Issuu on Google+

Quad

The

W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. APRIL 23, 2012

V O L UM E 1 0 2 . I S S U E 1 0

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Student Leaders Tour Rec Center See Page 2

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

PAGE 2

PAGE 11

FEATURES

PAGE 13

ENT

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad Staff Photographer

PAGE 17

SPORTS

PAGE 23


PAGE 2

THE QUAD NEWS

Students leaders given chance to see inside recreation center Angela Thomas News Editor

On Thursday, April 19, outside of Lawrence Hall, a rare citing of students gathering together, putting on construction helmets, and heading in the direction of the new Recreation Center, took place. As strange as this scene might have been, the students were not trespassing. Instead, a group of student leaders, selected to participate in the Recreation Center Committee, as well as other University officials and student leaders, were given a rare chance. Those officials who have been working closely with the Recreation Center, gave students, faculty and staff a chance to see the progress of the building. Students were separated into two groups and wore construction helmets as they were led into the Recreation Center by Project Manager, Department of Facilities Design and Construction, Steve Domenick. Students present for the tour represented the following groups : L.A.S.O., Student Activities Council, Recreation Staff, Student Ambassadors, Student Government Association, and many more. Student media was also present with staff member of The Quad and WCUR’s West Chester Weekly crew ready to film a segment about the Recreation Center.

The crew interviewed officials and students about their reactions. As the first group of students and staff filed out of the building, concluding their tour, there were many reactions. When asked what she thought about the

dents were watching where they were walking. Construction stopped for the students as they walked inside of the building. As students walked into the building, they were greeted by the wellness wall, which

Students head into the Recreation Center for a tour.

building, WCU student, Shaina Mason said, “It was so cool in there!” Many of the surrounding students agreed with her statement, surprised at how much progress the building had. The second group began to follow Domenick into the building. “Everybody ready? Let’s go,” Domenick said, while warning students to be careful where they were walking. Safety was the key element during the tour and Domenick made sure that stu-

features inspiring words that WCU students picked through a survey that was emailed last year. The first stop was the social lounge, where the hydration station and café will also be located. Students were shown where the squash courts were going to be and where the underground parking area will be as well. Students and staff were also given a chance to see where the climbing wall was going to be located, which will be

the predominant feature of the building. According to Dominick, the climbing wall will be one of the last items that will be installed in the Recreation Center before it opens officially on Aug. 24. A new aspect of the

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

Recreation Center is that it will feature multi-gender bathrooms and showers. Students were given a chance to see the tile patterns that will go inside of the bathrooms and showers. Students then moved up to the second floor where the weight-lifting and exercise machines will be. “It is quite an open space, it is pretty breath-taking,” Domenick said. Students were also amazed by the elevating track above, which will have

News APRIL 23, 2012

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU three running lanes. Nine times around the track will equal a mile , according to Domenick. There will be two exercise areas on the same floor. Students mingled around the second floor, mesmerized by how well the building was starting to look. “I have to practically keep putting my jaw up,” third-year student, Jessica Guzzardo, said. “The entire building will be wi-fi accesible,” Domenick said. “Anybody who wants to get on-line in the building will be able to.” One student had a question about the windows that will be placed near the basketball courts. She asked about the windows durability pertaining to basketballs being smashed against the windows while games were being played. Domenick replied that the windows and dry wall have high-resistence and has a lot of strength. Students were amazed by the views of the campus through the second and third floor windows. “Another aspect is that there will be some exercise equipment with video screens hanging from the ceiling,” Domenick said. When asked what she thought about the Recreation Center, Domenick’s intern, a Drexel University student, said “it’s better” in comparison to other recreation centers. “When I first started, I was looking through

the plans and noticed a lot of similarities,” the intern said. “And looking through the plans, there are a lot of similarities but then once it is here and it is built, this is really better.” The intern is a thirdyear student at Drexel. Domenick pointed out that the skylights had just been finished the day of the tour. The Recreation Center will also have geothermal heating and air conditioning. As students and staff left the tour, their eyes explored the building one last time, some of the students are graduating seniors, trying to catch one last glimpse at a building that some might not see again. “I’m coming back, even if I am an alumni,” one student said while other students were planning a roadtrip for August 24 to come back to West Chester. Domenick promises that the Recreation Center will open on time, but the schedule is a little behind, according to Domenick. As the second group left, amazed by the progress the recreation center showed, West Chester Weekly was ready to film reactions of the students and directors on the tour. For more information about the recreation center, please visit http://www.wcupa.edu/ studentrecreationcenter/default.asp. Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

PAGE 3

Student leaders were given a chance to see inside of the brand new Recreation Center

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad Staff Photographer


PAGE 4

THE QUAD NEWS

Teens forever, they came to dance By Kristin E. Holmes The Philadelphia Inquirer April 21--Hundreds of people gathered at the original home of “American Bandstand” in West Philadelphia on Saturday to recreate the televised dance party hosted by Dick Clark who died Wednesday. “My biggest thrill was dancing with Patti Page,” said Tommy Davis, 70, of Jenkintown, who danced on the show from 1965 to 1967. “Dick pulled me down from the bleachers,” Clark, 82, died in Los An-

geles of a massive heart attack. He was 82. The death of the man affectionately known as the “world’s oldest teenager” prompted scores of former dancers and “American Bandstand” fans to file into Studio B at the old WFIL-TV station. The building at 4548 Market Street now houses the Enterprise Center, a non-profit group that helps minority and disadvantaged entrepreneurs start businesses. The studio is rented out for events such as parties and wedding receptions. The center opened for

public tours Saturday because officials had received so many requests to visit the building since Clark’s death. Inside Studio B, “Bandstand” fans bopped, strolled and jitterbugged in memory of Clark. “I’d leave high school at 2:15 p.m., run across the street, grab the bus to City Hall, and the El to 46th Street,” Davis said of his days as a dancer. “Dick was a great guy. He was a clean-cut straightshooter.” Contact Kristin E. Holmes a 610-313-8211 or kholmes@ phillynews.com.

APRIL 23, 2012

Congratulations to the New Student Government Association Executive Board:

President: Michelle Strausbaugh Vice President: Stefan June Treasurer: Katie Kearney Secretary: Nora McGinley-Hence Parliamentarian: Kyle VanHart

Message from the Mayor’s intern For further information, contact Evan By Kelcie Rudman Special to The Quad

The public, educational, and government TV channel is in full swing within the West Chester community. Many students and residents might wonder what the channel’s purpose is, and this is what I’m here to tell you. Channel 33 is available to all Verizon customers. It is strictly produced by the public and community, and is used to distribute educational and government content to all of its viewers. This channel has many benefits for the residents of West Chester. Foremost, its purpose is to bring together the university and community’s relationship, while developing means of technology along the way. I am currently interning for Mayor Carolyn Comitta, and I have been assigned to be the primary liaison between the borough and university regarding

the PEG channel, otherwise known as the public access channel. As a fourth-year communication studies major, I have worked closely with Dr. Boyle, Mayor Comitta, theBorough Council, and my department, to monitor the progress of the station. As the semester went on, I constantly got updates on the channel and relayed this information to the community so we were all on the same level. Once the station was available to viewers, one of my responsibilities was to develop public service announcements to display on the channel; some of which include scheduled times of Borough Council meetings, future events and activities going on within the community, and parking information for residents of the borough. A hope for the channel is to be able to provide viewers with taped committee or Borough Council meetings that air during the week. This will

be a way to include them in government decisions, as they see at a closer level what is going on in the community around them. My goal is for both off-campus students and residents to hear about this channel through means of advertising or word of mouth. Even though I will be graduating in a few short weeks, I hope to come back one day in the future to see the PEG channel fully functioning with an overflowing amount of content. Possibly featuring university events, concerts, and departments, while also focusing on the borough and their events, meetings, and trips, that are so readily available to residents within the community. Look for updates on the channel as it continues to develop content, and spread the word. Please tune in to learn more about your university and the community of West Chester!

Lieb, via the Division of Student Affairs at 610-436-2117. This was the first time that students were able to vote for the candidates through D2L.


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

PAGE 5

DPS prepares plans for cameras, card reader in Recreation Center Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief As the construction of the Recreation Center will conclude over the summer, students of West Chester University will eagerly await the grand opening. Administration from the Department of Public Safety will devise a plan of video surveillance and of the card readers for the center. “We do an initial aiming of the cameras,” Captain Vining, Assistant Director of Public Safety (DPS), said. He explained that the purpose of pulling camera angles in, out or back, enables for the viewing of a more specific area. He explained that the review is more for the activity on camera, for instance a case of vandalism would involve observing a person’s movements. After projects are completed, police administrators will review the area to determine any areas not covered by a camera. Vining warns the importance of completing a walk-through because “you can never predict how people are going to use a building.” It is possible, he explained for example, people may use a spare room more commonly than anticipated. The establishment of the Recreation Center, covering 72,000 square feet, will involve 45 cameras. This addition will bring a total of 500 cameras on-campus grounds. Half of the installed video cameras are high definition. A process is in place to replace the cameras at the end of their life with the new technology, if the camera cannot be fixed. “We call it life cycle replacement” to update to the current standard. “First thing you want to

protect is life safety. First and furthermost, you want to protect your people,” Vining said as one reason for the cameras. “You can always replace property.” Safety of the students is the number one concern of the university police, he said. The assistance of the cameras can help with investigations involving physical harm, in addition to helping with theft-related incidents. Cameras deter crime, Vining explained as another reason the cameras hold an importance of their placements in the edifices on-campus. High definition cameras show a “clear picture” of a person’s face and indicate the activity at the scene. Cameras are the “best resource, from an electronic” stance. Security cameras can tell a story, he began. Wide camera shots can allow investigators to see the “activity” in the building. “Technology will never limit or replace your personal and good sound investigation skills,” Vining acknowledged how eyewitness and personal accounts are ultimately the “best resources.” Review of camera footage provides a “great tool for investigations” as a source to identify potential witnesses, “limit the suspect pool” and discover evidence of an occurrence. Vining explained an investigation involving camera footage can allow the police to “pick up something from most incidents.” This gives police a starting point to work an investigation, he stated. Investigators turn to the footage as cameras are “predominantly” tools. The DPS has cameras that can save images for 60 to 90 days. The technology enables the cam-

eras to be programmed to record for movement, allowing the camera to record less and provide more storage of recorded material. “There are two sides to every story and then there’s the truth in the middle,” Vining said. “As an investigator, you have to find the truth. As Law Enforcement, you work to provide the facts.” In addition to camera surveillance, card readers serve to determine who is gaining access to the building. Active WCU students can use their student IDs to access the Recreation Center via a card reader. An access list to the Recreation Center will consist of names provided to DPS. By swiping Ram E cards into the card reader, this allows an entry to those with permission to access the oncampus building(s). This private server allows authorities to “have an electronic notification of who is coming in to the building.” There are currently 17,000 active cards, including student, faculty, staff members and vendors, Vining said. Each card reader costs $1,100 and can be used for several years. The first reader, placed at the Science building, dates back 16 years. The card readers in the Residence Halls began in 2004 and they are refurbished after two semesters due to the amount of usage. In this case, Residence Life and Housing provides a list of students for access to their designated hall. All card readers log all information based on the student ID number. The information can be held up to five years, however, it is “not a 100% guarantee of anything” as it is only a “fact” in any

given investigation. Vining said the department tries to address locations to place “controlling devices” as they have a “standard footprint to what we do with buildings.” These devices include card readers, door sensors and emergency phones. An emergency phone will be located directly outside the main entrance of the Recreation Center. There are details to place emergency phones inside the center. In all projects, cameras cover every entry and exit points of the building. With a clear picture from the high definition cameras, this provides another means for police to identify persons as needed. Cameras cover all main doors and also the fire exit only doors. Along with the initial planning of camera placement, DPS administrators will complete a walkthrough of the building to determine common paths that students, faculty and guests will take. Several months after a building has opened, they will review the area to establish which areas are in need of cameras. In the case of the Recreation Center, this will be completed early on in the fall semester. The Recreation Center will be equipped with cameras on the perimeter of the building. These cameras are designed to withstand outdoor conditions. All of the cameras are also on a private secure network While people expect privacy, Vining said, the average person is on camera up to 30 times a day. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

Just think. You’ll stand out. At Cecil College you’re more than just a face in a crowd. Summer courses at Cecil offer small class sizes, which means you enjoy individual attention from highly qualified faculty who know you well. This summer you can maximize your learning opportunities at an affordable cost and transfer your credits. For more information, go to www.cecil.edu/summerstudies or call 410-287-1000.

