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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. NOVEMBER 14, 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 1 . I S S U E 8

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

OP-ED

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FEATURES

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ENT

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Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

SPORTS

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THE QUAD

Department of Public Safety preserves a safe campus for students By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-In-Chief Practicum Writer Each night students living on-campus use their Ram E-card as swipe access for entry into their residence hall. Accustomed to the Department of Public Safety [DPS] security officers, residents flash their ID cards with their color coordinated sticker indicating they reside in the residence hall. Lt. Ray Stevenson, Assistant Director Residence Hall Security division of DPS, said the role of security oncampus permits students and guests at the university to feel “safe and secure” anywhere on-campus and to “provide them with a safe environment” allocated for concentration on academics. Three components of safety measures, including foot patrol, bike patrol and security officers stationed in residence halls, make an effort to maintain a safe learning environment. “This form of [bike] patrol allows the officers to be approached more readily by the general public and drastically reduces response time by allowing officers to ride in sectors otherwise inaccessible to cars,” the DPS manual states. Stevenson said security officers making rounds in residence halls keeps them “visible and being proactive.” DPS police and security officers, proactive in a way that Stevenson aims, “if I can prevent something from occurring,” this can maintain a safe campus environment. The duties of the security division have expanded since the program began in 1985, according to the manual, to include: patrolling the south campus parking lots and the new housing complex at the south campus, monitoring the entrance to certain academic buildings, providing

security coverage for the Graduate Business Center and for College Arms property. With no security officer in the residence of University Hall, the security protection relies mostly on a night-watch duty. The first affiliated housing complex on-campus “wanted to create a hall monitor-like position.” Stevenson said the student held night watch position has “no authority” and would have to call in to DPS dispatcher for a responder to any incident. Stevenson felt the night watch is more centered on service aspects than security aspects. Describing the position to be like customer service, as the student being the customer, Stevenson said residents could go to the front desk for information. The night watch personnel acts as security as they check IDs and comply with keeping a log of residents signing in guests. A basic training to the night-watch staff, provided by Stevenson, reviews “basic front desk procedures” and services provided by DPS. Stevenson said he informs the employees of people “piggy-backing” into the residence, what to do if they suspect someone is under the influence, and “how to deal with irate/confrontational students.” The night-watch training is an hour-long session. “There has been no observed frequency or severity of incidents over the past eight years in University Hall that necessitated a change of security operations in the residence,” Mike Selby, University Student Housing [USH] Director of Housing, said in an e-mail. He said DPS has “not formally requested” the addition of a security officer in University Hall. USH views are similar to DPS

and Student Health Services as Selby said, “Student safety is our number one priority.” “We’ve always been prepared to (station) security there,” Stevenson said confidently in regards to University Hall. The decision to have the “student facilitated nightwatch” Selby said in a phone interview, had been developed previously by the private management company responsible for the construction and initial operation of University Hall. Construction of the residence began in 2003, and opened in fall 2004. The current commit-

tee said they have not seen the number of incidents increase and they are “fairly happy” with the 10 p.m. – 2 a.m. night-watch shift. A WCU student works at the front desk as a desk assistant until 10 p.m. as the night-watch begins. USH has changed the old shift from 11 p.m. – 3 a.m., after noticing the most “foot traffic” during the hours of 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Selby said the night-watch “seems to be working well for us” as the residence hall tends to remain a quiet building. University Hall is less than half the size of the two newest affiliated housing residence halls. “Security concerns are reviewed

News NOVEMBER 14, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Selby said the affiliated housing would have an “incredible amount of foot traffic” in and out of the building with their guests. Allegheny houses 636 residents, while Brandywine houses 622 residents. With a “strong working relationship” with DPS, the USH committee proceeded to have DPS security officers stationed in Allegheny and Brandywine Halls. Selby said the committee members wanted an authority “guarding” the residence and to ensure that anyone who should not be in the building could not access the residence at night. The safety factors mirror considerations of traditional housing having security officers. “Security officers are responsible for active patrol of the residence halls and grounds . . . they are stationed at the entrances to all residence halls during periods of occupancy between 8 p.m. and 4 a.m. in order to screen all persons wishing to gain [entry to the building]. They also conduct periodic floor checks during their http://www.wcupa.edu/dps/ assigned duty shifts,” the DPS Manual states. Stevenson would like to responsible for providing security coverage to the af- have security 24 hours; filiated housing in fall 2009. however the budget is “not Selby reports to the Ex- feasible now.” In January ecutive Director, WCU Foun- 2005 the ID card swipe acdation/ University Student cess machine installed alHousing (USH), LLC., in lowed for the security shift which all decisions are made. to change from previous 12 Their committee discusses and 10-hour shifts to the curfactors such as how people rent eight-hour shift. Using can gain entry to the building log visitations, DPS officials and who will be occupying the noticed “high concentration rooms. First-year students, of students” entering and transfers and upperclass- leaving their residence halls men can reside in Allegheny from 11 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. and Brandywine. Selby said during Thursday, Friday and the needs are different from Saturday nights. In general, the residents “living away foot traffic in residence halls from home for the first time” occurs from 8 p.m. to midas opposed to the needs night. DPS works “around the of the returning students. University Hall is an up- clock” with police officers perclassmen only residence. patrolling “24/7” during the yearly,” Selby said in an email. “Changes will be made if warranted.” He added that the night-watch position has given employment to more than 50 WCU students. Stevenson would like to see a security officer in the residence, which would uniform this across campus. DPS officers make rounds in University Hall with the “only difference” of no security officers stationed at the front desk. Stevenson said USH “inquired” about having the security presence to “protect” in Alleghany and Brandywine Halls. According to the DPS manual, the security division became

year. Students have a “misconception” that DPS employees have off Stevenson said. During the December to January winter break and summertime, DPS security works on a “skeleton staff.” Stevenson said during the summer, generally only two residence halls are open with security stationed from 8 p.m. to 4 a.m. This can depend on who is “occupying” the residence hall. Over the summer, there are resident assistants, students taking summer classes, orientation leaders, and various camps, among others. DPS security returns to a full staff as students return for the start of the academic year. DPS gets “intel” from security officers in residence halls. “Students feel more comfortable” reporting to the visible and perpetually present security division, Stevenson said. Students living in residence halls see a security officer every night, Stevenson said over time students become comfortable to make a report and explains “why we have security and police officers do rounds.” There’s a “two-fold” reason for security in the library. First, the security officer can ensure students are following “policies and procedures” of the library and university. Secondly, the security officer’s existence calls for students to “think twice” about their actions. A number of thefts from the library were reported during the previous academic year. Training includes having the security officers complete 40 hours of “on-sight training” during which they are stationed with an experienced security officer, sitting in each residence hall. Other areas of training include: CPR and first aid, drug identification training,

See SAFETY page 5


NOVEMBER 14,

2011

THE QUAD

Recreation Center Committe discusses additions, suggestions for center By Angela Thomas News Editor

be a 40-foot high wall for students to rock climb on. The wall will feature both rough and smooth surfaces, and a bouldering section. “We hope to get a lot of use out of it,” Domenick said. There will be a variety of skill levels for students to engage in the rock climbing wall. There will be holders every square foot and the hand holds will be color coordinated according to skill. One student suggested making the hand holders purple, gold, and white

els would look like. DeVestern described the wall as being “very Zen-like.” On Nov. 10, 2011, the The issue regarding Recreation Center Comthe security of belongmittee held its last meetings in the cubby-holes ing for the semester. Repwas brought up again. resentatives from Student Students at the meeting Government Association, brought up the idea of havResident Hall Association, ing a key rental system for Student Activities Council, those who want to lock up Black Student Union, and their belongings in the cubby various Greek organizations holes. Cubby holes will be were present for the meetlocated near the fitness cening to discuss the progress ter. Students can put their on the Recreation Center. belongings inside of them; “We’re a bit off schedule, however, the cubby but we are going holes will not be to take a step back in direct eyesight and see what we of students who need to do,” Steve are working out. Domenick, Project One representaManager, Departtive from RHA ment of Facilities suggested that Design and Conthe cubby holes at struction said.“We least have doors still plan for the on them to preopening to be in vent anyone from the fall of 2012.” stealing items. “It As students walk would be more by, they will begin noticeable to see to notice the rapid someone opening progress on the all of these doors Recreation Center. than someone just The next goal for pacing back and this semester is forth and taking making the center items at random.” fully enclosed for There was big the cold weather concern over havand putting teming WCU school porary heat inside. colors represented The Wellness in the building. http://www.wcupa.edu/studentrecreationcenter/collage.asp Wall was also Students wanted discussed and stuthe color purple dent leaders were shown an to bring out school spirit. to be more apparent in example of what the WellThe Feature Wall will the design of the building. ness Wall will look like once be another focus point of “That is the one thing it is completed. Last year, the Recreation Center. “It you remember when you students were given a sur- will be a nice piece to the leave a campus; how proud vey to pick the five words building,” Diane DeVestern, they are. WCU is getthey wanted represented Assistant Vice President ting to a point where we on the Wellness Wall such for Student Affairs, said. are proud of our school,” as “respect,” “success,” and The Feature Wall will said one representative. “dedication.” The climb- have seven designed panStudents are encouraged ing wall was also a main els with lights behind them. to visit the Recreation Cenfocus point of the meeting. The panels are made from ter website to see what “We’ve tried to make it natural and sustainable the building will involve. look more natural,” Mina material. The Feature Wall For more information, go Lele, Senior Interior De- will be located near the to http://www.wcupa.edu/ signer, Department of Facili- Fitness Center and was de- studentrecreationcenter. ties Design and Construction scribed as being “a lot of Angela Thomas is a fourthsaid. The rock climbing wall activity in a vertical place.” year student majoring in is going to be hand painted Students were shown ex- English. She can be reached and customized and will amples of what the pan- at AT683005@wcupa.edu.

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New Strategic Planning forWCU By Jen Mika Practicum Writer West Chester University is currently in the process of developing a new strategic plan known as “Building on Excellence.” The Plan for Excellence intends to allow all stakeholders to voice their thoughts as to where the future of the university lies. A survey will be sent out Nov. 14 and students are encouraged to complete all questions with honest answers. The time is now. We want to see change and to make improvement where we can. The idea for improvement and a new strategic plan was implemented in 2001. It was than updated in 2007 and has just recently been reviewed again since it has always been seen as successful in benefitting our university. For the past year, 32 members of our faculty and staff have been dedicated to composing a strategic plan that will bring forth improvement for the university, students, and our community.

The members of the committee have been attending meetings for the past year. The members of the committee find it extremely important that all people have a say. MaryAnn Hammond, a member of the committee and from the Student Health Services, states that “It’s students, faculty, staff; it’s people inside the university, it’s legislatives, it’s parents, the community, you name it.” She, like the other members, wants all persons to be involved so that WCU members can see the desired outcome. The Plan for Excellence has been developed so that students, faculty, and people of the community have the chance to help WCU grow. Hammond says that “anyone who has something to say, your voice will be heard. Everyone who is a stakeholder has a say in where the University will go.” As students, we have the opportunity to be a part of something huge. The first step may be filling out the survey. The survey will be sent

through e-mail to all stakeholders, and those interested in being a part of the development of the new plan should take some time to thoughtfully answer the questions. The survey will consist of five questions asking for one’s opinion on the strengths and weaknesses of WCU and what should be done differently in order to see the university and students succeed. Hammond suggests all stakeholders to “do some careful thinking, put thought into it.” By answering honestly, the committee will be able to gain a clear idea on what sort of improvements should be made in order to benefit the University. Once the stakeholders are contacted and the surveys are completed, they will be sent to a group of researchers sometime in December. They are then to find any similar themes, which will provide the committee with a focus on where the university should go.

