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WINTER 2013

MAGAZINE

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GUEST EDITOR MONIQUE BREAUX

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS 7 expert tips to dress up your house

GIFT IN A BOTTLE The right wine makes the perfect present


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CONTENTS WINTER 2013

A SPECIAL THANKS to this issue’s guest editor Monique Breaux

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SPECIAL FEATURES

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HOME: Get expert advice on decorating your house for the holidays. And yes, there is still time

BUSINESS: Celebrate to your heart’s content, then call ‘Designated Drivers’ for a ride home

FASHION: Looking to add another pair a of boots to your wardrobe? We’ve got the boots for you

FAMILY: Grandmothers have a way of making Christmas even more special. Meet three women who live to spoil their grandchildren for the holidays

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ALSO THIS MONTH 6

Meet our guest editor

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Splurge: What is splurge- worthy these days?

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CALENDAR: Lights, music and the best of holiday events

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Ask Jan: What to do about a chilly grandmother?

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In Your Stocking: Nice things can come in small packages

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Your Health: What are GMOS?

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Getaway: A tropical island trip or snuggling in bed. You decide.

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PARTY PIX On the Cover: Model is wearing tan rustic ankle boots with a buckle. Available at Brother’s.

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MAGAZINE

WINTER 2013

GENERAL 1100 Bertrand Drive Lafayette LA 70506 (337) 289-6300 Judi Terzotis president and publisher Cindy McCurry Ross executive editor Sundra Hominik L Magazine editor Kris Wartelle social scene, 289-6368 kwartelle@advertiser.com Ginger Garrison designer OTHER CONTACTS Scott Carr advertising director, 289-6438 lcitron@gannett.com Joshua Hundley, 289-6462 advertising sales, jhundley@gannett.com

§§§§§ L Magazine is produced four times a year in Lafayette, La. Distribution of this magazine does not constitute an endorsement of information, products or services. We reserve the right to reject any advertisement or listing that is not in keeping with the publications standards. Although every precaution has been taken to ensure accuracy of published material, we cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by authors. In no event shall unsolicited material subject this publication to any claim for holding fees or other charges. Copyright 2013

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FROM THIS MONTH’S GUEST EDITOR

Plan ahead for the holidays MONIQUE BREAUX

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A crisp, gentle breeze is blowing, the scent of cinnamon candles is burning throughout the house and the gumbo pot is simmering. The holiday season has magically arrived, and once again, I wonder, “How does this sneak up on us every year?” We plan to have the gifts wrapped, the tree decorated to perfection, homemade sweets displayed in our kitchen and holiday music playing. But, when will I have time to do all of this? I am a wife, mother of two amazing boys, the president and principal designer of POSH Exclusive Interiors, a nationwide design firm, and my feet aren’t on the ground long enough in one place to make this happen. With weekly trips to New York City to work with Trump International Realty, along with my amazing local clientele, my list of demands is as tall as I am! My darling grandmother, Agnes Hardy from Cecilia, would often say, “Your first chance is your best chance,” and this is my mantra. In the 20 years that I have been designing, I have applied vital tips to keep me on track for the hectic but festive holidays. First, always plan ahead. I begin planning for the holidays in early October. This includes deciding on what gifts I will buy, what I want our family Christmas tree to look like and what foods will be prepared. I have found that this planning method is very effective. Second, it is wise to select a holiday theme early on, including a color

theme as well as dining room and table decor. Buying fabulous ribbon to decorate the Christmas tree and dining table and complementing the table with fruit, like red or green apples and/or cherries, is a quick budget-conscious way to produce a great look with little effort. Third, I wrap all presents at the time of purchase. Wrapping a few at a time and storing them is a great time-saver. When wrapping, I often use the Tiffany blue box and white satin ribbon as a perfect example. That familiar blue box is attractive, and the white ribbon is très elegant, yet not overdone. I always use only one type of Christmas wrapping paper or box and just a few different ribbons on the packages. This theme makes for a greater impact under the tree. Finally, after decorating is done, I focus on hosting parties and family gatherings at our home. If you have a welcoming, organized home with a lovely Christmas tree and presents neatly wrapped and prominently placed, you can serve your guests just about anything, and they will enjoy the company and surroundings. In my world of design, proper planning and presentation are vital. The holidays are like any other large event I host. I plan ahead and always remember this time is for reminiscing and creating amazing memories with your loved ones. Remember, Christmas comes around only once a year, and life is short.

