundthat students us-

ing activity-based programs performed up to 20 percent higher than groups using traditional or textbook approaches. The greatest gains occurred in creativity, attitude, perception, and logic. New invigorating ways of teaching are always encouraged, as they are appealing to most students. Textbooks can be helpful at times, but should compliment what the class is based upon and not serve as the only element. Videos are often efficient for images and depictions of events because they can sometimes best portray concepts that cannot be dis-

played in words. Videos are best used in history-based classes, where the actual events can be witnessed by students. PowerPoint presentations are helpful because they allow students to follow along, while jotting down side notes and key concepts. Group work can also be useful in the sense that everyone is given a part and contributes accordingly, thus understanding each aspect of the given assignment. But perhaps the method that serves a lot of students the best is the classroom discussion, mentioned earlier. It is here we are able to be subjective and allow our

voices to be heard. We are able to formulate questions that prompt insightful answers and elicit rebuttals from our classmates. Thus it is essential we maintain these intellectual conversations to hear further analysis and gain a better perspective of each subject. The failure to promote the cherished classroom discussion can result in the repercussions of boredom, lack of interest, the failure to retain vital information, among other negative consequences. Evan Smith is a third year student majoring in political science with a minor in communication studies. He can be reached at es777403@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 9

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Graphic design students collaborate with China Kiersten McMonagle Special to The Quad

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rofessors, students, and parents gathered in the E. O. Bull Center’s gallery Wednesday evening from 5-8 p.m. for the opening of a new exhibit put together by the graphic design department. What sets this exhibit apart from others in the department is the fact that half of the 40 pieces displayed were created by West Chester University’s graphic design students, while the other half was created by students from Guizhou University’s art school in Guiyang, China.

With 20 pieces from each university, faculty advisor Belinda Haikes shared one of the possible names being considered for the exhibit: “20/20 Visions.” The name is a play on words, as well as on the concept: students’ visions of their areas. Haikes said that 30 students began work on the project last spring. Eventually the pieces were revised and narrowed down to include 20 from the department. Coordination for the project began far before that, though. Two years ago, when West Chester’s art department chair, Professor John Baker, visited and spoke with the dean of

Guizhou’s art department, the two men thought of how interesting a project between the two universities would be. Once the two departments decided to work together, both Baker and Haikes said one of the biggest challenges in putting the exhibit together was communicating with one another. “How do you talk with and about another culture when you have a language barrier?” she asked, going on to explain the use of a translator to discuss pieces and concepts over the last two years. Although a number of ideas were shared in the beginning stages of plan-

ning, Baker said that eventually they decided to ask students a question: “What does [your school and town] mean to you?” Each student brought an individual vision and interpretation of the question to the table. Baker said West Chester’s students tended to focus on specific places and landmarks, while students from Guizhou designed pieces centered more on ideas and philosophies important to their culture. Baker said he had worked with other cultures in the past, but this was the first project involving students and their work. What this means for the

university is not lost on students. Dan Mulligan, a senior in the fine arts department, ventured into the exhibit because he found the concept to be an interesting one. “It’s a big step for the university,” Mulligan said, explaining that he enjoys graphic design and seeing the work of students from other countries. Elise Berlin, also a senior and fine arts major, worked on the project with Baker as part of an internship and agreed that the concept was an important one not only for West Chester, but also for Guizhou. According to Baker, this exhibit is important not

Grab campus events by the horns

Hosted by Matt Toal, Justin Sochovka & Brian Fiocco

only for the university, but also for the students involved. He explained that because the pieces included were selected from a pool of 30 designs, those students involved are excited to have made it here. “They’re seniors. This exhibit will be good for their resumes.” The exhibit will remain at the E. O. Bull Center until March 1, and is open to anyone on campus. In May, the pieces will be moved to Guiyang for an exhibit at the university there. Kiersten McMonagle is a third-year student majoring in Communication Studies and minoring in journalism. She can be reached at KM745613@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 10

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

“Warm Bodies” heats up the box office

they attempt to communicate, they are limited to single words and choppy ast weekend, Sumgrunts much like lingo mit Entertainment used by text savvy youth. released what some In fact, the real are calling “another enemy of “Warm Twilight,” seemingly Bodies” is the dominating the monapathy and lack ster-human romance of connection that scene. However, the eventually leads connection between them down the Jonathan Levine’s road to becoming “Warm Bodies” and bonies. A “boney” “Twilight” is shortis the terrifying lived. The inevitable creature that a romance and drama zombie becomes in this “Romeo and when it has fiJuliet” parody is balnally given up anced with off-beat all hope. Yet dehumor and satirical spite its satirical social commentary routes, “Warm as it makes a selfBodies” is shameconscious effort not lessly optimistic to overdo it (a lesson as R’s discovery of Twilight should have love brings hope heeded). In fact, the to zombies and movie, based on Isaac humans alike. www.screenrant.com Marion’s novel, won Julie, the huthe weekend box ofman girl R falls Nicholas Hoult skillfully plays “R,” a lonely zombie who eventually discovers love. fice race. for, played by TeWith protagonist culture. Even the music Like Levine’s previ- resa Palmer, is an enerzombie “R” played by provides more than back- ous success with “50/50,” getic character who holds Nicholas Hoult, “Warm ground ambiance. From “Warm Bodies” addresses her own but unfortunately Bodies” takes the zombie ageless favorites like the dark humor of death falls into the stereotypical genre to new territory, Roy Orbison’s “Oh Pretty and mortality while find- boring “strong female” bringing new depth to a Woman,” to modern day ing romance in unexpect- lead whose main purpose previously flat zombie vil- M83’s “Midnight City,” ed situations and turning is really just to be a catalain. Slinking around an the soundtrack high- a potentially depressing lyst for the male lead’s airport in the post-apoca- lights character moments subject into a comedic lyptic future, R admits, “I and even provides com- drama. don’t want to be this way. edy. Levine cleverly interDay to day, R and the I am lonely, I am lost. I weaves “Romeo and Ju- other zombies shuffle mean I am literally lost. I liet” allusions (complete around with heads down have never seen this part with a balcony scene), and shoulders hunched, of the airport before.” Like classic and contemporary barely noticing when they “Zombieland,” “Warm media references from bump into one another, Bodies” combines zom- Kim Kardashian to Bruce reminiscent of the techbie horror with romantic Springsteen, and a combi- nology absorbed society comedy, but this time the nation of physical humor growing today. Even when