See PLANNING on page 6


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

A teachable moment: Learning from the Penn State tragedy By Professor Jane Tucker

Special to The Quad

Editor’s Note: This article

will review at least four specific areas of catastrophic failure in the hopes that readers can turn this tragedy into a learning opportunity. It also contains graphic material. By now the entire nation has heard about the sexual abuse scandal on the campus of Penn State University. If the allegations in the grand jury indictment are factually correct, these events represent a colossal breakdown of the educational, social welfare, and criminal justice systems in the jurisdiction. For whatever reason, a succession of individuals failed to fulfill legal (and moral) obligations, resulting in a both the inability to address allegations of sexual abuse and to prevent further victimization. Laws and procedures have been put in place to address and prevent the sexual abuse of children. All too often allegations of child sexual abuse do not come to light because they occur behind closed doors. In this case, there were a number of incidents where the individuals had enough information to intervene and prevent the continuation of the abuse. Briefly, the grand jury indictment obtained testimony from victims and eyewitnesses who alleged that Jerry Sandusky, a former assistant coach of the Penn State football team, sexually molested and abused at least eight males who were between the ages of 10–13 when the abuse started. The alleged conduct mentioned in the indictment goes as far back as 1994. Sandusky was an active coach with Penn State from 1967–1999. In 1977 he started a non-profit organization called The Second Mile. The goal of the organization was to assist “at-risk” children by involving them in positive activities

to build their self-esteem. forcement and social welfare father, who then advised him The indictment alleges representatives to proceed to leave the area. According that he met every victim with a case against Sandusky, to the indictment, the graduthrough this organization. or, at the very minimum to ate assistant then met with Starting with the Child have Penn State authorities Joe Paterno and advised him Abuse and Protection Act ban him from the campus, of the incident. This meeting of 1974, both federal and represents the first in a se- led to a subsequent meeting state-level governments have ries of failures in this case. with the athletic director attempted to provide pro- Failure #2 Tim Curley and Penn State tection for children through Apparently the warning administrator Gary Schultz. legislation and the creation from campus police was not In spite of an eyewitness acof agencies to investigate enough to deter Sandusky as count of the commission of a child abuse incidents. Penn- the indictment alleges that felony against a young child, sylvania law requires certain nearly two years later he was neither Curley nor Schultz individuals to report child observed performing oral sex notified the Department of abuse when they have “rea- on a young boy (Victim #8) Public Welfare as required sonable cause” to suspect in a shower on the campus of by law. In addition, they did that a child is being abused Penn State. On this occasion, not notify the campus police. (PA 23 Con. Stat. 6311). a janitor observed the crime. In fact, the only action they The list of individuals that are mandated to report such suspicions include school teachers, school administrators, law enforcement officials, and any individual whose occupation causes them to come in contact with children. Failure # 1 Judging solely from the contents of the grand jury indictment, the first time law enforcement officers heard http://www.latimes.com of the allegations Former Penn State University President, Graham Spanier and former PSU Footagainst Penn State ball coach, Joe Paterno assistant coach Jerry Sandusky was sometime in He relayed the incident to allegedly took was to “di1998. A then 11-year old fellow employees and to his rect” Sandusky to not use the boy (identified as Victim #5) immediate supervisor. He Penn State’s athletic facilireturned home from Penn was given advice on whom ties with young people, and State with wet hair. After to report it to, but neither to advise the director of The admitting to his mother that he nor his supervisor did so. Second Mile of the incident. he had been in the shower Their failure to report this There is no evidence that any with Sandusky, she reported incident to authorities was of the adults in this incident the incident to campus po- a second major breakdown attempted to identify the lice. The indictment names in the system. The indict- victim, notify the parents, or four law enforcement of- ment alleges that employees provide any assistance for the ficers as being involved in were afraid to report the in- rape victim in this incident. the investigation. Accord- cident because they feared Failure #4 ing to the indictment, these they would lose their jobs. According to the website officers did fulfill their legal Failure #3 of The Second Mile organiobligation to report the inciThe third failure, based on zation (www.thesecondmile. dent to the Pennsylvania De- the indictment, occurred in org), in 2002, they were partment of Public Welfare 2002. A 28 year-old gradu- advised of a version of the (DPW). However, pursuant ate assistant witnessed a alleged activities of Santo a combined law enforce- young male (estimated to be dusky. The statement on the ment and DPW investiga- 10 years old) being sodom- website indicates that they tion, Sandusky walked away ized in the football showers. did not receive the full verwith a stern warning not to Instead of calling 911 to sion of events and were not shower with children again. report the felonious rape of aware of the “serious alleThe failure of the law en- a child, he reported it to his gations” uncovered by the

grand jury. In spite of being a non-profit organization for children, they did not conduct an investigation of the incident and by their own admission did not prohibit Sandusky from participating in their program, including unsupervised interaction with children. Additionally, they did not seek to identify The Second Mile participant involved in the incident, notify his parents, or extend any services to the child. As an organization which deals with children, administrators and employees are mandated to report suspected child abuse to the Department of Social Welfare. There is no evidence that they did so. It wasn’t until 2008 when Sandusky admitted that he was under investigation, yet again, for child sexual abuse that The Second Mile decided to terminate their relationship with him. Lesson #1 So where are the lessons in this series of repetitive and tragic events? The first lesson is that the law requires individuals whose occupations bring them in contact with children to report suspicion of child abuse. This includes educators, law enforcement officers, coaches, and any organization whose employees work with or serve children. In fact, the failure of a mandated reporter to report suspected child abuse is actually a crime in Pennsylvania, a misdemeanor of the second degree (PA 23 Con. Stat. 6319). What constitutes suspicion of child abuse? While a full review of legal standards of proof is beyond the scope of this article, the behavior alleged in the indictment against Sandusky would clearly meet the standard of “reasonable cause” to suspect child abuse. The indictment alleges two separate eyewitness accounts of sexual conduct (anal intercourse and oral sex) perpetrated by Sandusky on children. In fact, if a law enforcement officer had been immedi-

ately contacted in either case, the eyewitness accounts would have provided probable cause to make an on-scene felony arrest of Sandusky, without a warrant. Lesson #2 The indictment alleged that the janitorial employees were afraid to report the incident because they feared that their jobs would be in jeopardy. Their fears were unfounded. Pennsylvania state law provides both civil and criminal immunity for individuals who report suspected child abuse. Additionally, the law provides for civil redress of any discrimination or adverse employment action taken against employees for reporting suspected child abuse. Employees need not be afraid to report child abuse to child welfare agencies as they have civil and criminal immunity and are protected from discriminatory and adverse employment action taken against them in retaliation for reporting child abuse. In fact, child abuse reports can be made anonymous through a tollfree number (1-800-4-ACHILD) from anywhere in the United States. Lesson #3 Sexual offenders, pedophiles in particular, have patterns of offending. One pattern is to involve themselves in circumstances where they have access to children. If the allegations against Sandusky are credible, it appears as if Sandusky created his own pool of victims by starting The Second Mile in 1977. Child abusers also tend to prey on children who already have experienced dysfunction in their lives. This dysfunction creates the opportunity for the abuser to become a source of emotional support for the child, thus creating vulnerability. Abusers will sometimes volunteer as camp counselors, Boy Scout leaders, or sports coaches to bring them into contact with children.

See LESSONS page 6


NOVEMBER 14, SAFETY From page 2

2011

and recognizing the effects of someone under the influence of alcohol. They also receive training from the Office of Judicial Affairs. Lynn Klingensmith, from Judicial Affairs, informs the security officers of university policies. Training includes learning of judicial affairs as the security officers familiarize themselves with the student code of conduct. The code of conduct applies to students residing off-campus. Students who violate university policy will be held “accountable” for actions and may receive a judicial, Stevenson said. Security officers “detect and report any individual who violates the laws of the Commonwealth and or regulations of the university,” as according to the DPS manual. Security officers participate fully in the student judicial process with the authority to give students

THE QUAD a judicial, Stevenson said. Mary Jane Rogan, Coordinator of Alcohol Education, said she has discussed the “health and safety issue” of their positions with the security officers to stop people from going to their dorm rooms, who appear intoxicated. She advises security officers to ask themselves to decide if the alleged intoxicated person can walk, talk and follow directions. Nationwide every year, 1,400 students die from alcohol related incidents, on or off of their college campuses, Rogan said. West Chester University has seen at least 24 hospitalizations this year for suspected alcohol poisoning, Rogan said. With the Good Samaritan Act, a caller dialing 911 for a friend suspected of having alcohol poisoning will not be judicially or legally processed. The number of 911 calls has increased since the act became effective this past September. Rogan con-

siders this good as members of the Student Health Services encourages people to “let a professional decide.” Rogan said those people are “thankful” that the caller cared to call for medical attention “out of concern.” Public Safety police officers have found people “passed out” in the snow, in traffic and other locations on campus, from consuming alcohol. Rogan said. She added that holding intoxicated persons at the DPS station is about “preventing deaths.” “It’s a process” to determine if someone is intoxicated, Stevenson said. Factors include “how much they’ve been drinking” and if they are a “danger” to themselves or to others. Stevenson said security officers identify if someone consumed alcohol by noticing indicators such as red glassy eyes, slurred speech, delayed reactions, if they are steady on their feet, whether they can follow directions or not, and checking

if students are writing legibly when signing in a guest. They can stop a person for safety reasons by calling into dispatch. Then a campus police officer responds to further handle the matter. The process also includes determining if the person is in need of medical attention and ensuring they receive it. Stopping an intoxicated person is an important aspect of security as this guarantees that person receives medical attention. Stevenson said the process for someone underage includes being cited and detaining them at the police station to receive medical attention. It’s DPS policy in notifying parents of the matter. “We don’t want students to go upstairs (to their dorm room) to quote ‘sleep it off’ and never wake up,” Stevenson said. The role of security involves “protecting students from themselves” after they consume alcohol. Other duties of the secu-

PAGE 5 rity division in the residence halls has officers reiterate to students they are “responsible for” the person they sign in to the residence. The presence of security is “for your safety” and “not to hassle you.” If a guest signed in raises “any concerns” to a security officer who “articulates a reason” for this, they may dispatch for a police officer to check on the situation. Guest admission into a residence requires a photo ID, or a security officer has the authority to deny entry. The guest log-in sheets, checked by security, contains student and guest names as “documented” material for DPS. Everyday students bring bags in and out of their residence halls, in which all bags are subject to search upon entry to a residence hall. If a security officer “believes” there may be contraband in a bag, they can ask for a search. According to the DPS manual, security officers have a duty to “detect, limit,

and report contraband, i.e. alcohol, weapons, drug paraphernalia, from entering the residence hall.” Students have the right to refuse a search, in which they will not be permitted to bring the bag inside the residence. If no “contraband” is found, the bag may be taken into the residence. However, if a search leads to finding contraband, the person and contraband are detained, the security officer documents the students name and school ID number, and campus police are called to respond. According to the DPS manual, security officers assist in medical emergencies, bomb threats, fires, fire drills, and disruptive incidents as well as assisting any police officer arriving at the residence hall regarding an incident. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 6 LESSONS from page 4 Lesson #4 When reviewing sexual offending cases, it is often discovered that a number of people knew, or were suspicious of the activity and did nothing. In this case, one wonders how much Sandusky’s wife knew about the alleged activities. The indictment alleges that she made phone calls to victims apparently in an attempt to talk to them before they were to testify to the grand jury. That behavior is not unusual. It’s found that family members, in specific, mothers and wives tend to enable the abuser. Sexual abuse thrives on secrecy. While the victims cannot be blamed for not disclosing, in most cases of sexual abuse someone else knows or was suspicious, but did not act. Their failure to act leads to the continued perpetration of abuse. Lesson #5 Pedophiles will not stop until stopped by law enforcement, and sometimes that is not even enough to deter them from repeating their offenses. In this case, as in so many others, we see a multitude of victims. Pedophiles that are not confronted or treated continue to amass an alarming number of victims throughout their lifetime. One study of 561 pedophiles that molested young boys had an average of 281 different sexual acts with 150 victims (Abel et al., 1987). It would not be surprising to experienced child abuse investigators to see the numbers of victims listed in the indictment grow significantly, particularly since The Second Mile has been around since 1977. Lesson #6 Lastly, there is a lesson about intervening in criminal actions. While Pennsylvania law does not make explicit reference to citizen’s arrest, it does indicate that when a private person is making an arrest they have the same rights to use force as would a law enforcement officer (PA 18 Cons. Stat. 508b).

