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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. APRIL 18. 2011

V O L UM E 1 0 0 . I S S U E 1 0

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Aid to South Africa, page 5 IN THIS ISSUE

NEWS

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OP-ED

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Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad

FEATURES

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SPORTS

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THE QUAD

College graduates prepare for future careers By Travis Pearson Practicum Writer

Recent college graduates face improving job prospects, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. Recent data shows that the Class of 2011 expects 13 to 14 percent more hires than last year’s grads experienced. With that said, the economy remains relatively uncooperative. Despite the Labor Department’s recently released optimistic job figures, “actual unemployment” continues to make finding gainful employment tough. Leo Hindery, media business executive and former “Obama for President” finance committee member, said that figures actually sit at 17.7 percent, and not the 8.8 percent the government released, according to a report he and his team circulate every month. Economic issues really surfaced in 2009, as the recession fully took hold and led to layoffs and less hires, according to the Inquirer’s story. The unemployment rate for 20- to 24-year-olds with bachelor’s degrees was 8.8 percent in 2009 and 9.2 percent in 2010. West Chester seniors certainly feel the effects of this financial climate. Students face multiple issues when looking for a job. “Always feeling under-qualified,” fourth year student Kaleigh Sunday said ss one of her biggest issues. “I swear I can be made to feel under-qualified for a fast-food job— and I’ve even worked one before.” “For psychology I need a higherlevel graduate degree. No jobs will consider me before I finish graduate school,” another soon-to-be graduate, Danielle Mosby, said. Many other seniors mention similar problems when searching for a job. Often times, jobs request that applicants possess multiple years of professional experience, which eliminates a large pool of college seniors. Some ads go as far as to tell college students not to bother applying because the company feels they’re not ready for the job. Students also list interviewing inexperience as a potential problem. “I’m not a smooth talker by any

means, so I think it’s going to be difficult to market myself as better than another [candidate]— even though I’m confident that I am,” Sunday said. Lack of available options and necessary or desired job skills were other commonly listed problems. Due to these issues, many students decide to take jobs outside their fields of study that they may not want, or move back home with their parents. Some statistics suggest that more students choose graduate school because of the difficult market, per the Inquirer. “There are enough jobs available, though maybe not exactly the ones that I want or am excited about. But, I feel as though I’m not really in a position to be that picky,” Sunday confirmed. Edwin Koc, the National Association of Colleges and Employers director of research, said that students had a median of 2 job offers by April back in 2007. Last year, more than 60 percent of new grads had no offers by April, though. At WCU, the Office of Institutional Research published their most recent findings for spring 2010. For that class, 623 students said that they planned to pursue full-time employment

trated by their job searches. The Twardowski Career Development Center, located on the second floor of Lawrence, is one potential place students can turn to if they want to secure some type of gainful employment in the future. Their mission is to “provide services, programs, and resources that facilitate the lifelong career development process and assist students and alumni with implementing and securing satisfying careers,” according their web page. The center points students toward the College Central Network’s databases when looking for a job. Students of all ages can search for jobs or internships on this website, and some job listings are directed toward the university. Businesses can use these tools to set up on-campus recruiting and look for interested students. Also, a career fair that spans all majors and fields is held once each semester. Three counselors stand by in the center to help students with their career pursuits, and can provide resume, interview or cover letter tips and training. For current seniors, though, time is running out. When asked to give advice, students are quick to offer their younger classmates ways to avoid the mistakes that they made. “Start looking early. Join a career networking site so you have enough time to familiarize yourself with the database and its opportunities. By doing this, you’ll have time to peruse the site at your leisure and will actually find jobs you may want to apply for,” Sunday said. “Honestly, netwww.smc.edu working is the biggest key to finding work. It’s all following graduation, and anoth- about who you know. If you have er 29 looked for part-time work. an insider in your field, your Of that total, only 138 (22.18 per- chances of landing a job increase cent) students had accepted a tremendously,” Mosby said. full-time position, and five took Students have many opportupart-time jobs (17.24 percent). nities on campus to succeed, but Another 7.21 percent of all job- with the economy still seemingly seeking students continued with struggling, seniors who find solid their current job. employment in their field after These statistics left a whopping graduation will probably be the 70.86 percent of seniors unem- fortunate minority. ployed upon their graduation. Travis Pearson is a student at Some current seniors reflected West Chester University. He can last spring’s statistics and said be reached at TP651537@wcupa. they felt hopeless, lost or frus- edu.

News

APRIL 18, 2011

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

Academic Affairs holds town hall meeting By T.J. Cromyak Practicum Writer

With the proposed budget cut on the university, the department of Academic Affairs held a town hall meeting on Thursday in Sykes to discuss possible solutions to fill the funding gap. Dr. Linda Lawmers, Provost, led the discussion on the possible outcomes of the budget cut to the university. The purpose of the discussion was to inform the faculty, staff and students in attendance of the possible solutions. In addition to informing, Lawmers wanted to engage a conversation with the concerned faculty. Lawmers set a scenario that if Governor Corbett cut funding by 25 percent, tuition would increase by 9 percent, and there would still be about a $9 million gap in funding. However, President Weisenstein has set aside a stabilization fund that was intended to carry West Chester through the proposed cut. Unfortunately, the fund will only be able to carry the university through next year. The stabilization fund would only be a short-term solution. The discussion continued with Mary Pat Werley, Academic Affairs Budget Manager She laid out different principles the university was going to stick with

throughout the budget cuts. Werley assured the faculty and staff that above all, the university will focus on the mission to provide a quality education and a meaningful reputation. In addition, Werley said that the Department of Academic Affairs will be focusing on the long term goals even if it means some “uncomfortable” changes, such as lay-offs. She said that the department would keep everything on the table and hold nothing back. Lastly, she said that the department would try to engage the faculty and staff in a transparent process. Dr. Jack Waber voiced his concerns for students saving money. “Students can beat the tuition increases by taking summer courses over the summer sessions,” he said. Lawmers said that students will be able to save money due to the fact that some fees are not required over the summer sessions. These solutions are not final, and will continue to change as the budget continues to change. Lawmers said that updates can be found on the Academic Affairs website in the future. T.J. Cromyak is a student majoring in communication studies with a minor in journalism. He can be reached at AC651771@wcupa.edu.

Welcome to “Your West Chester Vision” By Mayor Carolyn Comitta Special to The Quad

Everyone has probably been in a conversation about their hometown that starts with, “What this town needs is…” Mayor Carolyn Comitta wants to have that conversation with you about West Chester. Making West Chester the best place to live, work, and play - to preserve the best of the past and to build a vibrant future - requires an engaging community conversation. By hearing from the broad array of people who love West Chester, and who want to see it grow and thrive, we will be able to turn our collective vision for West Chester into reality. West Chester

needs to hear about your vision for the future. What’s your dream for West Chester? What makes it the perfect town and how do we keep it that way in the face of the tough economic situation? Join Mayor Comitta and other Borough leadership in the 2011 Community Conversation event, “Your West Chester Vision,” to be held at Sykes Student Union on West Chester University’s campus. Please save the date for Saturday, May 21, 2011 from 9a.m.-2p.m. More information, as well as event registration, will be available in the coming weeks on www.west-chester.com. This town is your town and West Chester needs your vision.


APRIL 18, 2011

THE QUAD

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WCU organizations provide free legal services to students By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-In-Chief

Sponsored by Off Campus and Commuter Association (OOCA) and Resident Hall Association (RHA), WCU students can seek free legal advice from a lawyer provided on campus. This service has been provided for more than 25 years. Lawyer John Winicov began his first year with WCU in the fall. Working for the last 25 years as a lawyer, he has experiences in criminal defense, labor law, personal injury law and group legal services. Beginning as a public defender for four years, Winicov now works in his own practice as well as working with WCU. The university is the first higher education institution he is working with, as an “umbrella” of group legal services. Appointments take place on Fridays between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. This semester, a total of eight appointment days were available to students. Each session lasts up to 15 minutes. In one day, the lawyer typically meets with six or eight students throughout the two hour schedule. “I’m pretty thorough in the briefing,” Winicov said in seeing each student for 15 minutes of a “condensed counsel.” Only undergraduate and graduate students are eligible for the free service. In addition to funding from OCCA and RHA, the Graduate Student Association (GSA) contributed for the service to be free of cost to graduate students. By the send of January, 75 students have sought the legal counsel advice. Of these students, 88 percent are undergraduate students with graduate students composing the remaining 12 percent. Students are allowed to have their parents attend the session if they would like. Lawyer confidentiality of the case applies. Students are recommended to bring documentations in relation to their appointment with the lawyer. This includes citations,