L

Joy Wilson Staff Writer

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

zombies are front and center. In fact, “Warm Bodies” provides a fresh spin on almost everything pop-

and comical one-liners that make what could have been a messy pot of stew turn out to be a beautifully browned pot-pie.

transformation. Nevertheless, Palmer pulls off as sincere a performance as possible, though ultimately out shown by Julie’s best friend Nora played by Analeigh Tipton. Tipton is granted the opportunity for more depth than Julie, creating a quizzically clever character whose sarcastic remarks offer relief from the drama developing in the unlikely romance between R and Julie. Rob Cordry’s character, M, also offers comic relief, an especially notable achievement since he is not granted the advantage of a voice-over. His admirable use of physical comedy and facial expressions combined with a couple well-delivered oneliners, results in a no less than laugh-out-loud loveable character. Yet no character was as sincerely vulnerable or absolutely loveable as Hoult’s “R.” Though make-up added veins, scars, and dirt, the young actor’s awkwardly cumbersome movements and longingly empty eyes sold

his zombie identity. As he stares at Julie for the first time, his eyes clearly say what his blood-streaked face cannot. Nevertheless, “Warm Bodies” is not without its faults. John Malkovich gives an unconvincing performance as General Grigio, Julie’s zombiekilling father. He never seems truly good or bad, nor does he convey the dominant presence of the leader he is supposed to be. The bonies are equally unconvincing due to poor animation resulting in more of a gangly horde of freaks than truly terrifying monsters. The declining humor at the end is mostly balanced by much awaited romance and action, and looking past a fairly too convenient ending proves not too hard a task once enveloped with the film’s quirky charm. All in all, “Warm Bodies” proves to be an off-beat creation sure to charm zombie fanatics and rom-com lovers alike. Joy Wilson is a fourth-year student majoring in Communication Studies and minoring in Studio Art. She can be reached JW794401@wcupa.edu.

It’s almost Valentine’s Day! Stop by Feminique for great gift ideas. Present this coupon and receive $5 off your purchase of $25 or more. Expires 2/14/13. Cannot be combined with other offers.

www.zombiesworld.com

Though comparisons between “Warm Bodies” and “Twilight” have been made, audiences will find that this zombie film sets itself apart.

C m


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Celebrities born this month: Erykah Badu Joshua Shapiro Staff Writer

studio in preparation for upcoming shows. However, her mother’s vocation did afford Erykah with a wealth of invaluable onstage experience beginning when she was only four years old. By the time she turned 14, she had begun to venture out into the local music scene, recording

song demo titled “Country Cousins.” The demo was all that producer Kedar onsidered to be Massenburg—officially the “First Lady of credited with coining the Neo-Soul” and the term “neo-soul”—needed “Queen of Neo-Soul,” to hear before quickly Erykah Badu made an signing the young talent achievement only a select to a deal with Universal few have been able to acRecords. complish. By combining Badu’s debut album, elements from three mu“Baduizm,” hit stores in sical genres—Soul, R&B, the spring of and Hipwww.curlology.blogspot.com 1997. The alHop—she was bum peaked able to create at No. 2 in a distinctive the Billboard style that was charts, and all her own. would evenYet, while tually go on she has been to be certified widely credittriple platied with firmly num. This establishing first studio althe neo-soul bum gave her subgenre, her the chance to real test has use music to always been voice her culto foster a tivated philogenuine consophical pernection with spective on her listeners. life and the “I just feel like formula for I share what living it well. I say, and While “The if listeners Queen of get it, they Neo-Soul” get it. And I has released never underfour more alestimate the bums since audience’s “Baduizm,” ability to feel me,” admit- Erykah Badu, “The First Lady of Neo-Soul,” has inspired artists like her message of empowerted Badu. Lauryn Hill and Alicia Keys. ment and acBorn to Kolleen and William free-style raps for a popu- ceptance has remained Wright on Feb. 26, 1971 in lar radio station. Follow- perhaps the largest conDallas, Texas, Erica Abi ing her graduation from tributor to positive recepWright—later changed to high school, Badu went on tion of both her work and Erykah Badu—was one of to attend Gambling State the neo-soul subgenre. three children. Her father University concentrating Badu’s work has surely left the family shortly on music full-time before inspired thousands of peoafter Erica’s birth, forc- leaving the school in 1993. ple around the world, in Unable to secure any addition to fellow neo-soul ing Kolleen to raise the substantial work after singers Lauryn Hill and children on her own. The Wright’s situation was GSU, Badu opted to go on Alicia Keys. particularly challenging tour with one of her closJoshua Shapiro is a second-year because as an actress, it est cousins, Robert Brad- student majoring in both English ford. While on tour, she was necessary for Kolleen and education. He can be reached at to spend long hours at the was able to record a 19- JS762110@wcupa.edu.

C

PAGE 11

Tweets of the week

Andy Milonakis @AndyMilonakis How many poor waiters in America have had to endure lame Rebecca Romaine Lettuce jokes? :(

Chris Pratt @prattprattpratt If I played Edward Scissor Hands in paper, rock, scissors every once in a while I’d throw a paper in there so he wouldn’t feel too bad.

Joan Rivers @Joan_Rivers Tomorrow’s Grammy Awards’ dress code says talent is not allowed to show any ass. Does this mean Rihanna has to leave Chris Brown at home?

Mark Hoppus @markhoppus

the second rule of fight club is you have to accept that ross and rachel were on a break. Mark Ronson @iamMarkRonson

how many times will i have to type my name into this Nokia until it realizes my names is not Mark Poopon?

Mental Floss @mental_floss

6 Inventors Killed by Their Own Inventions

Scan this QR code to read more!


PAGE 12

THE QUAD

The 2013 Miss WCU Competition

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Jessica Guzzardo/Photo Editor


/Photo Editor

Are You Interested in Winning $500??