Happy holidays, Monique


SPLURGE Tiffany Chaisson, Realtor At one time, my answer would have been handbags or vintage jewelry, but lately, I have been splurging on real estate. It doesn’t go out of style, my friends can’t borrow it and my kids won’t have to garage sell it when I’m gone.

It’s the holidays. Another reason to treat yourself. What have you splurged on lately?

Michelle Griffith, Real estate sales for Trump International Realty Recently I splurged on Isabel Marant boots and a fur infinity scarf.

Mohamad Bahlawan, Realtor Food. My mother is in from Lebanon, and we have been having homemade Lebanese food two to three times a day. She cooks for me every day, and the food is very rich.

Lori McCarthy, Realtor The last splurge was probably on a collectible antique gun that I bought for my husband. He was amazed that I found it and bought it for him.

Kibbeh, or kibbe, is a tradtional Lebanese dish that can be served raw or cooked different ways. GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO

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HOLIDAY DECOR Bold reds on the door help make an impact on this large Houston home. Monique Breaux of POSH Exclusive Interiors used oversized decorations to complement the large scale of the home. PHOTO BY CHIPPER HATTER

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HOLIDAY DECOR

HOLIDAY DECOR

expert decorating tips to try this season

Yes, there’s hope even for procrastinators

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By Kris Wartelle

kwartelle@theadvertiser.com

oo busy, too expensive, too late to get started. There are plenty of good excuses for not already having your home decorated for the holidays. If your reason for delaying decorating is about finding time to dress up the entire house, there’s a solution. Think about creating just one or two “wow” factors in your home. How about one door done up with spectacular holiday garlands and decorations? Or the great room mantel, trimmed with stockings and ornaments? Consider an awe-inspiring Christmas tree. Or even a staircase decked out in holiday splendor. By taking one area and decorating it in an extra special way, you can have that holiday look and feel without as much fuss and expense of doing your entire home. Monique Breaux, owner of POSH Exclusive Interiors and this month’s guest editor, offers these tips to get started.

1. Welcome guests at the door For getting others into the holiday spirit, Breaux suggests decorating your front door. “It is always nice if you can see that (door) driving up to your home. If you can get that holiday feeling, it makes a nice impression,” said Breaux.

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A Christmas tree adorned with magical elves and vibrant reds and greens was the theme for this Houston home decorated by Monique Breaux and POSH Exclusive Interiors. PHOTO BY CHIPPER HATTER

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HOLIDAY DECOR

HOLIDAY DECOR

expert decorating tips to try this season

Yes, there’s hope even for procrastinators

T

By Kris Wartelle

kwartelle@theadvertiser.com

oo busy, too expensive, too late to get started. There are plenty of good excuses for not already having your home decorated for the holidays. If your reason for delaying decorating is about finding time to dress up the entire house, there’s a solution. Think about creating just one or two “wow” factors in your home. How about one door done up with spectacular holiday garlands and decorations? Or the great room mantel, trimmed with stockings and ornaments? Consider an awe-inspiring Christmas tree. Or even a staircase decked out in holiday splendor. By taking one area and decorating it in an extra special way, you can have that holiday look and feel without as much fuss and expense of doing your entire home. Monique Breaux, owner of POSH Exclusive Interiors and this month’s guest editor, offers these tips to get started.

1. Welcome guests at the door For getting others into the holiday spirit, Breaux suggests decorating your front door. “It is always nice if you can see that (door) driving up to your home. If you can get that holiday feeling, it makes a nice impression,” said Breaux.

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A Christmas tree adorned with magical elves and vibrant reds and greens was the theme for this Houston home decorated by Monique Breaux and POSH Exclusive Interiors. PHOTO BY CHIPPER HATTER

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HOLIDAY DECOR

2. One focal point

The red-andgreen theme carried over to the staircase, also highlighted with elves.