Deana, Elementary Education

CECIL COLLEGE | North East, MD | Elkton, MD REAL STUDENTS. REAL SUCCESS.


PAGE 6

THE QUAD NEWS

APRIL 23, 2012

Proposed 2012-2013 budgets from Student Government Association Organization SGA SGA Auxilary Accounting Club Active Minds Alchemist Adapted Phyical Activities Art Assoc American Marketing Assoc Anthropology Athletic Training Best Buddies Black Men United Black Latino Greek Coun BSU Campus Crusade CALPSO Circle K College Republican Criminal Justice Daedalus Darlington Bio Club Dance Team Dance Company Earth & Space Science Earth Group English/Iconoclast Exercise Science Econ/Finance Forensics French German Club Grace Notes Gospel Choir LASO History Health & Phy Ed Hillel

2012-13 Proposed $35,000 $20,000 $700 $2,000 $400 $1,500 $1,185 $1,200 $2,075 $1,250 $550 $5,000 $5,500 $21,168 $3,000 $250 $3,500 $2,000 $1,205 $4,100 $1,190 $4,500 $6,000 $3,069 $2,000 $800 $630 $1,000 $19,000 $900 $500 $1,245 $5,500 $5,500 $500 $1,270 $1,080

Organization Homecoming Honors Habitant IGC Panhell IFC Instit of Magt Acct Invisible Children Indo American LGBTQA Lutheran Students Leadership (LEAD) March Band School of Music American Choral Dir. Brass Chamber Winds Collgium Mus Concert Band Concert Choir Crits Flute Guitar Masterworks MENC Opera Theatre Percussion Wind Trumpet Swope Ensemble Symphonic Band Men's Choir University Chorale/Cantari Statesmen Jazz Symphonic Orchestra Vocal Jazz Choir Women's Choir

2012-13 Proposed $15,000 $9,000 $1,270 $18,000 $8,500 $9,500 $1,320 $842 $500 $9,000 $550 $30,000 $60,000 $1,650 $1,825 $2,550 $1,206 $3,040 $4,575 $3,825 $1,500 $500 $1,961 $1,020 $2,000 $2,623 $3,570 $3,000 $2,000 $3,100 $637 $2,400 $3,400 $3,500 $2,000 $500

Organization

2012-13 Proposed Major Entertainment $46,000 Mock Trail $1,188 NOW Music Society $250 NCTE $2,000 Political Science $1,000 Precise $2,500 Philosophy $1,439 Psychology $210 QUAD $20,000 Relay for Life $8,150 Rotaract $2,000 Russian $1,500 Rec Services $57,000 Sports Clubs $60,000 SAC $115,000 Spanish Club $1,200 Serpentine $13,000 Sigma $1,450 Student OutR to Urb Schools $1,210 SNAP $1,700 Sisters United $4,500 Social Work $2,500 Students for Sensible Drug Pol $1,685 Union Adv Board $10,480 Univ Ambassadors $175 Univ/ Theatre $52,000 WCHEYC $4,000 W/M in Communications $1,920 Women in Science $200 WCTV $500 WCUR $27,000 Women's Ctr $5,000

Questions? Want to appeal? Do so this week. Contact Kaitlin Kearney, SGA Treasurer kk716720@wcupa.edu


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

Opinion & Editorial

Recreation Center Tour Every time I walk to the Lawrence Center, I notice how far along the New Recreation Center is coming. Being on that side of campus, I think of the Golden Ram pride I hold. This campus has come along way since I first started here. Back during my freshman year, the first sight of construction led me to “Houdini” (escape artist) my way around campus, in between blocked off areas of construction and cones. Now, as graduation nears, I have found myself admiring the finalized construction on-campus. I try not to look at the “Sanderson parking lot” since I was a “Sanderson Soldier” during my first year. Instead, I look the other way to see the Recreation Center, or what use to be Ramsey Hall. I toured the Recreation Center with other student leaders and I too had my breath taken away. We were amazed at what we saw inside the building and we look forward to seeing the building when it is finished. I’m in the pool of graduating seniors so I will be in the car returning for opening day of the new center. Now that I have seen the Recreation Center, inside and out, I cannot wait to see the finished product. This campus is full of memories that, even as the years pass and the memories might start to fade away, I know that, just like any student leader, we have left a mark here that we will never forget. WCU prepares their graduates for life after college as we get ready to move on. In the midst of job searching, I am also planning out which days or which events I want to return to campus for after I graduate. One of my friends asked me if I could come back to WCU, take classes but not pay tuition, would I do it? I thought yes I would. They were surprised at my answer. I told my friend, if you were a student leader and a Golden Ram, you would understand. ~ Ginger Rae Editor-in-Chief The Quad

PAGE 7

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383

Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Jess C. Guzzardo Photography Editor

Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Asst. Photography Editor

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Erica Brooks Business Manager Mike Mills Advertising Manager

COPY EDITORS Kelly Adams Bethany Van de Water Samantha Schaule

DISTRIBUTION Alexis Caporizzo Mike Coia ONLINE EDITION Laura Blyton FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2012 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


Latino voters to play crucial role in 2012 elections

PAGE 8

THE QUAD OP-ED

APRIL 23, 2012

By Jack Barnett Special to The Quad When looking at elections, demographics are always one of the major focuses. Politicians will try to reach out to certain demographics that they are lacking support in. Certain demographics are considered swing demographics because they can go Republican or Democrat. The key battleground demographic for the 2012 elections is Latino voters. Latinos are a crucial voting block for two reasons. They are a large and fast-growing minority; currently, they make up about 15 percent of the

population. Also, Latinos can swing Democrat or Republican elections. The Latino vote could make or break a candidate during an election. For example, in the 2004 elections, George W. Bush received 45 percent of the Latino vote, which gave him enough votes to win the presidency. Senator John McCain only received 31 percent of the Latino vote in 2008. Making such a meager gain with an important demographic doomed the McCain campaign; McCain lost despite gaining 55 percent of the white vote. Part of Obama’s electoral coalition in 2008 was

Latino voters, yet Obama is in danger of losing this demographic. Unlike the African-Americans, over 90 percent of whom consistently support the President, Latinos may turn on Obama in 2012. One reason is that Obama has failed to offer any immigration reform. The DREAM Act failed to receive enough support in Congress. This law would give permanent residency to certain illegal immigrants and its passage could give Obama a huge boost among Latino voters. Another reason is that Obama is deporting illegal aliens at record numbers, far surpassing the Bush

administration’s rate of deportation. Both of these factors will make Obama a tough sell in 2012. Romney hasn’t done any better at capturing the Latino vote. Recently he has been showed trying to court Latinos for his 2012 bid, yet he will have to answer for past actions. He went on record saying he would veto the D.R.E.A.M. Act if it were passed while he was president. He also praised the Arizona immigration law, which is unpopular among Latino voters. Even Tea Party favorite and Latino Marco Rubio did not support the law. Obviously, this will not fare well

with Latino voters. It will prove difficult for Romney to align with the hard right conservatives of the party while also gaining the support of Latinos. Both candidates’ support of Latino measures will come across as political stunts. That’s because they are; Obama and Romney do not have immigration reform on the top of their agendas. Still, the Latino vote is crucial and both candidates will fight to get it. A key battleground state is Florida, which has a large Latino population. The state has always had a large number of Cubans who consistently voted Re-

publican because of their anti-Communist views. However, as a new generation of Cubans comes of age, the days of Castro are less remembered. A report shows that there are 100,000 more Latino Democrats than Republicans. Still, this discounts independent voters. This still gives Romney a fighting chance in the state. But one thing is abundantly evident: the Latino vote will play an important role in deciding who wins the 2012 elections. Jack Barnett is a thirdyear student majoring in history and political science. He can be reached at JB723722@ wcupa.edu.

By Leah Skye Special to The Quad It’s that glorious time of year again when we, noble students, can expect our loving college bookstores to applaud the year’s hard academic work with a slap in the face of ludicrous textbook buy-back prices. Each semester, we shell out hundreds of dollars for textbooks only to be offered a hair-raising fraction of their worth when the time comes to sell them back. Once you’ve collected your meager $12 for that heap of books you paid $200 for only a few months prior, bookstores turn around and do it all over again to the next batch of students in a never-ending cycle of shameless profit. You may ask yourself how to go about avoiding this crooked predicament, and thankfully there is an answer. Bookstores are not the only carriers of the materials you need to further your education, and every year more students are discov-

ering the immense savings that accompany seeking alternative outlets to purchase their books. Amazon. com and Half.com are incredible sources, both for buying and selling books. Once you have registered for your classes, you should begin the process of shopping around on these websites for the best prices. Some people are under the impression that they only sell the brand new (and immensely expensive) versions of the texts, but that is incorrect. It is blissfully simple to find good condition, used copies of almost any book you are searching for. This being said, what stands out most about these websites is not simply the availability and variety of textbooks offered, but the low prices they can expect to find. I was able to find a Spanish textbook, for example, that the bookstore was asking nearly $100 for at the low price of $15 online. These are not min-

iscule savings, people! We are talking about a colossal price difference that is too good to be kept a secret. Also, shipping usually only costs between $3 and $5, so don’t expect to be laying out any serious cash in that area either. Once you’ve finished your use of the textbook, selling it back through these outlets is just as simple as buying was. Half.com, being an affiliate of eBay, allows anyone with a PayPal account to begin selling immediately. Amazon.com is just as accessible, with an easy signup process that will have you selling your books in no time. The process is nearly effortless, and entering the ISBN number from the back cover into the program provides your listing with a photo of your book and suggestions of what other sellers have it priced at. Listing does not necessarily guarantee finding a buyer, but when you do sell your books for close to what you paid for them it

is very rewarding. Here’s a newsflash, college kids. We are smarter than them, so don’t let your integrity be compromised simply for the sake of convenience. It has become the status quo that students should expect to lose hundreds of dollars on books, but it does not need to be that way. Yeah, that bookstore is located awfully close to campus and has fun, trendy WCU merchandise decorating the walls, but is it really worth paying up to 90% more than you needed to? I think not. They can only operate as long as students support them, and not giving them our business or money is the best way to take a stand and send the message that it is unacceptable to take advantage of hard-working students. Leah Skye is a fourth-year student majoring in communications studies with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at LS685444@ wcupa.edu.