• The Student Research and Creative Awards (SRCA) Committee announces the 2013 competition for West Chester University students •

A total of 12 awards, of $500 per proposal, will be presented to the student scholars at the April 16, 2013 West Chester University Research Day

You can submit a class project or independent research & creative activity For more details please visit http://www.wcupa.edu/srca

SRC Awards, please contact For additional information about the 2013 SRCA Dr. Xiaowei Zhu, Chairperson, SRCA Committee (xzhu@wcupa.edu) or Dr. Marc Gagné, interim Associate Vice President, Sponsored Research (mgagne@wcupa.edu)

Application Deadline: Friday, February 25, 2013 at 5:00 PM to through D2L


PAGE 14

Features

THE QUAD FEATURES

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner Be sure to order your flowers ahead of time to avoid any problems

By Kellyn McNamara Practicum Writer

F

lowers are a staple in the Valentine’s Day tradition. Couples exchange them to show they care, or singles give them in hopes of winning a love interest’s heart. Over the years, the sentiments of giving flowers have not changed, but the trends have. Here are some emerging trends to be aware of if you plan to buy flowers this Valentine’s Day. The first prevailing trend, according to local experts, is to order early. Call ahead, at least a day or two in advance. Flower shops become overrun with orders during the busy Valentine’s season. It’s important to place your order in advance to ensure that the shop will be able to process your request. Do not call on Valentine’s Day expecting same-day delivery; many local florists are

too busy to fill that request. “Sometimes we have upwards of 60 or 70 deliveries for one day,” says Kate McNamara, local business owner of Kati Mac Floral Designs. It is better to call a few days in advance to give the florist time to process your request. Christ i n e Wildauer, owner of Lorgus Flower Shop, agrees with this sentiment. Florists order daily product deliveries from a wholesaler based on the orders they have for the next few days. If your order is not already in the stack, there is no guarantee the florist will have the necessary materials to fill your order. Ordering early is key to ensure that you will be able to get the Valen-

tine’s flowers you want, and that they will be delivered on time. There

Frazer says “small, compact, high-style flowers” are newly popular, and other local florists agree. Mandy Stadtmiller, who has been in the floral design business for over 15 years, recommends vintage-style, garden arrangements. She also gives a tip: “If you want to save some money on a vase arrangement, bring your own container.” Stadtmiller says the container can be anything: a vintage milk jug, mason jar, or a cool glass pitcher. Joyce Wilder, another local florist and gardener, agrees: “Right now, it’s about getting creative beyond roses, babies’ breath, a n d carna-

tions.” are a She recomfew new mends succulent dish s t y l e gardens, arrangetrends ments with pheasant in flower feathers, and a vintage arrangelook. Wilder continues, ments. “you can spend less A r e a money for someflorist thing more interTamara allensflowerssandiego.com esting than roses.”

FEBRUARY 11, 2013 But if you are still feeling unsure of what to order, ask your local florist. “Trust us. We’re professionals,” says Frazer, who has worked at many flower shops over the years, but most recently, at Blue Moon Florist in Downingtown, and Kati Mac Floral Designs in West Chester. Frazer says, if you give a price point and a couple flowers, colors, or style words (modern, vintage, etc.), florists will be able to create something beautiful and personal for you. Another trend is to order locally. Supporting your local florist means supporting a local business and the local economy. You are not giving your money to a huge, national company; you’re giving it to a sustaining local business owner, supporting the small-business charm of West Chester. Most local florists subscribe to a “wireservice,” an online company like Teleflora or FTD. These companies gather orders for the locally-based flower shop, and send the orders over the Internet. These online services are cheap and easy. They take a percentage of every sale that is made with a local florist – money which local florists need to operate. They also advertise a specific product on their websites when that product may not be available to local florists. In fact, just last week – the week before Valentine’s Day – Teleflora’s entire sales team

Interested in writing for the Features section? Email quadfeatures@wcupa.edu

went to a sales conference. When McNamara called Teleflora to order more vases for Valentine’s Day, she was unable to get in touch with a sales representative that could take her order. “I was irate. I pay for this service, and they think it’s okay to go on vacation the week before a major holiday.” McNamara eventually was able to get in touch with a sales representative, but only after hours wasted on the phone. Clearly, the local florists’ needs are not the concern of this large company. Services like Teleflora and FTD are not all bad, though. They help florists by providing cross-country orders directly to a specific city. For example, if a West Chester resident wants to send flowers to Gramma Liz in Austin, Texas, ordering online through Teleflora or FTD is likely the fastest and easiest option. There’s no guarantee that the florist who receives the order will be able to duplicate the exact product, but Gramma Liz will appreciate the flowers either way. Flower trends are always changing, but these are a few to consider if you plan to order flowers this Valentine’s Day. By putting these tips into practice, you will save money, and your sweetheart will thank you! Kellyn McNamara is a fourth-year student majoring in nutrition with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at KM654122@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD FEATURES

PAGE 15

Philly Tattoo Convention to take place Feb. 8-10 at Convention Center By Kelly Morrin Special to The Quad

I

n this day and age, there are many forms of self-expression. One form that is not only becoming extremely mainstream, but very exciting, is tattooing and piercing. It is an ancient art form that is making its way into the modern world. Teenagers, young adults, as well as business men and women, are all getting beautiful tattoos and piercings to physically express themselves. It is an upcoming trend that does not seem to be ending anytime soon. Tattoos are not just for sailors anymore, al-

www.google.com www.google.com

though that traditional tattooing is very common and popular. This infectious trend is now coming to a convention center less than an hour away. This upcoming weekend is the 15th Annual Philadelphia Tattoo Arts Convention. This grand event takes place at the Pennsylvania Convention Center from Feb. 8-10. This event has not only taken place in Philadelphia, but also in Baltimore, Chicago, Louisville, Milwaukee and Minneapolis. Come on out to experience the fun and exciting life of a tattoo artist, as well as those they make a living

off of. Not only are there going to be thousands of tattooed fans, but there will be famous artists from the television show “Ink Master,” such as Tatu Baby, Sarah Miller, and Jeremy Miller. Other famous artists include Jack Rudy, Megan Massacre, and Myke Chambers. It will be a weekend full of artwork, clothing, pho-

tography, as well as tattooing supplies. The different events will start at 2 p.m. on Friday and 11 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. The convention ends at 12 a.m. on Friday and Saturday, and ends on Sunday at 8 p.m. Make sure to get there early to see all the great attractions. There will be venders to check out and entertainment to watch. The $20 entry fee for one day or $40 for the whole weekend will not only let you in, but it allows you to access illusion sideshows, burlesque shows, body painting contests, tattoo contests, as well as other events that will blow you away.

