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What are we rallying for Dub-C?

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W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. FEBRUARY 27, 2012

V O L UM E 1 0 2 . I S S U E 5

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

WCU needs you here,

see page 5 for rally information! Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

IN THIS ISSUE

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

NEWS

OP-ED

PAGE 4

PAGE 7

FEATURES

PAGE 9

ENT

PAGE 15

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad

SPORTS

PAGE 21


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THE QUAD NEWS

Council seeks to prohibit student housing expansion in town center By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor

The West Chester Borough Council introduced the discussion of eliminating the future expansion of student housing in the town center at its weekly meeting last Tuesday night. The ordinance would not affect student housing that has been “grandfathered,” or already existing as designated rented space for students. The Borough Council’s incentive to impede the growth of student density in the town center lies in the level of growth in the student population. Stan Zukin, who spoke at the meeting and rents to students in the West Chester borough, was given permission to renovate a building on Gay Street, on which he has not yet acted. Council President Holly V. Brown noted that the student population has expanded considerably in the past few years, which increases their concentration in residential areas. The high quality education for a fraction of the price of other colleges in the area has led to a higher number of incoming students at the university. While the university’s student count rested at

11,000 several years ago, it has since increased to 14,000 and will likely continue to grow. Zukin discussed the results of the 1990 Census, which indicated that 57% of the borough was designated to rentals. In 2000, the Census had reported thicker

“How can you look at human beings and tell them where to live because they are not a protected class?” Zukin said. “We were all students, and we still are students, we are still learning.” Tony Stancato, a building owner who rents to several graduate students in the

density with 63% of rentals located within the borough—the only other place in Pa. with higher concentration of rentals was Penn State University. He contended that the higher abundance leads to the requirement of more off-campus housing for students.

borough, re-emphasized Zukin’s sentiments at the meeting. “If it’s not a problem then why limit it?” Zukin asked Council members. Members of the Council did not express the same viewpoints, as they voiced their desires to assist the town economy by

increasing the frequency of business for their higher-end restaurants and boutiques. Several Council members expressed their desire to incur “empty nesters” who will provide the funds necessary to facilitate that need. “You want to incen-

News FEBRUARY 27, 2012

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU

is 12 years out-ofdate.” This was not the first time the council discussed the possibility of deterring the growth of student housing in the town center. “We all put money in because the borough council voted nine years ago and we did what you told us to do,” Zukin said. “And now you want to take that away. We have done everything we could do to restore downtown West Chester. It’s student money that paid for that restoring.” West Chester students also reacted to the proposition. “I can’t say tripadvisor.com this is surprising to me, in fact, tivize a balance [to I can’t believe this determine] who will hasn’t been brought frequent your restau- up sooner,” West rants and boutiques,” Chester University Mayor Carolyn T. fourth-year economComitta said. “The ics major, Alex Shingoal is to create more ners said. “I’m not sustainable balance. sure there would be This is a complex is- enough ‘empty nestsue; you need to look ers’ to replace the lost at the unintended business that resconsequences. Our taurants, bars, and comprehensive plan landlords would ex-

perience without the support of students.” “If their main problem is the loudness of college students, it’s not going to change the fact that these students are still going to go to the bars whether they live in town or a mile away,” WCU fourth-year Alize McCorriston said. While the Council has not come to a conclusion and will likely debate the issue for at least several weeks, Zukin offered the council a guarantee that he would not build a West Chester Commons in the town center if the Council agreed to delay their decision. Former Borough Council member and history professor at the university, Jim Jones, commented on Zukin’s promise, “Without any way to guarantee that Mr. Zukin has given up a legal right to which he is currently entitled, Council cannot give his promise much weight.” The Council will discuss the issue further at the next meeting and expects to vote on the matter within the next month. Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@ wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

PAGE 3

HSA gears up for Aid to South Africa By Clare Haggerty Staff Writer

On April 15, 2012, the West Chester University Honors College and the Honors Student Association (HSA) will host their seventh annual benefit, Aid to South Africa. Aid to South Africa, or ASA, as it is commonly known, will benefit three South African organizations: the H.E.L.P. Ministries soup kitchen, which feeds up to 6,000 people every day; Sparrow Village, which adopts and cares for children with HIV; and Nkosi’s Haven, which provides care and support for AIDS orphans and impoverished mothers and children infected with HIV/AIDS. “We are proud to be supporters for them and their commitment to effecting positive change in their communities,” Honors Student Association President Michael Jendzurski said. Jendzurski has been to South Africa. “When describing South Africa, you must note there are two South Africas,” he explained. “The first South Africa is painted with beautiful landscapes, warming skylines, and a harbor in Capetown full of opportunity. Juxtaposed to this image are informal settle-

Executive Director, Lori Brooks, expects this year to be just as big of a success as the previous six years. “Last year, we were able to donate almost $8,500 to the South Africa charities, and we’re projecting an attendance of around 1,000,” Brooks said. “So we’re hoping for an even greater donation this time.” Some of the activities to be included this year are carnival games and crafts, food and raffle prizes, and a magic show. Live performances will also be provided, including the WCU Gracenotes, Robots and Racecars, the O-Matics, and the Waffle Stompers, among others. Attendees are also encouraged to consider participating in walking the track or the soccer tourStudents http://www.wcupa.edu/Honors/ nament. and adults can form aidtosouthafrica/ teams to walk the worlds can exist liter- track or come indially across the street vidually in order to fundraise as they do from the other.” Not only is this a laps. The soccer tourbenefit to help the im- nament is five vs. five poverished in South indoors in the spirit Africa, but it is also of the recent World a community fair at Cup hosted by South which students, chil- Africa. “It is our hope that dren and adults are all from welcome. The event, organizations which runs from noon the campus and the until 6 p.m. at the community of all Hollinger Fieldhouse, ages will field a team attracts local families to play, learn about for the free commu- our specific philannity fair while also thropies, and have a raising awareness. good time amongst a Aid to South Africa strong sense of comment communities, malnutrition, and impoverished lifestyles. With houses built from plywood and aluminum scraps, roofed by a single tarp and a couple of bricks, one outhouse for a neighborhood of over 100 residents, and no running water or source of electricity, it becomes truly humbling how both

munity,” Jendzurski said. Aid to South Africa also needs volunteers for the day before and the day of the event, students interested in volunteering should contact the ASA team at aidtosouthafrica@ wcupa.edu. Aid to South Africa is especially important this year, because students from all around WCU are travelling along with the Honors College to volunteer in South Africa this May. Their main goal while in South Africa is particularly to help the poverty-stricken and those with HIV/AIDS. The statistics for both of these things are alarmingly high; ac-

cording to the ASA website, 66% of the nation’s 18 million children live in poverty, and of the 8,000 people who die every day from AIDS, 1,000 of them are from South Africa. Jendzurski highly recommends this trip to the “Rainbow Nation.” “The lessons you learn in an international setting far outweigh the insights you gain from a lecture or classroom setting,”Jendzurski said. “You learn so much about yourself and others through this trip; you gain a sense of global citizenship, an inspiration to serve and make a difference, and you learn

about yourself as a leader. But, most importantly,” he continued, “You understand the responsibility to share the South African story with others. You become a part of their history and the commitment to another culture becomes personal through a relation called friendship.” For more statistics and to find out how you can be a part of the solution, visit their website at http:// www.wcupa.edu/honors/aidtosouthafrica. Clare Haggerty is a first-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@ wcupa.edu.


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THE QUAD NEWS

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Graduate Student Association brings bus on-campus, shuttles to Graduate Business Center By Angela Thomas News Editor

able distance to campus, therefore only allowing students with access to a car to get to the center. “From personal experience, there is a concentration within

dark on busy streets without sidewalks.” “The Graduate Student Association then The Graduate developed a survey Student Associato assess the needs tion (GSA) has been of this bus for graduhard at work these ate students, within past two semesters. which we found that a majority of students who took the survey complained about the distance from main campus to the Graduate Center,” Anyanwu said. “We moved forward with advocating for a shuttle bus for graduate students to run in spring 2012 and were successful in providing this facebook.com first-time ever Members of the GSA stand in front of the shuttle bus that stops at Wayne Hall shuttle bus serand runs to the Graduate Center on Boot Road. vice.” Anyanwu was hapGraduate students the master of public may breathe a sigh health program that py to say that the of relief because now, I initially wanted to bus launched on Feb. there is a bus that enroll in, but I did not 6 in which the GSA runs from Wayne because of concerns handed out gift cards Residence Hall to the of how I would get to to WAWA to the first Graduate Center on the Graduate Center, 20 students that used Boot Road from 3:30 where some of the the shuttle bus that p.m. until 10:30 p.m. classes take place,” day. The bus will According to GSA Anyanwu said. “Af- run every week from getting some Monday through President Chibu Any- ter anwu, at the begin- feedback from fellow Thursday with the ning of the Fall 2011 graduate students, I exception of the week semester, students found that some grad- of spring break. So what are the beninvolved in the GSA uate students had a contacted their advi- lot of trouble getting efits of this bus? “The Graduate Censors, Dr. Jeffrey Os- to their classes at good and Dr. Darla the Graduate Center ter Shuttle Bus serCoffey, Associate and were particularly vice is beneficial Provost and Dean of concerned about their because it provides Graduate Studies. safety when getting convenient transportation for graduate They had an idea for to class.” Anyanwu mentioned students who may a bus line that runs from somewhere on that although there not have a vehicle, North Campus to is SEPTA route 92, have difficulty getthe Graduate Cen- “which can only drop ting to the Graduate ter, which is located off students at Phoe- Center, or would even about five minutes nixville Pike or Boot/ like to save money on off-campus. The Airport Road; this gas,” Anyanwu said. Graduate Business means that students “In the event that Center is not in walk- have to walk in the one has car problems,

there is an alternative solution to get to classes as well. This shuttle bus service allows prospective graduate students who are from the city and take public transportation, but would not have a way to get to their classes at the Graduate Center before the bus service was provided, to reconsider attending WCU for graduate school.” The other good thing about the bus is that there is no fee to use it. Anyanwu is thankful for the GSA Executive Board and members for helping bring this bus to campus. Bringing the shuttle bus on campus is not the only thing that GSA is doing on-cam-

dents for up to $500,” Anyanwu said. “We have provided more opportunities for graduate students to get involved on-campus more than ever before by allowing graduate students to represent the graduate student body on various university committees, as well as joining our recently created ‘Marketing Team’ this year.” Anyanwu explained that the ‘Market Team’ promotes GSA events within their graduate program. This strategy helps reach graduate students from different programs at WCU. “GSA planned and implemented the New Graduate Student Orientation for incoming graduate students, which

students to ask questions pertaining to obtaining a Ph.D degree.” The GSA will be hosting a Ph.D forum on March 28. The GSA also helped out with the Pink Zone Game and also hosted a “Pink Zone Weekend” networking event on Feb. 17 at Barnaby’s. The GSA has increased their presence on campus. Their mission this semester was to make the most out of their organization to advocate and reach out to as many graduate students as possible. “I believe that GSA have done so and have accomplished a lot this year, allowing the graduate student body to have a voice on this campus. This year, our social media presence has been enhanced through the creation of our Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as updates on our page via wcupa. edu,” Anyanwu said. “The Graduate Student Association has the potential to do greater things for the graduate student facebook.com body and I The Executive Board members of GSA from left to right Richard Miller am proud (treasurer), Stephanie Smith (secretary), Kendell Jones (vice president) and Chibu to serve as Anyanwu (president). President of pus. took place in August this organization.” Angela Thomas is “The Graduate Stu- 2011,” Anyanwu said. dent Association pro- “We have also pro- a fourth-year student vides conference and vided Ph.D informa- majoring in English. research grant sup- tional forums, which She can be reached at port to graduate stu- have allowed WCU AT683005@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