By Alex Hickman Special to The Quad This upcoming presidential election, I believe, will truly be a remarkable experience for all Americans. What will be the pinnacle of the season has yet to be seen. Will it be the triumph of the “good guys” over the “bad guys?” Will it be the campaign machines, now with virtually endless supplies of money (thanks to Citizen’s United, a decision by the Supreme court to allow corporations ability to fund campaigns unrestricted by the government) to bombard... sorry... “inform” the public to make the best decisions? Or will it be the largely televised talking-head debates where politicians will lie to Americans... sorry... discuss their platforms and solutions and promise a world so comfy voters’ glands salivate at the thought of such an outcome? I mean, empirically, any of these out-

comes can plausibly be the pinnacle of America’s presidential campaign and voting season, but looking at what such a system reaps and sows financially, socially, politically, spiritually, militarily, and environmentally, every year, I’d be a liar if I said I would enjoy four more years of do-nothing moderate policy making. As I was discussing the upcoming primary elections with a friend of mine, one sentence of our conversation sticks out like a sore thumb: “Yea, Alex, I know voting is important, if we don’t vote, we lose our right to complain.” The right to complain? I thought I had the right to contribute in my nation’s democracy! To voice my opinion, to be heard, to act! How dare he speak down to my rights as a citizen in such a way, I am an American, and I deserve to be heard. But, then again, when

The bookstore bamboozling Amend 2012

See AMEND on page 9


APRIL 23, 2012

Amend from page 8 was the last time Americans agreed on anything completely in the political sphere? It was at this moment every motor, gear, and capacitor in my brain began firing up, turning, and roaring, it was true enlightenment, a remarkable experience. My epiphany concluded with with a worldview more bizarre than any “Twilight Zone” rerun or Stanley Kubrick film could embody; what if it all didn’t matter! WHOAH THERE MR. REVOLUTIONARY, LET’S CALM DOWN... But just imagine a nation where there were no elections, and government officials elected themselves (rather reminiscent of our good ol’ nemesis the U.S.S.R, Fascist Germany, and of course some African countries only an eighth of Americans could pronounce and locate on a map). And this oligarchy was a set of mostly elder white-Anglo-Saxons with large sums of money in the stock of the nation’s industries. They would enact law after law limiting our freedoms of speech, of religion, to organize, to reproduce, to strike, sexual freedom etc. etc. to protect their own financial situations. (I mean if you’ve got the power to do so, with no one stopping you, why not!) If this were to happen, I’d be safe to say a large majority of us would get our muskets and revolutionary gear together and march down to Washington to fight for our rights as citizens, as people, and as plain old human beings!(gosh darnit!) We wouldn’t care about who leads the movement and who doesn’t, we wouldn’t worry about Republicans

and Democrats, Libertarians and Socialists, Anarchists and Communists, because there is one thing which would bind us, our humanity; and this humanity we must respect if there is going to be any kind of sustainable existence on good ol’ mother earth. Now lets look at our current system. Pretty awesome in comparison right? Everyone votes, they have their say to choose the politicians they like, we can organize, lobby our congressmen, run around like maniacs during protests (well as long as we’d like until the police get all fussy), and light candles to hold vigils for politicians to change their mind. It’s great! What does that guy who says we only “complain” know? We have it pretty good here in the U.S. Or do we? Going back to the statement I declared after my epiphany: “The election process doesn’t matter.” The meaning of this statement is rooted in the fact that: in a nation by and for the people, resting supreme executive power in a group of self-interested capitalists with their sticky fingers in everyone’s businesses, lives, and even well being (a shot at privatized healthcare, haha!) is intolerable! THERE I SAID IT. I hate Capitalism! A society paid for and based around one culture is a scary situation, and even scarier when it’s a society of pure consumption. We’re taught, through societal conditioning, the culture which arises from media, the political sphere, and in schools, how consumption, elitism, assimilation, police force violence, and conformity, are all good for us, and how the poor

THE QUAD OP-ED

became poor because of their lack of hard work. In reality, these are manufactured assumptions forced upon us to stop us from questioning the establishment. So what exactly is wrong with capitalistdriven politics? Whether you’re for the Democrats or the Republicans, you subscribe to a system of capitalistic imperialism controlling our very lives (how dare I accuse you! You’ve always done as you were told!) If I said we were all free to choose the right candidate whom we find to have the best policies for the nation, I’d once again be lying to you. When was the last time you knew a presidential, congressional, or even a municipality candidate for office before they were running for office? Even if you did, do you think the rest of America knows? American politics to me is less about freedom of choice, and more of like faction choosing. You can either be on the red or the blue team, they’re both going to screw you over because they’re owned and lobbied by so many capital seeking corporations, your vote is inconsequential to a check for a million plus dollars. These political parties rely on these companies to continue their dominance over the voting population, and these companies rely on the political parties to fulfill each others’ agenda. Forget just Crony-Capitalism, Crony-Politics is like it’s evil twin brother sent from hell. It’s come to the point that virtually any suggestion a citizen has on the political process will be burned in front of them and then the ashes spread over a hypothetical cemetery where once living natural personal

rights have gone to their final resting place. The “suggestion box” is getting smaller and smaller and we’re forced to sign our lives away to these political cliques if we want any voice at all. Thanks to a yearly spending of over 9 trillion dollars on political lobbying (the system of payment to politicians from corporations, non-profits, and unions, to vote in a specific way in crucial congressional decisions, or to continue and grow a political campaign) we can kiss even our “right to complain” away. The existence of political freedom in the U.S. is a fallacy and a lie. So what do we have? We’ve got a comfy oligarchical system (behind the mask of a representative democracy) which enacts law after law reducing our most basic rights (Patriot Act, Stop and Frisk of New York 2010, state enacted limitations on same sex couples, the list goes on and on), which works only on self interests, and which has the largest standing army and police force in the world (talk about paranoid). Ring any bells? Well, it should. Before you vote this upcoming election, do your part and let your voice be heard. Instead of only pushing a button, why not join an organization, activist group, or community service group to go out and truly make a difference. No ideas? Check out the movement Amend 2012 at http://www. amend2012.org! Alex Hickman is a fourthyear student majoring in political science with a concentration in International Relationals. He can be reached at AH728435@ wcupa.edu.

Perfect storm for Romney PAGE 9

By Bill Hanrahan Op- Ed Editor

This primary season has been a perfect Storm for Romney. There were countless things that had to go just right for Romney to win the nomination after Santorum’s early February surge. Romney won because he had incredibly good luck with delegate proportioning, primary (and caucus) timing, establishment support, and money, among other things. Santorum, of course, rose from being the candidate that was ignored to being the recognized conservative challenger to Romney after a long line of conservative candidates surged and collapsed before primary season, including Bachmann, Perry, Cain, and Gingrich (who would once again rise before his final collapse). He did this by winning the Iowa caucuses, which was totally unexpected just days before. Unfortunately, Romney was declared the winner by a measly eight votes and this dampened much of the momentum that Santorum could have had. It was revealed two weeks later when the final tallies came in that Santorum won by 37 votes, but his chance to capitalize on this was largely missed. The most frustrating thing for Santorum must be the timing issue. On Feb. 7, Santorum scored a surprise triple victory. He won handily in Colorado and it was a blowout victory in Missouri and Minnesota; he won Minnesota by 18 points and Missouri by 30 points, getting a whopping 55 percent of the vote.

This made Santorum the main conservative challenger to Romney. Santorum got a huge bump in the polls, both nationwide and in every state. Just three days after Santorum’s triple win, a poll put Santorum 15 points ahead of Romney, when, just one week before that, Romney was ahead of Santorum by about 20 points in the national polls. A Rasmussen poll put Santorum 12 points ahead of Romney exactly one week after the triple win. Unfortunately, Santorum would struggle to maintain this newfound momentum because there was a three week break in the primary process during which there was no time for Santorum to score some wins to maintain his momentum. That’s too bad. If Michigan and Arizona held their primaries one week after Santorum’s triple win, rather than three weeks, Santorum would likely be the frontrunner, rather than a drop-out. A poll released less than two weeks after his triple victory had Santorum just three points behind Romney in Arizona—a virtual tie. One month before Santorum’s triple win, Romney was 27 points ahead of Santorum in Arizona. Had the Arizona primary occurred one or two weeks after Santorum’s triple win, he probably would have pulled off an Iowa-style hairline victory against Romney in that winner-take-all state. Santorum had a way of outperforming polls; in a poll that came out just one day before the Colorado primary, Romney was See ROMNEY on page 10


The Golden Rams Society: building a better college

PAGE 10

By Jack Barnett Special to The Quad The Golden Rams Society is a student-run group created to educate the current student body about the importance of being proud and involved future alumni. Whether a person becomes an active and involved alum is directly affected by their entire college experience. The more positive experience a student has now, the more involvement, affinity and support will be given later. Students and alumni are the most important part of a college or university. We are ambassadors in the working world and our communities, representing the quality and excellence

Romney from page 9 beating Santorum by 10 points, but Santorum ended up edging out Romney by five points. In Michigan, Romney was ahead by 15 points in the polls the week before the Feb. 7 primaries but, just a few days after Rick Santorum’s huge win, Santorum was leading the Michigan polls by 15 points. His double digit lead continued into the next week. Had Michigan held its primary on Feb. 14, Santorum would have undoubtedly won the state by a double digit margin. This would have been an epic blow to Romney’s campaign since it was previously unimaginable that he could lose Michigan, the state where his father was so popular. Romney won Arizona and Michigan, giving him a huge boost that easily lasted into Super Tuesday, which happened the next week. Romney’s most important Super Tuesday

THE QUAD OP-ED

of a WCU education. Alumni are also an important resource to utilize to enhance college life. I was surprised to learn that WCU does not have very active alumni (participation in giving). In fact, among the 14 PASSHE schools, WCU is only number 12! One goal of the Golden Rams Society is to change this. As a member of the Golden Rams Society (or GRS), allow me to explain what we do. My fellow GRS members and I will be working several events including five presidential events, Alumni Weekend and Homecoming. We are charged with the task of

creating stronger bonds between alumni and current students. Our mission is to create pride, enthusiasm and awareness among the current student body about our university and its needs. WCU is an excellent and selective school. We should all be proud of West Chester University. To build loyal and dedicated future alumni, GRS members, like myself, will solicit input from our fellow students, engage in awareness campaigns, host special events aimed at growing student pride and ask for student support. We hope to fund scholarships, create new initiatives and, hopefully, new traditions

of our own for students to participate in and feel good about. So, why give to WCU? After all, students pay tuition, living expenses, and book costs, so why should they give more? This is a good point but it doesn’t look at the larger picture. All 14,492 of the students currently attending West Chester University can help make it a better place. If we all cared enough to give something, even a small donation, it would add up and make a positive difference to another student. Private support from alumni, parents, faculty, staff, corporations, and

win was Ohio, where he edged out Santorum by just one point. Ohio is another state that Santorum had double digit leads in just two weeks before Super Tuesday. Even by the time he blew his huge lead in Michigan (which was, of course, just in time for the Michigan primary) he was still leading the Ohio polls. This means that he would have won Ohio if it was on the same day as Michigan. If Ohio switched places with Michigan he would have won them both, because the Ohio victory would give him enough momentum to reclaim his lead in Michigan. But, as it happened, Santorum just helplessly watched as his double digit leads evaporated, falling like dominoes. Michigan and Ohio fell to Romney like clockwork, when the time was just right. This must have been very frustrating for Santorum. It wasn’t just Michigan that Santorum lost due to bad timing; he also underperformed on Super Tuesday. Had Michigan and

Arizona happened a week or two earlier, this would have allowed Santorum to renew and even increase his momentum for Super Tuesday, when he would have almost surely won Alaska and Ohio in addition to the three states that he did win. He wasn’t allowed on the ballot in Virginia (another stroke of bad luck) or else that would have come into play. He may have also edged out Gingrich in Georgia, forever sidelining the conservative vote-splitter who hated Romney so much that he didn’t see that getting out of the race was the worst thing he could do to Romney. Gingrich’s existence was part of this perfect storm for Romney. But the dominoes didn’t stop there. Wisconsin was another state that Santorum maintained a large lead in right up until the time the state actually voted. Just one week before he lost Ohio by one point, the polls showed him 16 points ahead of Romney in Wisconsin but, when the time came,

Romney beat Santorum by seven points. This is much in the same way that Santorum was still up by double digits in Ohio just two days before Michigan. It’s so clear that the order of these states was just absolutely perfect for Romney. To see how the delegate allocation favored Romney, consider the following. After the first eight primaries and caucuses, Santorum had won four of them—more than any other candidate. Romney only won three. Yet, here was the delegate count at that time: Santorum–50 and Romney–112. That’s right, despite winning more states than Romney, Santorum had less than half of the delegates. Maybe Santorum will have better luck with his next shot at the Republican nomination. He has a lot of potential and I would like to see him run again.