This convention is a very well-known event that is always talked about weeks before and weeks following. There will be lots to see, sand plenty to experience, and will definitely be worth your time and money. There is parking available for the convention, as well as hotel accomodations. Bring friends and family because children under 12 get in for free! If you are interested in tattoos, piercings, body modification, or want to start exploring these concepts, this is the perfect chance to delve right in. Kelly Morrin is a a third-year student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at KM735352@ wcupa.edu.

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PAGE 16

The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

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RADLEY RUN COUNTRY CLUB

is currently seeking full and part time positions as servers and food runners. Very flexible hours. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Call 610793-1660, ext. 209.

The Quad SuDoKu

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FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

Sports

Page 17

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Who has it better than the Harbaughs? Riley Wallace

Asst. Sports Editor

W

ing each of his first five seasons. While John Harbaugh jumped right from college into coaching, his younger brother, Jim, enjoyed a little more success as a player. He went to the University of Michigan to play quarterback, leading the team to the 1987 Rose Bowl in his senior year. He played in the NFL from 1987 to 2000, for various teams including the Bears, Colts, Ravens, and Chargers. For eight of those seasons, Jim served as an assistant coach under his father at Western Kentucky on top of playing on Sundays. In 2002, he joined the Oakland Raiders coaching staff as the quarterbacks coach. He got his first head coaching gig two years later when he spent three years at the University of San Diego. Next he swapped Southern California for Northern California when Stanford hired him, where he stayed until the 49ers swayed him to the NFL four years later. As I am sure you know, both Harbaughs came within one game of meeting last year when the Ravens fell to the Patriots in the AFC Championship Game and the 49ers lost in overtime to the Giants in the NFC Title Game. Had both the Ravens and 49ers won those games it would have marked the second time in three months that the brothers squared off. On

Associated Press

Thanksgiving Night, the two led their respective teams into a nationally televised contest that was anything but a traditional family gathering. John’s Ravens got the best of Jim’s Niners in a defensive struggle, 16-6. This time around, the brothers stole all the headlines from Baltimore to San Francisco for two weeks, with both classily dismissing any notion that the game was about the two of them; they instead turned the focus towards their players. With the game’s result still fresh in everyone’s minds, both coaches ad-

mitted to the difficulty in having to coach against one another with one being the victor and the other defeated. John, the winning coach, expressed his feelings perfectly following the game. “It was total elation and total devastation at the same time.” When the two met at midfield as the final second ticked off the clock, John said three words to his brother, “I love you.” I think as time passes, the brothers will begin to appreciate the accomplishment of both getting to the Super Bowl. At the end of the day who

else would you rather be coaching against in the Super Bowl than your very own brother? Jackie and Jack Harbaugh enjoyed the ride, a point they made clear at their press conference leading up to the Super Bowl. They expressed how proud they were of both sons and even came up with a family theme that described their viewpoint on the whole thing. “Who has it better than us?” Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.

Athlete of the Week: Corey Blake wcupagoldenrams.com

hen you grow up with siblings, it is a natural instinct to compete with them. For young boys, these competitions often take place in the backyard or the driveway. The dream of facing off in the biggest game on the biggest stage with you on one sideline and your brother on the other was fulfilled this year. Jim and John Harbaugh, only separated by a mere 15 months in age, lived out this fantasy last weekend on Super Bowl Sunday. We all know what happened as John’s Ravens were victorious over Jim’s 49ers, 34-31, but this is not about that game. This is about two brothers whose dream of being in the Super Bowl started in the backyard and landed in New Orleans. Jim and John are the sons of Jack Harbaugh who was also a successful coach at the college level, leading Western Kentucky to the NCAA FCS National Championship in 2002. The Harbaugh family got so much publicity in the two weeks leading up to the Big Game, their parents held their own press conference. Let’s start with the older brother, John Harbaugh. John was often on defense growing up, playing collegiately at Miami

University. His playing days as a defensive back ended with his college career, but his coaching career was just beginning. He started out at Western Michigan in 1984 and moved from one college program to another through 1997. Most coaches specialize in either offense or defense but John showed his tremendous knowledge for the game in coaching running backs, linebackers, tight ends, and special teams as well as the secondary. His stops included four years at Western Michigan, one at Pittsburgh and Morehead State, eight at Cincinnati, and a single year at Indiana before the NFL came calling. The Philadelphia Eagles hired John in 1998 and spent nine years as the special-teams coordinator under head coach Andy Reid. In 2007, his request to move up the coaching chain was fulfilled when he became the Eagles defensive-backs coach. A year later in January of 2008 the Baltimore Ravens came calling and John’s first head coaching job was finally attained. In his first five seasons at the helm, John Harbaugh enjoyed tremendous success. He recorded five straight winning seasons, compiling a 54-26 career record, and doing something that had never been done before in winning a playoff game dur-

After a pair of strong performances this week, men’s basketball’s Corey Blake is our AOTW. He had 12 points and 12 rebounds at Mansfield & 12 points and 9 rebounds at Millersville. Blake is averaging 11.2 PPG and 6.6 RPG so far this year.


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THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Defending champs struggle in opening series in S. Carolina Gym Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

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ne season removed from their national title, West Chester University baseball has not started the 2013 season the way it had imagined. The Golden Rams dropped the first two games of a three-game set with Lander University on Friday and Saturday by scores of 14-1 and 7-4. Junior ace Joe Gunkel was ousted from the game after only four innings, having given up six runs on six hits while walking three and hitting three batters. The tall righthander allowed a leadoff home run to infielder Graham Ramos, and things went downhill from there. Gunkel was lacking his usual command and strikeoutquality pitches, as he suffered through four innings and left the game with West Chester trailing 6-1. Lander’s starter Dylan Wolchik, on the other hand, pitched masterfully. He yielded just three hits to the Rams offense, with the only extra base hit being a solo home run to right from Jordan Wlodarczyk in the fourth the only run they would score in the game. West Chester did not have a baserunner until the third, and did not have a runner in scoring position for the remainder of the game after Wlodarczyk’s home run. “Their pitcher did a good job of mixing [pitches] and keeping us off balance,” head coach Jad Prachniak said. “We did have some good at bats but we weren’t consistent enough to put together many scoring opportunities.”