Opinion & Editorial

Voice No to Budget Cuts

PAGE 5

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief QuadEIC@wcupa.edu EDITORIAL BOARD

EDITORIAL STAFF

Angela Thomas News Editor Bill Hanrahan Op-Ed Editor Rebekah Balmer Features Editor Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor Kenny Ayres Sports Editor Lukas Jenkins Photography Editor

Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor Jess Guzzardo Asst. Photography Editor

COPY EDITORS Kelly Adams Bethany Van de Water Samantha Schaule

DISTRIBUTION BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Whenever college students hear the words budget cuts, they automatically think: Alexis Caporizzo tuition increase. This is a likely possibility since Gov. Tom Corbett said it last year. It Erica Brooks Mike Coia Ginger Rae Dunbar happened this academic year. The tuition increase at West Chester University nearly Business Manager ONLINE EDITION equaled how much an undergraduate student pays for two credits or how much a graduLaura Blyton ate student pays for one credit (both in-state tuition). Mike Mills Criminal justice majors are learning about criminology, corrections and policing. FACULTY ADVISOR Advertising Manager Dr. Philip A. Thompsen They are being educated in a classroom that has limited spots, despite the enrollment increase last semester. They hear how budget cuts would affect their university while they learn that Gov. Corbett wants to spend that money on prisons instead. It’s hard to Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] hear this de-funding information in a classroom, only to wonder how the money could Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted durgo to the prisons instead of to an environment that prepares students for their careers. ing the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped All departments are facing these repercussions. This academic year, WCU has aloff in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. lowed a small amount of classes to exceed their enrollment limit. However, some stuAll submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus addents had to fight for a spot in their classroom. President Greg Weisenstein (WCU) has and dress, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, said the proposed budget cuts could total approximately $9.5 million. Professors have faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are been working without a contract since July 2011. not associated with West Chester University. to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and As one of our staff writers reported last week, our university is undergoing construc- Letters 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. tion to build the new Recreation Center, which is not funded through the CommonOpinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West wealth of Pennsylvania. Such projects are not affected by the proposed defunding. Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m. Gov. Corbett suggests cutting the unnecessary funds at universities. Can he clarify this? There is nothing at our university, or any State System university, that is “unnecesDisclaimers [dis-kley-merz] sary.” WCU faculty has proven to make some noise and they say no to cutting our funds Copyright ©2012 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without again. Faculty members are encouraging students to have their voice heard by contact- the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student ing Pa. legislator. They are spreading the news of the rallies that will take place onbody, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, campus. student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint South Campus: Wednesday Feb. 29 at 9:45 a.m. - 10:15 a.m. in Sturzecirculation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered becker 116A (*Note: this time has changed). in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be North Campus: Thursday March 1 at 12:15 p.m. at the Academic Quad placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web (rain location Sykes Ballroom C). site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. Stop by. Make some noise. Prove how important our education is to us. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within ~ Ginger Rae five days of publication. Editor-in-Chief The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa. The Quad


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THE QUAD OP-ED

Mitt Romney: Only Hope for GOP

By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor

Traditional Republican values would suggest that the GOP would embrace the candidate most closely resembling rigid conservative values, indisputably epitomized by Newt Gingrich. Common sense would lead us to believe that the Republican Party would elect Gingrich as the Republican candidate, but when taking political and social factors into account, Mitt Romney is a more suitable selection in comparison with his fellow GOP candidates, and has the best shot at winning the presidency against the captivating incumbent. Super Tuesday next week, which will bear results from 10 states’ primaries with 437 delegates up for grabs, will either solidify his frontrunning position or dissolve his chances of a GOP nomination. Enduring the longest economic recovery in history, Republicans have been vocal in their disapproval of Obama’s government management, healthcare policies, and overall “socialist ideals.” This would lead us to believe that most Republicans would favor Gingrich as their first choice, in hopes that he would repeal Obama’s “radical policies,” transform the economy, and shrink the government as much as possible during his term in office. And while many want to count Gingrich out of the race after Rick Santorum overtook the runner-up slot,

with 39 states remaining and Super Tuesday approaching, the primaries are far from over. But if the Republicans want a realistic competitor to contend against Obama, Romney is the only candidate worth considering for several reasons. The main political determinant of Romney’s front-running qualification lies in his cohesion with the Independent Party. The rise of the independents has gained authority and will represent the portion of voters who have the power to determine the presidential candidate. “The swing voters who will play a pivotal role in determining his political fate are up for grabs,” Jeff Zeleny discussed the results of a national poll in a New York Times article. “[The poll] found just 31 percent expressing a favorable opinion of Obama. Two-thirds of independent voters say he has not made real progress fixing the economy.” The ambiguity independents express toward Obama gives the winning Republican candidate an opportunity to collect the additional votes and sway their thought process away from liberal economic principles. Although independent platforms take various forms, moderates generally tend to associate themselves with liberal social ideals and conservative views toward the management of the economy—a viewpoint Gingrich disap-

proves, while Romney’s campaign intentionally exemplifies. Romney generally avoids discussion of his

author and professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University, credited Romney’s strategic avoidance of controversy in a political analysis for CNN. “He has stayed away from most of the social issues and remained generally calm during the most heated moments of the debates,” Zelizer said. His tactical evasion of www.mctcampus.com social issues social ideals, while advo- allies him with modercating his conservative ates, who will have a economic management substantial impact on models. Julian Zelizer, the final tally.

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

However, some consider this strategy a flaw in Romney’s campaign. While Republicans are stereotyped for catering to the elite, Romney has faced criticism for trying to please everyone, which critics suggest as lack of conviction demeaning his ability to lead. Although these allegations are somewhat inconsistent, Romney’s accusations of “flip-flopping” present a valid concern for his political platform, a flaw that Obama will surely tackle. Glen Kessler of the Washington Post determined three of 10 allegations hold substance, deeming the other claims a product of media distortion. For example, the media claimed that Romney supported Obama’s

stimulus in 2009 and retracted doing so in 2011. “This is a stretch,” Kessler said. “The transcript of the 2009 interview (on CNN) clearly shows that Romney is talking about economic stimulus in general. In fact, he says that he wished a stimulus bill was passed before George W. Bush (then still the president) left office. That’s different from saying he would support what emerged as Obama’s stimulus plan.” Should the moderates agree with Kessler’s take on the issue, Romney’s campaign will gain considerable power.

Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD OP-ED

Letters to the Editor

PAGE 7

Below are several editorials written by other PASSHE Schools with regards to the proposed budget cuts for the upcoming fiscal year. The articles continue onto page 8.

The Rocket, Slippery Rock University

Budget. When you see that word, you probably want to put down the newspaper and quit reading. It’s confusing, and it doesn’t even affect you anyway right? WRONG. Pa. Governor Tom Corbett’s proposed budget for 2012-13 affects every single one of you in a very big way. Tuesday, Corbett announced his proposed budget, which includes a 20 percent cut, or $82.5 million, of state funding to Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) schools, one of which is SRU. So what does that mean for you, the typical student? Let’s look at the facts. Last year, Corbett proposed a 51.4 percent cut. Thankfully, the actual cut for 2011-12 was only 18 percent. But that 18 percent cut did enough damage to directly affect every single student. Because of the cut, the PASSHE Board of Governors was forced to increase the cost of tuition by 7.5 percent, which we’re sure you noticed when your tuition bill came in the mail in August. Let’s think about this for a second. For the 2011-12 fiscal year, PASSHE schools lost 18 percent of their state funding, which led directly to a 7.5 percent tuition hike along with several cutbacks. Corbett just proposed a 2012-13 budget, which would include a 20 percent cut of state funding. Assuming that stands and no concession is made by the state legislature, we could be looking at another tuition hike of about 8 percent. That’s a big deal. For some people, that could mean no longer being able to afford college. This is a public institution of higher education. There shouldn’t be a question of affordability. A tuition increase isn’t the only repercussion we may have to worry about. California University of Pa., another one of the 14 PASSHE schools, announced Wednesday, the day after Corbett revealed his proposed budget, that they will cut 11 of their 116 administrators. Slippery Rock doesn’t have any plans as of late, but if this budget cut goes through, changes are going to have to be made. So what can you do to help? Send an e-mail to Corbett and your other state representatives telling them why they shouldn’t be cutting funds to higher education. Post on Facebook and Twitter about it. It seems small, but social media has unbelievable power. We’re not sure what the motivation is for Governor Corbett’s apparent tirade against education, but we don’t like it and it needs to change.

The Penn, Indiana University

President Barack Obama, in his January State of the Union Address, laid out an ultimatum for the country’s colleges. “Higher education can’t be a luxury,” he said. “It is an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford.” Gov. Tom Corbett agreed with this sentiment in his Feb. 7 budget address: “I think he is right that we need to confront the problem. I think we need to talk about this honestly and without rancor and dramatics.” Corbett clearly does agree with Obama’s sentiment – what better way to convey that affordable higher education is a must than by hacking another 20 percent from state funding? I suppose we should be thankful, right? Last year Corbett’s proposed education cuts were a whopping 50 percent. Wrong. The state legislature approved an 18-percent cut, a blessing compared to the proposed 50 percent. But what was the result? Your tuition went up more than $400 – arguably a direct result of that 18-percent cut. What would another 20-percent cut bring? Another $400? $500? That’s a nearly $1,000 increase in just two years. IUP Interim President Werner has conveyed both dismay and uncertainty in response to the proposed cuts, saywww.delcotimes.com ing that, should they come to pass, IUP will be left trying to reduce spending by about $10 million. “It would certainly have some very serious implications for our ability to deliver services that we currently deliver,” he said. How, we should be asking Gov. Corbett, is that “agreeing” with the call for affordable higher education? It’s not. A 20-percent cut would be detrimental to not only IUP, but also the other 13 schools in the State System. What’s more is that our own president has expressed that he doesn’t know how the school would deal with such cuts. Does that make you angry? Are you concerned about the quality of your education in the coming years. Good. You should be. And you should do something about it. Don’t let your voice go unheard. Call state senators and representatives. Get involved in rallies. Heck, organize a rally. Find out what other schools are doing and get involved or bring their ideas here. Get angry. Get loud. Let Gov. Corbett know that this is absolutely unacceptable. It’s your education, and it’s up to you to defend it.