THE QUAD The Crimes Code of Pennsylvania allows citizens to use force (including deadly force) to protect themselves from death or serious bodily harm. That use of force also extends to protecting others from death or serious bodily harm. One can make the argument that both witnesses to Sandusky’s felonious assaults (graduate assistant and janitor) not only had the civic (and moral) obligation to intervene to protect these children, but also had the legal authorization to do so. The lesson here is that a citizen should take immediate action to stop an act of child abuse by whatever actions necessary. At the very least, this can be accomplished by verbally confronting the suspect and notifying them that the police are being called. However, the law would authorize using force to subdue and detain the suspect for the police. It is hard to imagine that there are people in this world that would observe such crimes against a child and not take immediate action to stop the abuse. Because of the inactions and omissions of a number of individuals, the victims continued to stack up from 1998–2005. At present there are at least eight alleged victims (documented) who now are potentially suffering from the long-term effects of child sexual abuse. The effects from child sexual trauma are many. Victims suffer from a loss of selfesteem, depression, and suicidal thoughts (and sometimes actions). Research indicates that many victims of sexual abuse turn to alcohol or drugs to attempt to deal with the negative feelings surrounding those experiences. Psychiatric disorders, including multiple personality disorder, bi-polar disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder have all been found in victims of child sexual abuse. What started as an organization to help “at-risk” children from single-family and dysfunctional homes has allegedly turned into the feeding ground for a sexual offender. This tragedy calls

into question the legitimacy of our educational, social welfare, and criminal justice systems in relation to the protection of children. These systems are only as good as those who work in them. The events at Penn State stress the importance of ethical and legal decision-making. In criminal justice we stress the judicious use of discretion as the decisions by criminal justice practitioners truly can change the trajectory of an individual’s life. The same can be said for educators, educational administrators and social welfare practitioners. Years ago I came across a business card provided by The Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute. It was designed to guide police officers in ethical decisionmaking. I often use the contents of this card in my presentations to student on law enforcement ethics. The card contained questions one should ask when making law enforcement decisions. Is it legal? Will my actions violate any laws, constitutions, or statues? How will I feel about myself? Will my actions withstand public scrutiny? Asking these questions may have helped the individuals involved in the Penn State scandal make more appropriate decisions. However, there is one other pertinent question that may have illuminated the situation and caused them take actions in this case that they did not. What would someone do if that was his or her child? References Abel, G., Becker, J., Cunningham-Rathner, J., & Rouleau, J. (1987). Predicting child molesters response to treatment. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 528 (1988), 223–334. Penn State Grand Jury Indictment. http://media.bonnint. net/seattle/6/672/67241.pdf Jane M. Tucker (ABD) is an Associate Professor in the Criminal Justice Department at West Chester University. She is a retired police officer with training in child sexual abuse and interviewing sexually abused children. She can be reached at jtucker@wcupa.edu.

PLANNING From page 3 There is a responsibility as students to help make changes and improvements in an education environment. The committee encourages all stakeholders, anyone involved at WCU and in the community, to take this opportunity to take a hold of what the university is and could be. By answering the survey, it will result in being one step closer to helping the university to grow and to succeed. Jen Mika is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalist. She can be reached at JM653231@wcupa.edu.

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Interested in writing for the News Section? Want an event covered? Email quadnews@ wcupa.edu

November 18It’s that time again- Java Jam is back. Sponsored by Student Activities Council,Black Student Union and Sykes after Dark, Java Jam is an annual event bringing the coffee house mood to Sykes Union. There will be free food and the midnight movie is “The Change Up.” Students can make their own photo mugs. On behalf of The Quad, we would like to send our condolences to those effected by former Editor-In-Chief, Aaron Benson’s passing. Benson served as the Editor-In-Chief from 2000-2001. He is remembered as a brilliant thinker, IT genius, and as a positive asset to The Quad.


NOVEMBER 14,

2011

THE QUAD

Opinion & Editorial Observe paths taken

PAGE 7

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief QuadEIC@wcupa.edu EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

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BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Art Director Britt Silver Business Editor Mike Mills Advertising Manager Dan Colon

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As I walk around on-campus, I look around seeing the same buildings every ONLINE EDITION day. When taking in more than the scenery down the road, I see the same buildings Kristin Solanick differently. The air I breathe in feels peaceful. We walk past things in passing, really FACULTY ADVISOR not paying much attention to what we see on a daily basis. Dr. Philip A. Thompsen Did you notice the leaves changing with the autumn nearing its end as snow covered the ground? I saw it. Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] By the time the school year rounds to its end students start to wonder where and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted durall the time has gone. Midterms have come and gone already. Sport seasons are end- Guest ing the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped ing as the winter sports pick up. I hope seniors have a good last season and first year off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. students good luck and enjoy your play time. Students give all their heart during the for All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus adperformance of their concerts and plays. The night ends with applause and lives with and dress, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, the individual for years after. faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. During my high school graduation we listened to a student say “there’s alLetters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not ways next year.” We get used to the safety net of saying “there’s always next year.” edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and Probably the last time you heard that, someone was referring to the Phillies. In colnot necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West lege and the same for high school, you wonder what “next year” entails when it’s the Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m. year after you graduate. Alumni are proud of their accomplishments and the school they graduated Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] from. It’s nice to see alumni at events. It’s comforting in a way. You realize you plan Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without to return to the same events you attended as a student when you’ll be an alumna/ the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student alumnus at the event. body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, I’ve talked with alumni at events that I meet somewhere on –campus when student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint our college years cross paths. I like to find out how they are doing and what their circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered current plans are. Some alumni have such WCU spirit; it seems like they never left. in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be Rather, their spirit carries on. placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web ~ Ginger Rae Editor-in-Chief

site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


PAGE 8

THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Israel-Palestine: The Other Side of the Story

By Dr. Lawrence Davidson Special to The Quad In Bill Hanrahan’s recent op-ed on the IsraeliPalestinian prisoner exchange a picture of the conflict was presented that matched well the storyline given the American public by its government and media. Since this point of view has been delivered consistently for over sixty years it comes as no surprise that many people believe it. Yet that story is not complete nor accurate. In the short oped reply that follows I will give you an alternative picture of the conflict that is historically accurate. After the allied victory in World War I the British took control of Palestine. In fulfillment of the Balfour Declaration, a pledge made to the World Zionist Organization, Britain began to facilitate the immigration of European Jews into what was an Arab land. The Zionists saw this immigration as the beginning of a process that would lead to a Jewish State in Palestine. The Jewish immigrants proceeded to acquire land and develop a Jewish centered economy. As their numbers grew so did the tension between them and the Arab majority population. The Zionist leaders expected this tension and the increasing violence that went along with it. There is a verified and quite infamous1956 statement made by Zionism’s principal leader in Palestine, David Ben Gurion, “It is normal, we have taken their country. It is true God promised it to us, but how could that interest them? Our God is not theirs. There has been

anti-Semitism, the Nazis, Hitler, Auschwitz, but was that their fault? They see one thing: we have come and we have stolen their country. Why should they accept that?” The Palestinians did not accept that and the result was repeated Arab rebellion against both the Zionists and the British. As 1948 and the announced date of British withdrawal from Palestine drew near, the Zionist leadership drew up a plan to cleanse the land of as much of its Arab population as possible. It is important to note that they did this prior to any invasion by outside Arab states. This too is well documented. Two Israeli historians, Benny Morris and Ilan Pappe, among others, have used declassified Israeli government documents to describe this process. Morris tells of a four stage expulsion of some 700,000 Palestinians, most of whom left to escape targeted Zionist violence. This violence included attacks and massacres of civilians and the destruction of entire Arab villages and towns, and was clearly of a terrorist nature. Pappe, in his 2007 book “The Ethnic Cleansing of Palestine,” gives even more detail of this process. As Pappe concludes, the process of expulsion was not the consequence of Jews of Palestine defending themselves against Arab violence. It was the consequence of a premeditated Zionist offensive. The real defensive violence was that of the Palestinians. The effort to encourage Palestinian emigration has never ceased. And from this point on this

writer has been an eye witness to much of what follows. Within Israel the democratic status given the non-Jewish population proved to be a facade. Arab citizens of Israel may be able to vote, but they are also systematically discriminated against at all levels, their standard of living purposely kept low, and their educational opportunities limited. Since 1948, Israel has not permitted the founding of a single new Palestinian town despite a

the size of their population. They are artificially manufactured tokens. In the Occupied Territories, which have been suffering a process of colonization since 1967 that is in clear violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention, things are worse. Here Palestinians are crowded into Bantustanlike enclaves and their ability to travel for reasons of health or education, or work, are extremely limited. To date, the Israelis have destroyed or con-

high birth rate. This means the increasing over-crowding Palestinians now experience is artificially manufactured by Israeli policy. As the Zionist leader Yesha’ayahu Ben-Porat put it in 1972, “...it is the duty of the [Israeli] leadership to explain to the public a number of truths. One truth is that there is no Zionism without evacuating Arabs, without expropriating [their] lands and their fencing off.” Finally, the very few examples of successful Arab-Israelis are the exceptions that prove the rule. Their numbers are minuscule relative to

fiscated over four million acres of Palestinian land, uprooted over 25,000 olive trees belonging to Palestinian farmers, confiscated 90% of the water resources for exclusive Jewish use, and daily harass Palestinians as they try to go about their business. Palestinian unemployment stands at 57% and 47% of Palestinians live below the poverty level. Meron Benvenisti, the former Israeli mayor of Jerusalem, has described the Israeli administration of the West Bank as “a cruel regime....a regime based on ethnic discrimination and separation, double standards and the