West Chester was not able to stop the bleeding, as the bullpen let in another eight runs, running up the Athletics tally to 14. Brent Roehrich allowed two runs in an inning of work, and sophomore Ryan Swearingen was hit hard for six earned runs in just two innings pitched. Ron Scull was the only West Chester pitcher to not allow a run, as he pitched a scoreless eighth. Dylan Zigman and Mike Raimo had a single apiece, and Wlodarczyk was 1-for-4 with a homer. For Lander, Ramos had three hits in three trips to the plate, including a home run and double, and also scored three runs, knocked in two and walked. Outfielder Patrick Grady was 2-for-3 with a homer and three RBI, while Erik Lunde collected two hits, walked twice, and scored four runs. Saturday’s game was a considerably better effort from the Rams, as they jumped on top quickly when a balk drove home a run in the top of the first. West Chester added some security in the fourth inning when Dylan Zigman’s RBI groundout plated Tyler Coleman. Fred Breidenbach was stellar through the first three frames, allowing just one hit to the potent offense that racked up a football-type score one day prior. He ran into trouble after that, however. Lander scored six runs total in the fourth and fifth thanks to two runscoring hits and a few well-placed ground-outs with runners on third. Breidenbach was pulled after five complete, and was responsible for six runs on eight hits and two walks. He was on the hook for the loss.

Gereg McCuch let in a run in relief but struck out three, and closer Kyle Weary was perfect in his inning on the hill. West Chester did manage to score two more runs in the game. One came in the fourth on an RBI single from Wlodarczyk, and the other in the sixth on an RBI single from Raimo. Wlodarczyk and Raimo were responsible for most of the offense for West Chester in the first two games. With his two base hits and one RBI in the second game, Wlodarczyk is now 2-for-8 with a homer, 2 RBI, a run and a walk. Raimo, who had two hits in five trips in the second game is now 3-for9 with a run and an RBI. Justin Lamborn also added three hits of his own in the second game. Lefty Chess Malone got the win for the Athletics. He gave up the four runs on 11 hits in seven innings of work. Kyle Tate pitched the final two frames, earning the save for Lander as they improve to 4-1, while West Chester sits at 0-2. However, despite the loss in the second game, West Chester’s offense did come to life after an anemic performance on Friday. “The loss was a tough one, but we need time to adjust to outside baseball,” first baseman Chris Pula said. “The team was good, but we did not play to what we are capable of. We saw improvement today, though. I feel in all aspects we improved and it is only going to progress with more reps and games under our belt. I feel like we just need to keep working the way we are and stay confident.” Coach Prachniak felt similarly, and was happy at the improvement between Friday and Satur-

By E S

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Right-handed pitcher John Barr winds up to throw a pitch. Barr is one of two lefties on the staff and should see time as a mid-week starter or a reliever.

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Center fielder Mike Raimo takes a hard cut. Raimo will likely be the Rams’ leadoff hitter this season as they look to defend their NCAA Division II National Championship. day despite it not showing up in the win column. “I felt like we played better in all facets of the game,” Prachniak said. “We still had some miscues and made some errors but collectively we were much better. We were more aggressive on offense, made some good plays defensively, and guys did a better job of

throwing strikes and challenging hitters.” West Chester will try to avoid the three-game sweep at the hands of Lander on Sunday, before returning home from South Carolina to play a twin bill at home against the College of Saint Rose on Feb. 23. The games are at noon and 2:30 p.m., respectively.

“Although we have struggled early, I have seen plenty of things to be encouraged about,” Prachniak said. “I know this group will stick together and we will start to play more consistent baseball.” Kenny Ayres is a third-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

Page 19

Gymnastics falls just short vs. Penn By Emily Seigel Staff Writer

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est Chester University’s gymnastics team traveled to Temple University on Feb. 2, where they placed third in the quad meet with a 184.875. Senior Kaley LaFleur finished sixth on the balance beam with a 9.625. The Ram’s had a very strong showing on the floor exercise where junior Paige Griffin scored a 9.65 and teammates Lindsay Knapp and Melissa Voskian tied for 11th place with a 9.50. Freshman Meghan Brannon tied for fifth place on the uneven bars with a 9.65. Following the meet at Temple, the Rams returned to their home turf on Feb. 9, for a dual meet against University of Pennsylvania. Though the team fell just short of a win, the girls posted their highest team all

around score of the season thus far, posting a mark of 187.750. The Lady Rams started off on the vault where sophomore Melissa Prisco finished in fourth place and set a personal record with a score of 9.55. On the uneven bars, Freshman Meghan Brannon came in third with a 9.70. Teammates Karen Laskaris and Paige Griffin were right behind Brannon, both achieving their personal best scores for the season, with a 9.625 and a 9.575, respectively. In the third rotation, the gymnasts were steady on the balance beam, with LaFleur receiving a 9.650 and Sophomore Lauren Bilenki scoring a 9.3, securing a fifth place finish. The Lady Rams wrapped up the meet with an outstanding floor exercise rotation. The girls scored a total of a 48.050, just shy of West Chester University’s record on that event. Brannon came

in second place with a huge score of 9.750, with Voskian just behind her with a 9.70. The dual meet was also the Lady Ram’s “Pink” meet, in which they donated half of the day’s proceeds to Unite For Her. The charity, founded by West Chester Gymnastics alum Sue Weldon, is dedicated to improving the lives of women and girls by providing awareness about breast cancer, complimentary therapies, and wellness programs that educate, empower, and restore. Another feature of the day was the welcoming back of alumni gymnasts, who generously came to support their fellow Lady Rams. Stay tuned as West Chester travels to Yale University on Feb. 16 for the Bulldog Invitational. Emily Seigel is a third-year student majoring in early childhood education with a minor in reading. She can be reached at ES734640@wcupa.edu.

wcupagoldenrams.com

West Chester competes in the uneven bars. After starting the season 3-0, the Rams were beaten by Temple and Bridgeport in the Ken Anderson Invitaitonal. And this Saturday, WCU came close to upsetting Division I Penn, losing by less than four points.