Bill Hanrahan is a fourthyear student majoring in political science and philosophy. He can be reached at WH750431@wcupa.edu.

APRIL 23, 2012

foundations—not the dwindling state funding—is what is currently giving current students the best education, both in and out of the classroom. We students need to take an active role in helping to ensure that our university is the place of higher learning that we want it to be and not a place that operates only with state appropriation and tuition and fees. We students—WCU’s future alumni—need to give too and we should! What better time to begin this than in April, student giving month. The rationale for giving is simple: give a little and get more back. Student donations will

be supporting a program, event, building and/or equipment needed that we students will directly benefit from. Let’s show our alumni that we care about our university and future alma mater! The Golden Rams Society will be out there trying to raise money for the university. Hopefully, this article helped create awareness for a new student organization here to help West Chester University. Remember, participating goes a long way. Jack Barnett is a thirdyear student majoring in history and political science. He can be reached at JB723722@ wcupa.edu.

Disclaimer reminder: Opinions expressed in the Op-Ed section are not necessarily those of The Quad or WCU.

Weekly Comments Several Secret Service agents have been canned and even more put on administrative leave over a prostitution scandal in Columbia. The scandal, which involved as many as 20 Columbian prostitutes, was apparently revealed after a fight over payment issues between a 24-year-old prostitute and a Secret Service agent. The agent had allegedly agreed to pay $800 but only offered $30 the next morning. The agent eventually agreed to pay $225. In the agent’s defense, he was probably just subtracting the cost of protection that he provided, in more than one way… At least he didn’t use counterfeit money to pay the woman... It seems a little bit harsh to fire these agents; after all, President Clinton got to keep his job... What’s the problem with some Secret Service agents receiving some “secret service” of their own? --Bill Hanrahan Far-left MSNBC political “analyst” and apparent Democrat Party operative Karen Finney, accused Mitt Romney of wanting to “go back to a time when women couldn’t vote, blacks couldn’t vote.” Of course, Romney never said anything that would cause a reasonable person to make such an accusation. Democrats are unable to defend their disastrous record so they will be sinking to new lows in their quest to maintain power. --Bill Hanrahan


Benefits of bringing back the children’s center

APRIL 23, 2012

By Dr. Geeta Shivde Special to The Quad In December 2011, the West Chester University Children’s Center closed its doors, and our community lost a valuable resource and support for students, staff and faculty. For 26 years, the Center provided high quality, affordable and accessible child care and early education for the children of women and men who studied and worked at WCU. The Faculty Senate would like to express its sincere thanks and appreciation to the staff of the Center for their years of service to the University. Over the past three decades hundreds of children benefited from childcare that encouraged play and exploration in a

THE QUAD OP-ED

loving and nurturing atmosphere. We also want to express our concern to those members of the WCU community whose lives have been negatively impacted by the closing of the Children’s Center. The Children’s Center grew out of an initiative in the mid-1980s by the WCU Women’s Center to address a pressing need expressed by women on campus for affordable childcare. These included graduate and undergraduate students who depended on the Center’s lower cost, flexibility and accessibility in order to manage having a family while finishing their degrees. Indeed, current students who have children have expressed concern about their ability to stay in school without the

Children’s Center. These students and others need our support in their efforts to reach their educational goals in order to secure a financially stable future for their families. We argue that this should be a priority for a public institution of higher education, especially during difficult economic times when added worries about childcare can force students to abandon their pursuit of a degree. Faculty and staff also relied heavily on the Children’s Center. For many, having the ability to find high quality care for their children on campus allowed them to have a work-life balance that made them more effective in their ability to teach and serve the needs of all students. It stands

to reason that employees who know that their young children are wellcared for, happy and close at hand are more satisfied in their workplace and more productive. Access to childcare and the commitment to a familyfriendly workplace that the Center represented was a valuable recruitment tool; its removal may hurt the quality of WCU faculty and staff in the future. Finally, the Children’s Center provided a highlyregarded community service and observation site for students working toward careers in education and related fields. Every semester, students from the Colleges of Education, Health Sciences and Visual and Performing Arts observed, gathered data,

PAGE 11

volunteered or worked in the Center, providing a benefit to the campus community, while gaining valuable learning experiences. It is shortsighted of the University to lose this valuable resource for our students, faculty and future teachers, especially since WCU has such an excellent reputation in this area. The Faculty Senate has taken up the challenge of focusing on issues that affect campus climate, including issues that transcend individual academic and service units, and affect individuals across campus communities. We believe that supporting students, faculty and staff who have children by offering childcare options improves the campus climate for

all who study and work at WCU. These parents are students who are working towards a better life for their families; faculty who are striving to provide the best undergraduate and graduate education possible; and staff without whom this university could not function. The parents of our university community deserve our support, and it is our sincere hope that the stakeholders across the university and administration in the future will find viable long-term options for child-care on campus. Dr. Geeta Shivde is a psychology professor at West Chester University and faculty senator. She is writing on behalf of the faculty senate. She can be reached at GShivde@wcupa.edu.

Looking for an apartment for next year? We still have...

Check our website for NEW deals!!

(610) 696-0953

• 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms left!! • Granite countertops • Spacious living areas • Parking! • Washer/dryers, dishwashers

www.zukinrealtyinc.com

121 E. Gay St.


PAGE 12

THE QUAD FEATURES

New Café returns to its Roots

People are buzzing about Roots Café, a new bistro on West Gay Street that opened last July. On the surface, Roots is a cozy stop for breakfast and lunch, with everyday favorites, delicious daily specials, homemade soups, sauces, and sides. But something bigger is going on at Roots: they’re building a model for sustainability that may be the wave of the fu-

Roots Café essentially sprouted up out of nowhere. According to the owners, the whole process was very spontaneous. “I was actually surfing Craig’s List late one night after work. I saw that Nick’s Café was up for sale and thought it wouldn’t hurt to inquire the next morning. That set in motion me taking over about a month later,” Cellicci explained. As the team started researching more options, all the pieces

explained. To that effect, Roots carefully selects its products. Everything from produce to meat, bread to honey - even the biodegradable to-go containers and cutlery are chosen with sustainability and organics in mind. “Its 24/7. Everyday, running to a different farm. But you build personal relationships with the farmers, and it gets easier,” Cellucci said. Recently, Roots teamed up with West Chester’s own

ture for foodservice. Recently, students from the WCU Food Lab visited Roots for a talk and cooking class with Head Chef and coowner, Dan Cellucci. It was a tight fit, but the class of 20+ students listened intently as Cellucci described how Roots got started, their current practices, and plans for the future.

fell into place. “When I told my coworkers we were opening a café, they thought we were crazy!” Roots Café co-owner, and Cellucci’s fiancée, Keyana explained. The idea for Roots may have been spontaneous, but the daily routine is well-grounded. “Our philosophy is sustainability and supporting local farmers,” Cellucci

www.westchesterdoes.com

By Kellyn McNamara Special to The Quad

Thornbury Farms CSA program. Cellucci explained, “You buy shares, which allow the farmer to buy seeds, or to pay farm hands to help harvest. You’re rolling the dice a little bit, hoping for a good grow season, but it see ROOTS on page 16

Features APRIL 23, 2012

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

New health food trend - chia craze

Column by: Lauren DiCrecchio Practicum Writer

“Chi-Chi-Chi Chia.” I’m sure all of you remember the little clay figurines sprouting chia seeds to resemble hair or fur. Who would have thought years later the seeds of a good gag gift would be ingested to promote health and energy? Remember: the seeds, not the pets. Do not eat your Chia Pets. Advocates, dietitians, athletes and many others are raving about this new “super-food.” The plant can sprout in a matter of days, but the real appeal is in their nutrition-filled seeds. Chia seeds are a versatile and nutrient-rich source of food that come from the desert plant Salvia Hispania. Not only do they contain all the nutrients we need on a daily basis, they are a great source of energy and help assist in weight loss. There are several claims from the media surround-

ing the nutritional affects of the seeds. Chia is an excellent source of fiber, omega-3 fatty acids, also known as the healthy stuff in fish, protein and antioxidants. Chia can help cut out cravings, balance blood sugar levels, and again, they contribute to weight loss. “They are definitely making a quick transition to mainstream,” TODAY’S nutritionist and expert Jody Bauer explains. These seeds are perfect for dieting. When you expose a seed to water, it creates a gel coating, increasing the size and weight. Although the size increases, there is nothing to fear, because the water gel has zero calories. This process will leave you feeling full for hours. “They’re pretty much tasteless so you can’t go wrong,” Bauer says. Although you can eat the seeds by themselves, Joy also suggests treating them as ground flaxseed, sprinkling a spoonful on yogurt or cottage cheese, or adding to

smoothies, or pancake and muffin batters. The gel that the chia seed produces is a great substitute for half the butter in most baked goods recipes and tastes the same. So for all of you bakers who cannot stand using all of that butter and oil, divide the amount you would typically use in half, and substitute with the chia gel, Bauer recommends. The chia seeds help balance your blood sugar and will leave you with a constant and steady energy. And like flaxseeds, chia seeds are a great source of the plantbased type of omega-3 fats called ALA, Bauer explains. “These fats help fight inflammation in your joints, arteries, and all over your body,” Bauer describes. “And chia seeds are ultra rich in soluble fiber, which helps lower LDL ‘bad’ cholesterol, promote regularity and control blood sugars.” The more you eat high-starchy foods see CHIA on page 16


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD FEATURES

How to wear your favorite T-shirt Column by: Lauren DiCrecchio Practicum Writer

Who doesn’t just love a worn-in, slightly-faded T-shirt? From ones with funny catchphrases or pictures, to those that act as souvenirs from memorable nights, tees are a great way to make a statement about yourself. Between concert keepsakes, sorority and club uniforms, and the crazy and hilarious selection at Urban Outfitters, I have managed to stockpile probably 50 t-shirts over the last couple of years. And unfortunately, some of them have yet to see day light. Sure, they’re comfortable, and awesome for lazy days (or even to sleep in) but what’s a gal to do when she wants to rock a tee and still look stylish? Yes, ladies, you can have your cake and eat it too. Today, I’m going to share a few different ways you can rock your favorite T-shirt and still look unique and cute for class. One of the most basic ways to spruce up a T-shirt is by pairing it with a cute structured jacket or a cardigan, instead of an old, frumpy hoodie. Small details, like adding a ring or headband, or even braiding your

hair instead of throwing it into a sloppy ponytail. Throw on some gladiator sandals instead of flip flops and this look can make all the difference in how you look and feel. Not only is this look totally comfortable, but it is almost effortless and quick. These little extras take just seconds to add — you’ll look great, but still make it to class on time. Another easy way to wear a T-shirt and still look cute is to tuck it into a skirt. I prefer a skirt that is slightly high-waisted – it’s dressy enough to wear on a date or look puttogether in class but isn’t so fancy that you compromise comfort. Pair this look with wedges — stilettos can look strange with something as casual as a graphic tee — and finish the look with a quirky fedora and statement ring. Try out an androgynous look. The relaxed look and feel of your favorite tee will look great with a pair of boyfriend jeans and a few deliberately placed menswear accessories. Experiment with beanies, classic leather belts, different pairs of casual shoes, and menswear timepieces. You’ll look casual and comfy, but not sloppy. Finish with a handy messenger bag.