If you can only do one spot, the mantel is it. In many homes, it is the focal point of the room, so (if decorated) it puts you in the holiday spirit.

PHOTO BY

3. Two focal points

CHIPPER HATTER

“If you do a tree and mantel, the impact of those two working together will help pull off a beautiful Christmas,” said Breaux “If you pick one of something (pretty) and just load (a tree or an area) down with it, it will be very effective.”

4. Color, color and more color This year, we are seeing a lot of red and

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HOLIDAY DECOR green, going back to the traditional Christmas look. You always have the fun, festive colors like the white and blues, but I’m seeing a lot of people going back to red and green. It could be all different shades of green from deep green to electric green. You can mix that with red to give it a new fresh look.

5. Smells like the holidays I have to have the scent of Christmas in the house. I don’t do a real Christmas tree, so I like the candles or the spray to get me in the holiday mood.

6. Ribbons and ornaments Two must-have items are ribbon and

Vibrant reds, electric greens and more magical elves add beauty and detail to this wreath in this Houston home. PHOTO BY CHIPPER HATTER

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HOLIDAY DECOR Christmas balls. The more the better.

The dining room decorations were scaled down with just a little red and subdued hues showcased on the chandelier.

7. Something for every budget Decorating doesn’t have to cost a lot. If you scout out what you want ahead of time and watch the specials, you can get a great start (Think next year.) However, if your budget allows and you want spectacular, hire a professional who offers design and decorating services for the holidays. It is always nice to be able to walk in the house and have everything done so you can have the Christmas of your dreams.

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PHOTO BY CHIPPER HATTER

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Holiday Calendar

Deck the halls and have some fun DEC. 5 Noel Acadien au Village. 5:30 p.m. Noel Acadien au Village will feature half a million lights, including the fully lit Open Door Chapel, themed Acadian home porches, , live entertainment, photos with Santa, holiday shopping and more. Acadian Village Tourist Attractions, 200 Greenleaf Drive, Lafayette. Advance tickets are $7 at Acadiana Shop Rite stores or $9 at the gate or at acadianvillage.org. Children 4 and younger get in free. 337-981-2364. acadianvillage.org.

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Noel Acadien au Village will feature half a million lights, including the fully lit Open Door Chapel, themed Acadian home porches and lighted holiday displays. ADVERTISER FILE PHOTO

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Carencro Country Christmas. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Event will include arts, crafts, food, music and entertainment. The Carencro Children’s Christmas Parade will roll at 2 p.m., sponsored by the Carencro Lions Club. Call JoAnn Lee, at 337-9864147, for details. Carencro Community Center, 5115 N. Univer-


sity Ave., Carencro. 337-896-6686.

Lafayette. 337-233-7060.

Chorale Acadienne’s “Christmas by Candlelight.” 7:30 p.m. Cathedral of St. John Evangelist, 515 Cathedral St., Lafayette. $25 adults, $20 seniors (65 and older), $10 students with valid ID. 337-3495342. choraleacadienne.com.

Lafayette Ballet Theatre presents “The Nutcracker.” 7 p.m. Heymann Performing Arts Center, 1373 S. College Road, Lafayette. 337-291-5540. Yuletide on the Bayou. 10 a.m. Bouligny Plaza, 100 W. Main Street, New Iberia.

“Trouble in Toyland.” 4 p.m. The Bayou Blend Chorus presents its Christmas show, directed by John “JP” Poirier, featuring quartets, double quartets and special guests. The Sliman Theater, 129 E. Main St., New Iberia. $10. 337-519-4006. bayoublendchorus.com.

DEC. 19 “Disney Junior Live on Tour! Pirate and Princess Adventure.” 3:30 p.m. Tickets are on sale at Ticketmaster outlets and at ticketmaster.com. Cajundome, 444 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette. 800745-3000.

DEC. 11 Christmas with Aaron Neville. 7:30 p.m. The voice of the Crescent City returns to Acadiana Center for the Arts with his full band in a special Christmas performance. Acadiana Center for the Arts, James D. Moncus Theater, 101 W. Vermilion St., Lafayette. 337-233-7060.