The survey feedback had a 94 to meet with the lawyer “after the percent response stating their fact” of their offense. Administrators of the service time with the lawyer increased provided encourage students to their awareness of their “rights seek legal advice prior to legal and responsibilities as a citizen.” and civil issues arising. The law- Winicov said if a student “feels yer is provided with leases of their rights have been violated,” housing contracts for south cam- he then suggests that they file a pus and village apartments, as complaint. “I always tell students what well as affiliated and traditional their rights are,” Winicov said. housing contracts. Brenner said students should “And I encourage them to plead discuss their lease, both on or off- not guilty.” By pleading not guilty, Winicov campus, to understand the consequences of violating their lease. recommends students attempt to Students can bring their have their criminal case lowered lease to the lawyer to to a non-criminal offense, such as receive help in “under- a noise ordinance. Brenner encourages that stustanding” the terms of the lease. This includes dents use their situation as a the right and restric- “learning opportunity.” For legal tions of the landlord issues, she encourages that stuentering the apartment. dents, “instead of pleading guilty Other matters involv- if they’re innocent, they can chaling housing responsibil- lenge” their case. It helps stuities that students may dents “learn responsibility” when seek legal advice on they handle their cases. Winicov suggests students include the consequences of hosting a party should have a lawyer to represent with alcohol. Brenner them if necessary. However, he said the lawyer can realizes this is costly to the stuinform students on dent. According to the website, what happens if under- www.wcupa.edu/och/home/leghttp://www.johnwinicov.com age guests are found by alaid, the legal consultant can the police in one’s apart- suggest professionals for considment. Students can eration, or refer students to the cases with “low amount of evi- learn how to “protect” themselves Lawyer Referral Service of the legally, when they are “hosting a Chester County Bar Association. dence” to fight it. “I’m speaking on behalf of the With 95 percent of offenses party.” Brenner created a survey for students,” John Winicov said. occurring on campus, Winicov is Of the students who filled out “surprised at the quantity of students to give feedback on the legal service they received. Survey the survey, nearly two thirds said offenses” committed on-campus. Christina Brenner, working for questions asked about the perfor- they were “very satisfied” with Sykes Administration, has mance of the lawyer as well as the the legal service from Winicov. worked to obtain a lawyer for stu- overall experience of the services Many students also commented dents to have free legal clinics. provided for students to receive on the survey that they would have liked to have had more time According to Brenner, there usu- free legal counsel. ally is an equal spilt of people who live on or off campus that seek advice from the lawyer available. Issues include underage drinking, persons hosting parties with alcohol, concerns with housing and landlords, and roommate issues. Brenner said roommate issues form from a resident not paying rent, persons moving in without helping pay for rent and arguments over parking spaces. Winicov said most of the cases he sees are alcohol related. This includes consumption, possession, http://www.johnwinicov.com supplying to minors and public intoxication. There were “small cases” of drug possession, or drug paraphernalia. He has seen some cases of shoplifting as well. Most students typically sign up leases, etc. The services provided by Winicov include civil and criminal issues. He cannot represent students as their legal counsel in court due to a conflict of interest. After the session, the lawyer does not know of the outcome of cases that students seek legal advice for. Winicov is “here for the students” who are interested in police searching knowing their rights in terms of “person, dorm rooms and apartments.” He has suggested to students who have

Goodluck on finals!

in one sitting with the lawyer. The majority of students responded that they found the lawyer to be very or extremely helpful to their situation. All of the students that participated in the survey said they know which “steps to take” next. “Even though it’s a summary offense, it’s very serious,” Winicov said in relation to alcohol related offenses. It is an offense he explained could prevent students from getting a teaching job, from getting into law school or other such future plans. At the end of the spring semester, the provided lawyer will hear from students inquiring about not getting their deposits back from their landlords. In other cases, some students ask the lawyer questions about breaking their apartment lease. The free services are not provided in the summertime. In the fall 2009 semester, 51 students used the counsel services. The whole academic year before this, 93 students used the services that were provided biweekly. Brenner said this “may be the largest year we’ll have for services” provided. Appointments can be made at the information desk at Sykes Student Union, or by signing up on the university’s website. This semester, the remaining appointment will be on April 29. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourth year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa. edu.

http://www.johnwinicov.com

For more information on John Winicov, visit his website at www.johnwinicov.com or contact him at (610) 692-2096


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THE QUAD

APRIL 18, 2011

Active Minds prepares to send silence packing

“The purpose is to really bring said. Active minds will be hosting students, the community and facthe LivLive coffee house on April ulty members together to talk On Thursday, April 28 and 28 from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. in the Friday, April 29, Active Minds about mental health, and to break Sykes common grounds. the stigma by talking about it and will host two events in honor of “LivLive is a conthe program; Send Silence cert that they have Packing. Active Minds is curaround the counties rently the only organization and what we’re going that allows students to help to do is have local promote mental health awarebands and local perness and issues on campus. formers come and it “Active minds is a mental is really to just health awareness organizaspread awareness tion, and we’re one of the 300 about mental chapters across the US and health,” Active Canada of Active Minds Inc., Mind’s newly electwhich is a national organizaed president for the tion,” current president of 2011-2012 year, Active Minds, Katie Lauren Montemuro Kirszenblat said. Active said. “[LivLive] is Minds Inc.’s goals are to http://www.sendsilencepacking.org partnered with the change the conversation Suicide Prevention about mental and health, and Task Force. We’ll to raise awareness and educate to change the stigma around menstudents because it is something have raffle baskets and the tal health issues. that effects everyone,” Kirszenblat money that we’ll raise will go to them. However the concert will be free and everyone can come out and support this cause.” There will be informational pamphlets about suicide prevention and mental health at the LivLive concert. Students, faculty and staff can also find out more information about Active Minds and how to become more involved with the organization. The LivLive concert was actually started by Susan Kelleher to honor her son who died by suiBy Angela Thomas News Editor

2011 SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

Scholarships of $1000 each will be awarded to two students who have completed at least 30 credits at the time of application and have a GPA of 2.75 or higher. For further information and application http://www.apscufwcu.com/scholarship-wcu.html or contact WCU-APSCUF Office 811 Roslyn Ave West Chester, PA 19383 mcavacini@wcupa.edu

Deadline for receipt of applications April 21, 2011 Scholarship recipients will be announced May 2, 2011

packs are donated by the family or friends of the person who passed away and they have the stories about those people (written on the backpacks) students are encouraged to read them and look at them,” Montemuro said. There will also be information and people to talk to for those who have lost someone to suicide. “People will be able to talk about their experiences and not be afraid ... it is something that people are hesitant to discuss,” Montemuro said. “It’s a really moving display. The impression that it leaves, I think ,is a priceless visual ... it just sounds like a number but when you see 1,100 backpacks out, http://www.sendsilencepacking.org it’s incredible and it’s emotional, but it gets Kirszenblat hopes that students people talking or just to realize will learn that mental health is that this actually does happen not something to be afraid of, “it’s and it is okay to talk about it,” something that affects everyone.” Kirszenblat said. “It does exist On April 29, Active Minds will and it is not something to be also be hosting an event called afraid of .There is support and Send Silence Packing. There will you are not alone.” For more information, please be a display of 1,100 backpacks around the academic quad (if it contact Katie Kirszenblat at rains, the event will take place in KK656270@wcupa.edu. Angela Thomas is a fourth year the Sykes Ballrooms). “It represents the 1,100 stu- student majoring in English. She dents in college who die each year can be reached at AT683005@ by suicide. Some of those back- wcupa.edu. cide. “This will be the task force’s eleventh concert and this will be our second on campus,” Kirszenblat said. The Mental Health Awareness Committee along with the Chester County Suicide Prevention Task Force and Active Minds are sponsoring the event.

Thoughts from the Mayor’s Office By Stephanie Eckman Special to The Quad

As a West Chester University student, the intern to the Mayor of West Chester understands the stresses, crises and time-consuming activities that are ever-present in the typical student’s life. Every day, students must plan around classes, studying, homework, jobs, reading textbooks and writing essays – not to mention finding time to eat and bathe. Many must even plan their days down to the hour to ensure they have adequate time to appropriately address every one of their responsibilities. One of the responsibilities of the intern to the Mayor is to attend Borough Council planning sessions and Borough Council meetings, each of which occurs once a month on the third Tuesday and Wednesday of the month, respectively. Initially, there was concern on the spring intern’s end about how these extra hours – about two for each meeting – would cut into homework time. In January, the intern attended the first pair of meetings. These took place during the first week of classes, so it was not yet unreasonable to expect her to

have the mental strength to listen with diligence and participate with enthusiasm. The meeting turned out to be unexpectedly positive and pleasantly surprising. The democratic process is really a beautiful one. The intern has the unique opportunity to watch the meeting with excitement from both a student’s and an on- or off-campus resident’s perspectives. Although the Borough Council does have an agenda of items to tackle, all meeting attendees are given the opportunity to express their concerns and ideas in an open forum format. The Borough Council takes the time to explain the background of each issue brought up for discussion for those present, who may be unfamiliar with the topic at hand. After each council representative voices his or her own opinion, the floor is open to any community member present who wishes to comment on the issue. In the past three months of meetings, community opinions have ranged from brief statements by citizens who had initially attended the meeting to speak on another issue to intricate presentations by groups of

community members passionate about a certain topic. This passion should be present in the heart of every West Chester University student. Every year the students come together as a student body to support certain causes ranging from university sports teams to the annual springtime celebration of bananas. Rarely, however, do students come together to support the democratic process in the town in which they live during the majority of the months they call themselves students. Please consider attending the next Borough Council meetings at 7 p.m. in Borough Hall at 401 E. Gay Street on April 19 and 20. Make your voices heard. Borough residents want to work alongside students to make this wonderful town the most enjoyable environment possible for all who share it. Only through this spirit of cooperation can West Chester, West Chester University and the student experience continue to grow. Stephanie Eckman is the intern to the mayor. She is a fourth year student majoring in Spanish and Political Science with a minor in Linguistics. She can be reached at SE662341@wcupa.edu.