Vests are a perfect add on to give the graphic tee look a little extra funk. A denim vest is a fun, unexpected way to add a rock and roll feel to an otherwise basic jeansand-tee look. This look is especially chic with a concert T-shirt, or printed pants. Finish off the outfit with a bold pair of shoes, eyecatching earrings, and a tough-looking bracelet. Pair it with a maxi skirt. Carrie Bradshaw anyone? It’s bold, but with the right amount of confidence, it’s easy to pull off! One way to make good use out of your maxi skirt is to pair it with a T-shirt. Make sure the tee isn’t too busy, and knot it right where the skirt begins for an ultra-chic look. Finish the outfit with a headscarf, classy ring, and ballet flats or even sandals. Always remember to keep the words on your graphic tees to a minimum. Keep it short and sweet in a large print. Now, with these little tips, there is no reason not to have fun and experiment new ways to wear all of those graphic tees. Lauren DiCrecchio is a fifth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in journalism and Spanish. She can be reached at LD658004@ wcupa.edu.

PAGE 13

Officer Irons, students get holein-one at Putt-Putt

By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief

Resident Assistant Anna Petrucci got robbed through the night. Officer Dan Irons was on scene, but no police report could be filed. This was another night that Irons advised residents of Goshen, Tyson, McCarthy and Killinger Hall, how to keep their property secure, prior to their night at PuttPutt miniature golf. Petrucci made several attempts to make par on each of the 18 holes on the miniature golf course. Despite her efforts, the golf ball rounded the hole several times and stole her chances of par. She got back on her game to make a hole-in-one on two courses. By the end of the night, she tied for first in a game against a Resident Assistant (RA) and two residents. With the semester winding down, textbook sell-back periods will begin. Around this time, most students wonder how much money they will receive upon returning their semesters books. At the Department of Public Safety, this is the time of the year that the officers warn students to be even more careful of their belongings and text-

books. The process of returning textbooks does not require a student ID. Irons explained how this leads to a theft opportunity for cash back. This happens every semester, he said. Irons estimated a probability of a “50/50 chance” that the complainant would have his or her stolen books returned to them, if he or she reports the theft to Public Safety as soon as it occurs. He informed students that reporting crimes in a timely matter is crucial and beneficial to the police investigation and to the person reporting the theft. “Every second that goes by is another second that (the thief) . . . is selling the (stolen) property,” Irons said. Officer Irons has previously recovered stolen textbooks and made theft-related arrests. He said some of the persons arrested for this crime have no association with the university. Bookstores buying back books do not require ID during the process. If theft is reported to Public Safety as soon as it is noticed, the officers can alert bookstore personnel to lookout for certain textbook titles to be sold back. He told the stu-

dents that if they have a suspicion of someone committing theft oncampus, to note the physical description of the person and to report the behavior to the university police. Irons discussed details of how the police could then look for witnesses to account the actions of the person who allegedly stole the property and attempt to find the property and the alleged party. Irons emphasized to students to report a theft when they notice the incident. “I can’t stress this enough. Please lock your doors,” Iron emphasized, “Even if it’s just to go (down the hall) to the bathroom.” Property “disappears often.” The night at PuttPutt had been quiet until WCU students showed up to fill the four golf courses with laughter. The sound of the golf ball clanked the side rails before the ball settled in the hole. “It was a fun outing with our residents,” RAs Petrucci and Ely Cruz agreed. Irons had fun in plain clothes as he made a hole-in-one on four of the courses. see PUTT-PUTT on page 16


PAGE 14

THE QUAD FEATURES

Greek Week 2012

APRIL 23, 2012

TT All photos by Ilana Berger / The Quad


PAGE 15

THE QUAD FEATURES

APRIL 23, 2012

This summer, get the credit you deserve. It’s the perfect time to catch up or get ahead on your credits. You deserve to make the most of your summer. Choose KU Summer Sessions and take your pick from an exciting list of on-campus and online classes. Make it a KU summer! For class listings or to register today, visit

www.kutztown.edu/summer

Session I: May 30-June 28 Session II: July 9-August 9

TM


PAGE 16 Roots from page 12

builds community and allows that farm to do better … by providing financial support.” Organics are another cornerstone of the Roots Café philosophy. “[Organic farming] is good because you can farm the same land for a long, long time – not like some methods.” Commercial farming uses so many chemicals – fertilizers and pesticides – to ensure a bountiful harvest that, after a while, the soil becomes toxic. Growing food from toxic soil is not only hazardous to our ecosystem, but also our health, and the health of future generations. Plus, “without pesticides, it just tastes better!” Cellucci added. Roots is still evolving. “It’s a work in progress,” Cellucci explained. “Someday, [Roots] would like to use all local and organic products, but it’s tough.” During the spring and summer, Oak Shade Cheese, an Amish creamery in Lancaster, provides Roots with homemade cheeses through the West Chester Grower’s Market. But in the winter, it is too cold for the horseand-buggy producers to travel.

THE QUAD FEATURES Last winter, Roots had to supplement their cheese with commercial distributor US Foods. Still, with less than a year under its belt, Roots has made significant strides toward a working model for local, sustainable foodservice. Cellucci left the students with a recipe for homemade mayonnaise. “It’s really simple - one egg yolk to one cup of oil.” First, Cellucci separated the egg yolk into a bowl and added some secret ingredient. Then, he slowly whisked in canola oil, adding air. The egg and oil began to emulsify, and the familiar mayo texture began to emerge. Cellucci also explained how you can spice up your mayo by infusing oils. “You can infuse oils with anything – herbs, peppers, spices.” For a spicy mayo, you can pour a cup of oil into a jar with a few chili peppers, and let it sit for a few days. The oil will take on the flavor of the chili peppers, and you can use that oil to make your mayonnaise. We were encouraged to try making it at home. Kellyn McNamara is a third-year nutrition and dietetics major, with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at KM654122@wcupa.edu.

Chia from page 12

and sweets, the more likely you are to find yourself with random slumps throughout the day. But the seeds themselves can be found in health food stores like Whole Foods and Fresh Market. They are even making their way into more commercial stores like Wal-Mart, which sells the seeds online. You can also find chia seeds in energy bars, and Bauer says she has seen chia seeds in supermarkets, often added to items like crackers, chips and cereals. Along with all of the great health and nutritional benefits, they are also

extremely affordable. More than enough chia for one month costs less than a dollar a day. There is no need for diet pills or all of those other extra costly health and weight loss materials - all you need is a measuring spoon. You can use as much or as little as you want to achieve your own desired results with these safe and chemical free seeds. Chia seeds are the perfect snack at a great cost that will get you all of the nutrients you need and help weight control. Lauren DiCrecchio is a fifth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in journalism and Spanish. She can be reached at LD658004@ wcupa.edu.

www.nomeatathlete.com

APRIL 23, 2012 Putt-Putt from page 13

When he returned the students to campus, he put on his uniform to work his shift until 7 a.m. “I think residents will get to know the police officers this way,” Cruz said about the community policing event. “That’s really refreshing.” At no cost to them, residents were provided transportation, two games of miniature golf, and eight tokens for arcade games, a soda and a hot dog. “With so many freshmen in the dorms, it’s nice for them to (be provided) transportation to get off-campus,” Cruz said. She led the group in games when one of the two buses broke down in the parking lot of Putt-Putt in Clifton Heights. Several students then played “I spy” while another group sang a mix of songs. Prior to the departure, Irons began his safety talk by holding a red solo cup. Similar to the discussions held by the Health and Wellness staff, he reviewed the ounces in the cup to the serving sizes of a standard drink of wine, beer and liquor. Irons shifted gears, this time to discuss safety in the pedestrian cross-walk. He

advised students that if they are already in the crosswalk to still “determine if you can cross safely” before crossing the street. He pointed out intersections such as High Street and Rosedale Avenue and instructed students to wait for the crossing signals to indicate when to cross. He noted Church Street and University Avenue and caught laughter from the audience when they visualized the heavy foot traffic crossing the street and jaywalking. He warned students that drivers cannot see them when they walk from in between food trucks and parked cars on Church Street. He recalled one night, even as his emergency lights flashed on his patrol car, people still crossed in front of him or other cars that drove by. “I liked how his information involved alcohol and then he talked about more than that,” Petrucci said. She and other McCarthy Hall RAs used the alcohol alternative event as a residence hall social for residents with Public Safety. “It gave me a new perspective when he talked about jaywalking.” Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@ wcupa.edu.

Want to nominate a professor for the “Teacher feature”? E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Check out the Quad online! wcuquad.com

PAGE 17

Entertainment

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

The Ting Tings rock the Troc, mesmerize fans with music By Angela Thomas News Editor

On Friday, April 13, a versatile group of fans lined up outside of the Trocadero Theater in Center C i t y, Philadelphia to see The Ting Tings perform live. One fan held a sign, asking The Ting Tings if she could play the guitar during their 2008 hit single, “Shut Up and Let Me Go.” Interacting with fans outside of the theater, the excitement was apparent. One fan said that they were excited for The Ting Tings to play. “It was my birthday two days ago, so my friends bought my ticket for my birthday,” the fan said. Like that fan, my Ting Tings ticket was also bought for my birthday. While excitingly waiting outside of the theater on a warm and sunny day, we discussed the songs that we hoped The Ting Tings would play. Songs like “That’s Not My Name,” “Soul Killing,” and “Hit Me Up Sonny” were the few named out of many that fans hoped would be played. Sadly, the only thing that disappointed me during the concert was the lack of presence of

my personal favorite, “Soul Killing.” However, the concert as a whole was one of the best that I have seen. While most fans were dancing along to The Ting Tings most popular song off of their debut album, “We Started Nothing,” which was released on May 16, 2008, that sign-holding fan was brought up to the stage to play part of the guitar riff to “Shut Up and Let Me Go.” Before bringing the lucky fan on stage, The Ting Tings teased the audience, playing the beginning part of the song and encouraging fans to clap along before diving hard-core into the song, where loyal fans sang their hearts out to The Ting Ting’s most known tune. This is how their entire set was— encouraging and adoring their fans. The Ting Tings released their second album, “Sounds from Nowheresville” in March of this year. The album, one of their strongest, launched The Ting Tings’s current tour around the United States and the world. Bringing with them a fresh sound that does not stray too far from their

original, The Ting Tings opened up with their song, “Silence,” off of their second album. Lead singer and guitarist, Katie White, hopped onto the stage, encouraging the audience to be silent while Jules de Martino, guitarist, drummer, and vocals for the band, began playing the beginning guitar riffs for their song, “Silence.” Audience members were drawn to White’s seductive, powerful voice as she sang the lyrics “hold, hold your tongue now and let them all listen to your silence.” As the song sped up, fans were blasted into the core of the song, jumping and dancing around to the beat. The whole show was electric from then on, with de Martino and White playing and singing in h a r m o n y under the bright and f l a s h i n g strobe lights. “Thank you Philly for having us,” W h i t e shouted to the audience. “This is the best crowd we

have had on tour.” The Ting Tings played a collection of songs from their debut album and from their new album. The petite White danced and belted out the words to “Hit Me Up Sonny” off of their new album, “Sounds from Nowheresville,” getting down on the stage to shake hands and sing to the fans. De Martino joined in with supporting vocals, casting out adoring fans who were excited to see both talented musicians back in

the music scene. Many jokes were thrown around by fans, and even while standing in line, there was the occasional out-of-tune admirer cranking out the lyrics of “That’s Not My Name,” which by popular opinion is the Ting Ting’s most recognized and entertaining song. However, as fun as the song is to sing, it is even more amazing to listen to White sing it. If there ever was a band that was exhausted after a show, it was probably

The Ting Tings. The band “brought down the house.” Their show was an energetic mix of both the old and the new, bringing together both the young and the old to enjoy this band’s eclectic music and unique style. Overall, The Ting Tings brought a style that was both familiar and unique to a crowd that was mesmerized by the music. Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.

Angela Thomas / The Quad

The Ting Tings performed at the Trocadero Theater on Friday, April 13.