DEC. 14 2nd Saturday Artwalk. 6 p.m. Artwalk will be part of Arts Expo event. Acadiana Center for the Arts, 101 W. Vermilion St., Lafayette. 337-233-7060.

Aaron Neville returns to the Acadiana Center for the Arts Dec. 11 for a special Christmas performance. ADVERTISER FILE PHOTO

ASO presents “I’ll Be Home for Christmas.” 6:30 p.m. Heymann Performing Arts Center, 1373 S. College Road, Lafayette. 337-2915540.

DEC. 20 “A Drive-Thru Bethlehem.” 6 p.m. The Children’s Ministry of Asbury United Methodist Church presents “A Drive-Thru Bethlehem.” Asbury United Methodist Church, 101 Live Oak Blvd., Lafayette. 337349-7276.

The Met in HD: “Falstaff.” Noon. “Falstaff” is a lyrical comedy by Giuseppe Verdi based on the Shakespearean character first seen in “Henry IV” and “The Merry Wives of Windsor.” Acadiana Center for the Arts, 101 W. Vermilion St.,

The Mavericks. 7:30 p.m. Fronted by the vocals of Cuban-born Raul Malo, The Mavericks have won both country and Grammy Awards. Acadiana Center for the Arts, James D. Moncus Theater, 101 W. Vermilion St., Lafayette. 337-233-7060.

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Hitchin’ a ride

Joshua Thibeaux, co-founder of Designated Drivers of Lafayette, and his drivers transport would-be impaired drivers and their vehicles home to prevent drunk driving. PAUL KIEU,

If Joshua Thibeaux offers you a lift, take it By Patricia Gannon

Between the constant festivals, a fleet of drivethrough daiquiri locations and a well-earned reputation for bon temps, Lafayette’s a leading candidate for sobriety checkpoints. But where there’s a problem, there’s a solution, and Designated Drivers of Lafayette is an idea whose time has come. “My mother’s side is all entrepreneurs, and my dad was an accountant,” said 25-year-old Joshua Thibeaux. “All I ever wanted to study was what would help me start my own business. “My dad’s more supportive now that I have four jobs and own my own company,” he said with a smile. Open now for nearly a

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year, Designated Drivers of Lafayette was more fate than inspiration. “I was able to follow through, and the capital and resources were already in place. They were already operating, but they needed me,” Thibeaux said. What Thibeaux sells is safety, but what customers get is convenience, first and foremost. A client calls and makes a reservation, and a team comes in a chase vehicle (one to drive the client, one to drive his/her car). The owner must provide proof of insurance and sign a liability form before being taken to their destination. “We have to have their signature, and not to say a few haven’t been, well, sloppy,” he said as he laughed. “We’re working on an electronic signature. We’re all about convenience

DECEMBER 2013

THE ADVERTISER

— credit card information, pickup time and, for those planning to continue using our service, a customer ID number.” Thibeaux is also building a website and app. There is a $15 reservation fee and $45 service fee for anywhere within Lafayette city limits. Outside, Thibeaux charges $2 per mile but also has student rates. He has a staff of six including himself, and zero tolerance for drugs and alcohol among his drivers. Surprisingly, his clientele are early- tomid-30s, mostly female and

young mothers. Males are more reluctant to give up their keys, but according to Thibeaux, the age and gender jump considerably at Mardi Gras. Clients can contract for more than just a ride home. Private drivers and chauffeur service are available for those who are uncomfortable with taxis. “It’s a thrill to have your own company,” he said. “I still get excited when I go to pick up a customer — just to know they believe in me.”