PAGE 8

THE QUAD OP-ED

The Snapper, Millersville University

Education is a luxury. It doesn’t come with expensive trinkets, catered dining services, or golden platters encrusted with rare jewels. Education is quite the opposite, but its luxurious quality lays in the faculty who devote their lives to passing their immersive knowledge onto eager students. Their passion for teaching allows their students to pursue their dreams, and someday attain their definition of luxury. Yet this promise is fading with another strike to education’s funding by Gov. Corbett’s latest proposed budget plan. This plan will cut higher education by $1.4 billion – specifically for Millersville University and the other 13 PASSHE universities, a 20% cut. Similar to last year’s budget cuts, students are expected to face increase in class sizes, lack of available classes, and a tuition hike. In this rough economy, finances are scarce, and jobs are even scarcer. A college degree will only get you so far; it doesn’t always guarantee that you will gain a foothold in your career. What are students to do if they cannot return to Millersville or their respective university? One option is to find a job and save the money to pay for college. But for others, transferring to a community college is the best option to continue their education at a lower cost. Regardless, Governor Corbett is also hitting community colleges, albeit at a lower percentage. There are numerous other areas that could alleviate these cuts from education: taxing prisons, especially eliminating last meal requests for Death Row inmates, taxing Marcellus Shale, big companies, and the upper class or the 1%. There are even more areas that can be hit and not suffer as great consequences as education does. The biggest consequence is the decreasing classes available to students, important for seniors seeking to graduate on time, and increasing class sizes that will imminently destroy a teacher and student’s personal experience. But this change won’t matter if students are transferring to out-of-state colleges, which are cheaper compared to the cuts. Instead of losing valuable assets like alumni staying in the state, government officials, such as those in Gov. Corbett’s cabinet could cut their salary. It’s the purpose of the recent discussion to tax the rich, or the 1%, instead of heavily taxing the working class. At that rate, the public would know where the money is going that is being cut. More than likely, the majority of the public is not aware of what their hard-earned money is spent on. So, who better to regulate the budget plan than the people who are being impacted by these cuts? Business people, faculty, administrators of colleges, and even students could possibly perform a better job. They know better than anyone else the current situation of who needs to be cut and without much thought, Marcellus Shale, the 1%, and other areas of society would immediately be hit. Or perhaps they would see that education is too costly. Maybe the best option would be to follow other countries that allow free education. Even more pleasing is eliminating general education classes, allowing immediate hands-on experience for students who are certain of their career. That would definitely reduce the amount of years in higher education and more time earning your luxury in your field. Students need a proper, affordable education to succeed in today’s world. It is ever-changing, ever-evolving yet is consistently producing the next leaders of the world. Some of the people who make decisions on these cuts are the same people who attended higher education, attained their degrees, and made a difference. Will we see this trend suddenly evaporate with these cuts or will we, the future leaders thrive through these tough times, and prosper? Stand up and be heard.

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

The Voice, Bloomsburg University

Governor Tom Corbett has recently announced that there will be more budget cuts, which will leave the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) with $330 million as opposed to the $412 million from last year for working and middle class students to receive a quality higher education. Since Corbett has taken office, there has been a loss of almost $175 million, according to the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties (APSCUF). Corbett plans to cut $82.5 million from PASSHE, which will cause tuition to increase at many of the state-owned schools, APSCUF said. This past year, Bloomsburg students had to add $436 to their bill to cover the 18 percent cuts. While the students need to pay more, the salary for Corbett and his workers has been increasing. Last year, the Associated Press reported that state lawmakers received a three percent raise, which put Governor Corbett’s salary to $183,000. He decided to stay at $175,000 and donate to charity, AP said. With the recent cuts, Corbett still employs 55 workers that in total make $4.3 million a year, according to Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. We at The Voice believe in the mission of PASSHE for state schools to supply accessible, affordable, “high quality education at the lowest possible cost to students.” We do not think Corbett is providing this. According to APSCUF, “the average PASSHE student graduates with over $23,000 in student loan debt.”We at The Voice believe this system will cause the opportunity for students to receive higher education to deteriorate. Students can barely afford upper level education as it is so by increasing the cost, fewer students will continue to go to school. We at The Voice believe as students are paying more for education, we should receive the quality we are putting in. This university is accepting more students than it can provide for, which is discouraging the quality we strive to have. Students are overpopulating classrooms, eateries, and shuttle buses. As Dr. Eric Hawrelak, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, pointed out in a ‘Letter to the Editor’ last week, classroom capacities have gone from a comfortable learning environment to a fight for the last available seat. With Sutliff still closed, open classrooms in general are difficult to find. We at The Voice believe there should be better accommodations made for students paying an extra $436 because of the budget cuts. Even common eateries on campus have taken a turn for the worse. Places like Roongos and the Husky have excruciating long lines since they have about the same number of employees as they did with students from before over acceptance. The shuttle buses have been overflowing with students as well. The environment we live in throughout the university should provide the quality we are putting our money into. Overall, we at The Voice believe students need to become more aware of the budget cuts. Students need to take action by writing to the governor, uniting with other students, and going to rallies if they don’t want the prices to increase even more than they already have. It is important for students to unite because one voice alone cannot send a message.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD FEATURES

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Features PAGE 9

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Many collaborate to sponsor eating disorders awareness week By Margaret Weaver Staff Writer

The Sister-to-Sister peer mentors of West Chester University will be holding Eating Disorders Awareness Week from Feb. 27 to March 2. According to their mission statement, the goal of the peer mentors is to “promote healthy body image and spread awareness regarding eating disorders to women on campus.” The program’s aim is to “help women by encouraging positive body image, self-esteem, and empowerment.” Founded in 2000 by Dr. Deanne Zotter, the peer mentors are a group of sorority women that meet once a week to learn how to

recognize the signs of eating disorders and learn how to teach their sorority sisters and other women on campus how to love their bodies. The women are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of eating disorders in their friends and family and they put on programs in their chapters to educate their sisters. Eating Disorders Awareness Week is Sister to Sister’s annual event. The goal for the week is to reach out to all women on campus and educate them on how to be healthy. The events are not limited to just sorority women because eating disorders affect everyone, regardless of

what organization they are in. The theme for the week is “Change the Way You See, Not the Way You Look.” Throughout the week, the Women’s Center will be accepting clothing donations. “Goodbye Skinny Clothes,” is intended for students to donate clothes that may not fit anymore. The idea is to get rid of the skinny clothes and be happy with current appearances and sizes. Students may drop off clothes to Lawrence 220 all week. On Monday Feb. 27, the peer mentors will be sitting at a table in Sykes from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. They will be handing out the

Food insecurity: an issue at home, abroad By Kellyn McNamara Special to The Quad

Imagine the anxiety of not knowing when you will get your next meal. For many people, this is not imagined – it happens every day. Food insecurity is a pervasive problem, both global and local. Recently, students and faculty from the

WCU Nutrition, Political Science, and Geography Departments attended the World Information Transfer (WIT) conference on Food Insecurity and Prevention. Representatives from around the world, including Yuriy Sergeyev, Ukranian ambassador to the UN, sought to raise awareness about the global

issue of food insecurity. Sergeyev discussed Ukraine’s historic struggle with food insecurity. The Holodomor, literally “killing by starvation,” tolled an estimated seven to 10 million deaths between 1932-33 as a result of Soviet food restriction. see INSECURITY on page 10

schedule for the week, information on good body image, and selling T-shirts. The T-shirts are black shirts with pink writing and say, “This is what Barbie should look like.” The shirts will be available for purchase all week. Monday night’s event is a film called “Miss Representation.” The film will be shown in Main Hall 168 at 7:30 p.m. This film shows how the media misrepresents young girls and women by focusing on appearance rather than what lies within. Free popcorn will be available. On Tuesday Feb. 28, there will be two events. The first is a free yoga session from

12 p.m.-1 p.m. in the Sykes Aerobics Studio. Jennifer Kelly, a registered yoga trainer, will lead the session. From 6 p.m.- 9 p.m. in Sykes 209 on Tuesday night, Sisters United will hold “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall.” The goal is to “shatter the unrealistic images in the media and write our own positive body image reality.” On Wednesday Feb. 29, three local women, Kate Capriano, Melissa Hays, and Elizabeth Kalogris, will be holding “Lunch + Learn= Free Pizza.” These women will teach participants on how to use the arts to raise awareness on body image issues and body diver-

sity. The event will be held in Sykes Ballroom C from 12 p.m.-1 p.m. The sisters of Delta Phi Epsilon are holding their annual National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associate Disorders (ANAD) Vigil on Wednesday night at 7 p.m. in Sykes Common Grounds. There will be an open mic time for the audience to share their testimonies after hearing from different speakers. Purple ribbons will be available for purchase at the Sister-to-Sister table and proceeds will go to Delta Phi Epsilon’s philanthropy, National Association for see AWARENESS on page 11

College Cellar: new website eases college student life

By Katie Derby

Special to The Quad

College Cellar is a new website to make college life easier. What does it mean to be a college student? When asked this very question, students described college life as free and exciting, but also stressful and chaotic at times. The free-

dom and independence one has in college comes along with constant responsibilities to tackle and decisions to make. This includes figuring out where to live, who to live with, and where to buy cheap textbooks all while trying to balance school and sometimes even a job. All these factors can indeed be overwhelming, but what if

there was something that could make college life just a little bit easier? This was exactly the goal that brothers Justin and Scott Geller had in mind when they created the website CollegeCellar.com. CollegeCellar.com is a relatively

see CELLAR on page 10


PAGE 10 Insecurity from page 9 Sergeyev describes, “In my country… millions of deaths were caused by the confiscation of everything considered as a food, the prohibition of the trade in foodstuffs, and the deployment of internal and border troops to keep the starving people from traveling to other regions… in search of food.” Rutgers University political scientist Dr. Alexander Motyl added to this chilling account, recalling a visit to Soviet Russia. There he saw a disturbing poster, warning against the consumption of corpses for survival. Motyl asked a Soviet official, “What is the purpose of such a poster; is it really that bad here?” The official paused, and replied solemnly, “Not all of our people are educated.” Such horrors are unimaginable to most of us, but tragedies like this are still occurring in many parts of the world, and hungry people can be found on every continent. In the U.S., food insecurity is more common than people may

THE QUAD FEATURES think. In fact, one in every eight Chester County residents are food insecure. Low wages and long hours make it hard to afford food, or find the time to cook. Additionally, urban areas across the country are “food deserts” where fewer grocery stores and limited transportation means limited access to food. Food insecurity may seem hopeless. However, speakers at the conference offered plausible, realistic solutions. Organizations, policies, technologies, and free press can all help prevent food insecurity. Locally, the Chester County Food Bank (CCFB) is an example of an organization that provides for food insecure households. One service offered is the Backpack Program. Each week, volunteers prepare back-packs full of non perishable food. The backpacks are delivered to over 500 lowincome school children every Friday to ensure that they will have food over the weekend. This is just one example of the many local organizations that help provide food for the hungry. Programs like these are important, but

more important are the people who take part in them. Anyone who would like to participate in the local effort to prevent food insecurity can start by getting involved in WCU’s March food drive. The Student Dietetic Association and CCFB are collecting high protein canned and non-perishable foods to be distributed to food insecure households this spring. Foods accepted include canned/packaged tuna or chicken, 12-oz. jars of peanut butter, and shelf-stable milk such as Parmalat. Donate non-perishable goods to the WCU Health and Science Center on South Campus March 5 -20. Collection boxes will be clearly marked and placed under the large bulletin board at the top of the stairs on the third floor. Make a difference in local food insecurity by volunteering, donating, speaking with others to raise awareness, and working to enact policies that put food on the table for food insecure individuals. Kellyn McNamarais a third-year student majoring in nutrition & dietetics with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at KM654122@wcupa.edu.