APRIL 18, 2011

THE QUAD

Aid to South Africa

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All photos by Jess Guzzardo/The Quad


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Opinion

THE QUAD

&

Editorial Meet the new boss

I’m a familiar face to The Quad, or maybe just a familiar name for people who are reading this and don’t know me. I’ve been writing for The Quad since the first issue of my freshman year. I’ve gone from being the assistant features editor, to the features editor, to the news editor, to now being the Editor-InChief. I’m taking over for our graduating Editor-In-Chief, Tara Tanzos. She has been a great editor to work with; she has been a great person to work with outside of the newspaper too. Once I began working in the office, over the course of the past four years, I’ve worked under six Editors. I’ve had six Editors that I learned from as I’m now taking on this role. I think over time I’ve gotten use to saying that I’ll be checking with my Editor for something, that out of habit, I’ll probably still say ‘I’ll check with my Editor’ even though it will refer to me. Before leaving her position, Tara has trained me on my new role. Lately I’ve been thinking about how working at The Quad has been such a great experience. Just like Tara and a handful of other editors, we have trained a handful of people on their jobs they hold now. With graduation nearing, we have been training replacements for the positions that need to be filled. There will be many new names in the newspaper next year. This goes for section editors and writers. It’s been great experience in writing articles, conducting an interview, making the sections lay-outs and balancing it with school work. Enjoy the 24 page issue and we’ll see you in the fall. Check out our website over the summer for any updates. ~ Ginger Rae

APRIL 18, 2011

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | Fax: 610.436.3280 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Rae Dunbar

Editor-in-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayers Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

EDITORIAL STAFF Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor COPY EDITORS Sarah Gurgal Lauren Whitcomb Linda Charles

BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Joshua Cash Business Manager Dan Colon Advertising Manager --Available-Asst. Advertising Manager Brittany Silver Managing Editor

DISTRIBUTION Kyle Pesce Sarah Kemmerer ONLINE EDITION Kristin Solanick FACULTY ADVISOR Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2011 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely

If you would like to write for The Quad in the fall semester, please e-mail us at quadeic@wcupa.edu.

by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.


APRIL 18, 2011

Letters to the Editor

To the Editor, Our society has laws preventing the infringement on the rights of others. It is illegal to steal, it is illegal to physically assault, it is illegal to murder a fellow citizen. These laws are necessary to ensure societal order and to protect people from undue harm. However, while these laws seek to protect the population, a grave humanitarian crisis is gripping our nation and more specifically our fair campus. It is understood that it is a choice and a right for people to smoke and this right must not be denied, however is it not a right to lead a smoke free lifestyle? It is assumed that the right to lead a smoke free lifestyle means that a person will not smoke and will not be exposed to smoke, yet is that the case. How many times on campus does the right of the smoker infringe on the right of the non-smoker? How many times must one seeking to lead a smoke free lifestyle have to sacrifice their right by walking through a cloud of smoke on the way to their class? Secondhand smoke exposure on campus is overwhelming. Students seeking to lead a smoke free lifestyle are constantly being failed in having their rights protected by the university. Students must go to class and must walk through campus to go to the library or to Sykes. These walks always begin and end with exposure to secondhand smoke at the entrances of campus buildings. Secondhand smoke is considered a class A carcinogen on the level of asbestos. The university does not build with asbestos because of the harms it causes, so why does the university allow student exposure to secondhand smoke? I am seeking to protect the right of the non-smoker and to increase awareness about the harm smoking has on those who do not smoke. For all those interested in decreasing secondhand smoke on campus come to Sykes ballroom 117 on April 19 at 8pm and have your voice heard. We can get smoking moved from building entrances and we can reach a compromise with the smoking population on campus. -William Grier, West Chester University Student To the Editor, Regarding “Proposed budget cuts may affect WCU students” in the April 11th edition of The Quad, I would like to provide several clarifications so that students and others have the most accurate and current information available. The Governor’s proposed budget, if enacted, would have significant ramifications for West Chester University. However, several key legislators have stated publicly that the budget reductions will be nowhere near as severe as what the Governor proposed. Under no circumstance will the cost to students increase by the magnitude indicated in the article. In all likelihood, the tuition increase for the upcoming year will be fairly modest. Of course, the actual tuition rate will depend largely on the amount of state funding that is restored to the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). I also want to point out that no academic programs have been targeted for reduction or elimination. Such steps would not be taken without first meeting the needs of students in those programs. Students can play an important role in ensuring that the budget that ultimately is approved enables West Chester University to maintain academic excellence and access for Pennsylvanians. I encourage students to write to their legislators and tell the story of the value that West Chester University provides to the Commonwealth. Information on the budget and how to contact legislators can be found by clicking on the “Budget Update” box at the bottom of WCU’s homepage. Working together we can ensure that West Chester University remains affordable without sacrificing its academic quality.

-Greg R. Weisenstein, Ed.D, West Chester University President

THE QUAD

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English club pending publication is disappointing Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief

Every year I look forward to the literature magazine that the English Club publishes towards the end of the spring semester. This year however, I’m not in a rush to pick up a copy of the Literati. I submitted several creative pieces to the lit mag, just like I did for the three other years I was a member of the club. This year I submitted eight poems. None of which are getting published. I inquired the pending publication with other members of the club. I had been on the executive board and told the other board members that I received an email notifying me that my writing would not be published. They too received an e-mail similar to mine. The e-mail I received said: “I regret to inform you that your work was not accepted into Literati. This was due to a large influx of great work and does not reflect the quality of your pieces. Good luck placing them elsewhere and please try again next year.” I submitted my work about two or three weeks prior to the deadline. Not a single poem can be placed onto a page. I doubted this could happen. Having been a member during the last three lit mags, I know we usually reach out to students for more material. The only executive board member to hear their work will be published is the president of the club. The president agreed that the English Club does not reject work until the magazine pages are full. The only other work to be turned down is any work submitted past the deadline as it would be too late to add to the publishing company. The English Club had strived that we publish student’s creative work and we do not reject anyone’s writing. My first year, the club accepted pictures to fill the pages to make a lit mag. My sophomore year we extended the deadline twice because we did not have enough content. The following year we had enough material when we pushed the deadline back from over winter break to the beginning of the spring semester. This year the club agreed to keep the deadline at the usual extended deadline to

be at the beginning of the spring semester. Since I had written poems in a creative writing class from the fall semester, I put a folder together of those poems I had written for class. Students prepare their work every year for the magazine. In the folder I put two poems I had developed more in my class. I also included four poems that I had written in the class. Then during winter break I added older poems to the folder and submitted it to the English Club’s literature magazine, the Literati. The previous years I had only submitted an average of two poems or short stories. After taking my poetry class, I was eager to put a collection of my poems together to submit to the lit mag. Now more than four months after submitting, I’m dismayed to hear that none of my work will be published. After I inquired about the rejection, mine as well as half of the English Club members, I wondered what was actually being published if we weren’t any of the writers. The board members discussed this with the editor of the magazine. The writers are our alumni. I think that’s great the alumni want to stay involved, but why are they getting selected over current undergraduate students? The budget is for the under grad class. We’re the ones who are paying for the lit magazine to be published. As members of the club, no matter how active, they are the ones to promote the magazine and sell it. The club members hold bake sales to raise extra money for their budget to cover the printing costs. This also helps lower the cost of the lit magazines. For these unfair reasons that were discussed with the executive board, I hope this doesn’t happen

again. This is the first year that I know of that Literati has rejected students’ work. I think I’m still dumbfounded by the fact the writers are the alumni and not the writers from the club or other current under graduate students. I understand this was not the entire board of the club that decided this. It seems the lesson learned is to make sure that the person in charge of the position is not only doing their job, but to make sure the process is being done fairly. Typically the person in the position checks in with how many pieces they were given and how the publication process is coming along. Since there are no rejections, within reason, there was no need to further check in with the literature magazine editor. The members said they were hoping to discuss the matter at their meeting. The lack of communication is a black hole in the club. I’m sure this will be a turn off for many of the members of the club, but I’m also sure many will return and submit next year. I hope they get published. The Literati is the English Club’s main objective that they prepare for throughout the year. Right now it’s their most disappointing turn-out. It’s nearing the time the lit magazine should be for sale. I love reading the creative work that other students have written. The publication is a great opportunity for students to have something published at their college. It encourages students to develop on their creative pieces to submit to publishing companies. With this year’s overwhelming rejection, this may be the only edition I don’t care to look at. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fourth year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 8