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Q DEAR JAN is not your typical advice column. Jan wants to know what happened next. Did you take the advice? How did that work out for you? Send your questions to jan@janrisher.com

ASK JAN

Back home, a little hurt raises question about son and grandmother’s relationship We have been living in another state for over 10 years and have recently moved back to our hometown. Our children didn’t grow up having their grandparents around. Our 18-year-old son has not been welcomed back by his grandma as warmly as he or we would have expected. She has been very, very cold and short with answers toward him. None of us know why. What should we do? Does my husband need to speak with her about this? (She is his mom.) Or should our son talk with her? — BACK HOME AND A LITTLE HURT » DEAR BACK HOME, This is a tough situation. Knowing a limited amount about your situation, my initial thought is that her reaction is probably not about your son — maybe he reminds her of something else. She may not be aware of her reaction to him. On the other hand, perhaps he offended her in some way that he is unaware. And still a third option would be that, depending on her age and health; she may be struggling with something else entirely. However, what I would recommend is that your son go to speak with her. I wouldn’t advise that he go alone — if you have another child who could accompany him, that would be my first recommendation. If he is willing to have that conversation with her and even apologize for something if necessary, then he is a mature 18-year-old young man. If she doesn’t respond positively to him, chances are that something else is going on and the situation may not be resolved easily. — XOXO, JAN » DEAR JAN, Where is Breaux’s bridge in Breaux Bridge? — LOST IN ST. MARTIN PARISH » DEAR LOST, According to Breaux Bridge’s official website, back in 1771, Firmin Breaux began buying land which eventually became Breaux Bridge. Guess what happened next? Yep, he built a bridge across the Teche. First, it was just a rope and wood suspension bridge for his family and friends to use. The bridge was tied to small pilings located at each end of the bridge and a pair of live oak tress on either side of the bayou. The bridge was a local landmark and used frequently when giving directions. “Go to Breaux’s bridge....” In 1817, his son built the first bridge suitable for wagons and allowed Breaux Bridge to grow on both sides simultaneously. Eventually, the transportation landmark was adopted as the city’s name. — XOXO, JAN

» BET YOU THINK THIS SONG IS ABOUT YOU, DON’T YOU? In August, ‘Ready to let this one go’ wrote asking about the best way to deal with a narcissistic family member — specifically regarding a good strategy for the relationship and if there comes a point when one should one cut bait. My advice was centered on the need to lower expectations for relationships with narcissists and, when approaching narcissists with new propositions, to frame them so that the narcissist is always in the best light. ‘Ready to let this one go” says she’s continued the relationship for now but has definitely lowered her expectations. She’s also tried new techniques as she poses questions or situations to the narcissist in her life and says her efforts have been met with positive, almost laughable, results. And we’ll leave it at that — any more info would create a scenario that requires the rest of us to sing the chorus of a 1972 Carly Simon song (reportedly written about Warren Beatty). 20

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IN YOUR STOCKING Monique Breaux, designer

Nice gifts can come in small packages. What is the best gift you ever received in your stocking?

One of my most memorable stocking stuffers I received was from Tim and my boys. It is a beautiful red patent leather Louis Vuitton clutch. The fabulous color reminds me of the holiday season, which is my favorite time of year!

Lisa Hanchey, attorney

Two kittens rescued from a sheltershleter. They were a great comfort to me after my father’s passing.

Michelle Griffith, Real Estate Sales for Trump International Realty Best gift in my Christmas stocking was a gold and emerald heirloom ring from my mother.

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YOUR HEALTH

GMOs are dangerous to your health If I asked whether you’d like a nice, delicious cup of Roundup (yes, the weedkiller), what would you say? If I told you that almost every time you eat corn, soy, rice or wheat you are eating Roundup, would you still want to eat those things? The truth is that about 90 percent of the corn, soy, rice and wheat grown in the United States is genetically modified to be Roundup resistant. Most European countries consider genetically modified food unfit for human consumption, even for people who are starving in Third World countries. But we are eating it here every day. We also feed genetically modified corn and grains to the animals we raise for food. We shoot them up with growth hormones and anti-

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biotics. We raise them in such awful, crowded and inhumane environments that they are given antibiotics to fight diseases that are rampant under such deplorable conditions. We drink water from plastic bottles polluted with phthalates and bisphenols. We line cans containing food with the same chemicals. The effects of all these things are passed on to us in our food, causing such things as early puberty in our children and unprecedented antibiotic resistance.

What are GMOs? Genetically modified organisms are defined as “any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology.”