Cellar from page 9 new website, launched to the public only this past week, but is already quickly gaining popularity. CollegeCellar is an online bulletin board where students or people can view information about different colleges throughout the country. The site includes information about tuition, on and off-campus events, job listings, roommates

FEBRUARY 27, 2012 for a variety of people. He thought that current students along with both high school seniors and incoming college freshman would benefit from this site. The student found that, “CollegeCellar is a quick and easy way to find different aspects of a university. The site contains important needto-know facts as well as fun facts.” Another student felt that the review section provides what most sites don’t: the social aspect, and the

their site has turned out, and hope that everyone will log on to explore the site and submit reviews to help expand CollegeCellar. The Gellers would also like to eventually collaborate with local businesses around campuses to promote discounted services for the student community. By logging on, submitting reviews, and spreading the word, students can help make this site become a recognizable brand.

www.collegecellar.com

needed, apartments for rent, or textbooks for sale. There is also a ‘review’ section, where one can read or submit reviews on bars, restaurants, or other happenings around the college or surrounding town. After exploring the site, one West Chester University student remarked that CollegeCellar would be useful

stuff you wonder about but can’t find an answer to anywhere else. The masterminds behind the site, Justin and Scott Geller, have both attended West Chester University. Justin is a WCU alumnus, while Scott currently attends as a computer science major. The brothers are pleased with the way

CollegeCellar was designed to help students and will continuously strive to make college life easier. If you have any questions about CollegeCellar, contact Scott Geller at Scott@ c o l l e g e c e l l a r. c o m . Katie Durby is a third-year student. She can be reached at KD716057@wcupa.edu.

Want to write for the Features section? E-mail quadfeatures@wcupa.edu


FEBRUARY 27, 2012 Awareness from page 9 Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders. On Thursday at 5:30 p.m. in the Sykes Theater, join the Sisterto-Sister Peer Mentors for Scale Bashing. The audience will hear stories of recovery from eating disorders and are encouraged to bring their own scales to bash. The Peer Mentors will be sharing ways on how to “break away from the scale obsession.” The last event of the week is another free yoga session on Friday March 2. Rebecca Preiser, MSEd, will be leading the session. She is a currently a doctoral student in the counseling center and she is also a registered yoga instructor. The session will be held in the Sykes Aerobic Center from 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. The Women’s Center, The Office of Wellness Education, Sisterto-Sister Peer Mentors, Sisters United, Delta Phi Epsilon, and the Counseling Center all sponsor Eating Disorders Awareness Week. For more information on the events of the week, visit http://wcupa.edu/_services/stu. inf/wellness/. For more information on the Sister-to-Sister Peer Mentor program, please visit http://roadrunner. cs.wcupa.edu/peer/. Margaret Weaver is a fourth-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at MW678077@wcupa.edu.

THE QUAD FEATURES

Constantly sick?

Column by: Devon Dadoly

Special to The Quad

Why is it that we always seem to get sick in the winter? With the drop in temperatures, immunity runs low. Frigid weather weakens the body, as well as the immune system, making us more susceptible to cold and flu viruses. The lack of vitamin D from the sun also makes us vulnerable to microbial infections. The important thing is to boost immunity with proper vitamins and a healthy diet. It’s no secret that a healthy diet can lead to a healthy life, but what about when you’re sick? The germs and bacteria that cause sickness live off sugar that is ingested in the form of food or drinks, which means that certain foods can actually make a sickness worse. Even medicine has sugar. Popular cough and cold syrups are loaded with sucrose and sucralose, a more processed form of sugar. Opt for something with honey, Echinacea, or zinc, as these are more natural alternatives and can eliminate bad bacteria growing in the body. It’s important to stay away from milk and dairy as well, as these house enzymes that can feed bacte-

ria. Water is especially essential, because it flushes out toxins that your body can’t handle. With most of us on the go, it’s difficult to take care of our bodies properly, especially during the school year. Here are some simple ways to boost immunity naturally. Vitamin C: Everyone knows to drink orange juice when sick, but what you may not know is that storebought orange juice may not be doing the trick. Pasteurized fruit juices lack the enzymes found in fresh-squeezed juices that are essential to absorbing important vitamins and minerals. The best ways to get the daily dose of vitamin C is taking the vitamin in its pure form. Vitamin C tablets, or crystallized powders like Emergen-C are cost-effective and taste great. Echinacea (Echinacea Purpurea): This relative of the daisy family is a plant native to the United States. It is known for its immunological properties and is one of the oldest remedies for the common cold. Echinacea can be found in liquid or capsule form and has no side effects when taken orally. It is most often found with Goldenseal, another essential plant for boosting immunity, as well as reducing anti-microbial effects. Probiotics and

Acidophilus: It is important to stock up on probiotics and acidophilus when sick because they break down the bad bacteria that sits in the stomach, and push toxins out of the body. Though some yogurts contain trace amounts of acidophilus, it is not nearly as much as the body needs. The best way to take probiotics is in a capsule or powder form that can be mixed with water. Probiotics are also important in maintaining a healthy digestive system. Elderberry (Sambucus): This sweet berry, used for centuries to boost immunity, has also been shown to ward of the H1N1 Virus and other cold and flulike symptoms. Elderberry can be found in many forms including a sweet medicinal syrup, lozenges, and capsules. Zinc: An essential element for all human health, zinc is an important dietary need. It is necessary for blood flow, and flushes out the toxins of the body. It has been proven effective to relieve cold and flu symptoms in the form of a lozenge or tablet. All of these products and more like them can be found at your local health food store, or the natural section of your grocery store. Devon Dadoly is a second-year student majoring in art. She can be reached at DD742228@wcupa.edu.

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March is...

Music in Our Schools Month National Craft Month National Frozen Food Month National Irish American Heritage Month National Nutrition Month National Peanut Month National Women’s History Month Poetry Month Red Cross Month Social Workers Month

Daily March Holidays 1 Peanut Butter Lovers’ Day 2 Old Stuff Day 3 I Want You to be Happy Day 4 Holy Experiment Day 5 Multiple Personality Day 6 National Frozen Food Day 7 National Crown Roast of Pork Day 8 International (Working) Women’s Day 9 Panic Day 10 Middle Name Pride Day 11 Johnny Appleseed Day 12 Girl Scouts Day 12 Plant a Flower Day 14 National Pi Day- Why today? Because today is 3.14, the value of Pi. 15 Ides of March 16 Freedom of Information Day 17 Saint Patrick’s Day 18 Goddess of Fertility Day 18 Supreme Sacrifice Day 19 Poultry Day 20 International Earth Day 21 Fragrance Day 22 National Goof Off Day 23 National Chip and Dip Day 24 National Chocolate Covered Raisin Day 25 Waffle Day 26 Make Up Your Own Holiday Day 27 National “Joe” Day 28 Something on a Stick Day 29 National Mom and Pop Business Owners Day 30 National Doctor’s Day For more holiday information visit: http://holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/march.html


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THE QUAD FEATURES

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Bathing suit season: is it your friend or foe?

Column by: Lauren DiCrecchio Practicum Writer

Aside from finals week, bathing suit season is that time of year that tends to creep up quickly and spark more anxiety in us college students. Some of us girls start to obsess over calorie intake and which self-tanners to buy while trying to get in as much time as possible at the gym. I’m guilty of it too, well maybe except the self-tanning. Although we love swimsuit weather, we put way too much stress on ourselves to find the perfect bathing suit that doesn’t draw attention to our problem areas. There is no such thing as the “perfect body,” but with a little help from this guide, you can find the perfect suit for your body. In one of my earlier columns, I discussed the different body types and how to dress for each. Just like apparel shopping, it is important to know your body shape when searching for the perfect swim suit. You never want to be discouraged though, and always remember that there is a flat-

tering suit for you! Before I get into the specific fits for your body, there are a couple of useful tips before you step foot in the fitting room. For me, trying on bathing suits is complete

Second, I personally feel more confident when I have a little color and a hair free body. Whether you self, spray or even tan with UV lights, you are more likely to have a confidence

here are a few simple guidelines on must haves and what to avoid for your body type. If you are looking to slim down your hips, I suggest a bottom that has a higher

ommend tops with lots of beading and ruffles. The extra material and texture look creates a fuller illusion. Steer clear of the infamous bandeau top. I also wouldn’t rule out tops with underwire.

http://www.vyneworld.com/

torture. I think way to much into it, but I have found with a couple easy steps, the experience can be a lot more enjoyable. First, I would recommend trying bathing suits on earlier in the morning because our bodies are less bloated. Make it your first trip of the day, instead of going after lunch or dinner when you had one too many pieces of bread.

boost when trying on your first suit. You also want to make sure you shave or get waxed. Third, have a plan. You want to have an idea of the type of suit to look for, so you don’t try something on that is not right for you. We all know that when we try something on that does not flatter us, we start to lose confidence and it can kill our shopping spirit. With that said,

waist. This will help create leaner looking legs. You also do not want to draw too much attention to that area, so stick with solid bottoms. Darker colors always recede, so black, navy or dark brown are great choices. By wearing lighter colored tops with fun prints and patterns, you will attract eyes to your upper half! For women with smaller busts, I rec-

If you are looking to control your belly, do not wear tankini’s; they are extremely clingy. Even though it seems they are made for this type of figure, they actually tend to accent that part of your body that some of us like to keep hidden. Choose a top that is a lower cut and bottoms that are cut higher. For a bigger bust, lower necklines and under wire tops are

the way to go, especially for support. I would stay away from triangle tops as they can be too revealing, and not in a good way. Solid prints up top are always a safe bet, but make it fun with beading or ruffles at the bottom to create a balanced proportion. And finally, if you are looking to flatten some of your curves, angled and vertical stripes are key. Tiestring bottoms can be a little tricky and tight for this body type, but a wrap cover (around your hips) is the perfect accessory! One last, important thing to remember when trying on bathing suits is to not focus on numbers and letters. It’s not about sizes, it’s about comfort. Summer is all about relaxing and feeling great, so make this years bathing suit shopping trip a fun one, and try not to stress yourself out too much. There is a style for every body type that will accent all of your best physical qualities, so don’t focus on the negative. Lauren DiCrecchio is a fifth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in journalism and Spanish. She can be reached at LD658004@wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

Check out the Quad online! wcuquad.com

The Free Library of Philadelphia welcomes author Jodi Picoult By Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor

Highly-praised contemporary author Jodi Picoult will soon stop in the City of Brotherly Love during her current book tour. The author of 18 novels, including the #1 New York Times bestsellers “House Rules,” “Handle with Care,” “Change of Heart,” “Nineteen Minutes,” and “My Sister’s Keeper,” will visit the Free Library of Philadelphia to mark the release of her newest novel, “Lone Wolf,” which will be available on Tuesday, Feb. 28. Picoult’s books are known for their often controversial plotlines involving topics such as stem cell research, date rape, teenage suicide, Asperger’s syndrome, and more. Many of her novels involve courtroom drama, uncovering

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Entertainment QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

The greatest Oscar acceptance speech never given By Barry Koltnow McClatchy Newspapers

www.jodipicoult.com

hidden secrets, and plenty of food-forthought metaphors. For “Lone Wolf,” Picoult conducted extensive research on wolf packs and their behaviors. In the book, Edward Warren is a young man who left his home in New Hampshire after a falling out with his father. His father, Luke, is an animal conservationist who survived living with a wild wolf pack in Canada. But when he is gravely injured after an accident, Edward and his sister Cara must decide whether to terminate his life support or

wait for a miracle. Picoult will host a signing for her new book, Lone Wolf, at the Free Library on Monday, March 5 at 7:30 p.m. The cost is $15 for general admission or $7 with a valid student ID. For those bringing a book of hers to the signing, Picoult will personalize all copies of her new book, “Lone Wolf,” and she will sign one of her previous books without personalization. Carol Fritz is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu.