THE QUAD

APRIL 18, 2011

The benefits of student entrepreneurship

Cierra Saunders

Special to The Quad

With high unemployment and job scarcity in our economy today, the prospect of entrepreneurship may entice those who feel that they have an idea worth pursuing. Though it may not seem like the right time to go into business. Small businesses and ingenuity help to sustain this economy. With any endeavor it takes careful consideration, time, money, and planning before one can start. One of the most important questions a person has to ask is whether or not they see their present interest as a hobby or something they can do professionally. If a person is willing to support their passion with the necessary sacrifice it takes to succeed, then that interest should be pursued. Starting up a business can be overwhelming; it helps tremendously to create and establish a step by step guide – an action plan that will help guide you on your way to success. Initially it is important to think about what you are good at; knowing where your strengths are. One of the first things an entrepreneur should do is have a clear vision of their business. Think about

your areas of interest, your goals and objectives and plan/envision how you are going to accomplish those goals. This should be done in the preliminary stages so you will know in which area to specialize. Some of the initial steps in establishing a business startup include but are not limited to: knowing what your intentions are and the vision you have for your business; establishing a name and trademark for your business—this will make it more tangible in the initial start-up phase; knowing the market and competition you will face and doing adequate research to get a head up on them; being able to complete the general tasks necessary before launching a business such as bookkeeping and marketing; learning and understanding the legal barriers to starting a business such as acquiring the proper licenses, insurance, and checking your municipality for zoning laws; estimating start-up costs and establishing an inventory; figuring out how you will acquire funding and support for your business. A vital step would be to seek out a mentor and carefully write up a business plan. Initial plans may not be that extensive and

it would be ok to have a business plan that is only one page long. All business must have a plan before they begin, in order for them to succeed. A business plan should include name, location of the company, products and services, objective of business or company, start up costs, future projections, and so on. Business plans will grow and become more extensive as the company grows. It is best to utilize print and online resources for assistance with business startup. Excellent resource websites include SBA.gov, Entrepreneur. com, and others. There, you can find most of the essential information necessary to get started. Information regarding business ideas, franchising opportunities, online and home based businesses, loans and

grants, registering a business, and necessary permits etc. can be found using these online resources. Probably the best practical advice for someone who is genuinely interested in starting a business is to shadow others who are in the position you want to be in. This is important because this will serve as a guide for how to begin your own business venture. With all of this in mind it

is important to know the right steps to take in order to become successful doing what you love. With a good business sense, belief in oneself, perseverance, and determination attaining a successful small business becomes more plausible. Cierra Saunders is a fourth year student majoring in professional studies. She can be reached at CS659995@ wcupa.edu

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APRIL 18, 2011

Features

THE QUAD

Founder of Chester County Peace Movement visits classroom

United States’ financial deficit to the war and ‘the government’s Karen Porter, founder of the refusal to cut defense spending.’ Chester County Peace Movement “We have cut things like social security spending and feeding the and community organizer with homeless out of the budget to Organizing for America, spoke to pour it into the rat holes of West Chester University students Afghanistan and Iraq. We can’t on Tuesday evening, April 12, afford this war,” Porter said. about her passionate vision for In addition to her involvement peace, support for the anti-war with the Chester County Peace movement and the controversy Movement, Porter contributes to that accompanies peace protests. Organizing for America, a nationEvery Saturday afternoon for al organization responsible for the past eight years, Porter and supporting Barack Obama’s presthe Chester County Peace idential campaign. Movement has held vigils on the Through the use of a ‘scientificorner of Market and High St. in cally conducted campaign’, Porter downtown West Chester. An oppo- and two fellow community orgasition group of conservative sup- nizers responsible for Chester porters of military action has County have combed the neighsince formed. They go by the borhood to speak to voters. They name of the Chester County work with a formalized process that carefully pre-selects a list of Victory Movement. “They think because we are potential supporters and then anti-war that we are also anti- knock on doors and make phone military, but that’s not true. calls to gain support. Referencing the three months Several of our members are decorated veterans,” Porter said. she spent teaching at Murom According to Porter, emotions run Technical Institute in Russia, high at these gatherings and Porter said that American citipolice intervention has been used zens ‘should feel lucky’ to have to avoid potential violence. The the degree of democracy available to them. While teachsituation is now ing seminars on busimediated by the ness, economics and American Civil crime to help the stuLiberties Union. dents improve their She said the two English, she said she groups must alterlearned a great deal nate corners weekfrom the experience. ly to keep a dis“While I was there in tance and avoid November 2008 folany physical lowing the presidenthreats. tial elections, a www.printfection.com Russian girl said she For Porter, it all began in 2002 always knows how after receiving news of a potential theirs will turn out and would war between the United States give anything to have an election and Iraq, following the September where their votes would actually 11 attacks. She founded the count,” Porter said. She pressed the general imporChester County Peace Movement in 2003 and began her work as a tance of voting and getting peace activist in Chester County. involved within one’s community “I looked at my 14 year old son in order to make a tangible contriand said ‘there’s no way they are bution to the country. “Our bigmaking him serve in this war.’ I gest goal is to educate people,” saw no relation; to me it made as Porter said. “Voting is just pressmuch sense as invading Iceland ing a button. You need to get out there and work for what you supor Zimbabwe,” Porter said. She attended an anti-war pro- port.” Leah Skye is a third year student test in Washington D.C. following majoring in communication studies. the declaration of war. She can be reached at LS685444@ “You would think that half a wcupa.edu. million people marching would get as much press as Libya or Egypt are getting these days, but we didn’t. We were not very popular. Pro-war enthusiasm was everywhere in America and we were drowned out,” Porter said in response to the ‘lack of media coverage’. In addition to her anti-violence values, she attributes much of the

By Leah Skye Staff Writer

For more

information visit: www.ccpeace.org

PAGE 9

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

Students Observe Day of Silence By T.J. Cromyak Staff Writer

On Friday, many students participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a day where students take part in a peaceful protest to show how members of the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Questioning) community feel silenced. According to Dayofsilence.org, the event started in 1996 at the University of Virginia in order to create safer institutions for students regardless, of their sexual orientation. Here at West Chester, Vice President of LGBTQA, Virginia Smith said that the organization usually holds a “Breaking the Silence” event in the quad, but this year it did not take place. “I don’t personally think it is effec-

tive for college students. The way the original event started was in high schools and that is why it worked so well,” Smith said. Smith also made the comparison of the effectiveness of having about 20 students out of 200 taking part in the event as opposed to about 30 out of 15,000 students on a college campus. The Day of Silence helps others to realize how members of the LGBTQ community are silenced with violent acts and speech. The day recognizes that being silent helps others understand the oppression forced upon the LGBTQ community. Members of both communities are involved in order to seek a better way of life for everyone. One of the easiest ways to get involved with the Day of Silence is to join the LGBTQA. Smith

said that if a student asks for information on the event, they will be given information on how to get involved with the Day of Silence and any other programs the LGBTQA has to offer. All across the United States students participate in the Day of Silence. Students can find out more information on the Day of Silence at dayofsilence.org. There are regulations to the participation, but everyone is welcome to participate. The event spans across all LGBTQ communities and the straight communitiy. T.J. Cromyak is a fourth year student majoring in Communication Studies and minoring in Journalism. He can be reached at Ac651771@ wcupa.edu

Roommate find solutions prior to issues developing By Jazzmine Carruth

the financial aspect is taken care of, you still are faced with having to live with other people who may at times get on your nerves. “To be honest I am a little nervous about having a roommate,” Nateesha Johnson, an upcoming

lems with our friendship.” To those students who are College students are often nervous about having a roomassigned to live on campus in the mate, there are certain precauresidence halls during their first tions that can be taken in year. While some continue their advance to avoid future discrepcollege experiences living on ancies. One way to avoid probcampus, others lems would be to choose a either move back roommate who is somewhat home because of similar, but also different. Also, discrepancies choose one ahead of time to get with prior roomto know the person. If that permates, or get an son isn’t someone you would off campus apartchoose to room with, then there ment or house to is time to try to find a different make their colperson. lege living situaRoomsurf.com is a website tion more comthat allows students to interact fortable. with other students who are For some time entering the school and looking now, there have for roommates. It also gives the been complaints student a head start on finding of students not out things about people who www.eduinreview.com getting along or are moving on campus and who having problems Roommates needs to communicate with one may share common interests. living with others another in oder to avoid future problems Sometimes students apply for on and off camhousing at the last minute and pus. As a student, being able to first year student, said. “The get into situations they didn’t pay the bills can be a hassle, but whole idea of being around a plan on signing up for. having a roommate or two to complete stranger makes me Courtney Brigman, a third help share expenses can seem nervous, but also rooming with a like the best thing to do. While friend could cause future probSee ROOMMATES page 10 Practicum Writer


PAGE 10

ROOMMATES from page 9

year student here at WCU, had a horror story she wanted to share with the campus about her second year experience with her old roommate. “ The first semester of my sophomore year had to be one of the craziest experiences I think I will ever go through at WCU,” Brigman said. “I had a roommate that had to have her own everything! Her own television, her own radio, microwave, and would not share anything. Talk about selfish, we had two of everything in the room!” Another student experienced several cases of horrible situations and went through five different roommates in three years. Shlonda Jones, a fourth year student, said, “Only two out of