DECEMBER 2013

Dr. Elizabeth McLain Your health explores nontraditional health-related topics.

GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, as well as tools for scientific research, drug treatments, even flower colors. The genetic manipulation of crop seeds — namely corn, soy, rice and wheat — began commercially in 1996. Seeds were genetically altered to be resistant to diseases, but more importantly, to be resistant to glyphosate (Roundup) and other herbicides. By making the plants resistant to Roundup, an entire field can be treated, crops and weeds alike, killing weeds without killing the crops.

Why are GMOs dangerous?

One way Roundup kills plants is to chelate the plant’s minerals, making the minerals unavailable for use in the plant’s growth processes. It also chelates minerals in the soil, rendering them unavailable to the crops that depend on soilbased minerals to grow and thrive. So in addition to eating the chemical that was sprayed on the plants, we are eating nutritionally deficient food when it is grown in this way. As a result, many of us are nutritionally deficient in important minerals. Roundup also has an estrogenic effect on our bodies. It disrupts the endocrine system, whichmanage all our hormones — including brain, digestion and sex hormones.


WINE

Don’t hesitate to give the gift of wine Choose the right stemware to enhance the flavor By Peter John

In recent years, I have noticed a bit of hesitation in people when gifting wines. I often hear people say that it is a little overwhelming when it comes to choosing the right one. Many people don’t realize that there are plenty of good bottles of wine in every price range that can be purchased locally. With the holidays approaching, I have made a list of wines that I have recently enjoyed (leaving off the years intentionally). We all have our preferences, but don’t limit yourself; celebrate a new year!

Peter John SUBMITTED

Once you’ve made your selection, store your wine at 55 degrees and always serve it slightly chilled. Although temperature is an important element to the enjoyment of your choice, stemware is something not to be overlooked. As strange as it may seem, the shape of the wine glass is used as an enhancement to each particular type of wine. You may want to consider giving stem-

ware to match the type of wine given. One brand of stemware, which I would recommend is Riedel; it can be found here in Lafayette. Choosing is easy. The box will indicate the right choice of glass to pair with the wine. CAUTION: Never wash your stemware after enjoying too much wine. Wait until the next morning …trust me about this. Always remember, you

can never go wrong with a bottle of Champagne! Cheers! Peter John’s Christmas List 1. Graham’s Vintage Port — Portugal 2. Peter Michael Les Pavots cabernet sauvignon — California 3. PerryMoore Beckstoffer cabernet sauvignon — California 4. Clos Vougeot Grand Cru Red Burgundy — France 5. Gevrey-Chambertin Red Burgundy — France 6. Moet & Chandon White Star Champagne — France 7. Chateau Gruaud-Larose Bordeaux — France 8. Chateau Lynch-Bages Bordeaux — France 9. Chateau Palmer Bordeaux — France 10. Gaja Sperss piedmont — Italy

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GETAWAY

Holidays are about home. But sometimes they’re also about getting away. What is your favorite holiday getaway?

Michelle Griffith, Real Estate Sales for Trump International Realty

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My favorite holiday getaway with my husband is the Aman in Turks and Caicos, and with my husband and daughter is the Viceroy in Anguilla!

Tiffany Chaisson, Realtor

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Depends on the holiday but you really can’t beat a weekend at my parents’ house. Mom still serves me coffee in bed and dad is always pouring a cocktail.

Mohamad Bahlawan, Realtor Although I usually spend the holidays in Lebanon, my favorite holiday getaway is Hawaii. Blue is my favorite color, and the light blue water and the warm sands of the beaches are very relaxing. Chilling out and living each moment is a great way to escape the stress normally associated with the holidays.


Handmade greeting cards easy to make Looking for a simple and elegant Christmas greeting or note card? Why not make one? Chet Pourciau, a New Orleans based-designer who grew up in New Iberia, has this DIY holiday project. What you will need:

• Block printing kit, cardstock, acrylic paint, paint rush and scissors

Instructions:

• Get a block printing kit from any arts and crafts store. • Create your design on a piece of tracing paper. • Transfer your image onto the wood block. • Carefully carve your design. Once your design is all carved out, you can start printing. • Lay your block down so that the design is facing upwards. • Lightly dab acrylic paints onto your block.