PAGE 18 THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT APRIL 23,2012

View the Schedule on WESS*

www.msnbc.com

“The

Dick Clark, a staple in music and television, died on Wednesday, April 18. Clark, finally o shown in this photo, hosted the popular talent show,“American Bandstand.” singer, D

Interested in writing for The Quad Entertainment section?

*The University reserves the right to cancel courses, change faculty and/or room assignments, modify its calendar, and make adjustments to the course schedule and the availability of the Web registration system. **Tuition and fees are approximate and subject to change without prior notice.

E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu

the aud her Apri The T Center Philadel She w the longe girl who back-up Catarac East Mo 40 single Now, De big wave producin top-40 artists Inglesia Fabolous Her d “The Ni Came released 2012. Ho


THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

APRIL 23, 2012

Tweets of the Week

PAGE 19

Dev mixes pop-rock and hip-hop styles, charms crowd in Center City By Angela Thomas News Editor

“The album is finally out,” popular singer, Dev, shouted to the audience during her April 17 concert at The Trocadero in Center C i t y, Philadelphia. She was known for the longest time as the girl who provided the back-up lyrics for The Catarac’s and Far East Movement’s top 40 single, “Like a G6.” Now, Dev is making big waves for herself, producing and singing top-40 songs with artists like Enrique Ing le sias an d Fabolous. Her debut album, “The Night the Sun Came Up,” was released in March of 2012. However, before

her debut album was released, Dev teased fans with singles like “Killer,” “In the Dark,” and “Bass Down Low,” before releasing her very own anticipated album. The 22-year-old pop sensation performed both songs from the new album as well as performing the song that skyrocked her to fame, “Like a G6.” She mixed things up a bit by including techno and dubstep tracks into her songs, with fans screaming, jumping, dancing, and enjoying themselves. Although her partners during both “Like A G6” (The Cataracs and Far East Movement) and “Naked” which featured Enrique Inglesias, were both absent during the per-

formance, Dev made the song her own and did a fantastic job without either artists. Dev has started a trend in the music field, creating a pathway for young women with a unique style to enter the industry with no shame. Her collective sound can range from hip-hop to pop-rock while providing an indie-edge to her image. During the show, Dev thanked her fans as well as dedicating her song, “Perfect Match,” to her fiancé, Jimmy Gorecki and her baby daughter, Emilia Lovely. Dev brought an energy to the audience that was like no other, laughing and joking with the DJ on stage, dancing

with her back-up singers, and waving, blowing kisses, and shaking hands with her fans. She was endlessly thanking her fans for making her the artist she is today. Dev has three more gigs left in Pennsylvania. She will be performing at York College of Pennsylvania on April 26, at The Crocodile Rock Café in Allentown, Pa. on May 2, and The Community Arts Center in Williamsport, Pa. on May 7. For more information, visit www. devishot.com. Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@wcupa. edu.

Angela Thomas / The Quad

Dev performed at the Trocadero in Philly on April 17.


PAGE 20

THE QUAD

APRIL 23, 2012

Classifieds

VISIT WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE How to Place Classified Advertising in the Quad

By Tyler Mertens & Brian Tracey

To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and click “classifieds.” Then enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 11 a.m. on the Sunday before publication.

8

Child Care Needed Non-smoker sitter needed

in Romansville, PA 1-3 times a month for 3 kids age 4-9, references a must. Reply to roadrunner.valle@aol.com 484-880-7045

Employment & Job Services

Rammy

Lifeguard/ Desk Attentant

Summer Job. Saint Albans SC Newtown Square, PA Must be Currently Certified in : Lifeguarding CPR/ AED First Aid 610-517-0583

Did you know there’s just one Quad issue left this semester? Place your Quad classified ad now at

wcuquad.com

P/T and/or F/T9

Radley Run 1 country CLUB is currently seeking 5 full and part time positions as 4 servers and food runners. Very flexible hours. Must 6 be willing to work weekends and holidays. call 2 610-793-1660 ext. 209

4

6

3

5

2

7 Walk-In 2 3 5Clinic 6 8

9

4

5

7

1

9

3 Services 2 8 4

6

open 365 days.

9 You7don’t8 have4 to wait 3 for1

hours in an ER or until 3 your1own5doctor 6 can2fit you7 in. Doctors Express offers 2 quality 8 urgent 9 7care 17 days5 a week with No Appoint6 ments 4 Needed. 1 3 On-Site 5 9 7 1 Physician, 9 6 X-Ray 2 and 8 Lab.4 Additional services we ofPart Time 3 8 fer:5 Travel 4 Vaccinations, 9 7 2 Camp Sports/ School Physicals, Drug Testing and STD Counselors Difficulty level: Challenge - 12 Have fun this summer Testing. For More Info while working with chil- Call 610-518-1060 or go dren outdoors. Great over- to DoctorsExpressDownnight camps in Pocono ingtown.com. We accept Mtns. of PA need coun- most insurances and offer selors to teach/assist with discounted Self Pay rates. Aquatics, Ropes Course, 8 4 6 7 1 9 3 5 2 Media, Tennis, and more. 9 5 3 2 8 4 6 1 7 Apply online at www.pine1 7 2 3 5 6 8 9 4 forestcamp.com 5 9 7 8 4 3 1 2 6 Solutions to last issue’s puzzles

4

3

1

5

6

2

7

8

9

2

6

4

1

3

5

9

7

8

6

7

3

2

1

8

8

9

5

9

6

4

7

2

9

1

8

7

5

4

2

4

3

6

3

5

1

1

2

8

4

7

3

6

7

6

9

3

8

5

1


APRIL 23, 2012

The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

PAGE 21

Diversions

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @THEQUADWCU

The Quad SuDoKu Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square. Solutions to the puzzles on this page will be printed in the next issue of The Quad.

7

2

8

5

6

9

1

3

4

3

5

6

1

2

4

9

7

8

9

1

4

5

2

6

8

4

1

6

3

7

8

9

2

3

8

4

5

1

1

2

3

9

4

7

9

7

7

5

8

4

3

6

9

8

5

3

6

1

7

2

6

3

5

4

8

2

7

2

8

6

1

9

4

5

5

2

9

7

6

1

3

Across

1 __ Tomé and Príncipe 4 Cap on spending, say 9 Norwegian Sea arm 14 Footed vase 15 Habituate 16 Friend of Fido 17 Agt.’s cut 18 Grouchy Muppet 19 The other side 20 The smile on an email happy face 23 Director Reiner 24 Jazz singer Anita 25 Vatican City is one 27 Split end in a uniform 32 Air-conditioned 33 Tut’s cousin? 34 Andrea __: ill-fated vessel 36 88 or 98 automaker 37 Barrier-breaking noise 40 “Pygmalion” playwright 43 Reeves of “Speed” 44 Palindromic Altar 47 Bridge holding such as ace-queen 50 Surprises 52 More decrepit 54 Wuss

55 Topsy’s playmate in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” 56 Exalted group leader, facetiously 61 __ cotta 63 Household cleanser 64 Alternate identity letters 65 Encouraging cry, such as the one formed by the ends of 20-, 37-, and 56-Across 66 Trumpet sound 67 __ canto: singing style 68 Leno and Letterman, e.g. 69 Artist Grant Wood, by birth 70 Bermuda hrs.

Down

1 Provide for, as a dependent 2 Teen haunts 3 According to plan 4 Ponce de __ 5 R&D site 6 A whole lot 7 “Dies __”: Latin hymn 8 Short and sweet 9 Mural on wet plaster 10 Comedian Lovitz 11 From one end to the other

© 2012 Tribune Media Services

12 Took out 13 Ditches where creeks once were 21 A patch may cover one 22 Co. designation 26 Rise up dramatically 28 Courtroom oath 29 Otto __ Bismarck 30 The Phantom of the Opera 31 Puts through a food press 35 Blind as __ 37 Babe Ruth’s sultanate? 38 “I’m __ roll!” 39 Wilder’s “__ Town” 40 Final race leg 41 Bum’s rush 42 Supergiant in Scorpius 44 Woodcutter who stole from thieves 45 New versions of old films 46 Paving material 48 Perfectos, e.g. 49 Suffix with profit 51 Pair 53 Jewish holy man 57 __ contendere: court plea 58 Shootout shout 59 Lawyer’s aide 60 Plow pullers 62 Inactive mil. status

The TV Crossword

Difficulty level: Challenge - 11 43 Drug that causes hallucina-

ACROSS

1 Actress __ Daly 5 Network for Diane Sawyer 8 Word in some Hope/Crosby titles 9 Bullwinkle, for one 12 Sightseeing trips 13 Long-running primetime serial about the Ewing family 14 Youngest on “The Cosby Show” 15 “Promised __”; Gerald McRaney drama series 16 Whitney and McKinley: abbr. 18 Dined 19 Adams and Ameche 20 Pitcher 21 Robe for Indira Gandhi

tions, for short 44 Sunbathes

DOWN

7

2

8

5

6

3

5

6

1

2

9

1

4

5

2

6

8

4

6

8

3

7

9

1

1

7

2

9

3

5

4

3

9

7

2

4

8

6

23 “X-Men: First __” 24 Arden and Plumb 25 Blockhead 26 Threaded fastener 28 Comedian Martha __ 29 Dallas hoopsters, for short 30 “__ the Clock” 32 Record speed letters 35 Take advantage of 36 Shredded cabbage dish 37 “__ dead people”; Cole’s line in “The Sixth Sense” 38 Character in “Winnie the Pooh” 40 “__ Attraction”; Glenn Close film 41 “Enemy of the __”; movie for Will Smith and Jon Voight 42 Run __; go wild

7

4

1

8

5

3

9

1 Rainbow __; food and game fish 2 Game show hosted by Chris Harrison 3 __ a soul; no one 1 3 and 4 Bradley 49 Sullivan 6 home 2 5 is his castle” 58 “__ 9 7 8 64 Courageous 75 Potter’s 3 8 title 2 on “M*A*S*H”: 3 5abbr. 6 9 10 6 Actor 4 1 on7 “Law & Order” 11.Actor Rob __ 1 8 9 6 12 Refrain syllable 7 2 4 1 13 Rather or Aykroyd 2 7 5 3 15 “__ & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” 17 Yrbk. section 19 “The Price Is Right” host 20 __ May Clampett 22 5th and Pennsylvania: abbr. 23 Winter garment 25 “Win, Lose or __” 26 Dallas school, for short 27 Throws 30 Lose vital fluid 31 “A Flea in Her __”; movie for Rex Harrison and Rosemary Harris 33 Mountaintops 34 Diner owner on “Alice” 36 Friday and Bilko: abbr. 37 “__ Rock”; Simon & Garfunkel hit 39 “For Me and My __”; Judy Garland film 40 “My Big __ Greek Wedding”

© Philip A. T


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 22

Women’s golf finish 2nd, men look for rebound performance By Justin Park Special to The Quad The West Chester University women’s golf team continues their great season with another strong performance earlier in the month at the Dr. Edwin Cottrell Invitational where they finished in second place. Despite the difficult weather, the team was able to keep focus and put forth a great performance, while pleasing head coach Doug Hendricks. “Overall, I’m happy to finish in second place for the Dr. Edwin B. Cottrell event. I consider it a building block to finish first in the near future,” Hendricks said. “We played in very challenging conditions so it was a good test for the mental side of the game.”

Gabby Couture, a freshman, scored an 87 and finished second overall at the event. “Gabby has had a great first year,” Hendricks said. “She is very competitive and has a strong desire to improve her game.” The outing just added to a great season for the golfers as they continue to improve. Coach Hendricks feels the team is heading in the right direction. “Overall, I’m happy with our progress,” Hendricks said. “It takes time and a real commitment to become a complete golfer. It’s a learning process, especially playing tournament golf. Focusing and making good decisions for 18 holes is a challenge for any golfer.” “I believe each player is starting to understand their strengths and weaknesses.