Boothe, Chapman shine in Big Apple Riley Wallace

Asst. Sports Editor

F

wcupagoldenrams.com

Randi Boothe runs hard during West Chester’s meet at New York City Armory on Friday afternoon. She finished third in both the 60-meter and 200-meter dash, setting school records in both.

or the second straight week, West Chester dominated the three jumping events as they traveled to the New York City Armory Friday afternoon. The Golden Rams showcased solid performances in most of the events at the Lafayette Rider Winter Games, but junior LeQuan Chapman and sophomore Jay Jabat dominated the jumping events. Chapman once again won the long jump, with a leap of 23 feet, ½ inches, and the triple jump with a distance of 47 feet, 4½ inches. His long jump was almost two feet longer than second place’s. Jabat tied for first, in the high jump with a final height of 6 feet, 6¾ inches with Jared Bloomquist of Lynchburg. Freshmen Joey DeCecco finished set-

tled for third with a height of 6 feet, 4¾ inches. Jabat also finished fourth in the long jump behind Chapman. Sophomore Eric Hunter nearly won the pole vault reaching a height of 15 feet, 3¼ inches. Lanny Buck of Kutztown took first with a vault of 15 feet, 7 inches. Junior Dillon Wallner placed seventh in the weight throw with a toss of 44 feet, 6¾ inches. On the track, the Rams were not nearly as impressive, but there were some individual performances worth noting. In the 60-meter hurdles, Freshmen Mark Van Teyens dashed to a sixth place finish with a time of 8.61 seconds. In the 400-meter race, junior Nick Drozd crossed the finish line in seventh with a time of 49.90 seconds. For the girl’s team, junior Randi Boothe finished third in both the 60-meter dash and the 200-meter dash, setting school re-

cords in both events. Her time of 7.79 seconds in the 60-meters broke her own record from a year ago, and her time of 24.94 in the 200-meter set a new standard at West Chester. Freshman Kiersten Bond took home the long jump with a leap of 18 feet, 5¾ inches, while freshman Breanna Barber tied for second in the high jump, managing to clear five feet, three inches. sophomore Kayla Owens finished fifth in the weight throw, tossing it an impressive 42 feet, 4¾ inches. Senior Nicole Smith crossed the line in eighth in the 400-meter run in a time of 59.19 seconds. The team will travel to take part in the Susquehanna University Open next weekend in the final tune-up before the 2013 PSAC Indoor Track and Field Championships Feb. 23-24. Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.


Page 20

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

C O L L E G E O F G R A D UAT E & PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Why do so many West Chester graduates choose a Millersville University master’s degree? Affordable - More than 40% of our full-time master’s degree students receive a graduate assistantship, which fully funds their tuition (48 credits). Flexible - A variety of evening, blended, off-campus and online course delivery options will suit your busy schedule.

“I chose Millersville University because of its nationally accredited School Psychology Program.”

Obtainable - Over 75% of our full-time students finish their master’s degree in one to three years. Respectable - We are a top ranked, public university with nationally accredited programs, supported by outstanding faculty.

Open House

with Program Coordinators

Thursday, March 7, 2013 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Stayer Hall Multipurpose Room

RSVP’s appreciated, but not required.

To RSVP or for more information

www.millersville.edu/gps or 717-872-3099

Ashley F. West Chester University, Class of 2010 Millersville University School Psychology master’s degree student Graduate Assistant

Master of Education • Art • Early Childhood Education • Elementary Education • English • Foreign Languages • Gifted Education • Language and Literacy Education • Leadership for Teaching and Learning • Mathematics • School Counseling • Special Education • Sport Management • Technology Education Post-baccalaureate Teacher Certification ESL Certification

Millersville University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution. A Member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. 4977i-0113

Reading Specialist Certification Master of Arts • English • Foreign Languages • History Master of Social Work Master of Science • Emergency Management • Integrated Scientific Applications (Weather Intelligence & Risk Management, Climate Science) • Nursing • Psychology (Clinical, School) Respiratory Therapist Certification School Nurse Certification


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

Page 21

Hockey closes out regular season with pair of devastating losses Kenny Ayres Editor-in-Chief

I

t was a long weekend for West Chester’s men’s hockey team, as their three-game winning streak came to an end with 10-1 and 5-0 losses at the hands of University of Delaware. Friday was just the second time this year the Rams have yielded double-digit goals, the other time being a 13-4 loss to Stony Brook in January. West Chester gave a solid effort throughout the first 20 minutes, but Delaware’s advantage in size, strength, speed and passing slowly turned what started out as an evenly matched game into a one-sided affair. The Blue Hens broke a first period 1-1 tie with a flurry of goals in the second. Tallies from Mark Zeszut (18), Chris Voloninno (27), Connor Moore (7), Christian Tasker (15), and J.C. Brancaccio (9) broke the game wide open. West Chester’s skaters could simply not match up against the Blue Hens, who were aggressive in the neutral zone, creative with the puck, and used their bodies mercilessly on the smaller West Chester players. The Rams’ season-long struggles resurfaced after the first, and they fell apart in the defensive zone. “We don’t move our feet, play simple hockey, take the body, shoot the puck or know how to play in our own end,” a frustrated head coach Mark Gonsalves said. Energy seemed to also be a factor. West Chester’s energy dwindled as the game moved on, while Delaware only became stronger. The Rams took

some lazy penalties, and with the force of the Blue Hens’ power play, it cost them greatly. The Blue Hens moved the puck on the man advantage with ease and fluidity, beating Rams golatender Randy Japchen several times. Japchen, who has been sound in net all year, is hardly to blame for many of the eight goals he gave up before West Chester switched to backup goaltender Will Parra. When the Rams did not play physically, Delaware walked all over them and pushed their way to the net, and when they tried to make the hit, the crafty Delaware forwards sidestepped the hits and often went in uncontested into the slot. “We simply imploded on ourselves. It was one of the most embarrassing losses of the year,” Gonsalves said. “It was a tough series,” goalie Randy Japchen added. “Every time we play Delaware, it’s tough. They are a solid team, highly skilled and they play a physical game... They use their size to their advantage and plant themselves in the net to generate goals.” In addition to their outstanding play, several close calls benefited Delaware, directly leading to goals. In the second period, a Delaware defender lost the puck over the blue line in the offensive zone and brought it back in, but the officials did not notice the offsides. Delaware was able to set up and score on that next play. Later in the period, a Mark Zeszut wrist shot kicked off the crossbar and was batted in with what appeared to be a high stick. After some deliberation, the officials decided it was a good

