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Chris Grimm, Mr. WCU 2012

Quad

The

W W W. W C U Q U A D. C O M MONDAY. APRIL 2, 2012

V O L UM E 1 0 2 . I S S U E 8

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

Isaih Robinson Passes The Crown

IN THIS ISSUE

Jessica Guzzardo/ The Quad Staff Photographer

NEWS

OP-ED

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PAGE 11

FEATURES

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ENT

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SPORTS

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THE QUAD NEWS

WCU crowns Chris Grimm as Mr. WCU By Clare Haggerty Staff Writer

On March 28, 2012, the Student Activities Council at West Chester University held the fifth annual Mr. WCU at Emilie K. Asplundh Concert Hall. Mr. WCU is a competition in which male students compete to be WCU’s Prince Charming and to win the coveted title and crown. Mr. WCU is decided by a combination of a panel of judges and voting by audience members. The judges included Dick Yoder, Mayor Emeritus of West Chester, Patricia Enger, Theater Director from Avon Grove High School, Maria Sciorillo, Miss Philadelphia 2011, and Todd Marcocci, President and CEO of Under the Sun Production, Inc. The competition began with an opening dance number. The theme of the competition was Disney, so the opening number started slowly with the competitors dancing with their female escorts to one of Disney’s slower songs, but the music abruptly changed to a faster song from the Lion King, which got the crowd laughing. The boys continued in an impressively choreographed dance number that even included the hosts, Natalie Walden as Snow White and Rachel Stolz as Belle, singing “Someday My Prince Will Come.”

“I was really impressed with the opening dance number. I didn’t know boys could move like that!” audience member, Nadia Thomas said. “It was really entertaining.” After the dance number, the fifteen contestants introduced themselves: Christian Conaway, Quentin Horton II, Caleb Duffy, Chris Grimm, Breckin DeWane, Daniel Love Colon, Geoffrey Quinn, Stephén Hood, Matthew Guerron, Kyle VanHart, Justin Sochovka, Adam Cerretani, Matt Hummel, Zakkary Zabower, and Brendan Fitzpatrick. After the contestants introduced themselves, they identified their platforms, which ranged anywhere from To Write Love on Her Arms to Big Brothers, Big Sisters to Relay for Life. The next part of the competition was the casual wear portion in which each contestant answered the question, “If your princess was in danger, what would you do to help save her?” The answers were very clever, spanning from climbing the tallest mountain, having “all the force of a great typhoon,” and, probably the answer that got the biggest reaction from the audience: calling Public Safety. The talent section followed, which included singing, dancing, stand-up comedy, cinematography, and even an act that included

rifle spinning. “I thought that the talent portion was both hilarious and creative,” audiencemember Shannon Nolan said. “Who knew we had such talent at WCU?” An intermission came next, during which audience members used their tickets to vote

“If you were granted three wishes, what would they be?” and “What is your favorite part of being a WCU student?” After the formalwear/ questioning portion, the 2011 Mr. WCU, Isaih Robinson, entertained the audience by reenacting his performance that won him last year’s crown. He sang Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” while wearing a dress, a wig, and high heels. After Robinson’s riveting performance, Belle and Snow White announced the top three contenders in no particular order: Justin Sochovka, Chris Chris Grimm Ilana Berger/The Quad Grimm, and Geoff Quinn. for the contestant that The top three then they believed should answered a question be Mr. WCU 2012. about how they would After the intermis- raise awareness on sion, contestants pro- campus for their platcessed onto the stage form. in their finest formalJustin, Chris, and wear with their beau- Geoff all had great tiful escorts on their ideas for promoting arms. Each contes- awareness for their tant drew a random causes, which were question from a bowl Legal Aid of Southfor Belle to ask them. eastern Pa., Big Some of the questions Brothers, Big Sisters, were, “If you could and Broadway Cares/ have dinner with any- Equity Fights Aids, reone, who would it be spectively. and why?” as well as “I thought all of the

News APRIL 2, 2012

QUADNEWS@WCUPA.EDU contestants were great and I would have been happy if any of them won,” audience-member Leah Coan said. “But I was really rooting for Chris [Grimm]. We know each other because we both used to be RAs and we’ve been friends ever since.” As the judges deliberated in making their final decision, the previous winners of the past four Mr. WCU competitions took the stage to announce the winners of the superlative awards. Most Dedicated, chosen by the SAC, went to Zakkary Zabower; Ladies’ Choice, chosen by the female escorts, was Quentin Horton II; the People’s Choice Award went to the contestant who received the most votes from the audience, Matt Hummel; Most Photogenic was awarded to Stephén Hood; and Mr. Congeniality, which was chosen by fellow candidates, went to Adam Cerretani. “When I found out I had received the People’s Choice Award,” contestant Matt Hummel explained, “the feeling of gratitude I had far outweighed the excitement. The credit really needs to go to the people who cared enough about me to come support me. That meant a lot to me, because that will have a longer lasting impact than any title I can win.” Before they announced the winner,

the contestants did a final dance number in which they promised to “pop, lock, and booty drop.” The dance included previous winners and featured the contestants as individual dancers. Finally, the time came to announce the winner. Second runner-up was Geoffrey Quinn and first runner-up was Justin Sochovka, which left Chris Grimm to be crowned the 2012 Mr. WCU. “The hardest part of preparing for the competition was definitely learning and practicing my talent… a ballroom dancing medley. Focusing was definitely tough because there is just so much anticipation and nervous take over,” Mr. WCU 2012, Chris Grimm said. “After I realized I won, I just remember looking out into the audience at my parents and seeing how happy and proud they were of me. I want to thank all of the men who competed; every one of us is a true representation of West Chester University and are deserving the title of Mr. WCU. Thank you for all of the memories and the new friendships I have made!” Clare Haggerty is a first-year student majoring in English. She can be reached at CH757342@ wcupa.edu. For more photos of Mr. WCU, see page 7


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

Student leader wins a chance of a lifetime at WCU

Fritz is a celebrated when I saw it. It looked sions office. By Angela Thomas The Philips Memorial student, working as the straight out of Harry The superest senior ever Building and the WCU Music-is-my-life Editor Potter.” It comes to no sur- at The Quad and as Even though Fritz is squirrels aren’t the prise that the Philips peer educator for the not a huge Harry Pot- only aspect that Fritz Memorial Building Health and Wellness ter fan, she still en- loves about the school. has the coveted title Center on campus. joyed the castle. “Has anyone else noas the most popular Fritz is also involved “I just think it shows ticed how gorgeous the and beautiful building in other activities such WCU’s true spirit as birds are in the outon campus. However, as Circle Kool Kids as a majestic school that door classroom by Merfor one student, that their secre-awesome- produces smart, kind, ion? So pretty!” Fritz building will become tary and Lambda Ate- and diverse students,” tweeted. their new home for the a-Pie. Fritz also won Fritz said. “This buildSo how does Fritz fall 2012 semester. an award from the ing gives me such Ram plan to decorate her Cannotwaitforgrad- WCU Humane Society pride.” room in the Philips uation-year student, Memorial Building? Carol Fritz, is ecstatic “With a ton of about the move. Grey’s Anatomy “I just couldn’t believe quotes around my it! I was so excited! I walls,” Fritz said, love the building and further gushing to be able to live in it about her favorite for a semester is just show. Fritz plans on a dream come true,” recruiting her mom, Fritz said. “I just hope sister, and her best there are trees outside friend, Taylor Swift of my room so I can see to help her move the squirrels. I just into the room. love the squirrels at Fritz will be gradWCU.” uating at the end of Carol Fritz, who mathe fall 2012 semesjors in the little things ter and so far, she with a minor in Steelis super excited for ers Football, won the the future. chance to live in the “I’m not quite Photo courtesy of Carol Fritz. Philips Memorial sure what the fuBuilding after submit- Carol Fritz standing in front of her new home for the fall 2012 semester. ture will bring. I ting an essay about hope to be workher favorite building for showing compasFritz comes from ing with an organizaon campus and why it sion and kindness to Smithfield, Pa., which tion that promotes the represents WCU the the WCU squirrels. is located outside of adrenaline of live mubest. “That was one of my Pittsburgh. Moving to sic, the importance of “It is just such a favorite accomplish- West Chester was a big squirrels, Jodi Picoult beautiful place to sit ments,” Fritz said. adjustment, but one books, equality for all, with friends,” Fritz Students were given that Fritz has not re- and the attractiveness said. “I always have to the chance to write gretted. of WTAE Pittsburgh walk through the arch- about their favorite “I have met some of news anchor, Andrew way of the building; my buildings. Fritz figured my best friends here Stockey,” Fritz said. “I friends always tease and I just love them,” just hope to end up as that she might as well me, but they just don’t give the essay a try. Fritz said. “Most of successful as Hilary understand.” “It would be a dream them are graduating in Clinton with the kind Fritz talked about her come true, so why not May but I am already heart of my mom.” love for the whispering try?” Fritz said. Fritz devising a plan to hold Angela Thomas has been arches, a tradition for wrote about the Philips them back.” Fritz says a WCU student since 1871, students to whisper to Memorial Building and she is joking but if the majoring in the politics of each other through the the first time she saw woman can conquer Harry Potter with a minor arches where they can the building during the Philips Memorial in Hermione Granger. She hear what the other is first-year orientation. Building, she sure can can be reached at Platsaying. “I just got cold chills conquer the admis- form 9 3/4.

PAGE 3 Aramark cancels room services in U-Hall By Ginger Rae Dunbar Angela Thomas fanclub President

Administrators of University Hall canceled the two-year contract with Aramark for room services, due to a lack of interest. Administrators reviewed the usage of the feature, which allowed for residents to call for room service, and discovered few requests. Food included all of the selections available at Ramshead, the Diner and Lawrence Dining Hall. University Hall began the trial run of the service as a way for Residence Life and Housing to determine the popularity of this program, which could extend into the services provided in other residence halls. Administers wanted to offer the service in affiliated housing, and selected University Hall as the residents are upperclassman. With the location of the affiliated housing, another debate was the close proximity to the buildings with dining services. University Hall is located between Sykes Student Union and the Lawrence Dining Hall. Several students who had requested the room services said they were surprised to see the services end. They wished to not be named after they admitted they used the service because they are lazy and they “don’t want to walk all the way over to grab food.” Administrators believed the number of requests would “sky-

rocket” during the winter months. According to the documented statistics, the service was not taken advantage of during the cold weather days. Room service developed as a suggestion from students as a way to have late night food delivered to their rooms. The program also allowed students to use their meal plan. After the snow storms from three years ago, the service was finally put to test. Much to the surprise of the coordinators, even when the snow came this year, the calls for room service requests did not come. Resident Assistants held floor meetings to ask residents why they did not use the room services. Most of the students present said that they were content with making Ramen Noodle soup in their room. Ramen Noodle soup is the most popular snack found in a college dormitory. The contract ends in May and would have to be renewed in September. The final decision to not re-new the contact also held as leverage to cancel the existing contract. With Governor Tom Corbett’s pending budget cuts, staff realized the service would be among the first cuts made by the university. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in being the Editorin-Chief of The Quad with minors in Phi Mu and Public Safety. She can and will always be able to be reached at The Quad office-even when she graduates.


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THE QUAD NEWS

APRIL 2, 2012

WCU Hosts “Get Yourself Tested Day” By Carol Fritz Entertainment Editor

For the second consecutive year, the WCU Office of Wellness Education and the WCU Women’s Center are sponsoring a free testing day for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on Monday, April 16. Last year, “Chlamydia Testing Day” was held on campus in April, and over 200 students attended to get tested for Chlamydia. Get Yourself Tested (GYT) is a national campaign to inform young people about STIs and to encourage them to routinely

get tested for STIs. GYT was developed as part of a larger campaign called “It’s Your (Sex) Life,” which was founded in 1997 by MTV and the Kaiser Family Foundation to support young individuals in making responsible decisions about their sexual health. This year at GYT Day, testing will be done for the STIs Chlamydia and Gonorrhea. Chlamydia is the most commonly reported STI in the United States, and it is the most commonly reported STI at WCU and in Chester County. There are about 2 million new

cases of Chlamydia every year. Gonorrhea is also a common STI,

reported every year. Both of these STIs are most prevalent in

Courtesy of Carol Fritz Last year, students stood outside of the Sykes Ballrooms to promote GYT.

and there are about 700,000 new cases

young people under the age of 25, and there

are often no symptoms with these infections, which emphasizes the importance of getting tested. GYT Day provides free Chlamydia and Gonorrhea testing for WCU students only. No appointments are necessary. Students will be tested for these infections through urine samples. The results are confidential, and they will not be given at the event. Results typically will be available in 1-3 weeks. If a student’s results are positive, a nurse or nurse practitioner will call the student to report the results. If planning to be tested,

students should not urinate for one hour before attending the event. If a student cannot attend the event, he or she can be tested at the WCU Health Center. There is a $10 visit fee for all appointments at the Health Center. WCU’s Get Yourself Tested Day is on Monday, April 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Sykes Student Union Ballrooms. The first 200 students to get tested will receive a free tshirt. Carol Fritz is a thirdyear student majoring in communication studies. She can be reached at CF716022@wcupa.edu.