absence of the rule of law.” The result is a life lived under constant threat of violence both from the state and its colonial settler agents. In January of 2007, Yosef Lapid, then head of Israel’s central holocaust memorial, Yad Vashem, condemned the treatment of Palestinians in the Occupied Territories. He said “it is inconceivable for the memory of Aushwitz to warrant ignoring the fact that there are Jews among us who behave today towards the Palestinians just like the German, Hungarian, Polish and other anti-Semites behaved toward the Jews.” The Jews who behave this way are not randomly spread through the population. They are specifically soldiers and settlers. They are agents of the state. It is against this backdrop that the entire issue of terrorism has to be understood. One might argue that the Israelis have been forced to act in this hostile and violent way because the Palestinians have refused to recognize the Israeli state, have sought its destruction. But, at least since 1988, this has not been true. It was in 1988 that Yasir Arafat and the PLO first recognized the state of Israel, renounced terrorism and sought negotiations for a two state solution to the conflict. Subsequently, even Hamas announced that it would accept a two state solution if the Palestinian people approved such a settlement in an open and fair referendum. Have Palestinians who are not associated with the PLO, violently attacked Israelis, sometimes using terror tactics, resulting in the deaths of innocent Israeli

civilians? Yes, they have. And have almost all of these actions come in response to Israeli attacks, many of which fall into the category of state terrorism that have killed and maimed innocent Palestinian civilians? Yes, they have. The simple fact of the matter is that both sides have a lot of “blood on their hands.” There is little sense in looking for morality in this struggle, there is none. That being said, from an historical perspective there is no doubt that Israel was founded by Europeans acting in a colonist fashion just at a period of history when colonialism was going out of fashion. That is a fact that cannot be undone. Israel is now part of the Middle East and it is not going to go away. The question is do the Israelis want to live in peace or do they want to expand and see their country evolve into an apartheid state? Given its present course there is little doubt that Israel does not want peace. It wants the land, all the land from the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea. And it wants it with as few Palestinians as possible. The problem for the Israelis is that the Palestinians are not simply going to go away either. They will fight back, they will resist. If you chose to point fingers at them for doing so you will have to come up with a better reason than the charge of resorting to terrorism. Both sides do that. It is just that the Palestinians have a better excuse to do so than do their oppressors. Dr. Davidson is a professor of History at West Chester University. He can be reached at LDavidson@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 14,

2011

THE QUAD

Bring this article into Artifact to get 10% off your next purchase during the week of November 14th-20th

Features PAGE 9

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Boutique in West Chester offers fall fashions at a great price

By Angela Thomas News Editor

In these tough economic times, it is often hard to find cute and one-of-a-kind clothing and accessories at an affordable price. However, WCU students need to look no further than West Chester to find a boutique that offers beautiful clothing and accessories for under $60. Artifact Boutique is located at the corner of Darlington and Gay streets. The store was opened up in June of 2009 by 2006 WCU graduate, Lauren Merkel. Merkel earned her B.A. in communication studies at WCU. So how did Artifact come to be? “I worked for a few years out of college, had a lot of retail experience

and then, basically, the opportunity, arose and the building was available. I wanted it and basically went out on my own, saved up enough money, bought everything for the store, took out a small loan and the concept came to me to do a discount store because the economy wasn’t doing well,” Merkel said. “It was the start of the crash of the economy. I knew I had to come up with something affordable and something that would work.” Merkel had a lot of help from her friends and family, noting her brother, who built the fitting rooms for her. “It’s been a lot of work but it’s also been really fun and it’s all been extremely personal because everything is done by me,” Merkel

In the next few months, Artifact will conduct online sales. “That’s what we are working on right now. Hopefully it will be a big success. People are always wondering if they can order online from our store,” Merkel said. Customers will hopefully be able to order online in the next couple of months, but Merkel does post new inventory on Artifact’s Facebook page so that customers can see what is new in the store. Artifact also has a mailing list where customers are sent coupons and promotions. Artifact is ready and geared up with many fashions for the fall. “We have some really great leggings. Leggings are always really popular for the fall,” Merkel said. “We also

have some great chunky sweaters, some really cute fall peacoats, and we also have adorable little cocktail dresses that can be worn with sweater tights.” Merkel also carries plenty of statement jewelry, which is a huge hit for the fall. Artifact gets new shipments every single week. “I am constantly making sure that I am always replenishing,” Merkel said. Artifact carries sizes small, medium, and large. Artifact has also gotten a labeling service. “It’s really cool. What we’ve done is we’ve gotten our name on our clothes. So it’s just a little bit more of a personalized touch,” Merkel said. “We don’t design anything. We order all of it from New York and

LA and then a lot of our vendors will put a personal tag on it for us.” Artifact carries Philadelphia sports apparel that was specifically designed for the store. “It’s just something fun for the girls to wear to all the different Phillies and Eagles games,” Merkel said. If students are looking for anything ranging from affordable sweaters to a cute dress for the weekend, even if they are looking for that pair of earrings that will complement their outfits, Artifact is the place to go. Visit them on Facebook at http://www.facebook. com/artifactboutique. Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@ wcupa.edu.

ger and Homelessness co-sponsor National Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week the week before Thanksgiving. This year, Chester County, and more specifically WCU, will be a part of this national effort. On Friday, Nov. 18 from 6 p.m. to 6 a.m., students will be able to participate in

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2010. It is statistics like these that provoke the question: “What can I do to help?” In an attempt to answer this, students and staff at WCU have organized an event to promote awareness of the issue and provide help to those in need. Each year the National Coalition for the Homeless and the National Student Campaign Against Hun-

said. “It adds a personal touch to the store. It’s not real generic.” Merkel had high hopes that students and young professionals would find the store beneficial to their wallets and wardrobes. “We have clothing, jewelry, hand bags, accessories, lots of sweaters, leggings, and some jeans. We keep everything under $60. The girls love it! They’ll come in and buy a couple dresses for the price they would spend on one dress somewhere else,” Merkel said. “It’s done really well for the last two years. Every year we continue to improve and even in the first month of opening we were extremely successful.” Artifact also carries denim jeggings for under $30.

Sleepout for hunger and homelessness awareness

By Sarah Gurgal

Special to The Quad

As the weather gets colder, the heat starts cranking in the dorms and various buildings around campus. Students are fortunate to have such well-kept shelters to go to after a long day of studying and trekking to class through the cold and wind. Unlike the fortunate students at WCU, there are people

in the United States who are not as fortunate. In fact, according to the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, in 2009, it was recorded that 110,917 adults in the United States did not have a shelter to call home. In addition, our country would be able to find just over 76,000 Veterans experiencing homelessness on any given night in

see SLEEPOUT on page 12


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Commuter students use OCCA as resource

By Dominique Perry Practicum Writer

The commuters attending West Chester University make up more than half of the population on campus. Even though these students spend half or less of their time on campus, they still require assistance in navigating student life. The Off Campus Commuter Association (OCCA) assists commuting students in attaining their degree with services, programs and events. The board members of the OCCA investigate issues and hold

meetings every Wednesday at noon so commuting students can make suggestions to common issues they face. One issue that aroused many commuting students is parking. The parking issue affects many commuters, and the OCCA explores subjects that hinder their success. Lateness to class, towed cars and outstanding fines all contribute to possible digression in completing college. “This year was the worst ever; the student population grew, but parking spots did not,” said Renee Donald, the vice president of the

OCCA. The organization suggested to the parking committee building a garage behind Sykes Student Union Center, this is one of many ideas that are in consideration. In addition to parking issues, commuters also face issues off campus that can trickle into their student life. In most cases, the working mom, non -traditional, financially astute, or veteran student attends class then leaves campus to continue their life outside of school. The ranges of students commuting to campus vary, yet each unique commuter may come across obstacles

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that can deter their ultimate goal: receiving their degree. The OCCA provides commuters with the services they need for off campus issues. One of the services includes a free consultation with a lawyer for legal advice. This fifteen minute consultation provides recommendations for various legal issues such as leases, citations, domestic issues and landlord/ tenant disputes. Students are urged to seek legal advice before actual complications occur. If legal action is needed students are referred to the Lawyer Referral Service of the Chester County Bar Association. Another service provided through the student affairs division is child care for children three and up. The child care program is funded through university subsidy and a grant from student services. A developmental education program is provided for children three to six for parents who are students or em-

ployed at the university. Connections with the appropriate resources can make a difference in the student life of a commuter. The OCCA organizes events and networking opportunities to keep commuters engaged in campus life. “The OCCA works to improve relationships with people and help commuters really experience the college life,” Donald said. Representatives from different organizations on campus come to the OCCA meetings to introduce their organization to busy commuters who may be interested. The OCCA also arranges workshops for resume building and leadership skills. Opportunities for leadership are offered through holding various positions within the OCCA organization. Both the vice president and president are commuters and hold prominent positions within the organization. Among the board of directors are positions such as the service director and

program director. These leadership opportunities are experience for work, which most college students need along with their degree. The OCCA informs commuters the importance of resume building and connecting job experience with intended degree. Every semester the OCCA attends the Association of College Union International conference. Any student can attend the conference. There is no fee involved. Students attend the conference in order to gain insights on how to make an organization better, and how to make oneself a better leader, and how to improve resume building. The OCCA tries to offer the same opportunities to commuting students, so that they too can take full advantage of their college education. Dominique Perry is a fifthyear student majoring in professional studies wtih minors in journalism and studio art. She can be reached at DP633925@wcupa.edu.

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THE QUAD

PAGE 11

Teacher Feature Presents: Mary Braz

By Rebekah Balmer Features Editor

Dr. Mary Braz, Assistant Professor in the Communication Studies Department, earned her undergraduate degree at Michigan State University in communication. She continued her education with a masters degree at Northern Illinois University and studied communication. At Michigan State University she earned her Ph.D. in communication with em-

phases in group dynamics and social influence. Braz started at WCU in the fall of 2008. She has taught as an instructor and graduate teaching assistant at other institutions since 2002. She advises the Graduate Student Organization in communication. She has advised it since she founded it last year. Braz routinely teaches small group communication, groups in organizations and societies, gradu-

ate research methods, and public speaking in the summer and winter terms. Her best professional achievement is receiving recognition of teaching excellence from the Honor’s College at WCU. Braz’s best life achievement is the “relationships I have with my family and friends.” Her current academic goal is “to offer a course on jury decision-making. This course would give WCU students the opportu-

nity to understand processes and consequences of jury decision-making by analyzing communication between jurors.” She hopes to begin offering it in Summer 2012. Her current non-academic goal is sewing curtains for all of the windows in her house. When asked what she loves most about teaching she said, “the students at WCU. My students are bright, engaged, and can apply course concepts

and theories to their lives outside the classroom in insightful and impressive ways.” The thing she loves most about WCU is enjoying “collaborating with my colleagues to shape curriculum and research.” Her advice to students is to “avoid stagnation. You don’t have to have your entire life, or even the next four years, all figured out right now. But don’t let indecision lead to inaction. Work toward any goal right now, know-

ing you can always change courses later if need be.” Braz made a final comment and said, “Thank you to the students, faculty, and staff at WCU for making this such a great place to work.” Her office is located in 404 Main Hall. She can be contacted via e-mail at mbraz@wcupa.edu. Rebekah Balmer is a fifthyear student majoring in women’s and gender studies and sociology. She can be reached at RB649636@wcupa.edu.