THE QUAD

APRIL 18, 2011

the five roommates that I’ve had I could deal with, the others were irritating.” “I had a situation where I was put into a triple in Tyson hall with two very promiscuous roommates that wanted to party and act a fool every day of the week. The other I had was just too needy, wanted lots of my attention and time and was way too emotional,” Jones said. “Luckily I did have two experiences that I enjoyed here at WCU that outweighed the negative aspects of some of those roommates I had to deal with.” To avoid certain situations such as these, the website collegeboard.com offers college roommate rules and helpful www.collegememorybook.com ways to get along with your roommate(s) when put into nega- dents who plan on taking sum- roommate for the fall semester, Jazzmine Carruth is a fourth year tive situations. For those stu- mer courses and are looking for a the best idea would be to start student majoring in professional studnow to avoid crazy situations ies with minors in journalism and such as these. education. She can be reached at JC659524@wcupa.edu

West Chester Alumnus Succeeds after College, Vietnam Draft Faustman says that the general public was skeptical of the veterans who returned home. During a time where jobs They were viewed as bad peoare scarce for people graduat- ple to hire because they were ing from college, college stu- “screwed up in some way.” dents can use all the help they A friend from WCU was the can get from an alumni of West one who set Faustman up for Chester University. his first job as an insurance Thomas Faustman is a fraud claims investigator. “I WCU alum, Vietnam vet, busi- could read, I could write, but nessman and writer. He came in the business community, the to WCU to play basketball, but eventually dropped off the “I had the team because he was “burned misfortune of out.” Faustman didn’t totally quit basketball though. He having a draft coached grammar school teams number with the during college in order to keep birth date they his skills up. At first, he wanted to do coaching as his career wanted.” because teaching was his passion, but he ended up graduat- people were mostly business ing with an English degree majors.” Back in those days, before the draft. many people didn’t have the After graduating, Faustman luxury of their parents helping was drafted into the army and them out in regards to career was sent to Vietnam. “I had advice. “You did it yourself. It the misfortune of having a was a different time looking draft number with the birth for jobs,” he says. date they wanted,” he rememHis first job took him on bers. “If you didn’t go to gradu- contingency because he didn’t ate school, you were drafted. have an Ivy League backPeople tried to fail the physical ground but his English degree by drinking excessively to helped him turn a 10 page raise their blood pressure,” he description of screws and bolts says. into three paragraphs. He Faustman served as a mili- made $4000 a year at his first tary policeman in Vietnam, job and another job at which gave him some tools for Traveler’s Place opened up his future job. After getting that would give him a company married right after he returned car and $6000 dollars a year. from Vietnam, he had to take “We had enough to make our any job that he could find. apartment payment. We had By Margaret Weaver Staff Writer

$5 leftover. Dinner at the parents’ homes was frequent,” Faustman said. Eventually, Faustman worked his way up to become a vice president at the company he worked for. He embarked on a self -study on what he needed to do to get ahead. “A lot of it was luck and this and that,” he says. He was formally trained in mentoring and was stunned by the lack of common sense training. The people he worked with had no ability to read people, to dress well, or hold meetings. He started keeping track of his study and eventually wrote a book on it. “Chameleon Skills: An Irreverent Guide Up the Corporate Ladder” is based on Faustman’s experiences as he climbed the corporate ladder. It offers advice to aspiring businessmen and women on how to study your boss. He says, “It’s the right thing to do. You won’t get this in business school.” He uses humor to explain the different ways to succeed in business, which is why he feels that college students will relate to it. To learn more about how you can purchase Faustman’s book and read reviews on this book, visit his website www. thomasfaustman.com. Margaret Weaver is a third year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MW678077@ wcupa.edu.

At Cecil College you’re more than just a face in a crowd. Summer courses at Cecil offer small class sizes, which means you enjoy individual attention from highly qualified faculty who know you well. This summer you can maximize your learning opportunities at an affordable cost and transfer your credits. For more information, go to www.cecil.edu/summerstudies or call 410-287-1000.

| CECIL COLLEGE | North East, MD | Elkton, MD REAL STUDENTS. REAL SUCCESS.

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APRIL 18, 2011

THE QUAD

PAGE 11

Greek Week 2011

Jess Guzzardo / The Quad

Photo by: Alexis Caporizzo

Jess Guzzardo / The Quad

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Jess Guzzardo / The Quad

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THE QUAD

Follow the Quad online! @TheQuadWCU

APRIL 18, 2011

Entertainment

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Filmmaker finds strange tales among owners of exotic pets Robert W. Butler

McClatchy Newspapers

KANSAS CITY, Mo. _ "Nobody likes to go to school on a Friday night." That was filmmaker Michael Webber's mantra when it came to "The Elephant in the Living Room," his documentary about people who keep exotic _ and frequently dangerous _ wild animals in their homes. "When people think of a documentary, they too often think of charts and graphs, text and statistics. And often documentaries are pretty one-sided ... there's an agenda," Webber said in a recent phone conversation. "All that gives the impression that documentaries are educational and less than entertaining." Webber was determined that "Elephant" never feel like a lesson. "Lots of people say it's a documentary that almost plays like fiction. I guess my background in narrative fiction film has influenced my style of storytelling. I brought all of that with me." "Elephant" centers on two men. Tim Harrison is a public safety officer in Dayton, Ohio, who specializes in dangerous animals. Terry Brumfield is an Ohioan who keeps two lions _ Lambert and Lacie _ on his rural property. Several years ago Webber, who has produced mostly horror films (" The Visitation," "House") and mysteries ("Devil You Know"),read Harrison's books "Wild Times" and "Wildlife Warrior. " "Basically these were stories of what Tim has seen in 30 years _ pulling pythons out of walls, taking lions out of basements. I thought it was really amazing and that I should meet this guy. "We talked off and on by phone for almost a year, and then I had the epiphany that this was the documentary I'd been looking for. "I also realized later why nobody had done this story before. It's because while there

are thousands of exotic animal owners, it's hard to find anyone who can represent the other side of the story. Tim is unique _ he has raised and loves exotic animals, but he also sees the danger. He became the cornerstone of the project, letting me follow him around for a year." Webber's camera caught some hair-raising moments. In one incident, a concerned parent called Harrison because neighborhood children were playing with a large snake. He was stunned to find it was a gaboon viper, among the world's most venomous snakes. It had slipped out of its cage and, b y some miracle, had not bitten any of the youngsters. "I also wanted to capture what life is like for someone who's raising a big predator in their home," Webber said. "I didn't want to tell this story from the outside. I wanted to be embedded in their lives." Brumfield's story was particularly compelling. In poor health and living on a fixed income, Brumfield struggled to provide good living conditions for his lions Lambert and Lacie. He and Harrison were thrown together when Lambert escaped his enclosure and began playing among the cars on a nearby highway. Webber said he realized how completely these owners adore their pets. At the same time, he said, they're tempting nature. "There's no question that they love their animals. The bond they have with their tiger or chimp or snake far surpasses the bond the rest of us have with our dogs and cats. That surprised me. "They often refer to these animals as if they're children. I have a friend with a chimp, and they refer to it as a member of the family. Very few people regard their dog as their son. But owners of exotic animals will do that." Maybe it has something to do with having a wild animal who is dependent upon you, Webber said. "Take a big majestic creature like a tiger. It's wild, but you've

raised it in your home. Here's an animal that's supposed to be hunting in an Indian jungle and instead it looks to you for its food. That's really compelling. "So it's often an unbreakable bond. And in a way that makes the situation worse when things start to go bad." That happened even in the case of Brumfield and his lions, Webber said. "In many ways Lambert was an incredibly gentle beast. He loved Terry and regarded him as the king of their pride. In all the time I photographed Lambert he never growled at me, never charged the fence. His mate, Lacie, was always growling and butting the cage, but Lambert would try to calm her down." But as Lambert aged and became sexually active, things changed. "Lambert had all the instincts and programming of a lion in Africa. One day he did turn on Terry. He had reached sexual maturity and was programmed to take over the pride." That exotic animals often turn violent isn't the animals' fault, Webber said. "When that chimpanzee ripped a woman's face off ... it wasn't because it was a bad animal. Basically he was saying, 'I'm a chimpanzee. This is what I do.' These attacks aren't unfortunate coincidences. The animals are programmed to do this." While "Elephant" doesn't openly advocate tighter restrictions on exotic animals, it strongly suggests that the lack of regulation is endangering both the animals and their owners. "You need a license to own a poodle. But you can keep a lion, tiger, chimp, crocodile or poisonous snake in your back yard and in many states there's no regulation whatsoever," Webber said. "That realization _ coupled with all the incidents of escape, injury and death _ really caught my attention. There seems to be no state that isn't affected."

www.tribute.ca

“The Elephant in the Living Room” has won four Best Documentary awards.

