Page 11

graduates from all of the world’s top 100 business schools. Recession in the USA, however, and slow growth in major economies as far apart as Germany and Japan, took their toll from 2002-2004 and demand for MBAs fell by around 20% from 2000-2003. In this period, on-campus company visits fell significantly and many MBA students had to resort to off-campus job searches and networking amongst alumni. From 2005-2008 we witnessed resurgence in MBA employer demand, far exceeding previous levels. The 2009 recession has proven to be relatively benign for MBAs compared to the 2001-2003 recession. Only time will tell if we are at a watershed.

TopMBA.com Index of MBA Recruiting shows an overall -5% (11%) decline in demand for MBAs in 2009. The decline is concentrated in financial services, which shows a -10% (0%) fall in hiring levels. The consulting sector defies the recession, growing MBA demand by 3% (-4%). By contrast MBA demand in general industry is flat (9%), and in the technology sector has grown by just 1% (0%).

www.qs.com

11

QS TopMBA.com Salary & Recruitment Trends 2009 Report  

QS TopMBA.com Salary & Recruitment Trends 2009 Report

QS TopMBA.com Salary & Recruitment Trends 2009 Report  

QS TopMBA.com Salary & Recruitment Trends 2009 Report

Advertisement