“Invisible Children” raises awareness By Dominique Perry Practicum Writer

Twice a month, West Chester University’s chapter of the group, Invisible Children, holds a bake sale in order to raise money to rebuild schools in Uganda for young children who were abducted to fight as soldiers. Five years ago, three young adults set out to Uganda to contribute to the unveiling of the longest lasting conflict in Africa. The organization began in San Diego when three young filmmakers, and eventually many supporters at different universities and high schools across the nation, wanted to make people become aware of the extremities that Ugandan children faced in war effected countries in Africa. The organization’s non- profit approach reaches out to the public by documenting

the lives of those living in injustice and conflict. According to the article “Why Uganda has failed to defeat the Lord’s Resistance Army,” for over 23 years, the Lord’s Resistance Army and the government of Uganda have stirred a war which left civilians unprotected and young children the target victims. The LRA began when a woman named Alice Lakwena formed a group in opposition to the Ugandan government leader, Yoweri Museveni, who had seized power in Uganda in 1986. After Lakwena was defeated several times, she fled to a refugee camp in Kenya in which her and Joseph Kony, one of Lakwena’s most influential protégés, upheld the force and formed the LRA. A certain spirit, known as the “Holy Spirit Battalion” prompted, both Lakwena and Kony

to damage and terrorize the lives of thousands of innocent children. Together they launched raids across northeastern Uganda. They abducted many children along the way, and used the children as soldiers, servants and ‘wives.’ According to Robert L. Feldman’s article “Why Uganda Has Failed to Defeat the Lord’s Resistance Army,” the estimates vary on the strength of the present day LRA. Today the numbers are relatively small, but a resulting 1.5 million internally displaced people are estimated from the conflict, which destabilizes a significant portion of northern Uganda. The LRA’s primary source of strength depended upon the children whom were abducted and ultimately used as soldiers. These children enabled the LRA to replenish

any losses or escapes during the battle. In an African Journal from American Magazine.org, Justin Isa, a survivor of the LRA in South Sudan, told reporters about the abuse he experienced during his time with the LRA. He bore scars on his back from beatings with machetes, and internal wounds from enduring the orders from his commanders. Isa was forced to participate in the killing of other abducted children whom the LRA did not trust or wished to be punished. Isa, along with many other children, were petrified to escape the LRA and their orders. Today Isa still has nightmares about the LRA capturing him again, even after the terrorized countries have come to a level of peace. Since the movie “Invisible Children: Rough

Courtesy of Dominique Perry

Cut” was filmed in 2003, the abduction of these children in Uganda has ceased. In recent years, peace has become closer to reach. From June 2006 to March 2008 in the Juba and Sudan, the LRA and government of Uganda engaged in a series of peace talks in order to end the conflict. In the last two years, an estimated 900,000 of the 1.5 million displaced have returned to their homes. Over one million people are still left displaced, due to lack of clean water, economic opportunities, lack of

health centers, and inadequate education facilities and opportunities. As for the Ugandan children, representatives from the organization Invisible Children on West Chester’s campus, are raising money to rebuild schools for these children to provide proper education and counseling for the children who were forced to fight and terrorize their country. Dominique Perry is a fifthyear student majoring in professional studies and minoring in journalism and studio art. She can be reached at DP633925@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 12

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Sleepout from page 9 the Sleep Out for Hunger and Homelessness event taking place in the residential quad. “People should attend the Sleep Out because it can give back in an unorthodox way,” Resident Director Dawna Jones said. “So many people go night after night without a home. We are using just 12 hours to do our part and bring awareness. It is an important cause to support.” The Sleep Out allows participants to “walk in the shoes” of the homeless by sleeping outside at night.

For each hour the participants sleep outside, others pledge to donate items, such as socks or non-perishable food items, which can be used to fight in the battle against hunger and homelessness. Teams may choose to make donations themselves in lieu of a sponsor if they would prefer to. Students were able to register as a team or individually to sleep

out during the event. Information about the event is currently available at www.wcupa.orgsync.com/org/ waynehall/SleepOut. “Even if people don’t have time to dedicate to the Sleep Out there are so many other ways for them to contribute,” fourth-year student Shannon Everett said. “While the act of sleeping out promotes the awareness of the

cause, it is also important to remember we’re trying to make physical donations toward the cause as well.” Participants will bear the weather throughout the night for as many hours as they can handle. Teams are able to split the hours up amongst each member if desired. Participants will be provided with food and warm beverages throughout

NOVEMBER 14, 2011 something that affects people in our community; just look at how many shelters we have in town. Hopefully this project becomes a staple among the service opportunities at West Chester University.” the night, as well as People who entertainment, such are participating are as various games and reminded to dress in a movie. While these warm layers and are are all great things allowed to bring a tent to be provided with, and any type of sleepsomething participants ing materials they could really use is the would like. There are support of fellow stu- still ways to be indents, faculty and staff. volved if groups missed “We want this the sign up deadline. event to be something Sarah Gurgal is a that could happen third-year student majoreach year on campus,” ing in excercise science. third-year Colleen She can be reached at Gibson said. “This is SG727785@wcupa.edu.

For information about making a donation to the cause, please contact Dawna Jones (djones@wcupa.edu).

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NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

Check out the Quad online! wcuquad.com

PAGE 13

Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Musical Fr33dom hosts glow parties in Borough By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief Practicum writer

Musical Fr33dom originated as a close group of friends who appreciate the same type of music. Now a musical movement with two DJs bringing electronic dance music to people who want to enjoy dance music and a club scene, the group hosts glow parties making for anything but a typical weekend in West Chester or Philadelphia. Kiel Sterling, founding member of the Musical Fr33dom, has the role of “bringing people together,” planning events, filming videos of the shows, providing glow sticks and promoting the group. When asked to host a musical show at Mas Mexicali Cantina of West Chester, upon agreeing, Sterling thought, “This could turn into something (permanent) down the road.” The group will host their next “lights-out” glow party at the Note, located at 142 East Market St., on Nov. 18. Along with a glow paint station, Kirk James Dupis, of the Kirkworx Productions, will have an airbrush station. The original intention of Musical Fr33dom began as a way to bring electronic dance music mainly to college areas, introducing young adults to the music. The nightclub type of music incorporates subgenres including dub-step, breakbeat,

chiptune, disco, techno and trance. They believe West Chester’s bars and restaurants require DJs to play popular top songs during play-list sets. The name of their group unintentionally serves a double meaning as their DJs have the freedom to play songs that will inspire those listening. Their lax views benefit the crowd to hear a better show and commits the crowd to staying and wanting to hear more. The group developed when the opportunity presented itself with the chance to perform for people who want to enjoy electronic dance music. Members of Musical Fr33dom never intended to be a promotional event. Music Fr33dom “came about because it brought people happiness.” A performance of theirs obtains high crowd reactions, glow paint scattered across the room and non-stop dancing. A rare feature about Musical Fr33dom is that while they target college age students at local bars, they are all about the dance party. For them, they say it’s all about the sound of the music, and they keep to that focus by engaging the patrons with old and new music intertwined. On Sept. 10 inside Mas, patrons got the “club experience” with a combination of glow sticks and glow paint offered by Musical Fr33dom, Sterling said, which came out of their own pocket.

Patrons could throw paint at each other. Sterling described it as a “crazy adventure, getting lost in music and glow lights.” Musical Freedom glow parties keep patrons on their feet the whole night, from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. The DJ dancing on stage behind his equipment is also found in a white shirt covered by glow paint. By attending their shows at local bars and restaurants, patrons experience a social mix of a club night and high school senior prom. “If you still feel like you’re in West Chester by the end of the night, then we haven’t done our jobs,” Sterling said in regard to entertaining patrons. “What we do is out of this world.” Sterling made confetti the night before their second show at Mas to drop on the patrons on the dance floor below. Anticipating timing, Sterling let the confetti drop from the second floor, grasping cheers in response. “I think West Chester never saw confetti get dropped like that,” Sterling said. With a rough maximum capacity of 400 people, Mas developed a line out the door and around the corner by 1 a.m. Sterling took a video capturing the long line of people waiting to enter to view their show, as he deemed this unheard of in West Chester. This show followed their success-

Pink and green neon hats were handed out to patrons with Musical Fr33dom’s logo “All for the Love of Music.”

ful summer night on July 2, 2011, despite college students having off for the summer during their “drop-out” show. “There’s a new wave of clubbers that are out there, bringing a new energy (to the dance floor) – that’s the college kids,” Sterling said. “We really embrace them coming out to the shows and tuning in.” Sterling said their Facebook fan page serves as a Musical Fr33dom Pandora. A form of marketing, by posting links and songs, he can “plug away the show” utilizing a social network. He prefers to videotape the shows, which “captures the moment,” allowing fans to “relive the moment” when watching the videos on Facebook and Youtube.

Simply watching the videos can place one in a nightclub scene. Dancers will want to move to the beat and music lovers will appreciate the playlist. “Love and happiness are the things you can’t put a price tag on,” Sterling said pertaining to the Facebook fan group expanding to over 300 followers. “That’s why we do what we do.” Sterling admits the effects are minimal, but effective for the crowd, with the use of glow sticks and paint, and lighting machines. With a self-pocket budget, the group does their best to provide cost-effective materials to entertain the crowd as the music sways them. “I wanted to take this to the next level and do something West

Chester has never seen,” Sterling said. “That’s what it’s been so far (for us.)” Their main goal is providing an environment that has people listening to a top DJ. And that’s exactly what they do. With a combination of dance music and bodies on the dance floor, it only “multiplies the energy” setting. Sterling explained by seeing 20 people “owning” the dance floor, they will want to be a part of that. Dan Fisher, a DJ for Musical Fr33dom, goes by the name of Love Cities DJ. A full time DJ for almost two years now, he first learned how to DJ using records on two turntables. Staying See FR33DOM page 16


THE QUAD

‘Cause and Effect’ performances on Nov. 18 and 19

Joanna Volpe Special to The Quad

West Chester U n i v e r s i t y ’ s Department of Theatre and Dance and the University Dance Company present their annual fall dance concert, ‘Cause and Effect.’ Works include those from current WCU dance faculty, guest

artists from the Philadelphia metro area, and three student choreographers (fourth-year student Allyssa Rommel, fourth-year student Daquinn Lloyd, and third-year student Kelly Peterson). Performances will take place in the Madeleine Wing Adler Theatre in the Swope

Building/Performing Arts Center on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19 at 8 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 19 at 2 p.m. A food drive to benefit the Chester County Food Bank is being held during the Saturday evening concert. Bring three non-perishable items and receive a half price

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Upcoming Shows

PAGE 14

ticket. Tickets are $12 to $15 and can be purchased at the Department of Theater and Dance’s box office on the ground floor of the E.O.Bull Center, by calling 610-436-2533, or by emailing TheatreDance@ wcupa.edu.

CAreer trAining. money for College.

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suCCeed. Serving part-time in the Air National Guard, you’ll have an entire team of like-minded individuals who want to help you get ahead. You can choose from nearly 200 career specialties, and develop the high-tech skills you need to compete in today’s world. You also train close to home, all while receiving a steady paycheck, benefits and tuition assistance. Talk to a recruiter today, and see how the Pennsylvania Air National Guard can help you succeed.