Students learn about benefits of second language By Nicole Bair Special to The Quad

This past Tuesday, March 27, West Chester University hosted an informative seminar about how to use a second language in future endeavors. The seminar was hosted and co-sponsored by the Twardowski Career Development Center Director, Becky Ross, and Dr. Andrea Varricchio, Spanish Language and Cultures professor at WCU. There was a panel of six advisors stationed at the front of the room addressing situations second language students might find themselves encountering in the near future. They also an-

swered various questions submitted by students. During the seminar, advisors seemed to be unanimous on several topics: to have a second language, to network, and accept the opportunities presented to students. Advisors made a point in particular to take advantage of the situations presented to you and learn a new language. An advisor was explaining how this could be difficult at first; but how in the end it can all be worth it. “Everything in France made no sense to me at first, you need to understand their culture, the countries, the people, etc.,” Jeffery Dore, a non-native French speaker,

said. Dore traveled to France with the company he worked for and was immediately thrown into a new language with little English assistance. He quickly absorbed the language in the ‘do or die’ situation and is now grateful for knowing not one but two languages. The entire panel went on to explain the benefits of being bilingual. “If you speak Spanish we need you!” Jane Hersberger, a non-native Spanish speaker, said. Jobs today are hard to come by, even with a four-year degree, but having a second language under your belt makes a significant difference. When companies are looking at a student’s resume and have

listed German, Spanish, French, etc. as a second-language, the application is most likely going to get a second look just because two languages are known. The advisors also touched base on internships and how second language students can truly benefit from the experience that they can offer. This summer is quickly approaching with many internships available, as long as students know where to look. The panel suggested several ideas of how to start looking: get a Linkedin.com account (the ‘Business Facebook’), look in towns with high populations of people that speak whichever language you speak,

network, and be open to new opportunities. As America becomes a bigger “melting pot” every day, it is getting more and more difficult to communicate between all of our citizens. Large companies are realizing this and are constantly looking for people with the added benefit of being able to communicate between two different languages. The panel of advisors left students with some fine points to to get students who speak a second language out there in these companies’ lines of vision. These points include: listing ‘Special Skills’ on a resume, right at the top, but 10 at the most and make a second language the first

one, if possible. Submit two resumes, one in English and one in the second language. This gets students noticed as someone who is serious about their second language. Advice from the advisors also included putting a face to your resume. If you are planning on applying to work overseas, tailor the resume further and show the benefits of that second language. Advisors ended the seminar with a final note: everyone has to start somewhere so don’t get discouraged. Nicole Bair is a fourthyear student majoring in liberal studies with minors in Spanish and Art History. She can be reached at NB777106@ wcupa.edu.


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

WCU Students to “Run on Dunkin ©” By Margaret Weaver Phi Mu Queen After months of negotiations and many suggestions from the students, the administration has finally decided to bring more dining options to West

Chester University. Dunkin Donuts and Auntie Anne’s Pretzels will be available starting fall 2012 at Sykes. The popularity of Chick-fil-A and Starbucks caused the administration to make this monumental decision. Indeed, many students wrote letters to the board of directors demanding that they offer more variety on chain restaurants. A survey was released over the course of the year to determine who would be coming to campus after the letters were received and analyzed. Along with the combination of Auntie Anne’s and Dunkin Donuts the options were Rita’s, Krispy Kreme, a very mini Wawa, McDonalds, Dairy Queen, and KFC. KFC was taken out later in the process due to the fact that Chickfil-A threatened to leave campus if they came on. Reasons why students wanted a Dunkin Donuts on campus included the easy access to a Dunkin Donuts. The nearest Dunkin Donuts is approximately 1.6 miles from Sykes, ac-

cording to Google Maps. open all year. When it Although students gets cold out, students could technically walk are not going to want there, it is a treacher- an Italian ice from Rious journey down Mar- ta’s or ice cream from ket Street. One letter Dairy Queen. Accordfrom a student said, “I ing to one letter from a realize that it’s techni- student, “soft pretzels cally not far away, but warm people’s hearts that area of Market and hands during the cold days.” Before the administration installs these two places, they would like students to help them decide where to put them. Auntie Anne’s and Dunkin Donuts have agreed to share a space in Sykes, thereformedbroker.com but Auntie Anne’s is also open to the option of a stand in the Lawrence Dining Hall. It wouldn’t replace Einstein’s. It would go inside of the dining room with the other options. Unfortunately, Dunkin Donuts and Auntie Anne’s pleas to be installed in the new fitness center were met with deaf ears. Their reasoning was “it would defeat the purpose of using the new fitness center. Putting junk food in a fitness center is like putting a herd of sheep in the wilderness of Africa near some lions. It won’t end well.” The survey for the location of Dunkin Donuts and Auntie Anne’s will be released on April 4. Participation in the survey will automatically enter students into a contest to win gift cards to these places. A new iPad is the grand prize. Students wishing to apply to work at these places should visit the Sykes Information Desk for an application. Margaret Weaver is a fourth-year student majoring in Twitter-grammar. She can be found breaking off the heels of stilettos to “prevent the stabbing of toes.” Street is creepy. And the sidewalk stops after a bit.” Another reason is that students want more variety when it comes to coffee and pastries. Starbucks is starting to offer sandwiches and more pastry items, but sometimes a donut and coffee are all students need to get a jump-start on their day. And sometimes, Einstein’s Bagels gets boring. Students are also tired of waiting in line for their coffee and having three coffee places will hopefully help this out. Auntie Anne’s Pretzels was chosen because students wanted an afternoon snack option. A pretzel and oldfashioned lemonade is sometimes the boost that students need to survive the rest of their day before dinner. Temple University has an Auntie Anne’s in one of their dining halls and their input to this decision-making was treasured by the administration. Another reason why Auntie Anne’s was favored over a place like Rita’s or Dairy Queen was because they are

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Resident Life & Housing allows pets in on-campus residences By Ginger Rae Dunbar Goshen Gorilla

Due to an overwhelming suggestion to allow students to have pets in their dorm rooms, the Office of Residence Life and Housing has decided to allow students to have a pet on-campus. The rule on pets in residence halls still has limits though, with the pet only allowed to weigh less than 30 pounds. There is a limit of one pet per dorm room. All roommates have to agree on housing a pet, despite if they share the space as a single room or multiple rooms.

If the program is perceived well by students, staff will make the rule change in the student code of conduct for the upcoming academic school year. While pets are allowed in residences for the remaining school year, Resident Directors made it clear to their residents that at any point, a Resident Assistant can pull this privilege from the residents. “I plan on bringing my cat back with me when I return from Easter weekend,” one student said. She wished to remain anonymous as she said she was

taking home a lizard she illegally housed. She was trading the lizard to her brother as a compromise to have permission to bring back the cat she picked out when she was a high school student. Both roommates are responsible for the volume of their animal and therefore they are subject to receiving a noise violation for the volume of their animal. In the result of ten noise violations, the judicial board hearing will have the right to remove the animal. Ginger Rae Dunbar can be found at the Coach outlet right now.

Organization postpones Banana Day By Ginger Rae Dunbar Too cool for school

WCU will postpone Banana Day for the first time in 15 years since its inception. After the protest held last year, the student-run group was asked to obtain free-trade bananas for their event. The protest involved some students not participating in Banana Day events, while other members who felt stronger about the situation, had informed students in the academic quad that the bananas were not free-trade. Every year students in the academic quad compete in activities to win a Banana Day t-shirt.

Banana Day, one of students’ favorite events is postponed until the free-trade bananas come in. The event, which would occur on April 4, may not be possible this year, despite the hard work of the organizers. No Banana Day also means no Banana Day t-shirts. “I’m really disappointed to find this out,” one student said. They stood in front of the posters announcing the postponement. “The tshirts are my favorite part about Banana Day.” “I know, right,” their friend added, “I have t-shirts from the last three years!”

Both students said that they are graduating in May and wanted a chance to win their last Banana Day t-shirt. They said that they plan on returning to the campus as alumni for the “best days, like Banana Day and Homecoming.” Student leaders are hoping to have Banana Day occur prior to the graduation ceremony in May. If the event does not get rescheduled, at the very least, they promised they will bring Banana Day to graduation. Ginger Rae Dunbar is an avid Banana Day fan. She has not won a t-shirt since her first-year at WCU.


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THE QUAD NEWS

Chester Dunkin Auntie will be ing fall The Chick-fil bucks c ministra this mo sion. In dents w the boa demandi offer m chain re A surv over the year to would campus were rec lyzed. A combina Anne’s a nuts th Rita’s, a very Donalds and KF KFC later in to the f fil-A thr campus Reaso wanted nuts on ed the e Dunkin nearest is appr miles fr

Zeta Phi Beta hosts HoodiesUp event for justice walk By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief

Members of Zeta Phi Beta organized a march to the courthouse in West Chester. The mission statement of National Zetas Helping Other People Excel service program (ZHOPE) is to empower people from all walks of life in a dutiful effort to enrich the community. Students gathered in D-Lot on Friday, March 30, to march into the borough with a lit candle, in honor of Travyon Martin and for justice, after the situation that left him dead at 17. Martin was slain by an armed night watch that thought Trayvon appeared “suspicious.” His death has gathered media coverage, bringing awareness to his death but no arrest to George Zimmerman, the neighborhood night watch that took Martin’s life in February. The Theta Lambda chapter sought out to orchestrate a campus-wide initiative to bring awareness to the cycling occurrences of discrimination and unjust acts of violence that laws like Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” leave too much room for, according to the press release. The members of the Theta Lambda chapter of Zeta Phi Beta propeled WCU “in uniting with what great ways we could to take a stand against the injustices that perpetuate senseless violence against today’s youth,”

Zeta Phi Beta member, Sabria Rogers wrote in a press release. “It’s an injustice across the nation,” Isaih Robinson said. “It’s being brought to the nation’s attention.” The march began in D-Lot after students lit one another’s candles. Several students arrived and walked with their hoodies up, as a symbol for Martin, who wore a hoodie on the fatal night. “The hoodie is a way of expressing support for the Martin family, and for all the sons of minority families who bear the heavy burden of other people’s negative assumptions,” Rogers wrote in an email. “There needs to be more of a reaction to what happened,” Kenaen Ellison said, “This is just a start.” Last week, Philadelphians held a memorial service at Love Park for Travyon Martin. WCU students walked in a scattered group on North Campus Drive past Goshen Hall and they walked in one large group down Sharpless Street. The group walked down High Street; at first the only glimpses the group caught were from those who drove by. The group chanted: “we walking!” The group repeated the line. Once again the person yelled “we walking” with the reaction of the crowd to chant back, “Travyon Martin!” The students continued on with their chant. They passed the crowded Kiwi Yogurt and stole the attention

of the customers. The group changed their chant to yell “walking for peace” and “walking for justice” as the group repeated each line. When the chants ceased, Robinson told by-passers that they were walking for Travyon Martin. Most bypassers continued to walk by in silence, as they watched the students with their candles. One by-passer responded by saying, “God bless him.” “It’s an issue that happens often. This is just the tip of the ice-berg,” Mr. WCU 2011, Isaih Robinson said. “There have been a number of Travyon Martin’s.” Students walked from High Street to Market Street. They crossed at the pedestrian cross walk to stand in front of the West Chester Courthouse. The forty students formed a circle as one led the group in prayer. After one student sang “Amazing Grace,” Sarita Brown, a Zeta Phi Beta member and 2008 WCU graduate, concluded to the group that there’s injustice and violence going on around us that does not get the media attention that Martin has received. Organizers of the event thanked students for walking with them for the cause. The students returned to campus together, a handful of them still carrying their lit candles. Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

APRIL 2, 2012

HoodiesUp walk

All photos by Jessica Guzzardo/Staff Photographer

After gotiatio suggesti students istration decided dining o

By Ma Phi

WC APRIL


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD NEWS

PAGE 7

Contestants for Mr. WCU shines brightly

Ilana Berger/The Quad

Ilana Berger/The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad

Ilana Berger/The Quad Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad Ilana Berger/The Quad

Jessica Guzzardo/The Quad


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THE QUAD OP-ED

Opinion & Editorial

April Fools - take a joke Any article you see with * (on our on-line edition) and is printed upside down, is one of our April Fools articles. You might get fooled, otherwise, enjoy what our writers have put together. April Fool’s Day is that time that you can play funny jokes on friends. April 1 is the one day of the year that you don’t want to believe what someone tells you, realistic or not, because you don’t want to be fooled. These jokes can start at the stroke of midnight and are fair game until midnight strikes again. ~ Ginger Rae Editor-in-Chief The Quad

APRIL 2, 2012

The Quad

West Chester University | 253 Sykes Student Union | West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383