ABC cancels ‘One Life to Live’ and ‘All My Children’ Melissa Maerz

Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK _ Two classic ABC soap operas will soon meet their demise: "All My Children" and "One Life to Live" will air their final episodes in September 2011 and January 2012, respectively, leaving only "General Hospital" to survive them. Since it premiered in 1970, "All My Children" has received more than 30 Emmy Awards and made history by airing daytime TV's first same-sex kiss between two women as well as its first lesbian wedding and the first coming-out story for a transgender character. The Emmy Award-winning "One Live to Live" has been on the air since 1968 and was among the first in daytime television to cover interracial romance, gang violence and teen pregnancy. The show made national headlines when it introduced a gay teen character (played by Ryan Phillippe) and was later honored by the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against

Defamation (GLAAD). In place of the two soaps will be two new series, "The Chew," a food show co-hosted by Mario Batali set to premiere in September 2011, and "The Revolution" (working title), a makeover show hosted by Tim Gunn that focuses on "health and lifestyle transformations" that will make its debut in January 2012. "While we are excited about our new shows and the shift in our business, I can't help but recognize how bittersweet the change is," said Brian Frons, president of daytime for Disney ABC/Television Group, in a statement. Noting that the two new series were inspired by the success of "The View," Frons said, "We are taking this bold step to expand our business because viewers are looking for different types of programming these days. They are telling us there is room for informative, authentic and fun shows that are relatable, offer a wide variety of opinions and focus on 'real life' takeaways."


APRIL 18, 2011

Top 5 summer activities:

1- Sleeping in 2- Baseball games 3- Barbequing 4- Swimming 5- Camping

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Wiz Khalifa to perform at WCU on April 27th Jazzmine Carruth Practicum Writer

Wiz Khalifa will be coming to WCU’s campus on April 27. He will perform in Hollinger Fieldhouse for WCU students. Tickets went on sale at the SSI window a couple of months prior to the concert, but sold out quickly. With his concert right around the corner students are eagerly awaiting to see his performance. With hits such as “Say Yeah,” “This Plane,” “Black and Yellow,” and, his most recent hit, “Roll Up,” WCU students are excited for the spring concert. Cameron Jibril Thomaz, who fans now know as Wiz Khalifa, is a Pittsburgh, Pa. rapper. He got the name from an Arabic word “khalifa” meaning “successor” and “wisdom” and then shortened the name when he turned 15 years old. Wiz Khalifa’s parents were both in the military and moved around a lot

when he was younger which caused him to experience the world quite differently than others. In those times he found creativity in becoming a rapper. With success knocking at his door, Wiz became a part of Rostrum Records in Pittsburgh. He has released major hits such as “Black and Yellow” which peaked at number one on the billboard hot 100. He has three studio albums which are “Show and Prove” (2006), “Deal or No Deal” (2009), and his recent “Rolling Papers” (2011) which is being sold in stores now. Pittsburgh Post–Gazette pop music critic Ed Masley crowned Wiz Khalifa as having “the skills, the look, the confidence, the drive, and the charisma for the job.” Additionally, The New Pittsburgh Courier says, “The combination of a young, charismatic M.C. with a slew of stop-and-rewind

rhymes together with a local independent label with major industry connections has set the stage for a hip-hop artist representing Pittsburgh to reach superstar status for the first time ever.” Fans of Wiz Khalifa can join his official fan club called Taylor Gang online at wizkhalifa.com. For those who plan to attend this event and are having trouble deciding what to wear, the colors black and yellow may not be a bad idea. Visit the website to see authentic Taylor Gang member-only clothing available for purchase. With final exams around the corner, experiencing the Wiz Khalifa concert may be a breath of fresh air to students attending. Jazzmine Carruth is a fourthyear student majoring in professional studies and minoring in journalism and education. She can be reached at JC659524@wcupa.edu.

Wiz Khalifa’s recent album “Rolling Papers” is now available in stores and online.


Upcoming Shows

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ELECTRIC FACTORY: April 21 - Iron and Wine April 26 - Coheed and Cambria April 29 - Rusko May 2/3 - Rise Against May 4 - Stone Sour May 7 - Cage the Elephant May 10 - Deftones May 18 - Arctic Monkeys June 24 - Dinosaur Jr.

THE TROCADERO: May 4 - Protest the Hero May 7 - The Airborne Toxic Event May 31 - Matt & Kim June 1 - Against Me! June 3 - The Script June 4 - Death Cab for Cutie

APRIL 18, 2011

DJ’s perform at Poesis Scratch Off Daniel Colon Staff Writer

DJ Amaze, Big Mark, DJ Dev, DJGROOVE, DJ Slice, DJ Meat, Dj Shorty T, DJ Say What?!, DJ E. Malik, DJ R. Mateo, and DJ K-swift; these are the DJ’s that came to Poesis Scratch Off. Some of these DJ’s are icons or worldwide entertainers known across the world. Some were even past competitors in the (DMC) Disco Mixing Championship, the biggest DJ competition in the world, but there is one thing for sure: Respect the DJ.

Brought to students by the student organization Poesis, DJ Amaze has the true persona and image of what one calls a DJ. “I have traveled all over,” Amaze said. “From Mexico to the Bahamas, Canada and England to name a few of the places I have been.” To add to Amaze’s credentials, he went to the University of Delaware to earn his degree in biology and has now DJed for Kanye West and was part of P. Diddy’s Vote or Die campaign. Last year Dj Shorti T and Amaze came up with a curriculum on how to be a DJ.

THE TLA: April 29 - Of Montreal May 1 - Peter, Bjorn & John May 15 - 104.5 presents Blue October May 16 - Lykke Li May 17 - Brett Dennen May 22 - Neon Trees

THE NOTE: April 21- The Slackers April 27 - Alkaline Trio April 30 - 104.5 Presents: Zelazowa May 9 - Thursday May 19 - Rusted Root

www.djamaze.com

“The class ranges from young kids around the age of 13 to grown men older than me,” Amaze said. “We teach the class with the digital setup but with connections to the actual turntables.” What started out in classrooms at cultural art centers, is now being taught in community centers and high schools in Delaware. The curriculum could have been seen in colleges and universities. The University of Delaware, as well as Delaware Tech, is looking at their curriculum as a possible elective that students can take. “This was a process,” Amaze said. “We realized that before we could do this as a class, we had to learn how to do a curriculum and then master the curriculum of DJing. Because you have to master what you do before you teach others.” To learn more about this curriculum or DJing you can contact DJ Amaze at mramaze@gmail. com or go to www. djamaze.com. Daniel Colon is a fourth-year student majoring in English. He can be reached at DC741117@wcupa.edu.

Interested in writing for the Quad Entertainment section? E-mail quadentertainment@wcupa.edu

Stay on course this summer! Online | Blended | Classroom

Semester Starts May 16th

Mod 5 | Mod A Starts May 16th

Mod B Starts June 13th

Mod 6 Starts July 5th

Register online at www.alvernia.edu/summer All courses are accredited and the credits are readily transferable.


APRIL 18, 2011

THE QUAD

Placing 5 6 8Classifieds 4 2 7

To 9place3 a classified 4 8 ad 1in The 6 Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and7 click 1 “classified 2 3 ads.” 5 Our 9 website makes it easy to enter your ad 2 exactly 4 as you 1 wish 9 it to7appear, 5 select a category, choose dates of 6 8 and 9 add2 special 3 fea1 publication, tures. Pay for your ad with any 3 credit 5 card 7 on6 our4 secure 8 major server. The rate for classified 4 9 is 530 cents 1 per8 word, 2 advertising with a minimum of 20 words ($6 1 2 6 7 9 3 minimum charge). Please note that all classified ads must be placed at 8 7 3 5 6 4 The Quad’s website at www. wcuquad.com. Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 12 noon on the Sunday Difficulty level: Easy before publication.

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Apts/Lofts/Rooms Off Campus House Four Bedrooms House 246 East Gay Street Parking for four cars, Gas Heat, yard, Town Center Email:rstpa@yahoo.com 610344-7552 Now accepting ads for the Fall 2011 Semester at

wcuquad.com Our Fall 2011 publication dates: September 12, 2011 September 19, 2011 September 26, 2011 October 3, 2011 October 24, 2011 October 31, 2011 November 7, 2011 November 14, 2011 November 21, 2011 December 5, 2011


Diversions

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7 p.m. Chester County Courthouse Join K-12 educators, West Chester University faculty, students & staff, local legislators, and other supporters of high quality public education to protest Governor Corbett’s proposed massive education funding cuts. Learn about this rally, other events, and the state budget at: apscufwcu.wordpress.com www.pastudentsvoice.org www.pafacultyvoice.org www.wcupa.edu/president/messages

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Tharp turns around tennis program APRIL 18 2011

By Amy Festa Staff Writer

With the season drawing to a close, the West Chester men’s and women’s tennis teams can look retrospectively at their seasons and notice a considerable amount of improvement not only this year alone, but in the past couple of seasons. Although the players can be credited with improving the program, the real difference maker stands on the sidelines for the meets. Head coach Tina Tharp came to West Chester from her job as the executive director of the Arthur Ashe Tennis Center. Since coming to West Chester, the men’s and women’s combined record is 32-43. Although the men are still coming along, there has been a noticeable difference in the performance on the women’s side. The women finished this season with a 14-8 record and their final match of the season against Holy Family was canceled due to rain. They are now preparing to enter the PSAC playoffs, which will begin on Monday, April 18. One of Tharp’s women’s players, Ali Fetter was named the PSAC Women’s Tennis Athlete of the Week for this past week. Fetter went 6-0 the previous week sweeping all three of her singles matches and all three of her doubles matches with partner Alex Santoro. The women’s team is also getting major contributions from Claire Afrassiabian, who has gone 12-4 in her matches this season. Tharp’s women’s team is continuing to improve and this season’s results prove that. However, the men’s improvement isn’t as noticeable. The men have an overall record of 6-13 on the season, but their record is not the end all be all for the men this season. Although they will miss the PSAC playoffs, there is still reason for the men to be satisfied with their performance this season. Their win against East Stroudsburg on March 29 was their first PSAC win since 2003. The members of the men’s team credit their bit of success to the coaching that they receive. “It’s my third year with Tina as my coach and since she has come here, everything about the program has changed,” said senior tennis player Alan Day. “I