ELECTRIC FACTORY: November 20 - Airborne Toxic Event November 22 - Five Finger Death Punch November 23 - Badfish November 27 - Simple Plan December 10 - The Devil Wears Prada

THE TROCADERO: November 16 - Tinariwen November 18 - Altruism November 20 - Mastodon November 22 - Rocky Loves Emily December 1 - As I Lay Dying

THE TLA: November 16 - Mike Doughty November 19 - Drive-By Truckers November 23 - Infected Mushroom November 30 - Steel Panther December 4 - Dashboard Confessional

THE NOTE: November 16 - Fu Manchu November 20 - Exit 34 November 23 - Nomad Clientele November 25 - Splintered Sunlight December 2 - Can You Canoe

Interested in writing for the Quad Entertainment section? E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 15

Deer Chaser dance group honors Native American Heritage Month By Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor

West Chester University of Pennsylvania was treated with performances from the dance group Deer Chaser as part of the University’s Native American Heritage Month celebrations. In 1915, Dr. Arthur C. Parker, a Seneca Indian, persuaded the Boys Scouts of America to set aside a time to honor the “first Americans,” which led to November eventually b e c o m i n g N a t i v e A m e r i c a n H e r i t a g e Month. On Tuesday, Nov. 8, members of the Native American youth g r o u p performed Lakota dances from the Ogala Lakota Tribe in South Dakota. The dancers were brought to campus thanks to Dr. Voss of the WCU Social Work Department and many sponsors, including: the Ethnic Studies Institute, the Frederick Douglass Institute, the Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Office of Social Equity, Francis Harvey Green Library, Sykes Student Union,WCU Social Wo r k Department, and Circle Legacy.

To kick-off the event, the performers sang the Honor Song. Traditionally sung at funerals, it was officially recognized as the Lakota National Anthem in 1979. The first dance performed was meant to honor children. The Lakota Indians

value their sacred children and the next generation of their people. Two of the dancers, Savannah Rose, seven, and Kado, four, learned to dance very early in life, much like many Lakota children who learn how to dance by watching the older generations. The “Men’s Grass Dance” was performed next by Sam Ironcloud, a student

at Black Hill State University in Spearfish, S.D., where he said that he takes “normal classes but designed from a Lakota point of view.” He plans to attend graduate school to attain a Master’s degree. “My plan is to make

He Sapa Win competition, which she won earlier this year due to her dancing abilities and drug and alcohol-free lifestyle, among other factors. Her dance, she explained, was more contemporary because it was not

of the Native Americans and the n o n - N a t i v e Americans. The audience members followed the dancers’ moves as they stood in a circle and held hands while listening to the partial-English lyrics. In the closing statements, Luke, the drummer and also Pickner’s husband, spoke briefly about numerous topics. He explained that there are sacred songs and dances that cannot be shared with the public. These dances are generally performed at the a n n u a l Sundance, which he described as the “Lakota New Year.” He then mentioned the sacredness of music and the way in which Native American men “woo” Photo courtesy of Carol Fritz women through Jasmine Rae Pickner from the dance group Deer Chaser performs the ‘Hoop Dance’ in Sykes Ballrooms. it. He explained that many of the romantic Lakota you happy by until the 1960’s that to the negativity and songs state “I love dancing,” Sam said. women were allowed stereotypes that often you” or “I will hold He explained that to dance in the “dance acccompany living on you.” He also said that some of the songs the “Men’s Grass circle” in the tribes. a reservation. Dance” was meant to A highlight of the “The negativity, it are comedic with help when feeling event was Jasmine makes me work lyrics stating, “I’ll emotionally or physi- Rae Pickner’s “Hoop harder, dance harder,” even lose weight for you.” cally hurt. Dance.” A two-time she said. “Our greatest Dancer Natisha world champion hoop Finally, the dancers Wa g n e r, t h e dancer, Pickner invited audience medicine to give back 2011-2012 Miss He performed with about members to partake to anybody is to make Sapa Win, performed thirty hoola-hoop-like in a dance with them. ‘em laugh,” he said. Carol Fritz is a thirdthe next dance. objects. She explained The dance, called Wagner represented that the hoop symbol- “The Friendship year student majoring in the Rosebud ized o n e s e l f . Dance” or the “Round communication studies. Reservation by Beginners generally Dance,” is performed She can be reached at competing in the Miss start dancing with to connect the circles CF716022@wcupa.edu. one hoop because it teaches them self-discipline and to take care of that one hoop means to take care of oneself. The dance moves in the “Hoop Dance” symbolized the eagle, the butterfly, and the flower. Pickner responded


PAGE 16

By Angela Thomas News Editor

In March 2011, Jodi Picoult debuted her 18th book titled ‘Sing You Home.’ ‘Sing You Home’ is different from many of the books that Picoult has written because this time, she features a huge political issue as the main storyline in her book. Like many of her books, ‘Sing You Home’ is written through the perspective of the different characters throughout the book, and in this one, it comes from the three main characters; Zoe Baxter, Max Baxter, and Vanessa Shaw. Zoe Baxter has been trying to have a baby with her husband, Max, for almost 10 years. Zoe, a music therapist, and Max, a landscaper, have put thousands of dollars into fertility treatments, but after a couple of miscarriages and one stillborn, the couple’s marriage cannot take it anymore FR33DOM From page 13 somewhat old school, he continues using the turn-table, along with records and his whole collection of music on his laptop. Fisher plays the songs he wants, which permits him to keep the high mood of the audience. He doesn’t bash listeners over the head by playing a top 40 playlist. He feeds off his listener’s reactions to the songs being heard over the loud speakers. He works with his own equipment, setting the mood as if on autopilot, when he carefully plans out his remaining set. He picks out the next song while the current song plays. “This is our outlet to

THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Book Review: ‘Sing You Home’ by Jodi Picoult

and they file for divorce. Zoe throws herself into her music therapy and Max moves in with his brother, Reid, who is an avid member of the New Life Church. Zoe is asked by her friend and the guidance counselor of a local school, to help a suicidal girl through Zoe’s music therapy. Zoe and Vanessa become good friends after Zoe’s divorce with Max. Eventually, the two fall in love with each other and they get married in the state of Massachusetts because where Vanessa and Zoe live, Rhode Island, it is not legal for same-sex couples to get married. Max falls into a downward spiral with his out-of-control drinking problem. Reid introduces Max to Clive Lincoln, the Pastor of New Life Church. Lincoln is an avid preacher against homosexuality and it is the main political agenda for his church.

Lincoln tries to persuade Max to accept Jesus Christ as his savior but Max refuses. When Max gets into a car accident and survives, that is when he accepts Jesus Christ and becomes an enthusiastic member of New Life Church. What makes Picoult’s book so riveting is that not only is it controversial, but it is also personal to Picoult. Picoult had a friend in college who was gay. “After college, I had a friend who, like me, was naturally, instinct u a l l y, and whole-heartedly attracted to boys. His name was Jeff. My roommate and I spent many Friday nights with Jeff and his partner Darryl, catching the latest movies and dissecting them over dinner afterward. Jeff was funny, smart, a technological whiz. In fact, the least interesting thing about him was that he happened to be

gay,” said Picoult on her website. Picoult’s son, Kyle, is also gay. Picoult found out when her son wrote a college essay about being gay. “Learning that Kyle was gay didn’t change the way I felt about him. He was still the same incredible young man he’d been before I read that essay. I didn’t love him any less because he was gay; I couldn’t love him any more if he weren’t. In the aftermath, I saw him blossom, finally comfortable in his own skin, because he wasn’t living a lie anymore,” Picoult said. It is not the lesbian storyline that makes this book controversial; it is the fight for LGBT rights in general. In ‘Sing You Home,’ Zoe remembers that she has three frozen embryos that were meant to be used for the future. Although Zoe cannot carry a baby to term, her partner, Vanessa, has a very good chance.

When the two try and go through the procedure, they find out that they must get Max’s permission. This would be easy but Max does not agree with their “lifestyle choices,” and therefore is persuaded by Lincoln to take this to court and fight over the embryos so that Max can give them to his brother, Reid, and Reid’s wife, Liddy. “Gay rights is not something most of us think about – because most of us happen to have been born straight. But imagine how you’d feel if you were told that it was unnatural to fall in love with someone of the opposite gender. If you weren’t allowed to get married. If you couldn’t adopt a child with your partner, or become a troop leader for the Boy Scouts,” Picoult said. “Imagine being a teenager who’s bullied because of your sexual orientation; or being told by your church that you are

immoral. In America, this is the norm for millions of LGBTQ individuals.” Picoult’s writing gets readers involved in the lives of these three main characters. It is not a one-sided story and that is what makes ‘Sing You Home’ a smart book. It shows what all three characters are feeling, their moral dilemmas, their frustration, their anger, their happiness, and their personal struggles. It is no surprise that when it first came out, ‘Sing You Home’ debuted at #1 on USA Today book list and New York Times Print & E-book list. For more information on the book, Picoult’s research into the subject matter, and more of her persona story, visit http://www. jodipicoult.com/singyou-home.html. Angela Thomas is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at AT683005@wcupa.edu.

letting loose and having fun,” Sterling said. He encourages people to dance at the glow party. For Sterling, music “keeps me motivated to do good in life, to keep going down that road.” Patrons find themselves exposed to new music they haven’t heard, exposing them to new genres and artists that could soon occupy their ITunes after downloading. Musical Fr33dom reveals new songs to listeners, taking them on a “new ride” that’s worth taking when Fisher drives and controls the radio, so to speak. Copies of records are furnished to Fisher before they are publicly released in stores, which is one of

the perks of being a DJ. Using this as an advantage, he exposes listeners to the latest music and remixes in older songs as he finds appropriate. As a DJ, Fisher understands how selecting the next song entails staying one step ahead of his listeners. He plays a song before the title comes across the minds of listeners. He developed a skill, learning to read the minds of listeners for the next song to spin. No need to make a song request, just enjoy their show. Think of him as a DJ that cannot be replaced with an IPod. Fisher ’s success reflects his passion as a DJ and love of the

music. To a viewer, Fisher is found spinning on his turn tables. Behind the table, he’s more than a DJ; he wants to be a part of the happiness spreading amongst the guests. “I love to accompany people on that journey,” Fisher said. He picks up local gigs and works weddings in addition to Musical Fr33dom. He can adapt to any genre found popular. Despite being a hip-hop DJ at heart, he can play for his audience by allowing them to hear what they prefer to listen to. Typically he’ll keep in mind about 100 songs he could play in the night. He accommodates his listeners, not sticking to a playlist created

prior to the event. KRS-ONE and hip-hop personally influenced Fisher in his love for music. He started spinning as a DJ in the late 1990s after hearing a DJ mixing and scratching records manually. His computer holds various genres, including hip hop, oldies, funk, step, house, Aladdin and more. He can tackle the challenge of playing based on the range of his audience. Fisher gets on his mic during the night, attempting to express a love for music and have patrons understand the show is about the music performance, not

necessarily the business hosting the group. Musical Fr33dom currently is working on booking a show at Mad River in Manayunk, starting off the New Year. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@ wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 17

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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

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NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 19

Women’s rugby ends season on high note By Devon Petaccio Special to The Quad The West Chester women’s rugby team ended their season on Saturday with a 29-3 finish over Quinnipiac University. The beginning of the game started rather slowly, but it didn’t take too long for the team to wake up. The scoring began in the ninth minute of play, when captain Beth DiMassa touched the ball down in the try zone for five points.

A few minutes later, the team from Connecticut responded with a penalty kick that was good for three points to bring the score to 5-3. Within the first half, Lauren Wertz scored for another five points as did MaryKay Heaton for five of her own. Within the first 40 minutes, much of the game was played in the home team’s try zone. And they defended with all of their might to keep the visitors from scoring, which turned out to be very successful.