Phone: 610.436.2375 | E-mail: quad@wcupa.edu | Web: www.wcuquad.com

Ginger Rae Dunbar

Editor-and-sometimes-Chief

QuadEIC@wcupa.edu

EDITORIAL BOARD Angela Thomas Animal advocate Bill Hanrahan Santorum’s Right-wing man Rebekah Balmer Emily Dickinson’s best friend Carol Fritz Fwitzle-Beaw Kenny Ayres Next Phillies Manager Jess C. Guzzardo Ginger Rae’s most requested photographer ALL BUSINESS & ADVERTISING STAFF Erica Brooks Still plays with monopoly money Mike Mills Loves Advertisements

EDITORIAL STAFF Brynn Dougherty Owes the staff Pita Pit Lukas Jenkins AKA Peter Parker

KOPY EDDITERS Kelly Adams Bethany Van de Water Samantha Schaule

LITTER BUGS Alexis Caporizzo Mike Coia TWITTERLESS LAURA Laura Blyton FACULTY ADVICE GIVER Dr. Philip A. Thompsen

Submissions Policy [suhb-mish-uhnz . pol-uh-see] Guest and opinion columns, letters to the editor, political or social commentary, and artwork is accepted during the academic year. All material may be sent to the attention of the editor in chief, The Quad, 253 Sykes Student Union Building, West Chester University, West Chester, Pa. 19383, Material may also be dropped off in our office, Sykes 253 or e-mailed to quadeic@wcupa.edu. An electronic copy of all work is necessary for publication and should be sent to the aforementioned e-mail address. All submissions must include a name and at least two forms of contact information, such as an e-mail address and phone number, for verification purposes. Students should include information such as an on-campus address, class standing, area of study, and/or organizational position. Material is only published if the author/ artist can be confirmed as a standing member of the University. Such distinctions include students, staff, faculty, administration, and alumnus. We do not accept submissions from members of the community that are not associated with West Chester University. Letters to the editor should not exceed 250 words; columns and commentaries should be between 500 and 1,100 words. All material may be edited to adhere to our policies, AP style, and space restraints. We do not edit for content unless it is libelous, excessively profane, or harmful to a particular individual or group thereof. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. The deadline for all Op-ed submissons is the Saturday before Monday’s publication by 2 p.m.

Disclaimers [dis-kley-merz] Copyright ©2012 The Quad. No work herein may be reproduced in any form, in whole or in part, without the written consent of the Editor in Chief. Opinions expressed within the letters to the editor, columns, and commentaries are those of the author and not necessarily those of The Quad, its editorial board or the student body, faculty, or administration of West Chester University. Founded in 1932 as Quad Angles, The Quad was re-named as such in 1975. The Quad is the independent, student-run newspaper of West Chester University of Pennsylvania and is published weekly throughout the academic year. The Quad is published on 10 Mondays each academic semester and has a weekly newsprint circulation of 3,500. The Quad is funded primarily through advertising sales and although we receive a budget through SGA and the student activity fee, The Quad is run solely by students and is not edited or altered in any way by University faculty, staff, or administration. The University has no prior review of the content. Rates and mechanical requirements for display advertising can be found on our Web site. Inquiries may be placed at the addresses or phone numbers listed above. Classified advertising may be purchased on our Web site: http://www.wcuquad.com. The Quad reserves the right to refuse any news items, letters, or advertising thought to be offensive or inappropriate. The Quad exercises care to prevent omissions and factual errors. Corrections for any published error will not exceed the space or prominence of the error that occurred. Claims for adjustment must be made within five days of publication. The Quad is printed by Journal Register Offset in Exton, Pa.

~ Rae Jay Editor AND Chief The Quad

If you can read this, all of the articles you are reading are our April Fools articles. For our print edition, our April Fools articles are printed upside down. Enjoy these articles that our staff editors and staff writers have put together for you. Some you may be glad they are not true, while other articles, I’m sure you will wish they come true. For a flashback of some of our previous April fools stories, here are a couple stories that editors have heard other students believed: *WCU Football team bumps to Division I *Starbucks on-campus to shut down *Residence halls to be demolished over winter break


More about the legality of WCU’s gun ban

APRIL 2, 2012

By Jon Blatman Special to The Quad In Bill Hanrahan’s OpEd on March 5, he suggests that the Department of Public Safety’s current prohibition on firearm possession on campus is unconstitutional. While I concur with his belief that the ban is wrong, I have a far simpler explanation as to why the current ban is in violation of state law. Mr. Hanrahan dismisses the citing of Act 188 in the DPS policy statement, but it is actually crucial to understand that Act 188 of 1982 created the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE), in the current format. (A current,

THE QUAD OP-ED

PAGE 9

amended copy is posted on PASSHE’s website, www.passhe.edu). Act 188 affirms that PASSHE is a Commonwealth agency, and that the system schools are therefore also agencies of the Commonwealth. Last year, House Bill 40, commonly referred to as the “Castle Doctrine” was passed by the Commonwealth Legislature, and signed into law by Governor Corbett as Act 10 of 2011. Part of Act 10 amended Section 6109(m.3) of Title 18, so that it now reads, in part: (m.3) Construction.-Nothing in this section shall be construed to:... (2) Authorize any Commonwealth agency to regulate the possession of

firearms in any manner inconsistent with the provisions of this title. This new language is very important because Section 6109 of Title 18 is the set of laws pertaining to how to obtain a Pennsylvania License to Carry Firearms (LCTF). Other laws within Title 18 and Section 6109 also describe prohibited persons (felons and others who are not legally allowed to possess firearms), as well as prohibited areas (areas where otherwise lawful possession of a firearm is illegal). It is notable that outside of a partial prohibition on firearm possession on the property of primary and secondary schools, there is NO law in the Commonwealth

against the possession of firearms on a Commonwealth (or private) college or university campus. The legislature has now made it quite clear that it is not the place of WCU, a Commonwealth agency, to create additional rules not currently found in law. It is my belief that the West Chester University administration is exceeding their legal authority under Act 188, and that the policy prohibiting lawful carry of firearms is in direct violation of the recently modified language of Section 6109. Further, any policy that would levy university sanctions is just as unlawful, and needs to be re-evaluated. If one is legally able to carry a fire-

arm off-campus, there is no reason they shouldn’t be able to bring their firearm onto campus. I have attempted to confirm the status of WCU’s weapons policy, in light of the recent changes in law, and have been mostly ignored. I was advised the policy would remain in effect while WCU and PASSHE officials “discussed” the matter. That has been the only contact I’ve had from WCU, and it was over two months ago. I’m really not trying to start a debate about carrying firearms. The decision to carry a firearm for self-protection is a very personal one, and many people have strong opinions on this subject.

All I’m asking for is that WCU no longer be “different” than other places I visit and spend time at. I feel as if I am clearly allowed to decide on my own if I choose to carry a firearm on campus under current law in the Commonwealth. I’d like to ensure that I am able to make that decision without fear of any reprisal from the University, potentially compromising my education and enrollment status, and without having to choose the security of my education over my personal safety and security.

fied or not. Researching events is time consuming and one cannot possibly hope to accumulate all the details for every event, and,as a result, people often use shortcuts, such as news programs, to gather information. Additionally, many people may only use one source for their information. Since even news corporations often spin stories the way they wish them to be seen, people who rely on them are especially prone to be biased. Because of this, it is advisable to glean information from a variety of sources and cross reference the facts for consistency. If sources offer their own analysis, it is okay to listen to them since they may offer a unique viewpoint, but one source’s analysis should not be blindly followed and consumers of infor-

mation should come to their own well-informed conclusions. Second, most people will find that an in-depth examination of any event will often bring understanding to all the sides involved. The goal is to understand the logic of every side. Humans rarely operate without following some kind of logic, reasoning, or strong motivation. And, as such, while one may claim that a certain side was pure evil, closer inspection will often reveal some type of logic or motivation. Large conflicts, in particular, are very seldom fought with pure emotion. As a general rule, when exploring a historical event or era, one must void oneself of all emotion and bias. Holding onto such feelings and tendencies will cloud one’s final

decision. Granted, this is difficult if one is a descendent of people involved in an historical event. For example, given the past treatment of Native Americans, would it be surprising if, on average, Native Americans have a lower opinion of the United States than some other groups? Native Americans are much more likely to condemn the United States for past actions, and understandably so. One example of distorted history would be a particular “battle” the United States fought with Native Americans: the Battle of Washita, where the U.S. military fought and killed women and children. This battle should be more appropriately named a massacre because a battle is when both sides fight with some degree of proficiency, but, in this conflict,

soldiers were shooting defenseless women and children. There were very few men on the Native American side that fought back. After proper fact gathering and analyzing, it can be said that the United States treated Native Americans very poorly. People often unintentionally project their values into life. Doing so gives them a distorted view of the world; these people often evaluate the actions of others against their own standards, often resulting in contempt for the actor. Therefore, it is imperative that one set aside one’s own beliefs, and be willing to listen to new ideas. There is no need to forfeit one’s personality, but people should realize that there is no one perfect way to view the world. Everyone has a cer-

tain “lens” that they view certain events with; everyone has a natural “filter” they use when they interpret information from the world around them. This “filter” alters their understanding of the event. How much the filter changes the information is dependent on the individual; for some people the level is so high that they twist the information they receive to a point where it in no way resembles what actually happened. When faced with a piece of evidence that clearly contradicts their “filter” they reject it out-right and question the source. These are the kind of people who cannot grow their understanding of the world around them. They refuse to come out of the shell and acknowledge the fact that they might

Jon Blatman is a fourthyear student majoring in Health Sciences. He can be reached at JB754491@wcupa.edu.

The need to properly analyze history

By Adam Farence Special to The Quad

When analyzing history, people either use erroneous information obtained from biased sources and/ or they project their own values onto society at the time, and do not realize that given what the people at the time of the event knew and believed would have had a profound impact on their decisions at the time. For this reason, people would greatly benefit if they had a method for understanding and analyzing history. First, when reaching an important decision and conclusion about events, one must be well rehearsed in the major and minor details. The goal is to understand why something happened, and then determine if the actions involved were justi-

See HISTORY on page 10


ry

n page 10

In response to WCU’s gun policy and the Constitution PAGE 10

By Ginger Rae Dunbar Editor-in-Chief

The gun-ban policy on university and college campuses is in effect rightfully for the safety of students, faculty and all staff members. With the amount of higher education institutions with a campus police department, there is no need to allow students or anyone else on-campus to possess a weapon. One’s constitutional right to bear arms is outweighed by the safety of the majority of the community. On a Pennsylvania college campus, state laws prohibit carrying a gun despite a license to carry. West Chester University abides by this law and prohibits all weapons with the no-weapon policy as described in the student code and conduct handbook. Gun bans also exist on state and federal properties, such as police stations, fire stations, hospitals, airports, courthouses, post offices and a few more locations. If the law was not in place, it would still be imperative

History from page 9

be wrong. While it is possible to reduce the effect of one’s filter to an almost non-existent level, it can never be totally eliminated. The best thing to do is to be aware of its existence. After one has studied his or her event extensively, one can begin to understand why certain events happened the way they did. One should be able to define the values

THE QUAD OP-ED

for college and university communities to instate a gun-ban and a no-weapon policy. It’s hard to believe that seven states are considering changing their gun laws, which would affect if a gun-ban would be valid on a college or university campus. Proposed policy changes in other states would allow for professors to carry a weapon. Legislators have not considered how this could create a problem for police to differentiate a shooter from the professor who is stepping in to help. Police uniforms act as a way for other officers to identify their own help from a potential gun person. On our campus, we have a police department with sworn officers who can respond to emergency calls. Public Safety officers would be followed by the West Chester Borough Police who would be the next to respond. Other neighboring police departments and SWAT could be on-scene as well. In general, if there was a school shooting on a campus and students were permitted to carry a gun,

some would say that this could end a school shooting. In this scenario, this could lead to more people getting hurt in the shooting as police would again not be able to distinguish the shooter from someone else who has a gun. If someone with a gun tries to help, it may now appear that they are the shooter. Pennsylvania has self – defense law and defense of the third party law. Courts make the final decisions if actions, based on the law, including if a death occurs, would protect the defender. People who misinterpret the law may wrongfully believe they have the right to act, especially in a third party situation. Could you imagine the impact of misusing weapons on-campus if students are suddenly allowed to carry? A bullet wound might become the leading cause of death of college students. This could outdo suicide, which is the second leading cause of death among college students. Each academic year there are 1,100 suicides of enrolled college students, according to www.suicideprevention.edu.

held by the respective parties at the time, the knowledge those parties had on hand (what they knew about other cultures, for example) and each party’s intended goals. The values held by a certain party are important because they give the examiner insight into the logic and foundation of these groups, a critical component to understanding why something happened the way it did. It is also important to understand the knowledge these parties had leading up to the event and,

finally, one must understand the intended goals of the parties at the time. To determine if an event was right, wrong, or somewhere in-between, one must compare the actions of the past to the values one currently holds. Using one’s respective set of values, one can compare the effects of the event to what our present day society deems to be important, and then one can make a decision on the event.