I’m excited that the entire team has plenty of talent and can continue to improve in the future.” With a two week break from tournaments, the team had time to prepare for the next tournament at the Navy Invitational in Annapolis, Maryland. “We are the defending champions of this event, so we are focusing hard on our short game the last couple of weeks,” Hendricks said. “I’m hoping for a real team effort this weekend. It’s a real honor to play in this event.” West Chester University’s men’s golf team will be heading out to Indiana (Pa.), to play in the Cecil Spadafora Invitational. The team will be looking to improve on a dissatisfying performance earlier in the month at the Dr. Edwin B.

Cottrell Invitational where they finished fifth of six teams. Head Coach Harry Hammond was “disappointed” with the teams overall performance, but believes the weather could have played a major factor. “The weather certainly wasn’t the best on either day and it did have its effect with all of the players,” Hammond said. “However, West Chester players failed to adjust to the conditions during their play and their scores reflected that lack of adjustment.” Understanding that the weather will continue to challenge the golfers, Hammond knows his players must adjust. “Spring golf requires players to play in weather conditions that add to this difficult game,” Hammond

said. “Mental toughness is important for each of them to handle the weather and manage their game on the course.” Despite the team’s overall struggles, WCU players Austin Mann and Connor Lefever finished tied for seventh individually, and continue to improve their game. The Cottrell Inivitational was held at Penn Oaks Golf Club, a course familiar to WCU golfers. However, the players seemed to have struggled in the short game, an area coach Hammond has been trying to improve on for the upcoming Cecil Spadafora Invitational. “The focus has been on all facets of the short game and putting. With the players challenged to complete the nine stations it set up for them each day,” Hammond

said. “As I watched their play at the Dr. Ed Cottrell Invitational, it was obvious to me that this area of the game was where we needed to work.” Even with their struggles in the last two tournaments, the team still feels they are headed in the right direction. “Golf challenges the player every day,” Hammond said. “The challenge to the team is to have four good scores each day of a tournament round. The team has done some very good things over the past season, and finishing strong at the next two tournaments should ensure an invitation to the NCAA Regional tournament being held in Hershey, Pa.” Justin Park is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at JP727721@wcupa.edu.

Surging Penguins extend series with two straight victories By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer Coming off a 2-0 lead in the series, the Flyers were poised to wreck the Penguins’ chances at a playoff run when they won a third game in a row to a score of 8-4. This game was not without problems, as the bad blood between the two teams continued to boil. The game was full of penalties and fights, and was so bad during the first period that the game was delayed quite a bit. After the game, NHL Senior Vice President of Player Safety Brendan Shanahan assessed the plays and gave both Penguins’ Arron Asham and James Neal game suspensions. Asham got a four game suspension after he crossed-checked Flyer Brayden Schenn to the ice and then hit him in the back of the neck. It was

this offense that got the Flyers’ organization and fans fired up, and really showed the Penguins’ lack of discipline in the series. The Penguins’ undisci-

plined playing style also showed later in the game when Neal charged at Flyers’ forward Claude Giroux, which gave him a one game suspension.

The Flyers managed to score eight goals on MarcAndre Fleury again after a similar goal count in game 2, whereas the Flyers’ goaltender Ilya

www.bleacherreport.com

Adam Kennedy tries to jam the puck past Ilya Bryzgalov while Sean Couturiere tries to push him away.

Bryzgalov only let in four pucks. Given the absence of Neal and Asham along with a 3-0 lead in the best of seven series, the Flyers were confident that they were going to sweep the Penguins in game 4. However, the Penguins were not going down without a fight as they managed to beat the Flyers for the first time in the series by 10-3. The game had clearly not gone as the Flyers had planned, and the blow was especially harsh due to this upset having occurred on the Flyers’ home ice. The first period resulted in a 4-3 lead for the Penguins. With 40 minutes left in the game, the Flyers thought they could cut this lead down and take back the game on their home ice. When the second period began, the Penguins showed their dominance as they scored five times in the

second period. The Flyers could not get a goal past Fleury, who was starting to look like his old self again. In the second period, the Flyers took nine penalties, including a game misconduct for Zac Rinaldo. This gave the Penguins ample opportunities to score, which they did, and even led to Bryzgalov being pulled from his post so back up goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky could take over. This goalie switch didn’t seem to help, as the Penguins were able to score their 10th goal early in the third. The Flyers were able to keep the Penguins from scoring again, but were unable to recover as they lost the game 10-3. The Flyers had the chance to redeem themselves by winning it See FLYERS page 27


PAGE 23

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 23, 2012

LAX in three-way tie for second in PSAC standings By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The Golden Rams lacrosse team celebrated a climactic 15-12 victory over No. 1 LeMoyne, followed by a 12-9 loss to rival No. 10 Lock Haven, and a win over Indiana (Pa.) in three home games at Vonnie Gros Field this week. West Chester’s (12-2, 8-2 PSAC) non-league triumph over previously undefeated LeMoyne (13-1, 10-0) on Monday served as head coach Ginny Martino’s record-breaking 218th win, making her the winningest coach in the league. “It felt really great to break the old record set by another PSAC conference coach,” Martino said. “But, it truly won’t sink in until after the season is over. Right now, I am really focusing on helping my players fulfill their own

dreams of winning a conference and National Championship.” Tori Dugan had an impressive week, scoring four goals on Monday, two of which pushed the Rams up 15-12 when the score was tied with eight minutes remaining in play. Erin Oczkowski registered a hat trick, Lauren Glassey put up two unassisted goals, and Jacki Patterson and Brittany Long each notched a tally as well. The Golden Rams took an early 8-6 lead in the first half, which was eliminated by a four goal run from the Dolphins, two from Brenna Bauer and two from Brittany Brigandi, to take a 10-8 advantage. Brigandi finished with a game-high five goals. Dugan and MacKenzie O’Keefe knotted the score with a goal each, while Jamie Dolan put the Rams in front again, 11-10, with

an unassisted tally at 14:23. Immediately after LeMoyne’s Kathleen Conese equalized the score, Theresa Giunta responded notching another tally, when Brigandi tied the game for the sixth time, 12-12. Dugan scored two of the three final goals of the game to solidify the score at 15-12. Jess Henderson, who had several impressive saves, finished with 12. LeMoyne’s Kelly Fucillo registered 13 saves in the loss. “The LeMoyne game was definitely the biggest game of my college career up to this point,” Henderson said. “They came in undefeated as well as being the No. 1 team in the country; that’s a lot of pressure.” Coach Martino’s 218th win surpassed former Millersville head coach Barb Waltman’s long-

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Erin Oczkowski splits the Lock Haven defenders. She had one goal in the game, but had nine goals in the last three games.

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Tori Dugan leaps to try to intercept the goal. She had a hat trick in the game. standing record, which elicited a proud response from her team. “They really surprised me by dumping a bucket of ice water on me after the big win,” Martino said. “What really surprised me even more was that the cooler was still full of water at the end of the game. It must have been 95 degrees on the turf during that game and I would have thought they would have drank all the water by the end.” While the team morale reached its peak on Monday afternoon, the Friday evening game dampened the mood with a 12-9 loss against rival Lock Haven. “Lock Haven, of course will be a huge game,” Patterson said before the contest. “They are having a rough season right now with four losses, and one loss in the conference… but we cannot underestimate anyone. They wait

their entire season to play us because we knocked them out of the playoffs last year.” With an exciting comefrom-behind victory, the Lady Eagles did not disappoint. The loss dropped West Chester to a three-way tie for second place, along with Gannon and Mercyhurst. Lock Haven (10-4, 8-1) gained the first place slot with the victory. The outcome marked the fifth consecutive time for the two schools that the home team has lost the game in a matchup. By halftime, the Golden Rams took an 8-6 advantage with their first three goals within the first six minutes. Lock Haven answered to tie the score halfway through the first, but the Rams ended the half with three more goals from O’Keefe and Oczkowski. Dugan registered a hat trick and Nicole Pyle

notched back-to-back goals in the first half to contribute to the early lead. The Rams only broke through Lock Haven’s defense for one more goal in the second, while the Lady Eagles added seven more to take the game, 12-9. After facing a high and low against two tough teams, the Golden Rams regained their composure against Indiana (Pa.) (10-5) at a home game on Saturday afternoon for Senior Day. The match, which was moved to 1 p.m. due to impending inclement weather, ended in a 23-8 triumph for the Golden Rams. Dugan scored six goals for the Rams, Oczkowski put up five, and Patterson and Stacey Pellechia each posted hat tricks. West Chester took another early lead with nine unanswered goals in the first half, taking an 18-3 lead into the second and never looking back. Henderson made 10 saves in the win for the Golden Rams. Coming off an exciting few games, coach Martino said they look forward to the team’s successful future. “I think that win on Monday gave us the confidence we needed in order to play the tough teams we have coming up and be successful,” Martino said. “We hit our stride right at the perfect time. We have really come together as a team and are playing the best lacrosse of our season so far. Only good things can happen when you are confident and focused.” West Chester will take on C.W. Post on Tuesday at 4 p.m. for their final home game of the regular season, followed by a 4 p.m. away game on Thursday at Kutztown. Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@ wcupa.edu.


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 24


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 25

WCU wins Bile Giles Invitational, splits four with Kutztown By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor The Golden Rams baseball team rebounded nicely from their rough week last week by earning their fifth straight Bill Giles Invitational championship, and then going on to split four games with Kutztown. On Tuesday, the Golden Rams traveled to Citizen’s Bank Park to play Wilmington University in the championship game of the Invitational. Strong pitching and a power surge from the bottom of the lineup helped lead West Chester to a 5-2 win. West Chester got a tremendous outing from senior Jordan Lehman, who went five strong innings without allowing a hit, and walked just one Wilmington batter. The excitement of pitching at Citizen’s Bank Park certainly did not phase the hard throwing righty. “Getting on the same mound as the Phillies is unexplainable. The emotions I had were hard to keep in and saying feeling like a kid in a candy store isn’t even close. As a pitcher I was in the moment but I wanted to make sure I held my emotions and performed for my team.”

Lehman, who worked quickly in his five innings, attacked hitters early in the count and did not let himself fall behind too often. “Attacking hitters is something we pride ourselves on at WCU. First pitch strikes are crucial in baseball and I was able to get a lot of those,” Lehman said. He was able to throw all of his pitches for strikes. Lehman had exceptional command of his whole arsenal as he stymied the Wilmington offense. “I had both my fastball and slider, and I have a lot of confidence in both,” Lehman said. “My slider was definitely the best it has been all year and with control of my fastball, everything worked well together.” The WCU bullpen backed Lehman up after he left, allowing just two runs on two hits while striking out four in the final four innings. Lehman and the rest of the staff also got some help from the bats, as West Chester touched Wilmington for five runs on nine hits. The Rams jumped to an early lead in the second inning when Matt Baer and

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Jordan Lehman throws five no-hit innings in his start at Citizen’s Bank Park for the Bill Giles Invitational final.