When the second half began, the Rams brought the heat and the game play intensified. The offense heated up as Heaton scored for her second try of the game. “In the first half our team did not come ready to play. In the second half we brought it back and we dominated the field,” Jessica Narvid said. As the score for West Chester began to grow, the anger of Quinnipiac became obvious and they started to play dirty. “It was easy to see that

(Quinnipiac) was breaking down as their game became sloppy, but I am proud that our team stuck to the rules, played hard in return and controlled ourselves. It really showed in the end when you looked at the score board,” Beth DiMassa said. In the last minutes of the game, Anna McGlade brought it to an end with a try of her own and a successful conversion kick, bringing the score to 29-3. With the season now ended, the team was very proud of their 5-1

standings. They worked really hard this season to get as far as they did. “The team bounced back very well from last weekend with their loss against Penn State University. The game started out a little flat but by the second half the team had really picked up the pace. The defense came on very strong but there were a few errors that were made that could have been avoided,” head coach Tony Deremer said. He was very proud of how well the team played

over the course of the season and how much heart and dedication the team put in. The team is very excited for the spring season to begin in a few short months ahead. Coaches and players expect great things from this team in the season ahead as they fight to get their spot at the National Championships. Devon Petaccio is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies with a minor in film. She can be reached at DP749140@ wcupa.edu.

Women’s hockey swept at home by UD By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer On Oct. 6, the women’s hockey team played a home game rematch against the University of Delaware, and lost 2-1. Learning from their loss the previous day, West Chester started the first period strong with their forechecking in the first period. Despite leading in shots on goal with 12 shots to eight and keeping play in Delaware’s zone, West Chester was unable to make a successful play in the first period. The quiet first period, devoid of any penalties or power play opportunities, ended scoreless for both teams. West Chester still remained the stronger team in the period through their ability to get the puck down into Delaware’s ice in an attempt to push a puck past goaltender, Brie Scolaro. West Chester’s unrelenting drive to score was present again in the second

period of the game, as evident by their persistent assault of pucks on Delaware’s goal. Seconds into the period, Delaware defensemen Sarah Berkley was penalized for a minor two-minute crosschecking offense, which gave West Chester a solid opportunity to score. West Chester was still unable to get a goal past goalie Scolaro, as Delaware’s unyielding defense was able to kill the penalty. West Chester was awarded another player advantage a few minutes later after Delaware forward Kim Blasnik was handed a two-minute minor tripping penalty. Despite the second player advantage, West Chester was still unable to slap a puck past net minder Scolaro. Delaware’s offense was also unable to flick a puck through the pipes. West Chester’s Goaltender Aly Golia held her ground against her opponents with the help of West

Chester’s firm defense. It was because of both teams strong defensive playing and inability to score against each other that the game remained scoreless after two periods of play. The third and final period was where all of the intense action of the game began to occur. Since neither team scored yet, both of them were fired up to finally score a goal during the last period. Delaware’s offense was able to get there first as they were awarded a power play when West Chester defenseman Virlen Reyes was sent to the penalty box for roughing. Delaware took the player advantage serious when defenseman Danielle Malysa scored the power play goal unassisted, gaining Delaware the late lead. Letting go of this goal did not keep West Chester’s spirits down, as they were hot on Delaware’s trails. When Delaware defenseman Alyssa Welsh was

whistled for a high sticking penalty, West Chester was finally able to make ample use of their player advantage with another power play. Defenseman Amanda Vito scored the power play goal assisted by forwards Becky Dobson and Kristen Neugebauer by sliding the puck into the corner of the net. “Usually we try to create space for our forward Becky Dobson to take a slap shot from the left wing, but they were really cutting down her angle,” Vito said after the game. “That left me with an open shot from the point, and with traffic in front it was able to go in.” After West Chester forced a tie with the possibility to go to overtime if the period ended without another goal, Delaware’s offense was quick to return play into West Chester’s defensive zone. West Chester was just as determined to score and it helped that they were awarded one last power

play towards the end of the game. Despite the player advantage, it was Delaware that scored the game-winning goal. Malysa was able to score once again and pitch the puck past Golia in an unassisted short-handed goal. With only a couple more minutes left in the game, West Chester was unable to get another puck past Scolaro, and the game ended in a second West Chester loss against University of Delaware (2-1). Losing to the University of Delaware in back to back games pushes West Chester down to the third seed in their division as they continue to fight with Slippery Rock for the No. 2 spot. Both of the former teams have eight points, while University of Delaware remains in the lead with 14 points. In order for West Chester to beat another strong team like the University of Delaware’s team, they

have a few defensive strategies to work on first. “Some things we could improve on is our defensive zone coverage,” Vito said, “Our goalie keeps us in the game, but we need to be able to break out of the zone and have better coverage there. Also, we need to have better support going up the ice. Sometimes players wait for just one person to skate end to end; there needs to be more support to create better offensive options.” West Chester is currently 4-3-0 and hoping to improve upon this in their next game against University of Maryland on Nov. 19. With a lot of time in between, there is hope that with some more practice and determination West Chester will start to bring home a few more wins. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@ wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Volleyball loses in PSAC semi-finals By Amy Festa Practicum Writer The West Chester women’s volleyball season came to an end this past Friday night when the Golden Rams fell to top seeded California (Pa.) in the PSAC semi-finals. The loss to Calif. came only three days after West Chester staged an exciting, and slightly unexpected, win. Earlier in the week, West Chester traveled to Kutztown to face their PSAC East rival in a quarterfinal matchup. Although West Chester was only seeded one slot lower than Kutztown, the Golden Rams were considered heavy underdogs after the Golden Bears

swept them in straight sets twice this season. Kutztown played a close first set with the Golden Rams, but eventually lost the first frame, 25-23. From that point forward, West Chester was strong offensively and never let Kutztown get that close again. The Rams took the second set 25-18, and the third, 25-16, to knock out the Bears in straight sets. Lexi Kegerise had a strong game for the Golden Rams, accounting for 19 of the team’s 47 kills. Kelly Martin also added another eight. Helen Fitzpatrick had a double-double for the Golden Rams with 26 assists and 14 digs. The win not only guaranteed West Chester a

Friday night matchup with Calif., but it also marked the first time in head coach Kassie Bellaver’s led her team to the conference semi-finals. For five consecutive seasons, West Chester has lost in the quarterfinals. West Chester needed an exciting victory in the quarterfinals. They were going to face a tough team in the semi-finals and needed the momentum from a big win to carry them into Friday night. Calif. (Pa.), who also won in straight sets in the quarterfinals against Gannon, had the best record in the entire league and is consistently a top contender in the PSAC year after year. West Chester hit the

road yet again on Friday night to meet up with the Vulcans. And again, the Golden Rams were considered heavy underdogs. In the first set, West Chester maintained contention, but were unable to top the Vulcans and eventually fell 25-20. The second set let a little more life out of West Chester. The Vulcans won 25-16 to take a commanding two set lead. But West Chester was able to bounce back and take the third set from Calif., 25-23. The close set put a little bit of a spark back into West Chester’s game, but their success was short lived and they eventually dropped the fourth set 25-12 to give Calif. a ticket to the PSAC

finals. Kegerise had 17 kills for the Golden Rams to go along with her three blocks and 12 digs. Allison Grammer and Julie Boblits each added nine kills. Julie O’Brien led the team with six blocks. Fitzpatrick assisted on 20 points while Mary Faust added another 18. Campbell had another strong defensive outing with 26 digs. The semi-final loss was the last game for seniors Campbell, Boblits and Fitzpatrick. All three players are letter winners for the Golden Rams. The Calif. win put them in a final matchup with Lock Haven, who took Clarion to five sets in the semi-finals before eventu-

ally knocking them out. The PSAC finals, which were played on Saturday, Nov. 12, was a closely played, four set match. Again, Calif. took the first two sets from their opponent before dropping the third. They were able to bounce back in the fourth set to capture the win and the title (26-24, 25-22, 19-25, 25-22). With the win, the Vulcans are celebrating their fourth title in the past five years. It is the seventh in the school’s history of the program. Calif.’s Brandy Harris was named tournament MVP. Amy Festa is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 21

Men’s basketball ready for rebound year By Riley Wallace Staff Writer When the temperatures drop and you can see your breath while walking to class, it signals the start of one thing: college basketball season. West Chester University’s men’s basketball team looks to improve upon last year’s sixthplace finish in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference (PSAC) East division. Head coach Damien Blair led the Golden Rams to a record of 14-12, and 5-9 in conference play. Blair is entering his fourth year at the controls and leads a Golden Rams team that is returning three starters from a year ago as well as bringing in a large recruiting class consisting of five freshmen and two transfers. The Golden Rams were picked to come in fifth place in the PSAC East division this year in the PSAC preseason poll, and we can expect this young team, which only has two seniors, to get better as the season progresses. In the poll, the coaches voted that Kutztown would finish first in the division, narrowly ahead of East Stroudsburg, then Bloomsburg who just missed out on the playoffs last year, last year’s division champion Mansfield, followed by West Chester, Cheyney, Millersville, and Shippensburg rounding out the division. Seniors Lance McDowell and Khalif Foster return to lead a team that aims at making a run at the PSAC playoffs at the end of February. The Golden Rams finished up their preparation for the season with a scrimmage

against Goldley-Beacom College (DE) last Tuesday. The Golden Rams will look to incorporate two junior transfers, Jon Breeden and Gary Lawrence, into the gameplan, along with looking for contributions from the five freshmen. With all the new faces it may take the team a few games to gel with one another. Once that happens, we will find out just what kind of team West Chester will be this year. The Golden Rams open their season with a nonconference game against the University of Sciences of Philadelphia, but will have three other games this week. West Chester will travel to Philadelphia University on Tuesday for a nonconference game at 8 p.m. They return home for a pair of very important PSAC games over the weekend. On Saturday, they will play host to Slippery Rock, and on Sunday, Mercyhurst will be paying a visit to Hollinger Field House, with both games being at 3 p.m. The weekend’s conference games will help West Chester get an idea of just how much success they can expect this season in the PSAC, as Mercyhurst and Slippery Rock are projected to finish fourth and fifth, respectively, in the PSAC West division. As far as some games that you should circle on your calendar for the upcoming year, there are a number of key games. On Dec. 4, West Chester hosts Gannon who is picked to finish third in the PSAC West. Then from Dec. 9 through Jan. 14, the Golden Rams face by far their toughest stretch of the season with six straight away games.

In the middle of that road trip, West Chester faces two-time defending PSAC champions, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, followed by California University of Pennsylvania, who is picked to finish behind IUP, and Kutztown: all between Jan. 6 and Jan. 11. So while most of the students are at home celebrating the holidays with friends and family, the men’s basketball team will be trying to establish itself as a contender in the PSAC. Once the spring semester kicks off, West Chester will host PSAC East contenders, Mansfield (Feb. 2), Kutztown (Feb. 8), and East Stroudsburg (Feb. 18). The Golden Rams finish their 2011-2012 home campaign against PSAC East rival Cheyney on Feb. 22. The PSAC conference tournament will be held at a destination yet to be determined from Feb. 28 through March 3. This restructured team has spent countless hours in the off season working hard and practicing with one another in hopes of creating a chemistry and brotherhood that will be vital to the team’s success. When the Golden Rams step on the court for the first time this season, these young men will have their minds set on accomplishing two goals, reestablishing West Chester as a prominent basketball program and making history. So join these young men and come out to support them, and help them reach their goals for the upcoming 2011-2012 basketball season. Riley Wallace is a thirdyear student at West Chester University. He can be reached at RW718681@wcupa.edu.