Adam Farence is a firstyear student majoring in history. He can be reached at AF764146@wcupa.edu.

According to www.npr. com the number of college students diagnosed with depression has increased over the last decade. A study they used for research showed that one in four or five students who visit their university health center are depressed, despite if they have been diagnosed. With college students being a large community to be diagnosed with depression, adding a gun to this may potentially put more blood on campuses. Seung-Hui Cho, the 2007 Virginia Tech shooter, was diagnosed with anxiety and severe depression. He legally obtained a gun before he killed 32 people and then himself. To obtain a gun, you only need to be 21 years of age and to pass a criminal

APRIL 2, 2012

record background check. To get your license to carry in Pa., you have to pay an additional cost. On our campus, our security officers do not even have a weapon. Why should a student or a resident be able to carry a weapon in the dorms? Security officers can act as a line of defense to prevent anyone from bringing a weapon into the residence halls. If this is not a policy, then the security and police officers of Public Safety, as well as other university police departments, cannot be proactive in keeping weapons off campus grounds. Someone could be on-campus with a weapon and you may never realize it. However, without the no-weapon policy, students could walk freely around with a weap-

on. No one could stop them until it became a problem and that problem could extend to a threat, an injury or a fatality. A student carrying a weapon on their waist can be seen as intimidation. Why do you need to go to class with a weapon? What is the need to carry a gun on this campus or any other college campus? You are in a learning environment when you walk around campus and attend classes. If you’re scared or afraid for your safety, walk around campus with friends. If you’re afraid to walk alone, call Public Safety for an escort.

Ginger Rae Dunbar is a fifth-year student majoring in English with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at RD655287@wcupa.edu.

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By Bill Hanrahan Director, Hair Justice Project

Unequal distribution of hair in our society

Bill Hanrahan is a fourthyear student majoring in political science and philosophy. He can be reached at WH750431@wcupa.edu.

I have a solution: redistribute hair. That’s right, Sean Hannity, Andrew Napolitano, and Brett Baier—give up those follicles. You don’t need them but many other men do. Until the government forcefully takes a high percentage of these men’s hair follicles and gives them to less fortunate men, there will be no such thing as social justice. Money helps a person who knows what he or she is doing live a happy life. But how can you live a happy life without that thick, full head of hair and straight hairline, perfect for that powerful side-part slicked back look? How are balding and bald men supposed to compete with men with full heads of hair for jobs and women? By redistributing hair follicles from men with an abundance of follicular units to men that are bald or balding, we can even the playing field dramatically. Furthermore, such mandated redistribution is much more justified than wealth redistribution. Many millionaires and billionaires earned their wealth, whereas follicularly gifted men did not earn their thick hair and perfect hairlines. Anyone who supports wealth redistribution ought to get behind this great social equity effort. Without addressing the unfair genetically imposed plight of bald and balding men, the world will never be a fair place. We must stop ignoring this great injustice and take action immediately.

of disease that needs to be cured and taking away their Autism is probably impossible since every part of their consciousness and most of their thought processes reflects their Autism—it isn’t like there is one part of the brain where Autism resides. Besides, most Aspies are happy with who they are and see Autism as an advantage in many ways because they see the world differently and many Aspies see immense benefits to their unique perspective. While Autism is a disability in some ways, it may be better to think of people with Asperger’s as differently-abled rather than “disabled.” Like everyone else, Aspies just want to be a full and equal part of society and live their lives to the fullest potential. The best “cure” would be a society that is willing to be more tolerant of those who don’t naturally conform to irrational social norms (such as looking someone in the eye, etc.). Autism awareness can help us build a society where people with Autism are understood and accepted for who they are, rather than being treated as diseased people that should be shunned and “cured” of their Autism. Society has made great strides in the past decades; people who used to be locked up in insane asylums are now better understood and allowed to positively contribute to the world. But we still have a long way to go before people with Autism can truly be equal citizens. Understanding and tolerance of people with Autism combined with the ability of Aspies to use their intellect to compensate for their lack of naturally acquired social skills can make the world a better place for Aspies and neuro-typical people alike.

Bill Hanrahan is the Director of the ACLU’s Hair Justice Project and author of “Follicularly Speaking: Hair and Justice in America.”

April is Autism Awareness Month. Autism is now said to affect one out of 88 children. Autism doesn’t go away with age so many adults have it too. When people think of Autism, they generally think of people who are severely disabled to the point that they cannot attend college or live on their own. In many cases this is, unfortunately, true. However, The Autism spectrum is wide and includes a diverse variety of individuals, including a number of “highfunctioning” Autistic people. Asperger’s Syndrome is a common manifestation of high-functioning Autism. People with Asperger’s (Aspies, as they like to call themselves) and other high-functioning Autistic individuals face significant obstacles in life, that’s for sure, but many of them are able to overcome these obstacles and live fulfilling lives. High-functioning Autistic people have significant deficits in social skills and therefore face numerous “failed social encounters” throughout their lives, especially as children. Aspies tend to be victims of bullying during their school years and frequently have trouble learning in a “typical” classroom environment. In most cases, these childhood troubles are not the result of a lack of intelligence—most Aspies have above average intelligence and a number of them are outright geniuses. The problem is that the Autistic mind works much differently than the “neurotypical” mind and thus Aspies frequently do not excel to an extent on par with their level of intelligence in a “normal” educational environment. Standardized tests may also underestimate the intellectual abilities of Aspies. Little, if anything, has been done to address this problem even on “high

stakes” tests such as the SAT, ACT, LSAT, and GRE. As young adults, life can improve for Aspies, especially those in Generation Y. Over the past decade awareness, diagnosis, and societal tolerance of Asperger’s Syndrome has greatly improved. Young adult Aspies no longer have to deal with immature and cruel peers, since most kids grow out of this behavior when they reach college age and are thus less likely to incessantly taunt their peers with Autism. (Yes, high-functioning Autistic people do attend college and frequently perform very well academically, even if their social struggles continue.) Furthermore, colleges have become more accommodating to individuals with Autism and this has allowed Aspies to be judged more based on their true intellectual abilities and less on the limits that their Autism imposes. Several universities recognize the value that students with Autism bring to campus and have thus ramped up efforts to accommodate them. Such colleges, one of which is nearby Drexel University, uses the term “neuro-diversity” to describe their efforts. However, there is a long way to go before we can truly say that Aspies are equal citizens. There is too often a stigma attached to Autism and thus Aspies frequently do not feel comfortable telling people that they are Autistic, even if it may help explain certain socially frowned-upon, but harmless, behavior. Many misconceptions about people with Autism plague even well-intentioned neuro-typical people. A big problem is the popular notion that we ought to come up with a way to “cure” Autism much in the way we might want to find a way to cure cancer. Many, if not most, Aspies find this offensive. Many Aspies don’t view their Autism as some sort

PAGE 11 men to appreciate because they take their full heads of hair for granted while their balding counterparts are stuck trying to style their hair with a thinning patch in the crown and a receded hairline. Worst of all, society mocks them for their hair loss. It’s all a big joke, except to the man who is losing his hair. Then, if balding men try to do anything to stop or reverse their hair loss, they get mocked even more. Simply put, society is cruel to balding and bald men. There is only one bald man that I can think of who is glad to be bald: Jason Alexander. If he wasn’t so badly balding at a young age, he would have never landed his role as George on the sitcom Seinfeld--Larry David would not have allowed a non-balding guy to be his character. Every balding man’s life would be much better with a full head of hair. It really means a lot and there is philosophical significance to hair loss, in that it does so deeply affect one’s life. The lives of millions of young balding men would be substantially better if they did not suffer from androgenic alopecia. Sure, it bothers some men more than others but, let’s face it, no guy with a full head of hair is likely to say “you know what would be great? If I started going bald.” Likewise, few bald men, no matter how well they handle their hair loss are likely to turn down a full head of hair if God offered to make it miraculously appear atop their heads. I could ramble on and on about this forever but

By Bill Hanrahan Op-ed Editor

THE QUAD OP-ED

In today’s political climate, we hear a lot about the redistribution of wealth and how it is unfair that “the rich get richer while the poor get poorer.” The real inequality that is much more tragic, however, is the unequal distribution of hair follicles atop the heads of men and (to a much lesser extent) women. For example, Andrew Napolitano’s hairline seems to be creeping downward while our poor friend Alan Colmes recedes even further back. Napolitano is the world’s only guy who has a proceeding hairline and he is the envy of the hair loss community. And what did Andrew Napolitano or guys like Sean Hannity do to deserve their thick hair with low, straight, hairlines? Nothing. They won the genetic lottery. Meanwhile, millions of other men are not so fortunate and, by genetic fate, are “follicularly challenged.” The common people think of hair loss as a sign of age but that is not really the case. The most unlucky men start balding before they turn 18 and are usually completely bald, save for the dreaded “horseshoe” of hair that survives. And even the horseshoe hair and the nape hair will thin out significantly in the most severe cases of androgenic alopecia (male pattern baldness). Millions of men don’t go completely bald but receding hairlines are tragically common. A man’s hair deeply affects his life. This is hard for the “follicularly gifted”

Autism Awareness

APRIL 2, 2012


PAGE 12

THE QUAD FEATURES

“I’ll have a Glenlivet on the rocks.”

Commentary By Kiersten McMonagle Special to The Quad

At the time, I didn’t know what Glenlivet was, although moments earlier I’d been assuring my table that we had plenty of it. At 19 years old, I’d never been in a bar, let alone waitressed in one, and I barely knew a Cosmo from a Martini. But here I was, five tables deep and keenly aware that my co-workers were wishing desperately that I’d just disappear. Not that I could blame them - I was wishing the same thing. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing. Glenlivet, I know now, is scotch, and the difference between a Cosmo and a Martini are the alcohols used to make them. But of the lessons waitressing has taught me, these things - menu items and types of alcohol - are probably the least important (Although my manager would likely insist that a good knowledge of alcohol is of the upmost importance). It was last summer that I started my first waitressing job, and in the months since then, I’ve learned that every table has something to teach you, whether it’s something seemingly unimportant that will become lost in the broken dishes and rolled silverware by the end of the night, or a mes-

sage that you’ll carry with you for the rest of your life; every customer leaves a part of themselves behind with the tip. Some, however, teach more important lessons than others. They leave their mark on the table where they sat, and over time you learn to identify tables by the people who sat there, not by their number in the computer system or their location in the restaurant. For me, that table is Rose. Rose was an older woman who would have lunch at the restaurant every morning and was always alone. She’d often be there before we’d even opened, and every time we’d let her in, not bothering to tell her that we wouldn’t be open for another half an hour. She’d order a rum and coke - something that I think she knew was a guilty pleasure she shouldn’t indulge in anymore but did anyway, and always a meal. I never saw her order something small - always a large chicken dish with a salad and whatever the soup of the day was - whether it was cream of mushroom or barbecue chicken and tomato. Or maybe the bruschetta pasta with grilled chicken and an Oreo sundae for dessert - as though this was her treat to herself. It was the one time a day that she let herself indulge

before getting back on the bus to where ever home was. She was lonely, and every day she would tell us about herself. About the writing classes she’d taken at the local community college, just to keep her brain working, and the bus driver that had asked her out. A family man, she described him as. One she wanted to introduce us to just as soon as he “shaped up.” And when it didn’t work out with him, it was us she came to for advice. She told us about her late husband named Jack (the irony of which was not lost on her) and how one day, she promised over and over, she’d bring us a photo of him. Somehow though, she always forgot the photo. Or maybe she just liked talking about him forgetting the photo meant she didn’t always have to be the one to bring him up because undoubtedly we would ask “where’s that picture of Jack?” We would have asked about him anyway. When Rose came in, we all served her. She only ever left two dollars for a tip, and that didn’t matter much anyway. It was the conversation we all enjoyed, and we knew that she’d remember us all - remember the things we’d talked about with her the last time she’d come in,

Features APRIL 2, 2012

QUADFEATURES@WCUPA.EDU

even if she never could get our names straight .(To this day, she calls me Haley, and a coworker of mine, Kiersten). We were her friends. And of all the things that Rose and I talked about over the months that I worked there, I think that one of the topics which stands out most is my education. Over the summer months, as we got to know one another, Rose learned where I went to school and that I was there as a journalism student, the same thing that she had studied years ago when she’d gone to college. And when I was home recently over break and I saw Rose, she still remembered

me. She asked about my classes and how my finals had gone. Rose never looked like someone you’d expect to have gone to college. To most people, she talked primarily about her husband and children. She seemed like a housewife through and through. To me though, she talked about her education, about the job she’d loved, and how much she missed classrooms and textbooks. She talked about the classes she’d been taking at the local community college, but they never seemed to live up to her standards. I think of all the things Rose taught me in the short time I’ve known her, this was the most

important: a person is never who you think they are. Rose had come from South Carolina after her husband died, unable to stay in the house where they’d spent their lives together. She’d come here and never been understood in the way that Jack had understood her. I think she told us so much about herself, because she wanted someone to talk to. She wanted someone to understand how she felt. As cliché as it sounds, Rose taught me to never judge a book by its cover. Kiersten McMonagle is a student at West Chester University. She can be reached at KM745613@ wcupa.edu.