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had a different coach my freshman year who was not nearly as dedicated to the tennis program. Since she has come here, she has brought in some great recruits, mostly for the women’s team.” Day also credits Tharp with focusing a lot on individual performance and making sure each athlete has the training that they need to improve. “I have noticed a huge improvement with my footwork, balance and strength,” Day said. “She cares a lot about the entire team and wants everyone to do well and improve not only in tennis, but academically as well.” The men finished up their season on Sunday, April 17 in a match against Philadelphia University that did not finish in time to make it into this week’s edition of The Quad. The women begin the PSAC playoffs on Monday, April 18 when they host East Stroudsburg for the quarterfinals. The semifinals and championships will be held at Bloomsburg. Amy Festa is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@wcupa.edu.

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wcupagoldenrams.com

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad


Baseball earns first PSAC East sweep PAGE 20

By Steven Fisher Staff Writer The West Chester University baseball team earned their first sweep of the season over visiting PSAC East opponent Mansfield on Friday afternoon at Serpico Stadium and captured their fourth straight Bill Giles championship over Wilmington. The Golden Rams got off to a terrible start in game one as they found themselves trailing 7-2 early on. WCU chipped away at the score posting two runs in the bottom of the third and another pair in the fourth to draw within one (7-6). In the fifth inning, Mansfield starter Eric Rosenberger (5-1) got roughed up by WCU’s bats. Rosenberger was chased from the game after allowing six runs and suffered his first loss of the season. WCU’s first six batters each reached base and would eventually score during the fifth inning. Third basemen Josh Heyne hit a two-run single, followed by a two-run double from Dylan Zigman. Reid Pulford and Jack Provine each added RBI singles of their own

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to round out the stanza. Rosenberger’s implosion on the mound was a rare sight for Mansfield. He was charged with 11 hits and 12 runs, 10 of which were earned, and five walks. He faced 27 West Chester batters and was unable to record a punch-out for the first time this season. Chris Pula finished game one with three RBIs. Provine went 3-for-4 with three RBIs as well. Brandon Wolfe was 2-for-2 with a RBI and two runs scored to help push WCU past Mansfield in game one by a score of 12-7. Jordan Lehman (3-4) pitched 5 1/3 innings in relief for the Golden Rams to pick up the win in game one. He allowed two runs on eight hits while walking two and striking out five Mansfield batters. Conor Kerins started the game and lasted only 1 2/3 innings. He yielded five runs, just one of them earned, on two hits. He walked three and struck out two. Kerins is still working his way back from undergoing Tommy John surgery in the off-season. Dylan Porter (4-2) started on the hill and stole the show in

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

game two of Friday’s doubleheader at Serpico Stadium. Porter out-dueled Mansfield’s pitcher Joe Candelmo (4-3). Porter surrendered one run and gave up five hits in a completegame effort. He walked three and struck out six. Candelmo also pitched a complete game scattering eight hits, giving up two runs and striking out four without walking a batter. “What was working best for me was mixing up the pitches and the location, moving in and out on hitters,” Porter said. “I give most of the credit to my teammates. They made my job easy and they did most of the work. They played hard, hustled and led me through the game.” Pulford was 2-for-3 in game two while Wolfe drove in a pair of runs and went 1-for-2 at the plate. West Chester had two errors in each game on Friday afternoon. The two errors in game one caused Kerins to leave the game early. Fortunately in game two, WCU’s errors did not ruin a stellar pitching performance by Porter. West Chester blanked No. 23 Wilmington University, 3-0, to claim the 11th Annual Bill Giles Classic at Citizens Bank Park in Philadelphia on Wednesday. Five Golden Rams pitchers combined on a five-hit shutout. WCU has now won its fourth straight Bill Giles championship and eighth overall while avenging a loss to Wilmington (26-4) in the process. When playing at Citizens Bank Park, the Golden Rams are a perfect 6-0. Josh Barr (2-1) picked up the win on the mound for WCU. Joe Gunkel recorded his second save of the season, pitching the eighth and ninth innings. Heyne doubled and scored in the fourth inning on a sacrifice fly by Provine. WCU was able to successfully convert a pair of sacrifice bunts to score the other run in the ballgame. WCU’s offense was held to just five hits; however, they came out on top. West Chester has now improved its record to 18-17 overall and 8-10 in the PSAC East. Their first PSAC sweep of the season could not have come at a better time. WCU currently sits in fourth place in the PSAC East behind Shippensburg (14-20, 7-7), East Stroudsburg (21-8, 7-5) and first place Millersville (27-7, 14-4).

APRIL 18, 2011

Provine has stayed hot in the last couple weeks. He is the only Golden Rams hitter to have a batting average over .400 (.403). He has six doubles and 20 RBIs and an impressive slugging percentage of .597. If WCU gets into the playoffs they will have to count on Provine at the top of the order to get on base in front of guys like Joe Wendle and Wolfe. While first and second place may be out of reach, they are in the hunt for third place in the PSAC. The Golden Rams will end their PSAC East regular season schedule with a homeand-home series against fifth place Kutztown on Friday, April

22 and Saturday, April 23. “We are playing good baseball and everyone is playing up tempo. I believe if we keep playing like this we will go farther than people expect from us,” Porter said. Friday WCU will travel to Kutztown, and on Saturday both teams will be in town to play at Serpico Stadium. Games will start at 1:00 and 3:30 p.m. (Facts and statistics in this article exclude the results of Sunday, April 17 games against Mansfield.) Steven Fisher is a fourth-year student majoring in communications. He can be reached at sf674180@ wcupa.edu.

OKtteSr TServeOYouRE SSIreeBLocO ations to Be

Th INSIDE THE BOOKSTORE 4/27 - 4/28 4/29 4/30 5/2 - 5/5 5/6

Wed. & Thurs. Fri. Sat. Mon. - Thurs. Fri.

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9:00 - 5:00 9:00 - 3:00 Closed 9:00 - 5:00 9:00 - 3:00

UNIVERSITY HALL PATIO

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Mon. - Thurs. 9:00 - 5:00 9:00 - 3:00 Fri.


WCU sends three to Nationals APRIL 18, 2011

By Amy Festa Staff Writer

The West Chester women’s gymnastics team sent three gymnasts to Colorado to compete in the USAG National Championships which took place at the U.S. Air Force Academy last weekend, April 8-9. The competition hosted gymnasts from all over the country who qualified to compete in the competition. Alli Aquila, Kaley LaFleur and Paige Griffin all went to Colorado to represent the West Chester gymnastics program. All three gymnasts were all-around competitors for West Chester this season. Both Aquila and LaFleur had been to Nationals before and have experience competing at this type of event. These three gymnasts were on one of the most successful gymnastics teams in West Chester history. Since head coach Barbara Cordova took over the program, it has continued to improve year after year. This year’s team set a new school record with their team score. They also

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set a new record on the uneven bars. Aquila has qualified for Nationals in all of her seasons at West Chester, making this her third trip to the event. “The altitude really affected [Alli] because she has asthma and anemia,” Cordova said. “But, she pushed through and worked really hard. Her best event of the day was the floor exercise where she scored a 9.125.” Aquila also competed on the uneven bars where she scored a 8.975, and the vault where she scored a 8.800. The results of the meet were out of the ordinary for Aquila. Her highest uneven bar score of the season was a 9.425. Her highest performance on the vault came in the second meet of the season where she scored a 9.45. “I did not have my best performance ever, but I was very excited that I made it to Nationals for a third year in a row as an all-arounder,” Aquila said. “It was a great experience and I am so glad that I got to share it with two of my teammates.” Alongside Aquila was

teammate LaFleur, who had not competed in the last couple of meets of the regular season due to an injury. This was LaFleur’s second trip to Nationals. Like Aquila, she qualified for Nationals in all of her seasons at West Chester. “[Kaley] had not competed in about four weeks,” Cordova said. “Nationals was her first meet back after the injury and she did great. She was up last on the beam so the pressure was on. She hit and scored a 9.55 and tied for 16. The winner scored an amazing 9.9.” When LaFleur was able to compete this season, she was consistently excelling on the beam for the Golden Rams. Last year at Nationals, LaFleur had her best beam routine of the season and scored a 9.625. She missed a trip to the finals by two positions. Griffin qualified for Nationals in her freshman season with West Chester. Griffin had an exceptional season for West Chester in her first season with the team. She competed as an allarounder for West Chester this season with her highest score coming against SUNY Brockport and Rhode Island early in the season (37.025). She was able to travel to Nationals for the first time with two teammates who have already gotten some experience competing on a national level. “We have worked all year for this opportunity and to get the chance as a freshman to qualify for Nationals was an incredible experience,” Griffin said. “Paige handled the pressure really well for her first time at Nationals,” Cordova said. “Her best event was on bars where she scored a 9.250 and tied for 22.” The USAG Nationals was the last event for the West Chester women’s gymnastics team for the season. All three gymnasts will return to compete for the Golden Rams next season. Amy Festa is a fourth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at AF649219@ Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad wcupa.edu.