goal. In addition to the goal, Delaware also got a power play because Tim Margadonna was hit with an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty and game misconduct for his reactions to the apparent missed call. Delaware also scored on that power play. West Chester did get one lone goal, in the first period to tie the game at 1-1. Tim Higgins managed to deflect a point shot past S.J. Broadt for the Rams only goal. It was Higgins’ 14th of the season. Broadt was stellar in net for the Rams, as he got his team leading 11th win and lowered his goals against average to under 1.5 per game. Saturday’s game at Delaware offered little comfort after Friday’s blowout. The Rams were shut out for the first time since their season opener against Syracuse back in September. “We lost tonight, but we played slightly better,” Gonsalves said. “We just don’t have the skill or depth to compete against a team like UD. It takes heart, pride, determination, desire and drive to be successful.” The Rams’ 14-goal deficit in the series was their worst this year, as they had some chances in both games but did not find the net but once. “We weren’t able to capitalize and we did not seem to be supporting the puck as we usually do, and that’s one of the keys to beating a team like that—possessing the puck,” senior captain Steve Meade said. With the two losses, West Chester falls to 1514-2 on the season, while Delaware improves to 249-1. This weekend wrapped

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Forward Ryan Evans controls the puck against the University of Delaware. With captain Steve Meade moved to the second line, to generate some scoring, Evans moved up to the top line and had a pair of solid outings. West Chester struggled as a team, though, losing 10-1 and 5-0. up regular season play for West Chester. They will be competing in the ACHA playoffs next weekend at Delaware, though their opponent and the time of the game have yet to be determined. Despite the rough weekend and mediocre season, West Chester is expecting big things in the playoffs and they know what it will take to win. “When it comes to playing playoff hockey the big thing is really perfecting the little aspects of the game, like being on position on the forecheck, on the breakout, and most importantly on defense,” Meade said. “The goal going into next weekend is to leave with a league championship.” Kenny Ayres is a third-year student majoring in communication studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.

WCU athletics schedule 2/11-2/17

Feb. 11 -no sports scheduled Feb. 12 -no sports scheduled

Feb. 13 -women’s basketball Kutztown, 6 p.m. -men’s basketball Kutztown, 8 p.m.

Feb. 15 (cont.) -softball @ Shepherd, 2 p.m. -softball @ Concord, 5 p.m. -winter track @ Susquehanna, 4 p.m.

Feb. 16 @ -softball @ Bluefield St., 1 p.m. @ -gymnastics @ Bulldog Invitational, 1 p.m. -women’s basketball vs. Bloomsburg, 1 p.m. Feb. 14 -softball @ Fairmont St., -men’s and women’s 3 p.m. swimming & diving, -men’s basketball vs. PSAC Championships @ Bloomsburg, 3 p.m. Cumberland Valley High School, 10 a.m. Feb. 17 -softball @ W. Liberty, 11 Feb. 15 a.m. -men’s and women’s swimming & diving, PSAC Championships @ Cumberland Valley High School, 10 a.m. (continues thru 17th)


Page 22

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

Balanced offense knocks off Mansfield, Millersville to continue strong playoff pushLady Riley Wallace

Asst. Sports Editor

W

est Chester went on the road and defeated Millersville Saturday afternoon 79-63 to push their second-place lead to two games over the Marauders. The Golden Rams traveled on the road Wednesday evening to take on PSAC East foe Mansfield (5-15). West Chester (156) jumped on the home team right out of the gate, scoring the first six points of the contest to take early control. The Mountaineers kept within shouting distance and finally took their first lead of the game on two free throws with just over five minutes to go in the half, 2523. The Rams answered a few minutes later with an 8-1 run to stretch the lead

to eight, and took that same lead into the locker rooms, 42-34. Following the break, it was Mansfield who kicked off the scoring, notching five quick points in the first minute to cut the lead to three. The Golden Rams answered right back, blasting the game open with a 19-2 run. The Mountaineers managed just one field goal while committing eight turnovers in a span of six minutes. Freshman forward Matt Wisely was the main contributor scoring all six of his points during the Rams’ run. Mansfield did not give up, however, as they clawed their way back to within single digits, trailing 68-59 with six and a half minutes remaining. West Chester closed the door by scoring seven of the next eight points and cruised to the 14-point victory, 86-72. Scoring was not hard

to come by for the Rams on this night, even without senior guards Jon Breeden, who was out with a back injury, and Carl Johnson who suffered a hamstring injury a few weeks ago. Five West Chester players scored in double figures with junior guard Jaleel Mack leading the way, pouring in 20 points off the bench. Sophomore forward Corey Blake recorded a double-double grabbing 12 rebounds to go with 12 points. Troy Hockaday did a little bit of everything by scoring 11 points, grabbing seven boards, dishing out three assists, and snagging four steals. With Millersville’s loss to Bloomsburg in triple overtime Wednesday night, it gave sole possession of second place to West Chester heading into a showdown between the two teams. Millers-

Photo by Brynn Pezzuti

Junior guard Jaleel Mack catches his breath during Saturday’s game against Millersville. Mack backed up his 20-point performance on Wednesday at Mansfield with another solid outing Saturday.