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD FEATURES

PAGE 13

The magic of accessorizing Column by: Lauren DiCrecchio Practicum Writer

We all know it doesn’t take much to ruin an otherwise great outfit with the wrong accessories. However, it is super easy to turn an ordinary outfit into something spectacular with the right accessories. If you have lost your way in the art of accessorizing, there’s nothing to fear. Here are a few simple guidelines to follow that will complete your outfit. Accessories are a great way to accent to your best parts and minimize your worst. You can use accessories to change the overall look to an outfit. You can take a the most basic top and add colored jewelry or the right bag to capture any style that you want. Accessories help create the illusion of your desired look such as elegant, casual, artsy, chic, sophisticated and many more. There is a wide variety of accessories to choose from which include scarves, hats, belts, jewelry, bags, shoes, eye-wear, hair products, and hosiery or socks. The trick

is not only knowing what your accessories are, but also in how you pair and wear them. There are two important things to remember when accessorizing: always consider your body type and always harmonize.

easy to get excited about the new cream lacy top you just bought for Saturday girls’ night! But one thing to always remember to keep in mind, is how am I going to accessorize this? If you don’t think ahead,

have to work with. The same rules apply to accessory shopping. You’ll find, as with clothes, different accessories and their colors flatter different body types and complexions. It’s important to remember to choose a size that

www.collegefashion.net

Shopping for accessories is one of my favorite things. Sometimes I find myself building my outfits around accessories I have already purchased! But for some of you, I know it’s not that easy. Why do we shop? For events, for relief, and for fun (at least those are my reasons!) It’s super

once you pull out that new top it may not work the way you had imagined because you don’t have the right shoes, or you need a little something extra like a fun printed scarf. I personally like to take a mental note of my accessory inventory before shopping so I know exactly what I

coordinates with your body type. If you’re thin with a smaller build, choose small to medium size accessories. Anything larger will create an imbalance and leave you looking awkward. Those of you who have a medium or average body type, any accessory size will work for you. Small

to large, thin to bulky, you have an unlimited selection, but don’t over do it. If you’re shorter, stay away from larger accessories, they will tend to emphasize your lack of height. Ladies with a larger build, medium sized accessories will be most flattering for you. Anything too small or large will place lots of emphasis on your size which in some cases, isn’t always bad! The ball is in your court, but you can bet that medium sized accessories are your safety net. There should always be a common element between your accessories and outfit choice. Dressing ourselves is an art, and each time we pair something together we tell a story, so theme is key. You can harmonize your accessories by color, weight or texture. You want to pick out a similar hue or choose a color that will accent your outfit choice. There should always be balance between your accessories and outfits. Bulky clothing with bulky accessories will only drag you down, where as a basic flowy top paired with a chunky beaded necklace says some-

thing totally different. Bright colored shoes are a great pair for a bright colored top, or bright colored jewelry. One motto I live by, the “EyesUp,” effect that when someone is looking at you they are either looking your feet or top. Not only is this a great look, it gives you more length, therefore creating a slimmer figure. Fashion designers create focal points not only in their clothes, but also in their accessories. Remember the rule of three: Three focal points are the maximum when accessorizing you’re outfit. Women who want to capture a taller and slender look, stick to the eyes up. If your taller and thin and want to appear shorter with a more curvy figure, stick to eyes down. Too many accessories can be tacky and clash, where as too little accessories can come off as uninteresting. If you’re ever in doubt, say no! Lauren DiCrecchio is a fifth-year student majoring in liberal studies with minors in journalism and Spanish. She can be reached at LD658004@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 14

THE QUAD FEATURES

APRIL 2, 2012

This summer, get the credit you deserve. It’s the perfect time to catch up or get ahead on your credits. You deserve to make the most of your summer. Choose KU Summer Sessions and take your pick from an exciting list of on-campus and online classes. Make it a KU summer! For class listings or to register today, visit

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West Chester University squirrels go viral, gain worldwide popularity By Carol Fritz Mrs. Plays With Squirrels

Move over, Rammy. A new West Chesterian animal has taken the world by storm-- the WCU squirrels. More widely known as the “Dub C Squirrels,” WCU’s tiny, furry friends have captured the hearts and tickled the funny bones of millions of people around the globe. With their bushy tails, beady little eyes, and their “nutty” escapades, what is not to love about these marvelous mammals? The furry frenzy started when the squirrels began a Tw i t t e r page, DubCSquirrel. Managed by the Squirrels’ undisclosed public relations liason who is a specialized squirrel whisperer, the page gained massive

amounts of attention and soon went viral, becoming the topic of discussion on numerous television and news shows. The Squirrels’ Twitter wittily documents the trials and tribulations of squirrel life. “Tried to find some acorns, instead got a lecture about Jesus Christ from a crazy in front of Main Hall. #whydidIleavemytree,” a Squirrel said in their first tweet. “That awkward moment when you and your ex-squirrelfriend are digging through the same trashcan and you have to make small talk,” another Squirrel tweeted. Since the start of the Twitter page, the Dub C Squirrels joined a traveling animal entertainment business and have

gained the adoration of millions. A worldwide tour with Alvin and the Chipmunks is in talks. Students have been passionately supportive of the squirrels’ endeavors. The SSI Bookstore has been raking in thousands of dollars in profit from Dub C Squirrels merchandise like T-shirts, water bottles, and lanyards for the firstyear students. Along with several faculty members who have tried to ride the coattails of the Squirrels’ fame by writing numerous “squirrelerly articles” about the animals, many students have become enamoured and starstruck by these celebrity creatures. “I once saw a Dub C squirrel drag an entire slice of pizza across the parking lot at Sykes. It

Carol Fritz/ The Quad

Carol Fritz/ The Quad

A Dub C Squirrel enjoys a peaceful spring day before their instant fame occurred in Fall 2012.

was awesome,” student Angela Thomas said, who was recently seen hiding in a bush trying to catch a glimpse of one of the squirrels. While the squirrels have fans in most WCU students, some individuals are still not too keen on these internet sensations. “I’m glad that the squirrels haven’t been on campus that much since beginning their world tour. I feel much more at ease walking around campus. I can’t even count how many times I almost had a heart attack when one of them jumped out of a garbage can as I was walking by. Not funny, squirrels,” an undisclosed second-year student who wished to remain anonymous, said. Carol Ann, Carol Ann, she’s too cool for seventh grade. She can be found sniffing the basement of Ruby Jones.

Check out The Quad online! wcuquad.com

A University of Pennsylvania squirrel, longtime enemies of the Dub C squirrels, jealously munches on an acorn as he hears the news of the Dub C squirrels winning the Nobel Peace Prize for their worldwide efforts in strengthening human-squirrel relations .

APRIL 2, 2012

QUADENTERTAINMENT@WCUPA.EDU

Entertainment

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 15


PAGE 16

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

APRIL 2, 2012

Opening acts impress fans A return voyage, in 3-D, for ‘Titanic’ white. the Stephenie Meyer “We tested about adaptation on Foxy Shazam’s Tabernacle Tour “The 15 facilities with one Host.” By Frank Lovece McClatchy Newspapers

By Molly Herbison Special to The Quad

During my amateur experiences as a concert-goer, I have usually found opening bands to be like tonsils: unnecessary, and at times, dangerously irritating. I would skip opening acts completely and just waltz in for the main event-- but that is no way to get a good spot for the headliner. I just have to suck it up and deal with the experimental shrieking and other shenanigans forced upon me by opening acts. S o m e t i m e s , however, an opener surprises me. This was the case of Foxy Shazam’s Tabernacle Tour, which is supporting the band’s latest album “The Church of Rock and Roll.” I could geek out about Foxy Shazam for days, but I will spare readers that particular torture. I will just say that Foxy Shazam is six passionate, talented guys

from Cincinnati, who consistently crank out soulful, anthemic songs. The first two shows of the tour, which took place on March 24 at Allentown’s Crocodile Rock Cafe and on March 25 at Philly’s North Star Bar, proved that opening acts can rock too. Cadaver Dogs, a trio from Columbus, Ohio, were dripping with attitude. Such bravado would usually turn me off, but Cadaver Dogs possessed a talent and raw energy that jolted me and the rest of the crowd into submission. The band’s live performances are undoubtedly kick-ass, but if getting to a show is out of the question, they have two EPs out right now (“Thrill Ride” and “On All Fours”), which are perfect for anyone who wants to rock out with his or her bad self. The second opener, Maniac, changed the mood with their catchy, pop-rock

tunes. Head maniacs, Jake Grigg and Shawn Harris, sang back and forth to each other with infectious grins that spread to the audience. Harris’s sister Vanessa, who bares a striking, yet irrelevant resemblance to Skrillex, lent her talents as chief keyboard player and back-up vocalist. The band splits their time between California (the home of the Harris siblings) and Australia (the home of Jake Grigg). These sunny locales shine through in Maniac’s bright, upbeat songs. “HooDoo,” “Pride of Lions,” and “Three Kings Day” are all great for the beautiful weather that West Chester is beginning to experience. So, download a couple of Maniac songs, go lay out in the quad, and relax. That is an order. Molly Herbison is a first-year student at WCU. She can be reached at MH757997@wcupa. edu.

facebook.com

The Cadaver Dogs were one of the opening acts for Foxy Shazam in March.

NEW YORK _ George Lucas has tweaked “Star Wars” on its various rereleases, including adding a scene of Han Solo chatting up Jabba the Hut. Steven Spielberg removed guns from the federal agents chasing the kids in the 2002 rerelease of “E.T.” James Cameron, however, is leaving his 1997 Oscarwinning best picture alone when the 3-D rerelease of “Titanic” sets sail Wednesday. “There was an instant” when Cameron might have considered tweaking “Titanic,” concedes its producer Jon Landau, in a telephone interview. “But very early on we shut the door on that, because we wanted people to experience ‘Titanic’ the way it was seen and not go and play a ‘Where’s Waldo?’ game. Whatever quote ‘imperfections’ were there did not hurt the box office.” And anyway, he figures, “If I’m going to go watch ‘Star Wars,’ I’m going to watch the original ‘Star Wars.’” Yet while Cameron didn’t change a frame, Landau says, the film’s writer, director and co-editor brought his trademark exactitude to the conversion from 2-D to 3-D _ an after-the-fact process that with some movies has produced results that look about as natural as colorized black-and-

minute of film from five or six scenes, to see if we were comfortable creatively with what they could do,” Landau says. They chose a company called Stereo D, “and we embarked on a 60-week process to convert the film. We spent over $18 million to convert it.” “I know this isn’t just a transfer,” says Bill Paxton, who plays salvage diver Brock Lovett in “Titanic.” “Jim being Jim, he has got to go in there and make it right,” he says of the technophile director, who has made pioneering strides in the use of morphing and other now-common cinematic tools. Even without the story itself being tweaked, Frances Fisher, who plays the mother of Kate Winslet’s character, Rose, says the film may resonate differently in 2012 simply because of society’s changes in 15 years. Growing economic divides hark back to the first-class and steerage distinctions of “Titanic” and of the Gilded Age in general. “What’s happening today, with all the established things that we took for granted breaking down _ the Wall Street collapse, the bailouts and a lot of people suffering _ I feel ‘Titanic’ shines a light on society on many levels,” Fisher says, speaking from Baton Rouge, La., where she’s filming

And as for how she thinks the movie’s 3-D will look, she offers an anecdote from the set. “In the scene by the clock where Kate comes down the stairway and Leo is pretending to be a first-class passenger in his tuxedo and they’re about to go to dinner, behind Leo were these black-andwhite squares. The shot was all set up and suddenly Jim goes, ‘Stop! Stop! There’s a smudge on one of the white squares behind Leo’s head!’ And somebody said, ‘Well, nobody’s going to be looking at that.’ And he goes, ‘I don’t want people to look at Leo in his close-up and see a smudge behind him,’ even though it’s out of focus. “So everybody goes scurrying for a solvent to clean it up,” Fisher says. “Who comes back with it first? Jim. He comes with a bucket and a rag and he’s just wiping up the thing. No big deal, he’s just doing it. And I walked over to him and said, ‘Jim, you’ve got crew people to do that.’ He goes, ‘I’ve done every job on a movie set except act _ that’s the one thing I don’t know how to do. But I know how to do every other job here! OK, we’re done, let’s go!”” If he’s like that with a smudge, chances are “Titanic 3D” will look shipshape.


anic’

APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 17

Fly away with The Astronauts’s innovative sound at The Note

By Elizabeth Knode Special to The Quad

Philadelphia-based music group, The Astronauts, will introduce West Chester and The Note to hip-hop with no barriers, experimental electronics, and a new innovative sound. With the slogan, “the average person wouldn’t understand us for we are from space,” it is enough to grab attention from all audiences. And that is exactly what the musicians want to do -- reach out to the masses and hope they are perceived by open minds. “One thing that isn’t corrupted in this world is music. It connects people together and doesn’t die. If Kanye West or

anyone in pop culture would stand up about the corruptions in this world through music, it would have much more of an impact for change,” The Astronauts’s beatmaker Theodore Grams said. The Astronauts were created by CEO/ producer Pace-O beats and lead artist, Montgomery Brown. The alliance of artistic astronautical pioneers includes manager Reinaldo Dejesus Jr. a.k.a. Spiknasty, Theodore Grams, Mont Brown, Pace-O, PO, Gabe Griffin, DJ FM Extraordinaire, Zach Marley, and Gabe Rosen, the drummer for the band Members Only. The group is selfmanaged and highly innovated with their

sounds, which all quick-started in 2009 when musical waves kept flowing. Theodore Grams and Mont Brown met at a barber shop to realize they were neighbors, and from then on, the other members gradually came to meet. Manager Reinaldo DeJesus Jr., who is a Temple University film school graduate, fashions screenwriting and photography in production with a vision of innovative sounds that exist through lyrics and beats. A novel music video that many of the members agree to be their finest is “We Shall Not Be Moved,” which was inspired by living the rough life in Philadelphia that promotes a survival of

the fittest attitude. Another top music video is “High-top,” and both of these can be viewed on the band’s Tumblr account at astronautsreallyfly. tumblr.com. The musicians’ passion and originality in music is adamant in how they describe their role models and outlook on what they create. “You have to always contradict yourself. Everything has always got to be better,” Theodore Grams said. The Astronauts wish to create, not re-create. They know they have to follow mandate, but it is from scratch and pure innovation. They are constantly, simultaneously working on projects, always improvising and

always coming up with new ideas. It is clear they are hard players and beat makers as their motto is “turn it up.” The members work as an interlocking braid of sounds, lyrics, beats, and art. “Music lives forever, but people die. So there should be a point in it,” drummer Gabe Rosen said. The group emphasizes how they want to emulate the civil rights movement through their music. Artists that have inspired The Astronauts include Teriyaki Boyz and rapper Pharrell Williams. Look for the upcoming music video “Pimpin and Angel” and a mixed tape of hip-hop, electronic, indie rock sound with

Members Only and Grams mash-ups and remixes. Until then, The Astronauts X The Phrat performing in a High Roller tour in West Chester at The Note Venue on April 14. Other artists include Mont Brown and Theodore Grams, as well as other artists Chill Moody, Zah Marley, Christian Tizon, Yung Triz, and Spiz Da Loose Cannon. The show is at 9 p.m. and doors open at 8 p.m. Tickets can be purchased prior at The Note’s website or at the venue for $8 $10. It is a 21-and-over show, so get lost in an experience of hip-hop with no barriers. Elizabeth Knode is a student at WCU. She can be reached at EK755213@ wcupa.edu.

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PAGE 18 THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT APRIL 2, 2012

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View the Schedule on WESS*

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*The University reserves the right to cancel courses, change faculty and/or room assignments, modify its calendar, and make adjustments to the course schedule and the availability of the Web registration system. **Tuition and fees are approximate and subject to change without prior notice.

E-mail: quadentertainment @wcupa.edu


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 19

‘Bully’ delivers emotional impact

By Kenneth Turan McClatchy Newspapers

LOS ANGELES _ If you feel like you’ve already read quite a bit about the documentary “Bully,” you have. But that still won’t prepare you for the experience of seeing it. “Bully” has been in the news a lot lately because it received a restrictive R rating (for a small amount of bad language) and then chose to go into theaters unrated. Its distributor, Weinstein Co., made that choice because the film’s subject matter, the pervasiveness of school-related bullying and what can be done about it, would seem to cry out for a high school age and younger audience. And “Bully” has an emotional impact that must be viewed to be understood. A passion project for filmmaker Lee Hirsch, who also served as his own cinematographer, “Bully” hopscotches around the country looking at the situations of five different children who have suffered the effects of bullying. Two of these children are unable to appear on camera. They’re represented by their parents because they were driven to suicide by persistent taunting, a situation that is every bit as disturbing as it sounds. For as difficult as it is to watch children being bullied, it is just as hard to experience the look of unfathomable despair on the face of David Long of Murray County, Georgia, whose 17-year-old son Tyler hanged himself in a closet in the family home. “I knew he would be

victimized at some point in time,” the father says, describing the indescribable. “He had a target on his back. Everyone knew that.” Sharing that agony is Kirk Smalley of Oklahoma, whose 11-year-old son also took his own life. “We’re nobody,” says the father, searching around for answers to why family complaints about school bullying had gone unheeded. “If it had been some politician’s son, there’d be a law tomorrow.” This theme of parental difficulty in getting satisfactory responses from those in authority positions in schools is one of “Bully’s” constant refrains. Adults are portrayed as clueless and ineffectual, reduced to either “kids will be kids” platitudes or hand-wringing sentiments such as, “This is an awfully complicated and difficult situation.” When it comes to showing what some kids go through on a daily basis, “Bully” concentrates on the situation of 12-year-old Alex Libby of Sioux City, Iowa. Ironically, precisely because the Sioux City school board takes the bullying problem seriously, it allowed filmmaker Hirsch broad access to East Middle School and to the buses where much of the bullying of Alex takes place. Since the kids on the bus were used to treating Alex with impunity and because Hirsch shot with a small Canon 5D Mark II, no one held back from hitting and cursing Alex just because a camera was present, which is where

the footage that gave “Bully” its R-rating comes from. Hirsch clearly developed a strong rapport with Alex, a bright, aware kid with an awkward manner who seems to confide in the filmmaker more than in his own parents. Alex is desperate for friends, and he doesn’t want to make waves, so he spends quite a bit of time trying to downplay the extent of his bullying, until Hirsch takes the unusual step of showing adults some of the footage he has shot. For a variety of reasons, the two other teens depicted get less _ and less effective _ screen time than Alex. Though we hear from Kelby Johnson, a 16-year-old from Tuttle, Okla., who was ostracized when she came out as a lesbian, we do not see her being taunted. And young Ja’Meya Jackson of Yazoo County, Miss., who took her mother’s handgun to her school bus to stop chronic bullying, is in so much trouble that we hardly hear from her at all. “Bully” is not comprehensive _ the more modern torments of cyber bullying are not much dealt with _ and it can feel haphazard as it jumps back and forth between its subjects. Still, the film’s cumulative force is considerable, and, more than that, it shows the efficacy of a recent “I Stand for the Silent” campaign that encourages all kids to speak up when they see bullying taking place. Maybe, this film suggests, getting power to the powerless is not as impossible as it sounds.

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Rammy

THE QUAD

By Tyler Mertens & Brian Tracey

APRIL 2, 2012

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THE QUAD

The Quad Crossword

APRIL 2, 2012

PAGE 21

Diversions

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @THEQUADWCU

The Quad SuDoKu Fill in the grid so that each of the numbers 1 - 9 appears once and only once in each row, each column, and each 3x3 square. Solutions to the puzzles on this page will be printed in the next issue of The Quad.

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1 Fictional Bagne of Toulon prisoner 12 “How relaxing!” 15 Military sanction 16 Friend of Piglet 17 The Hulk, untransformed 18 Double-chevron wearer: Abbr. 19 Universal signal since 1908 20 Ultravox frontman Midge __ 21 Held up 23 Office orders 26 Tessellated artwork 27 Native American in Connecticut 30 Dylan contemporary 31 Gave a shot, say 34 Spica’s constellation 36 Sprinkling 37 Lacking a point 38 First name in spy fiction 39 2010 Literature Nobelist Mario Vargas __ 41 Ga. airport that serves Hilton Head Island 42 Prefix with -loquent 44 Highest score possible with a single dart 45 Keen © 2012 Tribune Media Services

47 Missed payment result 49 Louisiana license plate image 51 Baseball Hall of Famer Cap 54 Easy to erect 55 Crony 57 Memory unit, briefly 59 Labyrinth location 60 The Bridge of the Americas locale 64 Gone by 65 Yellow Brick Road terminus 66 Remote abbr. 67 “Charlie’s Angels” actress

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1 Ring sequence 2 Reason for striking out 3 Divert 4 White House foreign policy gp. 5 Certain migratory pattern 6 Jump 7 Brace with a 90-degree bend 8 Krakowski of “30 Rock” 9 Southwest add-on 10 Really drawn-out 11 Dunn and Ephron of Hollywood 12 Lemming predator 13 Trousseau trunk

14 Reigns 22 __ Miguel, largest of the Azores 24 “Well said!” 25 PC peripheral 26 Hitchcock title kleptomaniac 28 “B.J. and the Bear” star Greg 29 Goliath, for one 31 Become extinct 32 Typically 33 London street known for high-end haberdasheries 35 His watch signals Superman 40 Whoppers 43 Mobile home? 46 Lack of similarity, informally 48 Holly follower? 50 “War with the Newts” sci-fi novelist, 1936 52 Old Dodges with frontwheel drive 53 “Swell!” 55 Trim 56 Key of Liszt’s Piano Concerto No. 2 58 Romance novelist Elinor 61 Circus safeguard 62 Quarantine advisory org. 63 Speech balloon cry of dismay

The TV Crossword

Difficulty level: Challenge - 1041 Adder or asp

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42 In the distance 43 “Say __ to the Dress” 44 Lions’ lairs

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1 Ice cream treats 2 Actor on “Criminal Minds” 3 Broadcasts 8 4 6 1 4 __ Howard 7 9 5 54Sully, as someone’s reputation 7 3 6 “__8 to 2Hart” 9 8 2 75Before 106 Role 1 3on 4“Suburgatory” 119 Chinese 5 7 6Premier Chou __ 122 “__ 6 walked 4 9 out in the streets of Laredo...” 3 2 1 8 13 Pop music singer Bobby __ 1 3 5 7 15 “The Big __ Theory” 17 Dorothy’s aunt and others 19 “Making the __”; reality series 20 Actor Sean __ 22 Ferengi characteristic 23 Reddish horse 25 “American __” 26 Refrain syllable 27 __ up; delays 30 Actress Vera __ 31 “The New Adventures of __ Christine” 33 Flies high 34 FedEx rival 36 “__ and the Fatman” 37 “__ Harbor”; short-lived Gregory Harrison/Rue McClanahan series 39 Anti’s vote 40 “__ About You”

© Philip A.


PAGE 22

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 2, 2012

Ilya Bryzgalov bounces back from rough start just in time By Deanna Vasso Staff Writer A few months ago the number one complaint from Flyers fans was about the team’s goaltending, but after winning the last 11 in 16 games, goaltender Ilya Bryzgalov has won over Philadelphia. Bryzgalov came to the Philadelphia Flyers in a trade with the Phoenix Coyotes in the post-season after the salary cap was adjusted by the trading away of Mike Richards and Jeff Carter. The native Russian goaltender got $51 million in a signed contract with the Flyers for the next nine years. The trade came

as a shock to some fans who were wondering if he was worth that much. Bryzgalov had somewhat of a rough start in Philadelphia, which further emphasized this complaint. February seemed to be a bad month for the whole team, and goaltending was one of the most talked about issues. Young rookie goalie Sergei Bobrovsky also seemed to not be doing as well in net, most likely due to not playing as much as he did last season. It was towards the end of the month that Bryzgalov started to amp up his performance in the net. Although the Flyers were

still losing some of their games, there was a noticeable difference to the goaltender between the pipes. In March, Bryzgalov has really turned things around and even achieved three shutout wins in the last 16 games. He even beat former Flyers’ goaltender John Vanbiesbrouck’s all time shutout streak record of playing 227:40 minutes without a goal against. He set a record of his own of 249:15 minutes when he used to play for the Anaheim Ducks, which he beat in the same game. This new Bryzgalov was stunning not only for fans but for the league itself. Every week the NHL picks

three players for the past week and names them as the “three stars of the week.” The league chooses three players that they think played exceptionally well, and they post this article on the league website the following Monday. Bryzgalov was named the first star of the week on March 12 and then again on the March 19. The recognition from the league has definitely helped the goaltender to boost his confidence on the ice. In addition, the Flyers’ starting goalie is the first player this season to receive back-to-back first star of the week recogni-

tion. Right now Bryzgalov is 32-15-7 with a .910 SV percentage and 2.46 GAA. The Flyers clinched their spot in the 2012 Stanley Cup Playoffs shortly after the New York Rangers and the Pittsburgh Penguins. As of now, the first round of the playoffs will be a Pennsylvania battle between the No. 5 Flyers and the No. 4 Penguins. Bryzgalov has been one of the key assets in keeping the team in the running for the Cup, and in helping the team to clinch their spot. Now, all he has to do is continue playing like he has been and help the Flyers towards a title. Teams who win the Cup

are teams with good goaltending, and this is exactly what the Flyers need to claim their victory. Unfortunately, Bryzgalov recently got injured in a game against Tampa Bay. Despite the chip fracture in his foot, Flyers GM Paul Holmgren is denying that the injury will affect the goaltender too much. The Flyers are hoping that they lose Bryzgalov for only a few games, as they are going to need him back in goal on Tuesday in their game against the Rangers. Deanna Vasso is a fourthyear student majoring in English with a minor in creative writing. She can be reached at DV670502@wcupa.edu.