Josh Heyne had back to back RBI singles. In his next at bat in the fourth, Baer wasted no time getting West Chester on the board again. He took a first pitch fastball and belted it over the ten-foot fence in left center field and into the fifth row. It was Baer’s fifth home run of the year, second to Joe Wendle’s nine, and it proved to be the winning run. Two batters later, West Chester struck again when catcher Reid Pulford crushed a hanging curve ball to almost the exact same spot. The line drive home run landed in the flower bed in straightaway left field and gave the Rams a 5-2 lead. “It was surreal to hit a home run at Citizen’s Bank Park, I barely knew how to react as I watched the ball go over the fence, and when I was rounding the bases, all I could do was smile like a little kid,” Pulford said. West Chester would add one more in the sixth when an errant pickoff throw from the catcher sailed into left field and allowed Josh Heyne to coast home with West Chester’s fifth run. The victory gave the Rams their fifth consecutive Bill Giles Invitational title and their ninth in the 12 years of the tournament’s existence. Baer finished the day 2-for-4 with a homer and two RBI and Pulford was 2-for-3 with the home run and a walk. The Rams, however, had little time to reflect on their tournament victory as they picked right back up with conference play on Friday with a doubleheader at home against Kutztown. The Rams won the first game 5-1 behind Joe Gunkel who went the distance, allowing just the one run on five hits while punching out three. Once again, the Rams offense was led by the scorching hot Matt Baer,

who delivered his second home run in as many days in the first inning, this time a three-run bomb to left. Baer’s home run was the fifth run in the first inning, as it was preceded by an RBI single from Chris Pula and a sacrifice fly from Justin Lamborne. West Chester’s five runs in the first were all they needed for the game, as they cruised to defeat Kutztown in game one, winning consecutive games for the first time since April 6. They were not as fortunate in the second game. Kutztown bounced back with a tremendous offensive output, and the Rams’ bats fell silent en route to an 8-0 loss. The Rams managed just two hits, both of them from leadoff hitter Mike Raimo. Fred Breidenbach took the mound for West Chester and could not find a groove as he gave up three runs in the third inning and a grand slam in the fourth. Matt McCallister pitched the remaining three innings, allowing just one unearned run, but the Rams were unable to mount a comeback. The split was the fourth consecutive doubleheader the Rams did not sweep after sweeping the previous seven before that. They would make it the fifth consecutive time on Saturday when they split with Kutztown again, this time on the road. The Rams, after stringing together consecutive wins earlier in the week, found themselves with two consecutive losses when they dropped game one 7-6. Pula went 2-for-4 with two doubles, a run scored and three RBI, and Jordan Wlodarczyk and Lamborn both added a hit and an RBI apiece. The Rams sixth and final run came from Baer, his sixth RBI in the last four games. Dave Stieg did not pitch

well, allowing six runs on eight hits in five innings, but did not earn a decision since the game was tied at six when he departed. After failing to score in the top of the seventh, West Chester sent Conor Kerins out for his second inning of relief. Kerins struck out the first batter, but then a walk and single put the winning run on base for KU with one out. West Chester countered with the side-winding righty Kyle Weary, who gave up a hit, but the runner was thrown out at the plate for out number two. Kutztown sent up a pinch hitter with two on and two out and he came through with an RBI single, giving Kutztown the 7-6 walk-off win. Facing a season series loss to a conference foe, the Rams rebounded in the second game and settled for the split. Lehman toed the rubber for the Golden Rams, and put together yet another strong outing. He threw a complete game, and surrendered just three runs (two

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Matt Baer, whose recent power surge has given him three homers in four games, tosses the ball back into the infield.

earned). He also struck out five and walked just one batter. The offense backed Lehman up again, as they touched Wilmington for five runs. The Rams scored three runs in the second inning, outing them ahead for good. Matt Baer clubbed his third home run of the week, a two run shot in the second to open scoring. Baer’s power surge moved him up to seven homers for the year and 33 RBI, both second on the team behind Wendle. Pula also continued his recent tear, doubling home Wendle in the third. In the four games against Kutztown, Pula was 4-for-11 with five RBI. The Rams also got RBI singles from Lamborn (2-for-3), and Pulford (1-for1). The win improved the Rams to 13-7 in the conference and 29-8 overall. They have just four games with Bloomsburg next week before they play their final regular game against University of the Sciences on April 30. Then they are off to Butler, Pa., on May 2 to begin the 2012 PSAC Tournmanet. Head coach Jad Prachniak is not concerned with the recent play of his team. In fact he is certain they are on the right track. “The league is very competitive, so we have to play solid in all areas of the game in order to win both ends of a double header,” Prachniak said. “We have not been as conistent lately, but you also have to give credit to the opposition at times, we have played some good teams who have played well. I have been encouraged by the way we are playing this week and hopefully we can build on that moving forward.” Kenny Ayres is a second-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@wcupa. edu.


PAGE 26

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 23, 2012

WCU Softball clinches PSAC playoff berth with sweep By Riley Wallace Staff Writer The Lady Rams swept both series the final week of the regular season, taking two from the University of Sciences (16-22) by a combined score of 15-3, and clinching a berth in the PSAC Tournament by sweeping ESU by scores of 19-4 in game one and 4-1 in game two. In the opening game against the Devils, West Chester (28-23, 7-9) wasted no time in getting out in front as they scored four runs in the top of the first. They followed that with four more in the second, one in the third, and two in the fourth, as they cruised to an easy 11-1 victory. Second basemen Kim Begley and designated hitter Kelly Anderson led the offense for the Rams. Begley had three hits in four at-bats, and Anderson went 2-for-3.

The two combined to score four runs, steal three bases, and knock in six RBIs. Shortstop Jessica Norris also went 2-for-2 with two runs scored. Devon Utterback (14-11) pitched a five inning complete game allowing just one run off four hits while striking out two and walking one. The nightcap was much more competitive as the ladies fell behind in the first, but scored three in the second to take a commanding 3-1 lead. The Devils crept to within one in the sixth, but West Chester added an insurance run in the top of the seventh to win 4-2. Leadoff hitter Charlotte Conaway led the way for the Golden Rams, going 1-for-2 with a triple and run scored to go along with two walks. Norris went 1-for-3 with a RBI and a stolen base. The Rams really took advantage of their base runners as

they stole a total of five bases despite being caught stealing only twice. Kim Murl (14-9) picked up the win, pitching 5.2 innings, allowing two runs off seven hits and striking out eight while walking one. Kate Skokowski relieved Murl in the fifth and shut down the Devils the rest of the way. West Chester stayed hot as they visited the Warriors of East Stroudsburg (12-29, 5-11) for a doubleheader Friday afternoon. In the opener, it was all about the Rams offense. They scored two in the first, four in the third, five in the fourth, and eight in the sixth to finish off the Warriors, 19-4. With both teams battling for a playoff spot, the Lady Rams were the ones who set the tone for day as three different Rams homered in the game. Catcher Nicole Cruts, first

Jess Guzzardo/ Staff Photographer

The Rams make the final out in their game against East Stroudsburg. West Chester won the game by a score of 19-4.

Jess Guzzardo/ Staff Photographer

Jillian Murray waits for the shortstop’s throw to first base with the ESU baserunner running hard up the line. basemen Jillian Murray, and designated hitter Abby Block each had two-run dingers. Anderson and Cruts each went 3-for-5 with a double and three RBIs to complement the homers. The offense was very efficient as they left only six runners on base off 18 hits. Utterback pitched another complete game going the full six innings, allowing four runs off four hits, and striking out three while walking another three. The second and final game of the regular season for the Rams was very competitive and came down to the very end. West Chester pulled ahead with a run in the fourth, but ESU tied it up with one of their own in the sixth. In the top of the seventh, the ladies scored the three deciding runs off Conaway’s two-run triple and Norris’s squeeze play to go on to win 4-1 and clinch a playoff spot. Norris was the only Golden Ram to record two hits, going 2-for-4 with a double and an RBI. Jessica Russ went 1-for-2 with a run scored and a walk. Utterback started her second

straight game of the day but only pitched 2.1 innings before being relieved by Skokowski in the third. Utterback gave up no runs off five hits and struck out one. Skokowski (7-7) came in and finished the final 4.2 innings allowing only the single run off two hits while striking out three. Having secured a playoff spot in the upcoming PSAC Tournament, which begins Wednesday, the Rams will now sit and wait to see who they play. With Millersville and Shippensburg splitting the doubleheader this past weekend, it looks as though West Chester will finish tied for second in the PSAC East division with

S h i p p e n s b u r g . Shippensburg, though, holds the tiebreaker over the Golden Rams so they will receive the third and final seed in the East division. This means that West Chester will have to face two teams from the Central and West divisions in a three team double elimination tournament. The Golden Rams will be paired with either IUP or Bloomsburg from the Central division, and either California or Gannon out of the West division. All roads seem to be pointing towards number two ranked Kutztown who went 15-1 in the PSAC and 43-2 overall. Riley Wallace is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at RW718681@wcupa.edu.

The Quad would like to make a correction:

division, and the tiebreaker left WCU out of the playoffs. This information was not available at the time of publishing and we apologize for the misleading information. we would also like to congratulate the men’s tennis team for a season well played, and wish them the best for next year’s campaign.

In last week’s issue, it was reported that the West Chester University men’s tennis team earned a spot in the PSAC post-season. Unfortunately, this is not the case. There was apparently a three way tie for fourth place in the


APRIL 23, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

West Chester gymnastics finishes strong with solid effort at USAG Nationals By Emily Seigel Staff Writer The West Chester University Women’s Gymnastics team wrapped up their season by sending five gymnasts to the USAG Division II Collegiate Nationals in Bridgeport, Conn. on April 12. On the first day of competition, junior Kaley LaFleur earned second All-America honors with a seventhplace finish on the balance beam. LaFleur scored a 9.675 on the beam, tying Texas Women’s University competitor Bethany Larimer, and earning an alternate spot for the event finals. Freshman Stephanie Schuler placed ninth in

the all-around with a 37.325. She scored a 9.5 on the uneven bars, a 9.525 on the beam, and a 9.35 on the floor exercise. Sophomore

Emily Seigel completed a successful bar routine with a score of 9.425, followed by a 9.35 on the beam. Senior Alli Aquila scored a 9.3 on

www.wcupagoldenrams.com

West Chester performed well at USAG Nationals, with five gymnasts competing in events.

the bars and a 9.45 on the vault. Junior Melissa Voskian scored a 9.475 on the vault to place 27th overall. The Lady Rams completed a successful season thanks to head coach Barbara Cordova, and assistant coach Sherri Missimer. Coach Cordova was recently named the 2012 ECAC coach of the year and has worked extremely hard to develop the West Chester women’s gymnastics team into becoming a dominant force amongst the Division II schools. Emily Seigel is a second-year student majoring in early childhood education. She can be reached at ES734640@ wcupa.edu.

PAGE 27

Flyers from page 22 during game 5 in Pittsburgh on Friday night, but again the Penguins were going to fight them off. Of the series, this was the game that actually looked like a playoff series game. It also appeared that the Penguins finally remembered that they were playing for a chance to go for the Stanley Cup. Poor goaltending has been a problem for both sides in the past four games, which is evident by the high scores, an uncommon occurrance for playoff games. In game 5, Fleury seemed to have regained his confidence in the net, which led the Penguins to a second victory of 3-2, making the series score a bit more competitive at 3-2 in favor of the Flyers. The teams appeared to

be playing at even strength in game 5, but the Flyers were sluggish in the third, where they needed to be powerful to tie the game at 3-3. However, they were unable to do so having been shut down by the Penguins defense team, which led the Penguins to another win and hopes for a comeback. The series went to game 6 back in Philadelphia on Sunday night. The Penguins were hoping to push a game seven with another win, and the Flyers had hopes that they could finally defeat the Penguins to move onto round two of the playoffs. *Note- Game six was played after this article went to press. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@ wcupa.edu.

Looking for an apartment for next year? We still have...

Check our website for NEW deals!!

(610) 696-0953

• 1, 2, 3 and 4 bedrooms left!! • Granite countertops • Spacious living areas • Parking! • Washer/dryers, dishwashers

www.zukinrealtyinc.com

121 E. Gay St.


PAGE 28 The Phillies are off to a slow start this season. Just fifteen games in, they find themselves at 7-8 and in last place in the East. The pitching is as good as promised, with the staff posting an ERA of 2.41, second best in the majors. The problem is the offense. Through the first fifteen games the Phillies have scored just 42 runs, worse than any other team in the majors aside from the Pittsburgh Pirates.

THE QUAD SPORTS

Sports

APRIL 23, 2012

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Rams improve to 12-2, now tied for 2nd in PSAC East Page- 23

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer


Quad 102-10