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

The West Chester University men’s basketball team is hoping to bounce back from a dissapointing 2010-11 campaign.


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THE QUAD

NOVEMBER 14, 2011

Field hockey advances to NCAA Championship By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The Golden Rams overthrew undefeated Bloomsburg in the NCAA semi-finals with a score of 3-2 after double overtime that was decided by penalty strokes at Bloomsburg on Friday, sending WCU to the National Championships. With the win, West Chester claimed its first South Region title, and will face the North Region winners, UMass-Lowell, in the National Championships on Sunday at 1 p.m. at Sports Stadium at Bloomsburg University. The Division II powerhouses played 100 minutes of field hockey with a tied score of 2-2 before the game was sent penalty strokes to decide their fate. West Chester (15-4-1) gained an edge over Bloomsburg (19-0-1) as goalkeeper

Kristin Arnold made her biggest save of her career defending her goal from Bloomsburg’s final attempt to take the game. West Chester held a 27-21 advantage on shots throughout the game and a 19-8 advantage on penalty corners. “This week’s practice is based off what we have seen from Bloomsburg,” head coach Amy Cohen said. “We try not to worry too much about what another team is going to do, rather how we are going to counter them.” And that’s exactly the craft the Golden Rams mastered on Friday afternoon against the No. 1 seed. Bloomsburg’s Brittany Matthews put up the first tally in the 27th minute, coming off the right corner, taking an assist from Sandy Anceravage.

The Golden Rams responded with back-toback goals with five minutes remaining in the first half to head into halftime with a 2-1 hold over the Huskies. Kayla Gluchowski put the Rams on the board with her 13th goal of the season, taking a shot off a deflection from Michele Schrift. Schrift then gave West Chester the lead, deflecting a high shot from Carley Buckwalter, putting the Rams up 2-1. Jenna DiSabatino tied the game in the second half as she sent a shot over the players’ heads into the upper left corner in the 47th minute of play. The score remained 2-2 throughout regulation and both overtimes, putting the teams’ fate in the hands of their penalty strokes. West Chester outshot the Huskies by an 8-4 margin in the first

15-minute OT, while the hosts outshot the Golden Rams 7-4 in the second OT. The Rams held an advantage in the shootout and were awarded a “team” goal, taking an edge over the Huskies with a 3-2 victory. Senior co-captain, Brynn Adams, made two defensive saves while Schrift and Nancy Stehmen made one. Stehmen displayed outstanding athletic and academic achievement as she received the Elite 89 award at the 2011 NCAA Division II Field Hockey Championship banquet on Thursday of this week. She received the award for being an athlete in the NCAA tournament while maintaining a 4.0 cumulative GPA as a second-year student at the university. She was the first WCU student athlete to receive the academic award.

Hollenbach operated as the backbone of Bloomsburg’s team, making 12 saves, which propelled the team to overtime and penalty strokes. But it was still not enough to halt the Golden Rams’ aggressive offense. Arnold was credited with three saves in the win. “All season long we’ve expected the best from ourselves every time we step on the field, and this weekend is no different,” Adams said, as Cohen agreed. “We have had an excellent season from the first day of pre-season,” Cohen said. “When I got here last March, each practice was starting to prepare us for what we would see this season. The team has done an amazing job in learning and growing on and off the field. I am very proud of each and

every one of them.” “This season was much more than I could have ever asked for,” Adams said of her final collegiate field hockey performances. “We set our sights high in the beginning of the season and I am so proud of this team for making it as far as we did.” The Golden Rams will face UMass-Lowell for the championship title on Sunday at 1 p.m. at Sports Complex Stadium. The game will be a rematch of the contest played on Sept. 3 resulting in a 4-3 comefrom-behind victory for the Rams. WCU took the game in OT to stunt the River Hawks’ 24-game winning streak. Brynn Dougherty is a fourthyear student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa. edu.

Golden Rams fail to make playoffs By Sean Breen Special to The Quad On Saturday afternoon, the West Chester football team hosted Indiana University of Pennsylvania in a non-league game. The game was West Chester’s final game of the year, as they failed to make the playoffs for the second consecutive year. West Chester won the toss and elected to defer in the second half, showing confidence in a defense that dominated Millersville last week. It didn’t take long for the defense to fall apart. On the Hawks’ first possession, an array of play action passes continued to burn the defense for big yardage and eventually led to a touchdown for IUP.

The Rams answered right back when they ran a trick play, handing the ball off to wide receiver Tim Keyser, who threw the ball back to quarterback Sean McCartney, who found LaRonn Lee wide open downfield for a huge gain. Two plays later McCartney hooked up with Lee again for a 7-yard touchdown strike. That is all the Rams would get for the rest of the day. The next possession for the Hawks led to a 20 yard touchdown run which put IUP back on top, and they didn’t look back after that. The Hawks completed a big 3rd down and 14, setting up a field goal, making it 17-7. The lack of the ability to make a crucial stop is something that has plagued the Rams’ defense

most of the season. Turnovers ruined any hope of a comeback. McCartney threw his first interception of the day when he attempted a pass over the middle that was intercepted and returned all the way down to the Rams’ 6-yard line. Three plays later a pass was completed for a touchdown and the Hawks led 24-7. The problems continued for the Rams when McCartney was intercepted again. This time the ball was on the Rams’ 42-yard line which led to a Hawks’ field goal making it 27-7 late in the second quarter. Instead of attempting to score before halftime, the Rams took a knee. After the half, the offense was looking for a spark with Matt Carroll at

quarterback. They didn’t get one though as they went three and out and were forced to punt the ball back to the Hawks. IUP kept the ball on the ground on their first possession of the third quarter, but that didn’t stop them from driving the ball. They took the ball 81 yards for a touchdown and also killed seven minutes off the clock. McCartney was back in at quarterback as the Rams coaching staff continues to keep you guessing as to which guy will be out there under center. Looking to answer back with a score of their own, McCartney hooked up with sophomore wide receiver Tim Keyser on a terrific 25- yard pass and catch. A facemask call on IUP and a roughing the passer call had the Rams in

business on the Hawks’ 24yard line, but the drive came to a halt when the Rams failed to convert a 4th and 1. The fourth quarter led to much of the same. IUP kept the running game going so they could keep the clock running. The IUP players were undisciplined as they were flagged for many personal fouls (facemasks and roughing the passers) and unsportsmanlike conduct. West Chester was not able to capitalize on their mistakes as they fell 34-7, ending their season with a 5-6 record while IUP improved to 7-3. After the game, sophomore kicker Shawn Leo reflected on the season. “Going into the season we had high expectations and

goals and unfortunately we couldn’t achieve them. There were a lot of mistakes in the games we lost and we need to learn how to avoid them to be successful next year. We have a good group of guys coming back next year and we need to work hard in the off season and come out ready to win,” Leo said. One bright spot on the day came during the halftime show. Jared Bonacquisti and Dom Dovidio were presented with certificates from West Chester’s president Dr. Greg Weisenstein for donating bone marrow last summer that could potentially save lives. Sean Breen is a thirdyear student majoring in English. He can be reached at SB718728@wcupa.edu.


NOVEMBER 14, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 23

Women’s basketball eager for new season The former All-PSAC East forward and 2003 graduate of West Chester became an assistant to Kane before One year after falling the 2004-05 campaign. in the quarterfinals of Alongside Kane and the PSAC Tournament, Wooden will be Lindsay the West Chester Wilson, who will begin University women’s basher fifth season as ketball team returns to another assistant coach the court this Tuesday, on the Golden Rams’ when they go on the bench. road to take on West Chester was Philadelphia University picked to repeat as in their season opener. third-place finishers in Head coach Deirdre the PSAC East in a Kane begins her 25th preseason poll of the conference’s head coaches three weeks ago. West Chester did receive one first-place vote, though, signifying that someone feels the Golden Rams can go to great heights this season. The Golden Rams will be led by senior guard Allison Hostetter and junior forward Alex Lennon, who were each named to the PSAC East preseason allleague team. They will be joined by senior guards Shamyra Hammond and Jill Keefer, each three-year letterwinners, to form the leadership core of the team. H o s t e t t e r, Lennon, and Keefer all return after starting each and every one of West Chester ’s 27 games last year. Brynn Pezzuti/ The Quad Hammond played in 25 of the team’s games, providing Meghen Kerrigan is one of 11 returning players for this veteran women’s a key defensive basketball team. presence to the By Joey Samuel Staff Writer

season in charge of the Golden Rams, who finished third in the PSAC East last season, but crashed out of the conference tournament in the first round. This season, they will look to build on that performance and go one step further by going to the NCAA Tournament. Kane will be joined on the bench by top assistant Kiera Wooden, who enters her eighth season in the position.

team. Also poised to play a key role this season are junior forwards Carly Strickland and Ambreelinne Ortman, who took part in all of last year’s 27 games, despite not starting a single one. This year, one or both of them could crack into the starting lineup. The Golden Rams welcome one new recruit to the team in forward Kendall Benovy, a six-foot freshman who hails from Hershey, Pa. Also joining the roster this season is Serifat Junaid, another six-foot freshman forward who redshirted last year. Junaid, who attended Camden Catholic High School, also plays track for West Chester. We s t C h e s t e r ’s greatest threat in the PSAC East coming into the season appears to be fierce rival, Bloomsburg.

The Huskies were picked first in the division in the coaches’ poll, and received five first-place votes. Edinboro, meanwhile, were picked as the crop of the West division by the coaches. After opening the season away at Philadelphia University, West Chester will return home to play a pair of games at Hollinger Field House, where they went 12-2 last season. Both will be conference games, meaning the Golden Rams will have little time to prepare before meaningful contests are being played. On Saturday they will take on Slippery Rock, while on Sunday they play Mercyhurst. West Chester will then play a number of key conference matchups throughout December, including a trip to

Edinboro on the ninth, before hosting the Carol Eckman Memorial Tournament at Hollinger Field House on the Dec. 30 and 31. Molloy College and the University of the Sciences will be the Golden Rams’ opponents for the tournament. The Golden Rams will take on division favorite, Bloomsburg, first at home on Jan. 21 and then away on Feb. 11. We s t Chester concludes the regular season on Feb. 25, and would begin the PSAC Tournament on Feb. 28 if they can qualify for it. If successful, the Golden Rams would then take part in the NCAA Tournament for the first time since they participated in 2003. Joey Samuel is a thirdyear student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa.edu.

Brynn Pezzuti/ The Quad

The West Chester University women’s basketball team is ready to start their fight to get back to the PSAC Tournamnet, this time going further than the quartefinals.


PAGE 24

THE QUAD Flyers captain Chris Pronger returned to the ice Wednesday for Philadelphia’s game against Tampa Bay. Pronger had been sidelined since Oct. 24, when he took a high stick to eye in a game against the Toronto Maple Leafs. Pronger, against his will, is required to wear a visor for at least the time being.

Sports NOVEMBER 14, 2011

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU downed by IUP in final game Page - 22

Field hockey overcomes Bloomsburg in semi-finals Page - 22

Women’s rugby finishes season with 29-3 victory

Page - 19

Ilana Berger/ The Quad

Quad 101-08  

The Quad issue of November 14, 2011

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