Men’s golf places 10th at Dr. Gymnastics breaks records, Edwin B. Cottrell Invitational sends five to USAG Nationals By Justin Park Special to The Quad

West Chester University’s men’s golf team will be playing host to the third annual Dr. Edwin B. Cottrell Invitational at Penn Oaks Golf Course on April 1-2. The team will try to rebound from a frustrating performance at the St. James Invitational played at the Founders Club in South Carolina, where they finished 10th of 16 teams. Head coach Harry Hammond was disappointed with the team’s overall performance, but recognized factors that could have led to their anguish. “The team did not play well at all and I had one player become dehydrated on the course, which definitely influenced his score the first day,” Hammond said. One bright spot for the team was the performance of Austin Mann, of Collegeville, Pa., who finished 11th on the overall individual board. In the two rounds, Mann hit a 148 on

the par-72 course. Still, the team realizes they must play better and they are certainly happy to be playing this upcoming tournament close to home. “The team travel time to most of our tournaments is a minimum of five hours each way,” Hammond said. “Balancing the travel, tournament play and the time away from classes is difficult. To be at home for a weekend is special for them and will allow most of the parents to come and watch their sons play.” Aside from the luxury of being home, the team believes they will benefit from knowing the course. “Playing this weekend on our home course should be an advantage for the team,” Hammond said. “The players have spent considerable time working on their short game, which Penn Oaks course demands.” Since returning from the St. James Invitational, the team has spent nearly every day at the Penn Oaks course and coach Hammond has held two 18-hole qualifying

rounds to establish which five golfers he will use on the team this weekend. The others will have the chance to gain experience by playing individually. Despite the recent struggles on the road, Hammond is happy with the team’s overall progress and will continue to encourage them. “For the most part, I am pleased. They qualified for the NCAA regional tournament in 2011 and I expect them to again qualify for this year’s NCAA regional being held in Hershey, Pa.,” Hammond said. “I have told them that I believe they are good enough to finish as one of the top five teams at regionals and be invited to the NCAA national tournament. They have the talent to do this.” The Dr. Edwin B. Cottrell Invitational at Penn Oaks Golf Course tournament began on Sunday, April 1 at 1 p.m. and picked up again on Monday at 9 a.m. Justin Park is a third-year student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at JP727721@wcupa.edu

By Emily Seigel Staff Writer In the past couple of weeks, West Chester’s women’s gymnastics team wrapped up their season with some amazing feats. On Feb. 24 the Lady Rams hosted a quad meet against visiting teams Ursinus College, Rhode Island College, and Wilson College. This home meet was the team’s senior meet in which they honored their four graduating seniors. The competition began on the vault where freshman Stephanie Schuler won the event with a 9.7. Following Schuler, in third and fourth place were senior Alli Aquila and junior Melissa Voskian, both who received their personal best score on the vault. On the next event, the uneven bars, Aquila won the event with her personal best score of a 9.55. The Lady Rams took the top three places on

this event with Aquila in first, sophomore Paige Griffin in second, and Schuler in third. The Lady Rams then traveled to the balance beam where junior Kaley Lafleur tied both her personal best and the school’s individual balance beam record with a huge score of 9.85. Following Lafleur, teammate Emily Seigel came in second with a career high of 9.625 and freshman Melissa Prisco, also with a personal best of 9.5. The Lady Rams finished the competition on the floor in which four of the six gymnasts in the line-up received their career highs. The Rams received a team score of 189.15, which secured them a win in the quad meet. On Saturday, March 9, the Lady Rams traveled to Rutgers University where they placed third in the tri-meet with a 189.025. Schuler posted a careerhigh on the balance beam with a 9.75, which was

awarded, second place against the Division I competition. The balance beam line-up also tied its school record with a 47.7. Other career highs included Seigel with a 9.625 on both the balance beam and the uneven bars, along with sophomore Cassandra Ringer who tied with Seigel. Last weekend, the Lady Rams traveled to Southern Connecticut State University who played host for the ECAC championships and their last meet of the season. The meet began on the balance beam in which Lafluer posted a big 9.7 to help the Lady Rams. The gymnasts then moved to the floor exercise where they really left their mark. Griffin broke the floor record with a massive score of 9.875. “Personally I never thought I was able to get such a high score, so to see a 9.875 was just incrediSee GYMNASTICS page 26


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 23

Individual performances highlight Danny Curran Invitational By Joey Samuel Staff Writer For the second straight week, West Chester’s track and field teams put on solid performances, especially in the field events. They competed in the Danny Curran Invitational on Friday and Saturday at Widener University in Chester, Pa. While no Golden Ram managed to win an event, that didn’t mean that some athletes didn’t accomplish something important. Amanda Hughes was very impressive, finishing fourth in the javelin with a distance of 121 feet, 4 inches, adn third in the discus with 120 feet, 1 inch. Both of those performances were enough to qualify her to

the 2012 PSAC Outdoor Championships, which take place in early May. The men were solid in the field as well. Brian Pellechia finished ninth in the hammer throw with 138 feet, 8 inches, while teammate Dillon Wallner finishied 11th with 138 feet even. That was good enough to qualify both athletes to the PSACs in that event. On the track, Ryan Karli was the top performer for the men, finishing third overall in the 110-meter high hurdles with a time of 15.61 seconds. The women performed even better on the track. Nicole Smith and Kathleen Casey each qualified to the PSACs in the 800-meters. Smith finished in 2:20.81, while Casey finished in 2:21.45.

Casey also placed eighth in the 1500m with a time of 4:46.94. Brittany Boyer also got herself into the PSAC Championships, finishing sixth overall in the 5000m with a time of 18:47.09. While the PSAC Outdoor Championships won’t take place until the first week of May, which is the last week of classes, the track and field teams have plenty to keep them busy before then. Next Friday and Saturday, the teams will compete in the Metrics & Combined Events Challenge at Millersville. The following week, they will host the WCU Open here at West Chester. Joey Samuel is a third-year student majoring in political science and Spanish. He can be reached at JS719745@ wcupa.edu.

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William Breiner reaches back for his javelin throw. He finished ninth overall with a distance of 178-7.

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THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 2, 2012

West Chester tennis teams eager to improve in spring By Brian Johnson Staff Writer After posting a 3-2 record in the fall portion of their season, West Chester University’s women’s tennis team resumed their play earlier this month with a team trip to Hilton Head, South Carolina. The spring break trip saw the team play four matches in five days against nonleague opponents from South Carolina, Texas, Ohio, and Illinois. The Golden Rams began the PTR Spring Fling tournament on March 11 with a 9-0 loss to South Carolina’s Limestone College. The Saints dominated the singles competition, winning all six matches in straight sets. WCU’s Alex Santoro gave the team their best chance at a singles victory with a 7-5,7-5 loss to Limestone’s Lauren Bolender. Doubles competition drew out better performances from the Golden Rams as the number one duo of captain Brittany Counts and Alex Santoro dropped a tough 9-7 match, while the second doubles team of Ali Fetter and Nicole Paller fell 8-6. The next two matches put the women up against tough competition from North Central Texas College and Tiffin University, which they lost 8-1 and 9-0 respectively. Sophomore Nikki Paller earned WCU’s only point of the two matches with a straight set victory over Sarah Palacio of NCTC. Their fortunes changed in their final match against Roosevelt University as they steamrolled the Lakers 9-0. Nicole Paller, Haley Wissinger, and Rebecca

Thiel all won their matches 6-0, 6-0 while the top three singles of Counts, Ali Fetter, and Santoro only dropped a total of six games. “I was pleased with the performance [in South Carolina],” head coach Tina Tharp said. “We didn’t get a lot of play in the fall due to the delay in our courts being ready for competition...so we were trying out different doubles combinations to see what our strongest combinations would be and what our strongest line-up would be.” Unfortunately, the run was not to last, as they traveled to Washington, D.C. to take on the University of the District of Columbia. WCU was swept early in the doubles competition and were unable to recover in the 9-0 loss to UDC. Paller came close to getting the Golden Rams on the board in her three set singles loss. Paller clawed back from a 6-1 first set defeat to push the match to the deciding third set where she fell 10-3 in the tie-breaker, dropping the set 7-6. The loss was only a minor setback for the girls, as they came back up to take two consecutive matches: one against Philadelphia University and an all important conference win over East Stroudsburg University, putting the right foot forward on their quest to earn post-season play this year. West Chester’s men’s tennis team also restarted the season in Hilton Head after their 2-3 start in the fall with four matches of their own. The men came out in a better position than the women, finishing with a

2-2 record for the week. They began the trip with a 5-4 win over Ohio Wesleyan University on March 11. Luan Kichen played a fantastic match at fourth singles to take the win of the Golden Rams. Kichen, a junior, dropped the first set 2-6 and came back to post a 6-3 win in the second and a 6-4 win in the third. The next two matches were not as successful for the men as they, like the women, lost to Limestone College and Tiffin University. Their final match, however, was a mirror image of the women’s match as they swept the court with a 9-0 victory over Roosevelt University, losing a combined total of only five games. “We came out with a 2-2 record, but competed in both of our defeats,” captain David Goldenberg said. “It was a great experience to play teams from out of our conference and from different states. I’m proud of how the team is performing so far.” The trip back north was just as unkind to the men as it was to the women, beginning the post-trip season with a 9-0 loss to the University of the District of Columbia. That was immediately followed up by a 7-2 defeat at the hands of Philadelphia University. The Golden Rams turned the tide this week with a convincing 6-3 victory over Gloucester County College and a dominating 9-0 win over Bloomfield. The two straight victories improved the team to a record of 6-7 overall, and gives them the momentum they need going into league play, where they will be looking

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www.mc3.edu/summer to earn a post-season birth. “We stay really focused at practice and continue to work hard on the court,” explained

Goldenberg. “I believe we are out-performing ourselves from last year, and I’m confident that all of our hard work and excellent coaching by

coach Tharp will lead us into the post season.” Brian Johnson is a fourthyear student majoring in English. He can be reached at BJ669485@wcupa.edu.

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J.J. Cook returns a serve during his singles match. Cook was 6-2, 6-0 winner at fourth singles on Thursday.


APRIL 2, 2012

THE QUAD SPORTS

PAGE 25

Rams’ win streak reaches 15 with sweep of East Stroudsburg By Kenny Ayres Sports Editor The West Chester baseball team continues to dominate their opponents, as they stretched their win streak to 15 games with a double header sweep of East Stroudsburg on Tuesday. The Rams, who at one point last week were ranked No.2 in all the nation for DII teams, defeated their PSCA rivals 7-3 and 9-5 Saturday, pushing their overall record to 20-1. West Chester once again jumped out to an early lead in game 1, capitalizing on a costly pair of errors by ESU second baseman Ryan Guarino. With Provine on second after a one-out double, Joe Wendle hit a ball on the ground to second base but Guarino mishandled the ball, allowing Wendle to reach first, then threw the

ball away allowing Wendle to advance to second and Provine to score. Justin Lamborn then singled, knocking in Wendle, and Matt Baer put the capper on the four run inning two batters later when he doubled to score Lamborn and Jordan Wlodarczyk. All four of the runs were unearned. ESU began to mount a comeback in the second inning, scoring twice in the frame, but West Chester came right back in the third, scoring three more runs and taking a commanding 7-2 lead. Wendle got the inning started with a single, and scored one out later when Lamborn ripped a double down the left field line. Later in the inning, with two men out and Lamborn and Matt Baer on the corners, ESU’s Guarino made his third error of the game on a ground ball from Josh Heyne. The error allowed Lamborn to

score, and then Chris Pula singled to plate Baer. Of West Chester’s seven runs in the game, six were unearned. Lamborn finished the game 2-for-3 with two runs scored and two RBI, and Baer went 1–for-2 with a walk, a run scored, and two RBI. The two RBI from Baer brought him to a total of 6 RBI in his last two games. “Matt Baer has had some great at bats this season and he has come through with some game changing extra base hits for us. Matt has been locked in since our first day in the fall. He plays with a lot of energy,” said head coach Jad Prachniak said. On the mound Joe Gunkel held ESU in check for the entire game, throwing all seven innings and finishing with a solid line of 7H, 3R (2 ER), 4 BB, 4K. The win put Gunkel to 3-0 on the season, and

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Joe Wendle takes his lead off first after knocking in Mike Raimo with an RBI single. Wendle also had a two-run home run in game 2 of the doubleheader.