PAGE 13

Quick, name the 10 most memorable Oscar acceptances speeches ever given, not including Sally Field’s iconic “You like me” speech. I suspect that your Top 10 list has fallen about 10 speeches short. Oh, you remember a few incidents surrounding Oscar speeches, like that cute Italian guy leaping over the backs of the seats to get to the stage, or Adrien Brody planting a wet one on Halle Berry, but not the speeches themselves. It’s not your fault. These speeches simply are not memorable, even though the winners have been practicing in front of a mirror since they were 8 years old. But there is a big difference between giving a speech in front of an appreciative audience of one, and giving a speech in front of an indifferent audience of millions. When the big moment comes, nerves and excitement overtake all the practice, and the winners dissolve into a gooey mess. Those who manage to maintain their cool are smart enough to avoid the pitfalls that

come with excessive ego or vindictiveness. Just once, we’d like to hear an Oscar acceptance speech that goes something like this: “I would like to thank the academy, but not all the academy. “There are members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences I really want to thank. They are the people who voted for me. The rest of you can drop dead. “Where were you when I really needed the support? Where were you when I was a young actor being rejected at auditions every day and working as a waiter at nights until I couldn’t stand anymore? I was sleeping on my buddy’s sofa, and sneaking into buffets with friends and eating off their plates. I had to go to auditions in the same clothes I wore the day before because I didn’t have extra outfits, and couldn’t afford dry cleaning. “Which brings me to the world-famous fashion designers who have dressed me tonight. I would like to thank you for sending free clothes to my home, but I could really have used the free clothes when I was broke. I am

making plenty of money now, and I don’t need your stupid clothes, but I’m told that I have to wear the clothes or Joan Rivers will rip me to shreds before I’m off the red carpet. “I want to thank my manager for sticking with me through the lean times, but my big-shot agent only signed me after a small film I did made a big splash at Sundance. Before that, he wouldn’t even return my phone calls. Now, he would take a bullet for me. I wish he would. “At this point in my acceptance speech, I’m supposed to thank the studio that made this movie. It’s the smart way to go because you never want to insult a big studio. But this is the same studio that passed on me for 20 other roles. They told my agent I wasn’t right for the part, which means I wasn’t attractive enough, or tall enough or short enough or thin enough or fat enough. “Just because conventional wisdom says that rejection is part of this business doesn’t mean we have to like it. Nobody likes to be rejected, and just because there is a See OSCAR page 14


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THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

The World/ Inferno Friendship Society mixes things up at The Note By Nicole Bair Special to The Quad

“Speak easy,” a term coined back in the 1930s, refers to an illegal establishment that served alcohol during the prohibition. It sounds pretty awesome, but the music played at these dangerous gatherings was even better. A bit more modern, but still showing the “speak easy” vibe, was the mix of jazz, with some soul, and a hint of punk at The Note last Thursday night when The World/Inferno Friendship Society took the stage. The show was led by Jack Terricloth, “a man that seems to have stepped out of a burlesque carnival circus,” said Mario, a fan of the band. As Terricloth sashayed out onto the stage, a champagne bottle

could be spotted in hand. Known for his stage banter and views on politics, he promptly kicked off the show with a bang. The band quickly moved everyone in the audience; literally, there was an instant mosh pit. Dance moves straight from the 50s broke out in the middle of the crowded floor as dare devils surfed the tops of the crowd. Meanwhile, mohawks were spotted, ladies climbing the railings, teenagers leapt from the stage only to be caught by the burley lumberjacks of the crowd, and the constant stench of sweat stung in one’s nostrils. No surprise to its attendees, the show went off without a hitch. Unlike a normal band, these fine folks have band alumni. Containing over 30

members, the musical group offers a new experience every time they put on not a show, but a performance. With only enough room on the stage for a limited amount of members, there is usually room for 10 performers at a time. The performance on Thursday consisted of: a bass, a drummer, a keyboardist, a saxophonist, an electric violinist, and several other talented contributors. With the way these folks brought their music alive with their heart and passion, it is hard to believe any other combination of group members could sound anywhere near as fabulous as they did. Nicole Bair is a fourthyear student majoring in liberal studies with a minor in Spanish. She can be reached at NB777106@wcupa.edu.

www.chunksaah.com

The World/Inferno Friendship Society album,“The Anarchy and the Ecstasy” was released in 2011.

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Tweets of the Week

By Liz Thompson/ The Quad

OSCAR From page 13

thin promise of fame and riches at the end the rainbow doesn’t mean we have to put up with this abuse. Most actors aren’t rich or famous, and never will be, and so I see no reason why we can’t be treated with some dignity. “I’m also supposed to thank the director of this movie because film is a director’s medium, and it isn’t smart to insult directors. Well, this is the same director who regularly seduces his leading ladies, and everybody knows it. In another profession, he would be called a

predator. “I want to thank my fellow nominees. Winners never had to thank their fellow nominees. It was understood that the winner got everything, and the losers got shown losing on national television. That’s how the game was played, but now it is politically correct to not only acknowledge your fellow nominees, but say how honored you are just to be in their company. “And, of course, I have to thank the other actors in my movie, even though some of them came to the set late every day

because they were out drinking all night. “I would thank the writers but it’s customary to pretend that the words magically appear on the page, or that the director wrote the movie, so who am I to buck tradition? “Finally, I want to thank the fans. I would be nothing without the fans. That’s what I was told to say, and I suppose there is some truth to that. But these are the same fans who ignored my movie when it came out, and went instead to see a movie starring Nicolas Cage as a flaming head.”


THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

PAGE 15

The Silent Session: unspoken interview with singer Elle Varner

Emerald Thomas Alumnus Writer

Rising star Elle Varner is a recording artist who released her debut single, “Perfectly Imperfect” this past August. The Quad recently conducted a “Silent Session” unspoken interview in which questions for the singer were answered through her music. Thomas: “In the music industry today it’s hard to set yourself apart from the pack, how would you describe your originality and sound?” Varner: “I am 32 flavors and then some; I’m beyond your peripheral vision, so you might wanna turn your head…” Varner describes herself as being a poster girl with no

poster in her song “32 Flavors.” She is a mélange of the girl next door with the girl around the block. With her journey being as common as a cold, her honest lyrics accentuate her unique expression of “urban, quirky, R&B, soul” as she calls it. With influences ranging from the depths of jazz like Ella Fitzgerald, to the continuous work ethic of Beyonce, Elle hones her individuality while striving to inspire and be an example through her music. Thomas: “People see you today as this beautiful, energetic, confident young singer from LA, not realizing how far you’ve come, so how can you relate to indi-

viduals struggling to accept themselves?” Varner: “I can’t help being depressed, when I look down at my chest, Oh, yes, my chest, it might as well be nonexistent…If I had no cellulite, big breasts and pockets real wide then maybe I could be fly…and worst of all, I’m reminded in the cruelest ways, of how I don’t look and I should look…” Varner sheds the outer layer of her swag and lets listeners in to see the many personal battles which she had to overcome with her lyrics to “So Fly.” Whether it is being envious of the attention that other girls would get or striving to be accepted on an uncompromis-

ing societal standard, we have all been there. It took a lot of learning, a lot of growing and more importantly, self-love. Varner tells her fans Varner: “Growing up, nobody understood me. They didn’t understand what I was doing, what I was about, why I had glasses on, why I wore what I wore. But I’m here now, and I’m doing my thing. You out there and you’re different, you got your own swag…don’t let nobody in this world take that away from you, cause it’s all you got.” Elle Varner’s new 13-track mixtape is titled “Conversational Lush.” Audiences can learn more at www. ellevarner.com. Be on the lookout for her

debut album “Perfectly Imperfect,” projected to hit the market this spring.

Emerald Thomas is a 2011 WCU graduate. She can be reached at ET682650@wcupa.edu.

www.iamboigenius.com

Elle Varner’s single,“Perfectly Imperfect” features rapper J. Cole.

Taylor Swift invites New Jersey teen to American County Music Awards By Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor

Taylor Swift won “Entertainer of the Year” at the ACM Awards in 2010.

Music superstar Taylor Swift has inivited a teenage boy from New Jersey to be her date at the 2012 American County Music Awards. 18-year-old Kevin McGuire, a senior at Sterling Regional High School in Stratford, N.J., is currently battling cancer for the second time. Knowing that her brother loves Taylor Swift, McGuire’s sister started a Facebook page titled, “Taylor Swift Take Kevin McGuire to Prom!” According to USAToday, McGuire’s cousin said that

McGuire was worried about finding a date to prom because he was “going to be bald and have chipmunk cheeks due to cancer treatments.” McGuire’s sister decided to take a chance and try to get McGuire his dream prom date. “My sister’s great,” McGuire said. “She’s like my best friend. She said, ‘I’ll get it done.’ And I was like, ‘yeah, okay,’ and three days later, she made it happen.” Taylor Swift caught wind of McGuire’s request, and although she denied it, she proposed a different idea. “Kevin, I’m so sorry but I won’t be able to

make it to your prom. But I was wondering, the ACM Awards are coming up...Would you be my date? Love, Taylor,” said Swift on her Facebook page. McGuire said yes and thinks it “is a lot better than the senior prom.” McGuire is currently being treated for leukemia at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). He hopes to feel well enough to attend the American Country Music Awards, which will be held on Sunday, April 1 in Las Vegas. Carol Fritz is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 16

THE QUAD

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FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Classifieds

VISIT WWW.WCUQUAD.COM TO SEE YOUR AD HERE

How to Place Classified Advertising in the Quad To place a classified ad in The Quad, visit www.wcuquad.com, and click “classifieds.” Then enter your ad exactly as you wish it to appear, select a category, choose dates of publication, and pay for your ad with any major credit card on our secure server. The rate for classified advertising is 30 cents per word, with a minimum of 20 words ($6 minimum charge). Deadline for placing classified advertisements in The Quad is 11 a.m. on the Sunday before publication.