Photo by Brynn Pezzuti

Sophomore forward Corey Blake looks to pass during West Chester’s game against Millersville. The Golden Rams have now won 10 of their last 12 games to move up to the all-important second place spot in the PSAC East with only five games remaining. ville (15-8) really needed this game in order to stay step-for-step with the Rams as they come down the homestretch. The Golden Rams made sure the Marauders knew nothing would come easy on this day as they kept Millersville off the scoreboard for the first two and a half minutes. West Chester dominated the opening half, never letting the Marauders get closer than six after the opening minutes. The lead got as large as 14 with over 11 minutes remaining in the half, and the Rams took a seven point lead into the locker rooms, 38-31. West Chester came out in the second half and set the tempo as it had done in the first half, going on a 12-1 run in the first five minutes to take a commanding 50-32 lead. The Golden Rams kept the pedal to the metal as they never let Millersville get any sort of momentum going. The lead

never got below 13 over the final 15 minutes and the Rams cruised to 79-63 win. This victory on the road is very crucial, because West Chester now has a two-game lead over the third-place Marauders with only five regular season games remaining. It is important to keep in mind that only the top two teams from the PSAC East will receive a bye in the first round of the PSAC Tournament. The scoring load for the Golden Rams was by committee as four players recorded the team-high of 12 points. Blake came one rebound short of his second double-double of the week as he grabbed nine boards to go with his 12 points. Hockaday and Breeden, who returned from his back injury, had identical stat lines of 12 points, four rebounds, three steals, and two assists. Junior guard Shannon Givens poured in 12 off the bench. As a team, West Chester shot an in-

credible 20 for 21 from the free throw line, and almost 46 percent from the field. The Golden Rams dominated the Marauders on the glass, outrebounding them 36-25, including 16 offensive rebounds, which they turned into 18-second chance points. The superiority on the glass and turning the ball over only 17 times allowed the Rams to shoot 20 more field goals than Millersville, 61-41. This week, the men will look to complete their three-game roadtrip with a perfect 3-0 record as they take on Kutztown (5-17) Wednesday night at 8 p.m. This upcoming weekend, they will host one of their two final home games when Bloomsburg (7-14) comes to visit Hollinger Field House Saturday at 3 p.m.

Riley Wallace is a fourth-year student majoring in communication Senior guar studies with a journalism minor. He can be reached at RW718681@ of her team wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 11, 2013

THE QUAD SPORTS

Page 23

Lady Rams stumble at Millersville to end four-game winning streak Joey Samuel Sports Editor

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oor shooting in the second half was the West Chester women’s basketball team’s downfall on Saturday as they lost an important PSAC East contest to Millersville, 76-58. After a back-and-forth first half that ended 3734, West Chester came out completely flat in the second 20 minutes and saw the deficit grow quickly. Extremely poor shooting from beyond the three-point arc made matters worse, with the Lady Rams making just rsville. 1-of-11 attempts. econd place With West Chester unable to stop the bleeding,

Millersville continued to make shots that the Rams could not, and the Marauders went on to win by an 18-point margin. West Chester made just nine shots in the entire second half, while Millersville made 14 shots including four three-pointers. Interestingly, it was the Lady Rams’ top players who shot the poorest from the field. Senior forward Alex Lennon went 3-for-13 for only six points, although she did grab 10 rebounds. Meghan Kerrigan shot 2-for-12 including 1-for-4 from three-point range. Paige Elliott went 4-for15 from the field and missed all three of her long-range attempts. All in all, the Lady Rams shot an abysmal

31.2 percent from the field, and only 20 percent in the second half. They made four of 19 threepoint attempts. Millersville, on the other hand, had a pair of players score more than 20 points in Senada Mehmedovic and Aurielle Mosley. Mehmedovic made more three-pointers by herself (five) than the entire West Chester team. The game represented a chance for West Chester to climb in the PSAC East standings, but it was a missed opportunity to say the least. The Lady Rams fell to fourth place in the division, two games behind Shippensburg, Millersville, and Bloomsburg, who are all locked in a tie for the top spot. After

splitting the season series the Lady Rams had with the Marauders, West stretched their winning Chester will play both streak to four games with Ship and Bloomsburg one a comfortable 78-60 road more time before the end win over Mansfield. It of the regular season was the team’s talented Despite the loss, the freshman class that led Lady Rams have already the way, with Brittany Siclinched a playoff spot cinski scoring 17 points, in the PSAC East, as Dallas Ely adding 14 and has Kutztown, who, as Jasmen Clark scoring 10. this issue went to press It was Mansfield’s eighth,was in fifth place, a half- straight loss. game behind West ChesEly scored five threeter. The top six teams pointers, half of the 10 in each eight-team divi- threes that the team sion qualify. The top two made. The fact that the teams earn a first-round team could make 10 bye, though, so earning threes against Mansfield one of those seeds will be made its four against the Lady Rams’ main goal Millersville look all the over the last five games of more disappointing. the year. That means the West Chester will wrap games against Blooms- up its short road trip burg and Shippensburg this Wednesday, as they are very important. travel to Kutztown for an Quarter Page Square Summer 1 1/12/13 Earlier in theMC3 week, 8 Ad_Layout p.m. game. Then,2:39 thePM

Lady Rams will return home to host Bloomsburg on Saturday afternoon in a matchup with many playoff implications. If West Chester can win the game, it could put the team back into a decent position as they push for one of the firstround byes. The game the following week against Shippensburg will also be key. If the Lady Rams lose to Bloomsburg, though, it would all but squash any hopes they have of earning one of those all-important top two spots in the PSAC East division. And, of course, the Rams must first beat Kutztown on Wednesday. Joey Samuel is a fourth-year student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached Page 1 at JS719745@wcupa.edu.

Make this summer count. Looking to catch up or get ahead? Summer Session courses at Montgomery County Community College are a great idea. Our credits transfer seamlessly to most schools (check with your home institution), and our tuition rates are hard to beat. Summer (14 weeks) - May 15 to August 13 Summer 1 (6 weeks) - May 21 to July 3 Summer 2 (6 weeks) - July 8 to August 15 Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor

Senior guard Meghan Kerrigan looks to run the offense during the game against Millersville. Like most of her teammates, Kerrigan shot poorly, going 2-for-12 from the field including 1-for-4 from long range.

Register now at

www.mc3.edu/summer


PAGE 24 While the Sixers have not quite met expectations over the first half of the 2012-13 season, one bright spot as been second-year forward Lavoy Allen. The Temple grad is averaging 9.6 rebounds in his last five games, including 22 boards and 14 points in Saturday night’s win over the Charlotte Bobcats. Jeremy Pargo added 12 points and six assists in his 76ers debut.

THE QUAD

Sports

FEBRUARY 11, 2013

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Breeden returns from injury to lead Golden Rams over Marauders

Jess Guzzardo/Photography Editor


Quad 104-02