lowered his ERA to an impressive 2.88. “Getting a complete game from Gunkel to start the weekend is great for us,” Prachniak said. “Joe does a good job of challenging hitters and allowing our team to play defense behind him, he did walk a season high four guys but he was able to work around that and finish the game. He has good stuff on the mound and he competes really well.” Whereas the 7-3 victory in game 1 featured mostly offense generated from errors, game 2 was pure production. The Rams rapped out nine runs on 10 hits en route to a 9-5 win and sweep of East Stroudsburg. East Stroudsburg struck first in the game, capitalzing on an error and an errant pickoff attempt to score twice in the first inning. Their lead was very short lived, however. Raimo doubled to lead off the first, then advanced to third on a wild pitch and scored on a balk. Jack Provine followed with a single, which brought up Wendle with one man on and nobody out. Wendle did exactly what he has been doing all year. He crushed the offering deep to right field and over the fence for a two-run homer, his eighth of the season, putting West Chester on top 3-2. Wendle added another RBI in the second inning on a single that scored Mike Raimo to make it 4-2. In 21 games now, Wendle has eight homeruns, which is only three less than the entire team had combined in the 2011 season. A lot of credit must go to the top of the order, however, who continue to get on base and give Wendle the chance to drive the runs in. In the doubleheader, Provine was

Brynn Pezzuti/ The Quad

Kyle Weary throws two scoreless innings in relief to help secure West Chester’s 9-5 win over East Stroudsburg 4-for-4 in the game, and Raimo reached base in three of his four at bats. “Provine in the two-hole and Raimo at leadoff continue to do a great job of setting things up for us offensively. They will often work a count full and foul off some pitches, creating a seven or eight pitch at bat which can be draining for an opposing pitcher,” Prachniak said. East Stroudsburg did tie the game at four in the third, but West Chester then exploded for both a run in the third and fourth, and three runs in the sixth to take the lead for good. Fred Breidenbach struggled a bit on the mound, allowing five runs (four earned) on seven hits in his five innings of work, but Kyle Weary came on in relief and shut down the Warriors. Weary entered when the game was still close, and did not allow a hit for the final two innings while the offense took charge and propelled WCU to a 9-5 win. “Weary did a good job of getting the last six outs in game 2. He gives the opposition a different look with his delivery and usually gets a lot of ground balls

and soft contact.” As has been the story all season, West Chester’s bats were live in the 9-5 defeat of ESU. Wendle led the offense, going 2-for-2 with two walks, a homer, and three RBI, and Josh Heyne also added two hits, and three RBI in four trips to the plate. Matt Kirchner and Chris Pula each added an RBI as well. West Chester now sits at 20-1 on the season with a perfect 6-0 conference record. Surely they have seen their name climb as high as No.2 on the NCAA polls during this stretch, but it is not something they are giving any thought at this time. They just want to focus on each day and keep winning games. “We are aware of the polls, but those polls have nothing to do with the task at hand on any given day,” Prachniak said. “Whether it is a practice or a game, our expectations are that everyone will compete at a high level with consistent focus and effort.” Kenny Ayres is a secondyear student majoring in communication studies. He can be reached at KA739433@ wcupa.edu.


PAGE 26

THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 2, 2012

Women’s LAX bounces back after loss to Bloomsburg By Brynn Dougherty Asst. Sports Editor The West Chester women’s lacrosse team dropped their first regular season conference loss since 2006 against Bloomsburg with a 14-13 OT deficit, which was followed by a PSAC victory over Mercyhurst. The Rams took a loss to the Huskies on Sunday afternoon at Sports Stadium and counterbalanced that with a win on Saturday night over the Bears at Tulio Field. The triumph for Bloomsburg (4-2, 2-0 PSAC) was their first victory over West Chester since 2003 and put a halt to their 15-game losing streak. In the loss, West Chester (5-1, 3-1) also ceased its 72-game regular season PSAC winning streak. “The loss to Bloomsburg was a tough one and a wake-up call for us for sure,” Tori Dugan said. “We got

away from playing our game and playing as a team. What should have been an intense and competitive attitude towards the game turned to fear and complacency. Playing like that is not like us and we are confident that moving forward we will be able to fix this problem.” The Rams showed signs of fixing the problem with their victory over the Bears six days later. Late in the first half of the Bloomsburg game, the Rams trailed behind 7-3 but regained their composure to tie up the score at 7-7 by halftime. Erin Oczkowski scored the first two goals of the second half to lead the Rams at 9-7. But the lead didn’t last long, as Bloomsburg’s Sam Mazzie matched Oczkowski’s goal to tie the score 9-9. We s t C h e s t e r ’s Brittany Long and Bloomsburg’s Julie Falk each added goals to keep the score even for the third time. Mazzie and Tori

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Senior Erin Oczkowski added five points against the Huskies, but it wasn’t enough to push WCU to the win.

Dugan exchanged goals when Cavana added a goal with 8:13 remaining in the game, putting the Huskies on top 12-11. Nicole Pyle sent the game into overtime with 54 seconds remaining in regulation. In the first of two, three-minute OT sessions, West Chester’s Jacki Patterson scored from assist from Dugan. Fifteen seconds later, Falk answered to tie the score, 13-13. With no scoring for the remainder of the first session, the teams faced sudden victory. While West Chester won draw control, Bloomsburg forced a turnover and picked up a ground ball to regain possession. The Huskies took the ball down the field and earned a free position shot where Samantha King netted the ball in the lower left side to end the OT struggle. Oczkowski finished with five points, four goals and one assist, while Dugan also earned five points with two goals and three assists. Jess Henderson (4-1) made 13 saves in the loss for West Chester while Sara Bates made 14 saves for the win. “Our loss to Bloom showed us that we cannot take any game for granted or any team lightly,” Dugan said. “Being at the top of the PSAC every year and a national contender, makes us a huge target for every team we play. We have had an awesome week of practice and we can’t wait to play another game.” The Rams used their opportunity to take down Mercyhurst on a Saturday night game.

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Junior Tori Dugan runs up the sideline during the game against Mercyhurst. Dugan scored a hat trick in this game and added another five points (two goals, three assists) in the game against Bloomsburg. “We will go into this game with confidence knowing that we have so much talent and athletic ability on our team, and when we put the pieces together they know what hit them,” Dugan said. “I am excited to see how we bounce back from our loss to Bloom as a team... We want to show PSAC that losing to Bloom should have never happened and we won’t let it happen again.” With a 17-7 victory, the Rams effectively implemented their strategy and took down the Bears on Saturday. Dugan, Jamie Dolan and MacKenzie O’Keefe each registered a hat trick in the win, taking down Mercyhurst for the first league game this season. The Rams took immediate control in the first eight minutes with a 4-0 lead with goals from Dugan, Oczkowski and two from Lauren Glassey. After Mercyhurst’s Anna Lagrett put up the Bear’s first goal, O’Keefe earned her hat trick with three straight shots and three other unanswered goals from West Chester.

The second half produced similar results, as Mercyhurst improved to 11-4, scoring twice in under two minutes, but Dolan regained control with two straight goals. The Bears were unable to recover from the deficit, and West Chester maintained control until the clock ran out. Henderson took the win with nine saves. The Golden Rams rescheduled the game

versus Gannon to Sunday at 2 p.m. after it was rained out on Friday afternoon. “Gannon will be a good game,” Dugan said. “But if we play how we’ve been practicing it should be a fun game to play in.” Brynn Dougherty is a fourth-year student majoring in economics and finance with a minor in journalism. She can be reached at BD670913@ wcupa.edu.

Gymnastics from page 22

nastics team finished their season with a winning record, an accomplishment that has not been achieved in a very long time. Additionally, the gymnastics team will be sending five of its gymnasts to the USAG Collegiate Nationals from April 12-14. Aquila qualified on the vault and uneven bars, Voskian on the vault, Lafleur on the balance beam, Seigel on the uneven bars and balance beam, and Schuler in the all around. Emily Seigel is a secondyear student majoring in early childhood education. She can be reached at ES734640@ wcupa.edu.

ble. It just shows that hard work pays off,” Griffin said. Right behind Griffin was senior Erin Simon who received a career high score of 9.7. Though the floor line-ups total score did not beat the school’s record, it was a season high for them, posting a score of 48.025. The Lady Rams concluded the meet with the vault and bars, leading them to a third place finish and a team score of 188.775. The West Chester University women’s gym-


THE QUAD SPORTS

APRIL 2, 2012

PAGE 27

Softball splits last six, falls to 2-4 in PSAC conference games By Riley Wallace Staff Writer The Lady Rams went a mediocre 3-3 this past week against Lincoln, East Stroudsburg, and Indiana University of Pennsylvania to fall to 2-4 in the conference and 19-16 overall. Up first for the Golden Rams were the winless Lady Lions from Lincoln (0-14) Wednesday afternoon. In the first of two games, the ladies used an eight run spurt in the fifth inning to take a commanding 11-0 lead and effectively end the game due to the mercy rule. The Rams were led by superior pitching as Kate Skokowski (5-2) pitched five flawless innings as she allowed

only four hits while striking out seven. Offensively, the girls spread out the hitting as five different batters had two hits. Lincoln had no answer for the three Jessica’s as leftfielder Jessica Russ, third basemen Jessica Schuck, and shortstop Jessica Norris combined for 5 for 9 with four RBIs, and five runs scored. The Golden Rams picked up right where they left off in the second game as each player batted twice in the first inning as they pushed across 13 runs, followed by an additional four in the second and fourth to win 21-0. Kim Murl (5-5) allowed only one hit in five strong innings but this game was all about the hitting.

The ladies piled up 18 hits with four of them landing behind the outfield fence. Centerfielder Melissa Spinosa and Schuck both homered and finished the game with four RBIs. Next up for the Golden Rams was a doubleheader from visiting PSAC East foe, East Stroudsburg (7-16, 3-3), Friday afternoon. In the opener, the ladies pushed across a run in the second and held onto the lead for most of the game until ESU managed three runs in the fifth, and their comeback attempt fell short as they lost 3-2. Devon Utterback (8-9) picked up the loss after pitching five and a third innings, giving up three runs on four hits, before

being relieved by Skokowski. West Chester managed only two hits the entire game as both Kelly Anderson and S c h u c k re c o r d e d doubles. In the nightcap, the Lady Rams responded very well to the tough loss earlier in the day, as they jumped out to a four run lead after two innings. One more in the fifth and three in the sixth pushed Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer it to eight, effectively Jessica Norris looks back at the throw to first base before deciding ending the whether to advance to third. game due to the eight run rule. Abby Block and Megan run and stolen base to go Skokowski picked the Kelly were the only with two runs and three victory going the Rams to reach base, but RBIs. Schuck went 3 for distance while allowing all three failed to cross 5 with two runs and a five hits and no walks. the plate. double. Right fielder Norris hit her first In the second half of Kim Begley went 2 for 4 homer of the year as she the doubleheader, the with a homer, two runs went 2 for 3 with two bats woke up and West and two RBIs. runs scored and an RBI Chester scored one in The struggling Lady to lead the offense. the top of the eighth, but Rams face one conferOn Saturday, the Lady couldn’t prevent the ence opponent in the Rams traveled to IUP Crimson Hawks from upcoming week and hope (14-8-1) to take on the scoring two in the bottom to rebound as they head Crimson Hawks in a frame as they were swept into the home stretch of doubleheader. In the out of Indiana 11-10. their schedule. first game, the ladies Skokowski was On Tuesday, the ladies had no answer for IUP’s roughed up in the five begin a four game road dominant pitching as and two-thirds innings trip with a doubleheader they only scraped out she pitched before being against PSAC East rival three singles and failed lifted for Utterback, who Shippensburg. to record a run as they picked up the loss. On Thursday, the Lady lost 8-0 in five innings. Skokowski gave up nine Rams will be playing two Utterback picked up runs on 14 hits while nonconference games the loss as she pitched walking and striking out against Holy Family, and four innings, allowing two. Utterback came in finish up the week at seven runs off five hits and pitched one and a home in another nonconwhile striking out two. third, giving up two runs ference matchup with Murl relieved Utterback on two hits and three Gannon on Saturday. in the fifth but did not walks. Offensively, the Riley Wallace is a thirdrecord an out as she gave Lady Rams woke up year student majoring in up two hits and the after sleeping through communication studies. He eighth and final run, the first game. Norris can be reached at ending the game. Norris, went 3 for 4 with a home RW718681@wcupa.edu.


PAGE 28 After a disappointing loss to the struggling Washington the Sixers bounced back Saturday to beat the Atlanta Hawks 95-90. Elton Brand led the way with 25 points, and it was the first time he had over 20 points, 10 rebounds and five assists since 2007. The win was much needed for the Sixers who have been struggling over the last month and have fallen to 7th place in the Eastern conference.

THE QUAD SPORTS

Sports

APRIL 2, 2012

QUADSPORTS@WCUPA.EDU

WCU sweeps East Stroudsburg, remains perfect in conference Page-25

Lukas Jenkins/ Staff Photographer

Quad 102-08  

The Quad issue of April 2, 2012

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