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P/T and/or F/T

Part Time

Radley Run country CLUB is currently seeking full and part time positions as servers and food runners. Very flexible hours. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. call 610-793-1660 ext. 209

Landscaping and Maintenance 8 General Estate Upkeep, grass cutting, tree 2 trimming, planting, also light carpentry and painting. 6 5 mi from College. $10/ hr. to start. pmtvrob@ve9 rizon.net 610-578-9129

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You don’t have to wait for 4 hours 8 in3an ER 6 or1 until5 your own doctor can fit you 1 in. 7Doctors 4 Express 9 5offers8 quality urgent care 7 days 5 a week 3 with 7 No 8 Appoint2 1 ments Needed. On-Site 7 Physician, 4 6 X-Ray 3 and8 Lab.2 See your message here next week! Place your Quad classified ad now1at Additional services we of3 8 fer:9 Travel 5 Vaccinations, 2 7 6 Sports/ School Physicals, by Tyler Mertens & Brian Tracey 5 2 Drug 6 Testing 9 1 and 4STD7 Testing. For More Info CallDiabolical 610-518-1060 Or Go Difficulty level: - 13 to DoctorsExpressDowningtown.com. We accept most insurances and offer discounted Self Pay rates.

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FEBRUARY 27, 2012

The Quad Crossword

THE QUAD

PAGE 17

Diversions The TV Crossword

ACROSS

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1 Summoned, with “for” 5 Skedaddle 9 Travolta facial feature 14 Symphony member 15 Okla., from 1890 to 1907 16 Pick up 17 Carnival sight 18 Slight advantage 19 Plus 20 Redundant position? 23 “The Time Machine” people 24 Low in a lea 25 Redundant alert? 32 Traffic stopper 33 Beauties 34 South American vacation spot 35 IRS employee 36 Pay

38 Pizzeria fixture 39 Poetic time of day 40 View from Toledo 41 Sitcom set at Mel’s Diner 42 Redundant habit? 46 Nothing but __: perfect hoops shot 47 Kiss and cuddle, British-style 48 Redundant guesses? 55 Trunks 56 Prefix with stat 57 All-night party 58 Oscar night VIP 59 Detective Peter of old TV 60 Canadian tribe 61 Hamlet in “Hamlet” and others 62 Auto pioneer 63 Driven drove © 2012

Tribune Media Services

Down

1 VMI program 2 Victim in Genesis 3 Taboo 4 Settles a score 5 Apply, as a brake 6 Comedian __ the Entertainer 7 Golden Fleece vessel 8 “Jurassic Park” menace, briefly 9 Dins 10 Tissue abnormality 11 Houston-to-Tampa direction 12 Glenn of The Eagles 13 Explosive letters 21 Stylish vigor 22 Mosque officials 25 Anouk of “La Dolce Vita” 26 Sturm und __ 27 Halloween vandal, perhaps 28 Teeny

29 “The Empire Strikes Back” director Kershner 30 Reunion attendee 31 Departed 32 Silver fineness meas. 36 Ire 37 __ Jordan: Nike brand 38 Member of a small ruling class 40 Poetic laments 41 Speck 43 New 44 Belgian seaport 45 Marriages 48 1960 Olympics city 49 Sea predator 50 Consequently 51 Rabbi’s house of worship 52 Container weight 53 Penultimate fairy tale word 54 Future flower 55 Address bk. entry

1 Saget of “America’s Funniest Home Videos” 4 “Green __” 9 “Grounded __ Life” 12 Yoko __ 13 Actress Eva Marie __ 14 Coach __ Parseghian 15 “__ be in England now that April’s there...” (Robert Browning) 16 Tropical fruit 17 Network for Wolf Blitzer 18 Explorer __ de León 20 __ PG; like movies possibly not for the whole family 22 Actor on “NCIS: Los Angeles” 26 Toaster’s proclamation 27 “Boys Don’t __”; Hilary Swank film 28 Meyers or Graynor 29 Role on “Up All Night” 32 “The Big __”; movie for Bogart and Bacall 35 “Last __” 39 Glover or DeVito 40 “The __”; series for Mr. T 42 Prefix for cycle or form 43 Kingdom 47 Bart Simpson’s “Grampa” 48 Banned insecticide 49 Unfasten, as one’s shoelaces 50 Monogram for author Stevenson 51 “__ Yes to the Dress” 52 Rings, as a bell 53 “The Old Man and the __”

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1 Betty of old cartoons 2 “__ of Old Smoky” 3 Singer Pat __ 4 __ as a lamb 5 President Arthur’s monogram 6 “The Adventures of __ Tin Tin” 7 High school subject: abbr. 8 “The Perfect __”; film for George Clooney 9 “Fear __” 10 Crotchety 11 Kentucky Sen. __ Paul 19 Dracula and others: abbr. 21 Diane Sawyer’s employer 23 Pot __; braised beef dish

24 Role on “Cheers” 25 Sigourney Weaver sci-fi movie 29 Plummer or Peet 30 “__ Fair”; Reese Witherspoon film 31 Actress __ Jillian 33 Singer and actor who played Mingo on “Daniel Boone” 34 “The __ and the Pendulum” 36 Pancake topper 37 Approaches 38 “Gone With the Wind” star 39 Failures 41 Small plateau 44 180˚ from WSW 45 “One Day __ Time” 46 Comic strip “__ Abner”


PAGE 18

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Women’s hockey wins DVCHC title with defeat of UVA By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer Last Sunday afternoon, West Chester’s women’s hockey team played in the DVCHC league championship game against the University of Virginia. The highly anticipated game ended in a close 4-3 victory for West Chester. “After coming off of two big wins against teams that are going to nationals, we knew we needed to carry that momentum and solid team play over into the championship game,” goaltender Aly Golia said. West Chester was on the attack early by shooting at Virginia’s net continuously for the first

four minutes of the game. The stakes were extremely high in this post-season game and the team did not want to make any mistakes. They were given the opportunity to score early after Virginia’s Kerry Wilson went into the box for a tripping penalty. West Chester forward Karine Thibault took advantage of this momentum and scored the first goal on the power play assisted by Becky Dobson and Daria Carzo. This granted West Chester the early lead, which they were striving hard to keep. The lead did not stick despite another power play for West Chester at the 12th minute of the period. Virginia was quick to kill their penalty

off and be on the offensive. Shortly after the two minute period where they were short a player, Virginia forward Shannon O’Donnell evened the score 1-1 with a goal assisted by Wilson. A second before the first period ended, West Chester’s Thibault was whistled for a slashing minor penalty. Since there was only a second left in the first period, Virginia was given a power play at the start of the second period. Virginia was hoping to use their advantage to score another goal, but West Chester went on the defense strong as soon as the puck was dropped. West Chester’s strong defense easily managed to keep their rivals’

Budget protests!

pucks out of their zone. The defense was on top of the puck so much during the short-handed play that Dobson was able to score an unassisted goal to win back the lead. Not to be outdone, Virginia was right behind them. Within seconds of Dobson’s goal, Virginia forward Mei Tuong scored unassisted to again tie the game. The two teams continued the action back and forth in the second period by scoring goals one after the other. A minute after Tuong’s goal, Vito scored, assisted by Carzo, to break the tie game and give West Chester the upper hand once more. Despite the lead, following Vito’s goal, West Chester took backto-back roughing and hooking penalties. This gave Virginia ample

opportunities to score as a 5-on-3 ensued. For the next seven minutes, Virginia assaulted West Chester’s net but goaltender Golia stood her ground and kept the pucks from going in. At the 11th minute of the second period, defensemen Liz Petry scored, assisted by Vito, to widen West Chester’s lead by two goals. Being down by two goals, Virginia tried to come back in the final period. Wilson scored unassisted four minutes into the game in an attempt to try to tie the game and hope for an overtime opportunity, but Virginia was still one goal behind. Both teams were taking penalties during the rest of the period, but despite having two power plays each no pucks were getting past either goalie. Having come this

far, West Chester’s Golia did not want to give up another goal, and she continued to be a force to be reckoned with between the pipes. “When it was 4-3 in the game, my focus was on stopping every shot. I was confident in my team but I didn’t stop focusing on the game until the buzzer sounded,” Golia said. We s t Chester continued to shoot puck after puck at Virginia’s net for the duration of the period, but all of these shots were blocked. By keeping play in Virginia’s zone, West Chester kept out any more goals against them and won the championship title game 4-3. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@ wcupa.edu.

South Campus Rally Wednesday 2/29 Sturzebecker 116A 9:45 – 10:15

North Campus Rally Thursday 3/1

Church St & University Ave Near bus stop & Ehinger Gym (Rain location: Sykes Ballroom C)

12:15 – 1:15

Governor Corbett’s 20% proposed cut to state university funding will affect class size, class availability, loan amounts, low-enrolled majors, services offered, and YOUR TUITION.

Rally to make your voices heard! APSCUF Faculty and Coaches Association of PA State College & University Faculty

Courtesy of Carl McCombs

West Chester net-minder Aly Golia pounces on a loose puck off to the side of the net. Golia made 22 saves on 25 shots, helping West Chester to a 4-3 victory in the DVCHC Championship Game.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 19

Two big wins prepare women’s basketball for playoffs By Joey Samuel Staff Writer During the final week of the 2011-12 regular season, the West Chester University women’s basketball team won a pair of games and as such, locked up the second seed from the PSAC East heading into the playoffs. The first and more important of those two games took place on Wednesday, when West Chester put on a third straight dominant performance as they crushed rivals Cheyney, 80-58. The win put West Chester on a 15-6 record in the PSAC East, and clinched the second seed in the division for the Lady Golden Rams. Junior forward Alex Lennon was a dominant force for West Chester, as fans have become

accustomed to. She posted a second consecutive double-double, pouring in 21 points in addition to her 10 rebounds. Paige Elliott was also impressive, adding 11 points of her own despite coming off the bench. Kendall Benovy chipped in with seven points and seven rebounds. The game was never close in truth, and West Chester was already up 46-24 by halftime. Cheyney managed to keep West Chester from extending their lead any further than that throughout the second half, but that was all Cheyney was able to do. Lowly Cheyney dropped to an abysmal winless record of 0-25 on the season, and 0-21 in the PSAC. Meanwhile, West Chester improved to 19-6 on the year and

15-6 in conference, which meant they were locked into the second seed from the East division heading into the playoffs. Then, on Saturday, in a game that served as little more than a tune-up before the playoffs, West Chester extended its winning streak to four with another solid victory over Mansfield, 79-71. Lennon was impressive as always, shooting 10-for-17 from the field and scoring a game-high 24 points. Starting center Ambreelinne Ortman was equally impressive, scoring 21 points and adding 11 rebounds. Senior guard Allison Hostetter, in her final regular season game, chipped in with her own double-double, scoring 11 points and collecting 10 rebounds.