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad


Women’s LAX conquers defending champs PAGE 22

THE QUAD

By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor

No. 7 West Chester ran with a 16-3 victory against host Shippensburg preserving their 67th regular-season conference win, and nine-game 2011 winning streak in a PSAC league match on Saturday afternoon. The streak continued on the following Saturday after a 21-5 triumph over Edinboro. Only dropping one contest this season, West Chester (10-1, 8-0 PSAC) won their eighth consecutive game of the 2011 season on Saturday, April 2 against Shippensburg. Claire Grimwood was the star of the game with four goals and six points overall. Her success did not go unnoticed, as the league named her the PSAC athlete of the week earlier in the week. The honor marked the first weekly award for a Golden Rams player in the 2011 season. Grimwood added to each of West Chester’s wins last week. Against Bloomsburg, she tallied two goals and recorded a single ground ball and one draw control.

Against Gannon, she put up six goals and recorded two ground balls, four draw controls and a caused turnover. It took her a mere four minutes to register a hat trick in the game. When facing Mercyhurst, Grimwood scored two goals, had a draw control and caused one turnover. In total for last week, Grimwood contributed to West Chester’s 3-0 week with 10 goals, three ground balls, six draw controls and two caused turnovers. Although Grimwood’s accomplishments added to the win over Shippensburg on Saturday, she was not the only contributor to the team’s 13 point advantage over their hosts. Tori Dugan posted another hat trick—her fourth in the last four games, earning four points on the day. Lauren Glassey put up two goals with two assists, while Erin Oczkowski and Jackie Hoover each scored twice as well. MacKenzie O’Keefe (7-1) took the win in the cage, making five saves in the process. Meghan Kearney made 11 saves in the cage, taking the loss

for Shippensburg. The Lady Rams had a one week reprieve before they traveled to Edinboro for another PSAC match on Saturday at 1 p.m. The Rams were well equipped to dismantle the Fighting Scots over the weekend, especially with the asset of the PSAC athlete of the week, Grimwood. West Chester took down the Fighting Scots with a final score of 21-5. Jackie Hoover, Jacki Patterson, Nicole Pyle and Claire Grimwood each scored to contribute to the Rams’ 21 earned points. Hoover initiated scoring 26 seconds into the game, giving West Chester an early 1-0 lead. Edinboro’s Zajak took an assist from Kaitlin Magee and evened the score 25 minutes later. West Chester put up two more goals, while Edinboro responded with one. West Chester answered again with two more goals enlarging their advantage to 5-2. With nearly 16 minutes remaining in the first half, Edinboro’s Shannon Rohrich

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scored to shrink the Rams’ lead to 5-3. Before the half came to a close, the Rams tallied six goals; West Chester extended the scoring into the second half, scoring five more goals before the Scots responded. During that run, Shannon Hayes scored three goals with three assists. Patterson took an assist from Grimwood, giving the Rams a 16-3 lead with nearly 20 minutes remaining of play. Courtney Hey ended the Rams’ scoring streak 27 minutes into the second half, making the score 17-4. Grimwood responded with another goal nearly three minutes later. After Zajak put up Edinboro’s final goal, the Rams finished up scoring with four goals to solidify the score at 21-5. The Golden Rams had a 43-12 advantage on shots and 16-12 edge in draw controls. Edinboro dropped six of their 12 clear attempts. The Fighting Scots also had 19 turnovers, allowing West Chester to maintain control for a majority of the game. Edinboro has a 3-8 overall

record and is 0-7 in PSAC league play. The victory improved the Rams’ record to 10-1 in the regular season, and 8-0 in PSAC league play. Jacki Patterson commented on the Rams’ flawless league record, “I think it is very possible for us to keep a perfect PSAC record. We are undefeated so far and we really want that PSAC trophy back on our home turf.” The Golden Rams will face Dowling on Tuesday in Oakdale, NY at 4:00 p.m. The Golden Lions are 7-2 overall, and 3-0 in conference play. Although Dowling looks like a good match up for the Rams, the Golden Lions will likely be no match for West Chester’s perfect PSAC record. “The future for our team looks really promising,” Patterson said. “We are so close as a team and we really mesh on and off the field. We are going to be unstoppable and will see Adelphi again on their home field in May, no doubt.” Brynn Dougherty is a third-year student at West Chester University. She can be reached at BD670913@ wcupa.edu.

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Softball clinches playoff spot in eastern division PAGE 23

By Riley Wallace Staff Writer

The West Chester softball team took care of business this week by going 3-0, taking one game from Philadelphia University and sweeping a doubleheader with Millersville. After six innings of play, the Golden Rams held on for a 4-3 win Wednesday against Phila.U, before the game was called because of rain. The second game of their doubleheader against Phila.U was cancelled. On Friday, the girls beat Millersville twice at home, clinching a playoff berth, and winning the first game 11-6 and 2-1 in the nightcap. West Chester (27-16) started their first game at Philadelphia University (12-17) with a quick lead, scoring a run in each of its first two innings. In the first inning, shortstop Jessica Norris drove in a run with a RBI groundout, and leftfielder Erin MacNamee drove in a run with her first of two doubles in the

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second inning. The Rams pushed their lead to 3-0 in the fourth when designated hitter Nicole Cruts hit a solo home run in the top half of the frame; her second of the year. In the bottom half of the frame, Phila.U responded with a run of their own to cut the lead to two, and then two more runs in the fifth to tie it up at 3-3. MacNamee sent one over the centerfielder’s head in the sixth inning for a RBI double that put the Rams up one. The girls scored four runs in the top of the seventh inning, however those were nullified when the game was called with Phila.U at-bat in the bottom of the seventh. By rule, the score reverts back to the last fully completed inning. The Rams were led on the mound by Devon Utterback (12-5), who went wire-to-wire for the win giving up five hits and three runs, only one of which was earned, and striking out five and walking three. The bats were led by MacNamee, who

went 3-for-4 with two doubles and two RBIs, and Cruts, who went 2-for-3 with the home run. On Friday the girls celebrated their senior day by clinching the final playoff spot in the Eastern Division with their win in the first of two games against Millersville (13-21). Catcher Kate Kmiecinski got West Chester off to a quick start with her grand slam in the first inning, which erased the Rams only deficit of the entire game. Centerfielder Megan Kelly led the charge in the third inning with a two-run double, followed up by RBIs by MacNamee and Norris to push their lead to 8-2. Millersville did their best to get back into the game by scoring four combined runs in the fourth and fifth innings. But the Golden Rams pushed the game out of reach with three runs in the sixth inning. Cruts and rightfielder Kelly Anderson each singled with the bases loaded and a sacrifice fly

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from Kelly added the final run. Utterback (13-5) picked up yet another win, pitching four innings and allowing seven hits with four earned runs and striking out one and walking five. Kim Murl relieved Utterback and finished the game off by giving up no hits or runs, and striking out one to pick up her fourth save of the season. MacNamee, Kmiecinski and Anderson led the offense with three hits each. Third baseman Jessica Schuck and Kelly both recorded a double. The second game of the doubleheader was a pitcher’s duel between Murl and Alicia Hughes (8-7) of Millersville. West Chester got on the board first, putting up two runs in the third inning with MacNamee driving in Anderson with a RBI single and Kelly, who scored when second baseman Abby Block grounded out to the shortstop. The Marauders responded in the fourth inning with a bases loaded single that drove in a run to cut West Chester’s lead to

one. From there, each team’s pitcher took over shutting down both team’s offense. Murl (12-8) picked up the win going the full seven innings, allowing four hits and one run while striking out two and walking none. Eight different batters reached base for the Rams with either a hit or a base-on-balls. Anderson recorded a double in the third inning for the only extra base hit for WCU. The win pushed West Chester’s PSAC East record to 8-6 with only two conference games at Kutztown remaining. The girls finish up the regular season Monday at Takoma Park, MD where they will face nonconference foe Washington Adventist in a doubleheader at 4 and 6 p.m. Having clinched a postseason berth, the Golden Rams will begin their playoff run in the PSAC tournament on Thursday, April 21 with the championship being on April 30. Riley Wallace is a second-year student at West Chester University. He can be reached at RW718681@ wcupa.edu.

Jess Guzzardo/ The Quad


PAGE 24

Thaddeus Young and the Sixers begin their quest to the NBA Finals against the No. 2 seeded Miami Heat. The Sixers finished the season 41-41 and secured the No. 7 seed in the playoffs, The Heat won the season series against the Sixers 3-0.

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Sports

APRIL 18, 2011

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Baseball wins three straight - Page 20

Lacrosse still perfect in PSACs - Page 22

WCU makes playoff push

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad


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