West Chester ran out to a 40-29 lead by halftime. Mansfield was able to cut into that lead during the second half, but they couldn’t do enough to overcome the Lady Golden Rams. While both teams shot a similar percentage from the field, it was West Chester that got off 90 shots, making 32 of them. Mansfield could only put up 58 shots, and 21 of them were successful. Depth was also a major issue for Mansfield. Three of Mansfield’s players played more than 35 minutes of the 40, with one actually playing all 40 minutes. Another player was on the court for 33 minutes. Meanwhile, no West Chester player played more than 29 minutes. The win didn’t end up meaning much for the

Lady Golden Rams, though, as they were already locked in as the PSAC East’s second seed. They finished the regular season at 20-6, 16-6 PSAC. Next up for West Chester are the playoffs. The Lady Golden Rams will open them at home, first taking on Millersville this Tuesday at Hollinger Field House in the PSAC quarterfinals. They will then face the winner of the game between top seed Bloomsburg and fourthseeded Shippensburg. If West Chester can reach the final, they would face whichever team emerges from the PSAC West side of the bracket. West Chester may have to win the PSAC, or at the very least reach the final, if they hope to be selected to take part in the Division II NCAA Tournament. The Lady

Golden Rams are currently unranked. In fact, no teams from the East side of the bracket are ranked, not even Bloomsburg. The West side includes three nationally ranked teams. Edinboro is the top seed, and is ranked No. 2 in the entire country. Also in the West playoffs are No. 18 Gannon, and No. 24-ranked Indiana (Pa.). California (Pa.) rounds out that side of the PSAC tournament bracket. As such, it will be difficult for West Chester going forward. Last year, only three PSAC teams made it to the NCAA Tournament, and none of them even made it into the third round. Joey Samuel is a thirdyear student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@wcupa.edu.

WCU to add women’s wrestling team for next season By Brian Johnson Staff Writer Over the past four years, West Chester University’s wrestling team has had a copious amount of success. Two conference championships, nine All-Americans, and five national champions appear to give the program very little room to get stronger. Well, they’re about to get some girl power. Beginning next season, WCU will be adding a brand new women’s wrestling program to go along with its men’s team. At the helm of this new program will be Ron Tirpack, one of the most experienced coaches in the country. He spent 12 years as the head coach

at Swarthmore College, five years as an assistant at Ursinus College, all while being a coach with the Pennsylvania High School National Team, Women Only Wrestling, and the U.S. Olympic team, a career which has earned him the opportunity to be one of only 40 men with Gold Level Coaching Certification, the highest honor bestowed by USA Wrestling. Coach Tirpack’s program, like all young programs, has to be built from the ground up, and that starts with his wrestlers. One of those wrestlers is new WCU student Kim Spiegel, a native of Selinsgrove, PA. “Kim is our first step,” coach Tirpak said of Spiegel, who has spent

the past two years at the Olympic Education Center in Marquette, Michigan. “She’s not usually referred to as a baby step. But she’s our first step.” “He (coach Tirpak) told me this summer that they were going to start a program,” Spiegel said. “And I decided to call him up this fall and ask if the program was still happening, he said ‘yes,’ and I came here.” Spiegel may be the first step, but for a coach with such a glowing reputation, more steps are bound to arrive both in the near, and distant, future. “Because all of this has just developed in the past couple months, I really haven’t done any hard recruiting,” coach Tirpak

said. “But I know I’ve been contacted by a couple individuals who are very interested... I already have a few girls in ninth grade, tenth grade, who are saying, ‘We’re coming with you coach,’ but that’s a long way down the road.” The addition of the women’s program, which will have the same club designation as the men’s, could end up being a fantastic addition to the university, drawing in good students, and good athletes from the region. “New Jersey is starting to pick their program up,” coach Tirpak explained. “We have a good program going in Pennsylvania... and we in Pennsylvania, as the preeminent wrestling state, need get more girls involved.”

As of right now, there are 14 members in the Women’s College Wrestling Association, many of which are west of the Mississippi River, and if the new women’s program can have success over the next few years, it might open the doors for many more schools in the northeast to create women’s wrestling programs, providing the opportunity for many female athletes to have both an educational, and athletic, experience in college. But for right now, coach Tirpak’s focus is on getting West Chester going in the right direction. “We’ll have basically two types of women that will come here: some that just want a great colle-

giate wrestling experience, and we’ll be prepared to give them that,” he said. “But then we’ll have others that will want to carry it beyond this and go to the international level, and we can do that. I’ve coached every girl on the national team, all 21 of them at some point, and we can prepare [the girls] for that. But here we need to start with baby steps.” Brian Johnson is a fourthyear student majoring in English. He can be reached at BJ669485@wcupa.edu.

*Editor’s Note: The WCU baseball and softball games were played after this issue went to press. The scores can be found at www. wcupagoldenrams.com.


PAGE 20

THE QUAD SPORTS

FEBRUARY 27, 2012

Phillies offseason worries slowly fading as spring training begins By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor After an early exit from the playoffs last year at the hands of the St. Louis Cardinals, the Phillies entered the offseason with many question marks. How long will Ryan Howard be unable to play? Who will fill his spot? Does Cole Hamels want a long term contract? These questions, and quite a few more, were in the mind of every Phillies fan after the October collapse, and it seemed like a giant mess that would take forever to sort out. Well spring training started last week, and for now, the wave of uneasiness that started with Howard’s ruptured Achilles seems to have calmed down a bit. Beginning with Howard,

the Big Piece seems to have been progressing nicely after offseason surgery to repair a torn Achilles tendon. Close to a month ago, Howard was allowed to resume light workouts and has since resumed baseball related activities. As expected, Howard showed up to camp looking a bit out of shape, but after months of inactivity, that is expected. It was an encouraging sight to see Howard jogging, taking ground balls, and depositing several moonshots in batting practice (one of which is rumored to have left the park and hit Jose Contreras’ truck). What may be more encouraging is that Charlie Manuel and Ruben Amaro Jr. do not see Howard, the major league leader in

www.talksportsphilly.com

Roy Halladay, who had already tossed six bullpens before camp started, will be the Opening Day starter for the third year straight.

homeruns and RBI since 2006, missing much time. Both think it will be a stretch for him to be out there on Opening Day, but a late April to mid May return is not out of the realm of possibility. Regardless of how long he is out, the Phillies are prepared. Offseason acquisitions of former Phillie Jim Thome, outfielder Laynce Nix, and utility man Ty Wigginton make it fairly easy to “replace” Howard until his return. This is how it would work. Wigginton can play first, third, outfield, and according to Amaro, second base. Thome, who has not played first since 2007, came to camp early, and in incredible shape to work on his fielding. Manuel thinks he can play first base a few times a week if need be. John Mayberry, Jr., presumably the starting left-fielder also has experience playing first. So, if Mayberry is in left, either Thome or Wigginton will fill in at first. If Mayberry plays first, Nix, Domonic Brown or Wigginton can fill in for him. Even if Mayberry and an infielder need a day off the same day, Nix or Brown can play left, Wigginton can fill in at third or second, and they still have a first baseman in Jim Thome. The bench additions in the offseason have made it so every position can be accounted for if there is an injury or a player needs rest. This cuts down on the workload put on an aging Polanco and injury prone Chase Utley. The only bench question that remains, however, is who will fill in for Jimmy Rollins should he be unable to play? Wilson Valdez, a key fixture of the Phillies

bench was traded to the Reds, and Wigginton does not play shortstop (at least not that we know of). There is talk of bringing up Freddy Galvis, the highly touted prospect, should that scenario arise, but it is unlikely he would be deprived of minor league experience to ride the Phillies bench. The other injury questions have been answered in the first few weeks of spring training as well. Polanco, Hunter Pence, and Hamels have all recovered from their end of the season bang-ups and surgeries, and are all ready to go. Utley, who missed the first two months of last season with tendonitis in the knee, is taking it easy this spring to make sure he is ready to go come April as well. Aside from injuries, another major question going into training was whether this would be Hamels’ last year as Phillie. Hamels had a career year last year, finishing with a 14-9 record and 2.79 ERA. Should Hamels have a similar year this year, it seemed very likely that he would test the free agent market and probably score a huge long term contract for 2013 and beyond, possibly even in his hometown of San Diego. That changed when Hamels talked to the media for the first time about his upcoming free agency. Hamels addressed media questions about his contract the other day, stating that he has no deadline to reach an agreement (meaning he will be open to re-sign regardless of how long it takes), and that he enjoys the city of Philadelphia and does not want to leave. He also went as far as to say he would not want to play for a

www.pennlive.com

Ryan Howard’s Achilles tear seems to be healing well, and Charlie Manuel believes he will be ready for action by mid-May. team whose fans only show support for three innings (Dodgers and Padres fans are notorious for not showing up until the third inning and leaving after the sixth). In addition to thinking about the starting pitching, the Phillies have continued to make their bullpen a priority this offseason. Additions of Chad Qualls, Jonathan Papelbon and Dontrelle Willis, paired with the re-signing of Kyle Kendrick leave the pen in a formidable position, even though they lost Madson and Lidge to free agency. Spring training will be a fight for some pitchers to make the team, but having quality relievers all competing for a spot is certainly a good problem to have. The rest of the starting roster looks pretty much the same as it did at the end of last year, with Carlos Ruiz, Shane Victorino, Mayberry, Rollins, Cliff Lee, Vance Worley, and Roy Halladay all showing up to camp healthy and eager to resume workouts. Halladay, who has somehow become even more popular after his offseason fishing adventure in which he rescued a naked man who had been attacked by

an anaconda, will be the Opening Day starter for the third straight year. He will most likely be followed by Lee, Hamels and Worley, with the fifth spot still up in the air. Lastly, Raul Ibanez will not be rejoining the Phillies for a fourth year, as the 40-year-old outfielder signed a 1-year contract with the Yankees. It remains to be seen who Roy Oswalt will sign with, although there is talk he could rejoin Philadalphia before April. Outfielder Ben Francisco will also not be wearing the red pinstripes in 2012, as he was traded to Toronto for WCU alumnus Frank Gailey in January. While there are still some doubts about this aging team, things are certainly looking up from where they did in October. A lot of the pieces have fallen into place, including the encouraging news on the Big Piece, Hamels, Polanco, and Utley. In what will be a tight NL East race, the Phillies are ready to once again fight to reach October and to end this season with a parade down Broad Street. Kenny Ayres is a secondyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 21

Men, women both place No. 1 at PSAC Championships By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The West Chester University men’s and women’s swimming teams dominated the Pennsylvania State Athletic Competition beginning last Thursday and ending on Sunday, at Cumberland Valley High School. The win was the 14th consecutive and 25th overall for the men, and the sixth straight time for the women. The men broke the tie with Clarion for most titles in PSAC history, leaving their rival far behind in fourth place. The Golden Rams’ men’s team earned 35 All-PSAC honors with 13 honorable mentions, while the women brought home 31 All-PSAC honors and 21 honorable mentions. “This has been a tremendous season of growth and gradual maturity,” head coach Jamie Rudisill said of the young team. With two seniors on the women’s team, and none on the men’s, their massive victories over the competitors demonstrate their depth and determination. The men ended with a score of 749.5, easily surpassing runner-up Gannon with 472 points. Edinboro finished with 445, while Clarion also scored 445. Bloomsburg, Indiana, and Shippensburg took fifth, sixth and seventh places, respectively. “The Clarion men falling to fourth was not expected,” Rudisill said. The women, who have also historically gone head-to-head with Clarion swimmers, outscored the foes by over 200 points, as well as the 12 other competing uni-

versities. double PSAC champion Winslow took the contributed to the 400 They wrapped up with with a 1000 free victory runner-up slot in three medley relay and the a total of 684, while on Friday and a win in events, including the 200 medley relay, while Clarion took second with the 1650 free finishing 200 backstroke, the 100 placing second in 100 441 points. California in 15:51.62. back and the 200 indi- butterfly and eighth in University of The women exempli- vidual medley. She also the 200 butterfly. Pennsylvania finished fied similar dominance assisted the 400 free Sop homore Mia third with 412 while over their contenders as relay and the 400 medley Barone contributed to Gannon ended in fourth well. relay teams to victory. two relay wins, as well with 336.5. Sophomore Kacie “Placing second in all as the runner up win in Junior Tommy Rhoads McNichol automatically of my individual events the 800 free relay, while was named the PSAC qualified for the NCAA was defiantly an indica- Lauren Keenan added to male swimmer of the D i v i s i o n I I tion of how hard I the overall score with a meet. He successfully Championships for the worked this season,” third place achievement defended his titles in the 1650-yard freestyle with Winslow said. “They may in the 200 butterfly and 200 and 500 free, took a PSAC meet record of not have been first fourth in the 400 indisecond in the 1000, and 16:55.24. She also places, but I was okay vidual medley. contributed to three of earned second in 1000 with that because I still Sophomore Amelia West Chester’s five relay free, third in the 500 helped my team rack up Buckley, the two-title victories. free, and contributed to points to win our defending champion, “I was really surprised a second place slot in the Championship.” took third in the 200 actually,” Rhoads said 800 free relay. Freshman Codyanne breaststroke as well as after receiving the honor. Freshman Alexis Murtaugh also added the 100 breaststroke on “There were so many Walley took second in points to the team’s total Saturday night. She also great competitors at the the 1650 free behind with a win in the 500 contributed to the 400 meet who I felt could McNichol, while earning freestyle on Saturday. medley relay win, and have deserved the same her own title in the 1000 She also took third in earned sixth in 200 indihonor. But after it was free on Friday evening. the 1650 free and 1000 vidual medley. announced I was She also contributed to free, and contributed to “After our win I felt extremely happy, and it the winning 400 free three relay wins and a p u r e happiness,” kind of showed that all relay team and 800 free second place relay Winslow said. “I was the hard work was worth relay which took second. achievement. happy of course that we it.” Sophomore Megan Senior Leah Varvo won, and that all of our Sophomore B o g d a n Grebenyuk took two individual titles, including the 100 breaststroke in 56.36 seconds and the 200 breaststroke in 2:02.68. Sophomore Ryan Stahley contributed to four of the five relay victories. He also took an individual win in the 50 free, with a third place honor in the 100 free, and fourth in the 100-yard butterfly. Junior Calvin Starosta won the 200 backstroke with a time of 1:51.71, and placed second in Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad the 100 backstroke. Jared The men and women’s swim teams both finished first in the PSAC Championships last week. It Haley was a was the 14th consecutive win for the men and 6th consecutive win for the women.

hard work, as a team and individually, had finally paid off.” The list of swimmers and divers who qualify for nationals will be released on Tuesday. “We are looking at something like eight women and another four divers, and maybe only a couple male swimmers and another few divers,” Coach Rudisill said. “Women could be top ten, and men [could be] top 20 this year.” Rhoads attributed the team’s success to their level of dedication. “We practice every day of the week except Sundays, and during the weekdays we do doubles every day,” Rhoads said. “We sacrifice a lot of social time with our friends outside of swimming, but only because we want to be the best at what we do. Being in the water as much as possible, and training to the peak of your ability, is essential and makes us such strong athletes.” “I believe the team’s success has much to do with our relationships with fellow teammates along with our coaching staff,” Buckley said. “Also, many see men’s and women’s swimming as separate but in fact we are not. We come together to not only help each other train but to motivate each other as competitors in and out of the pool.” The NCAA qualifying swimmers, who will be revealed on Tuesday, will take nationals beginning March 14-17 in Mansfield,Texas. Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@ wcupa.edu.


C O L L E G E O F G R A D UAT E & PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Why do so many West Chester graduates choose a Millersville University master’s degree? Affordable - More than 40% of our full-time master’s degree students receive a graduate assistantship, which fully funds their tuition (48 credits). Flexible - A variety of evening, blended, off-campus and online course delivery options will suit your busy schedule.

“I chose Millersville University because of its nationally accredited School Psychology Program.”

Obtainable - Over 75% of our full-time students finish their master’s degree in one to three years. Respectable - We are a top ranked, public university with nationally accredited programs, supported by outstanding faculty.

Open House

with Program Coordinators

Thursday, March 8, 2012 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. at Stayer Hall Multipurpose Room

RSVP’s appreciated, but not required.

To RSVP or for more information

www.millersville.edu/gps or 717-872-3099

Ashley F. West Chester University, Class of 2010 Millersville University School Psychology master’s degree and certification student Graduate Assistant

Master of Education • Art • Early Childhood Education • Elementary Education • English • Foreign Languages • Gifted Education • Language and Literacy Education • Leadership for Teaching and Learning • Mathematics • School Counseling • Special Education • Sport Management • Technology Education Post-baccalaureate Teacher Certification ESL Certification

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Reading Specialist Certification Master of Arts • English • Foreign Languages • History Master of Social Work Master of Science • Emergency Management • Integrated Scientific Applications (Weather Intelligence & Risk Management, Climate Science) • Nursing • Psychology (Clinical, School) Respiratory Therapist Certification School Nurse Certification


FEBRUARY 27, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 23

Winning streak reaches eight for men’s basketball By LJ Harrell Special to The Quad Coming into the 2011-2012 season, the West Chester University men’s basketball team wanted to make history. Step one of that process is complete as the Golden Rams will make their first appearance in the Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference postseason tournament for the first time since 20082009. Finishing the regular season as the No. 3 seed in the PSAC East, West Chester will face Bloomsburg University in the quarterfinals on Tuesday. The Golden Rams (17-9, 14-8 PSAC) finished off the regular

season with victories over cross-town rival Cheyney University on We d n e s d a y and Mansfield University on Saturday. West Chester completed the season winning eight consecutive games, and 11 of their last 12 games. “We don’t want to lose focus on what got us here,” head coach Damien Blair said. “And when you have wins on a consecutive basis like we have, you have a tendency to forget about doing the little things like defense, taking care of the ball, and running the offense. We will need to do those things if we want to make any noise in the playoffs.” “It’s always fun to

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Corey Blake drives through the lane and rises up for a lay-up over the Cheyney defender.

win,” senior forward Lance McDowell said. “We are having more fun and the togetherness is there now. This is how we wanted to play the entire season, but we’ve hit our stride exactly when we wanted.” On Wednesday night against the Cheyney University Wolves, the Golden Rams completed the season sweep against the Wolves with a 76-55 victory. It marked the first sweep of Cheyney since 2006. West Chester ’s two wins against the Wolves this year were by a combined margin of 51 points – the largest such margin by the Golden Rams in the history of the series. “It’s never this easy,” Blair said. “Whenever you can beat up on your rival it’s always a good thing.” West Chester struggled in the first half, as they only shot 33.3 percent (8-24) from the field. Cheyney tied the score at eight with 13:51 to go in the first half before the Golden Rams went on a 22-9 run in the next 10 minutes to open up a 13-point lead. West Chester went into the half leading 31-22. “We came out a little lackluster and sluggish, and obviously Lance didn’t play to his full ability in the first half,” Blair said. The Golden Rams upped the ante in the second half as they shot the ball a lot better. Led by McDowell’s 23 second half points, West Chester shot 51.7 percent from the field during the half. McDowell scored the Golden Rams first 12 points of the half. “I can’t explain it, I just came to play,” McDowell said. “I knew I didn’t play my average

game in the first half and I had a sense of urgency the rest of the way.” West Chester pushed the lead to as many as 23 points in the second half and was never challenged by Cheyney. McDowell finished with a team-high 25 points to go along with seven rebounds, two assists and a block. Carl Johnson finished with 13 points, six rebounds, two assists and a block. Jaleel Mack added 10 points, three rebounds and four assists. Harley Williamson grabbed a game-high 10 rebounds in addition to scoring six points. “When Lance is playing well, we are tough to beat,” Blair said. “He makes a lot of plays down on the box and he can shoot it from the outside. If you concentrate on him that means Jon [Breeden], Carl [Johnson] and [Jaleel] Mack will have opportunities as well.” On Saturday, the Golden Rams continued their winning ways, defeating the Mansfield University Mountaineers (9-17, 6-16 PSAC) 75-62 in the regular season finale. West Chester completed the season sweep of Mansfield, and has won four straight against their conference rivals. “I thought we were up and down for 60 percent of the game,” Blair said. “I think the last four or five minutes we played the way we are capable of playing.” The Golden Rams started strong as they led the entire first half. West Chester led by as many as 10 points in the first half, but only held a three-point lead (39-36) at the half. In the second half, the

F o s t e r ’ s game-high 17 points and nine rebounds. Mack added 14 points and was 3-3 from behind the arc. Johnson (12 points) and freshman Corey Blake (11 points) also scored in double figures. On Tuesday, West Chester will travel to Bloomsburg to face the Huskies for the third time this season; tipoff is slated for 7:30 p.m. The Golden Rams swept the season series from Bloomsburg this season, winning both games when the Huskies were in first place in the PSAC East Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad (70-64 in West Carl Johnson makes a no-look pass Chester on 1/21 and 74-71 at as he crosses center court. Bloomsburg on 2/11). This is the Golden Rams held the Mountaineers scoreless 16th time that West for the first three Chester will be particiminutes. West Chester pating in the PSAC then went scoreless for postseason tournament. “[Bloomsburg] is going four minutes, allowing to want to beat us Mansfield back into the game. Late in the second because we beat them half, the Mountaineers twice,” Blair said. “The rallied to take a 51-49 good thing is that our lead. But the Golden kids are familiar with Rams answered back the things that they run. immediately and ended We have to be expecting the game on a 26-11 run them to come out and to win the regular season play as hard as they possibly can for 40 finale. “The kids don’t want to minutes and we have to lose,” Blair said. be able to match that “Although they are and exceed that throughfeeling good for them- out the course of the selves and we’re not as game. Hopefully we are efficient in some areas prepared and ready.” LJ Harrell is the play-bythat I would like us to be, play voice of WCU men’s when it comes down to it, it seems they are digging and women’s basketball. All in and doing what they of the playoff action can be heard live and exclusively on have to do to win.” West Chester had four BrandywineRadio.com. He be reached at players in double figures, can LH639694@wcupa.edu. led by senior Khalif


PAGE 24

THE QUAD SPORTS

The Flyers came back from a 3-0 deficit on Saturday to send their game with the Calgary Flames to overtime and eventually win in shootout. Ilya Bryzgalov has struggled in shootouts this year, but he stood tall in this one stopping four of five shots from Flames players. In the fifth round, Matt Read, in his first ever shootout attempt, beat goaltender Miikka Kiprusoff and gave the Flyers the 5-4 victory. The other Flyers goals came from Scott Hartnell (2), Braydon Coburn, and Jakub Voracheck. (Photo courtesy of The Associated Press)

Sports FEBRUARY 27, 2012

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

Rams look golden going into playoffs

Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

Rams top performers at 2012 PSAC Championships Page-21

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Lukas Jenkins/ The Quad

DVCHC title goes to West Chester women’s hockey Page-18


Quad 102-05