Creating unique wood block Christmas cards is a fun holiday DIY project. SUBMITTED • Use enough paint to cover the block, but make sure not to get paint in the crevices • Place a piece of card stock over the wet paint and use a roller to transfer the paint • Let the paint dry. You can even use you block print on fabrics and walls

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{Quiz} the

2. YOUR FAVORITE WINTER ACCESSORY IS: a. Boots, boots, boots! b. Scarves c. Coats

3. WHICH CHRISTMAS ACTIVITY DO YOU ENJOY MOST?

What new holiday tradition should you start this year?

1. YOUR FAVORITE HOLIDAY TRADITION INVOLVES: a. Warmth – Cozy scarves and boots, crackling fires and hot cocoa can keep you warm in even the coolest weather. And it never feels quite like Christmas time without the cool weather and the cozy items that come with it. b. Light – Whether it’s the twinkly lights that decorate homes and trees or the candles that light the church during an acapella rendition of “Silent Night,” it’s hard not to experience joy through light during the Christmas season. c. Community – Whether you’re celebrating with loved ones or strangers, Christmas brings together people in a way few other holidays can. After all, what good are gifts, cookies and decorations if they aren’t shared?

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a. Attending Acadian Village’s Festival of Lights – What could be more beautiful than a million lights in a historic village, except that the proceeds benefit a charity? b. Attending the Lafayette Ballet Theatre’s performance of “The Nutcracker” – It wouldn’t be Christmas without this holiday classic. c. Attending the Academy of the Sacred Heart’s Christmas at Coteau – Historic grounds, shopping, a gourmet luncheon – What more could a woman ask for?

4. WHEN IT COMES TO CHRISTMAS PARTIES, YOU: a. prefer to be an attendee. All the fun, none of the work! b. prefer to be the host. You love everything about party planning. c. prefer to skip them. The holiday season is busy enough.

5. YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE IS DECORATED: a. Traditionally: white lights, green and red ornaments. b. Modern: Glittery, feathery birds are perched on branches. c. Sentimentally: Handmade childhood ornaments and souvenirs from vacations.


THE QUIZ

Answer key: 1) a. 1, b. 2, c. 3; 2) a. 2, b. 1, c. 3; 3) a. 3, b. 2, c. 1; 4) a. 2, b. 1, c. 3; 5) a. 2, b. 1, c. 3 IF YOU SCORED 5-8 POINTS:

Joy through senses You find the Christmas spirit through your senses – the beauty of holiday lights, the warmth of your favorite coat, the harmony of voices singing a Christmas carol. You’re likely to already host a Christmas party and get others into the spirit. Start a new tradition by painting your own holiday dish set at a spot like Clayfish Bisque. Start by painting a platter and choose a new item to paint and add to the collection each year. IF YOU SCORED 9-11 POINTS:

Joy through tradition You find the Christmas spirit through tradition. Whether your traditions involve carols, cocoa or cookies, there’s always room for a new tradition. Start a holiday village display in your home and add a new house or shop to the display every year. IF YOU SCORED 12-15 POINTS:

Joy through others You find the Christmas spirit through bringing it to others. Although most soup kitchens and charities see a large influx of volunteers and donations around Christmas, there may be other ways to bring joy to people on Christmas. Many people work Christmas Day and would likely love a surprise meal or present. Call your city’s government to find out what you can do for police officers, fire fighters and other emergency staff who have to work on Christmas.

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he T

SPIRIT of the SEASON

FINE AN TIQUES JEWELRY HOME F RAGRAN CES HOLIDAY DECORA TIONS PRE-LIT CHRISTM AS TREE S SYMPLI CLOTHIN G CHRISTO PHER ORNAME RADKO NTS DON’T FO TO ORDE RGET R HOLIDAY YOUR CAKES! Ser ving L u Monday-S nch aturday

Open Sundays 12-4

902 Harding Street • Oil Center • LAFAYETTE • 337.234.1116

EASY PARKING • FREE GIFT WRAPPING • GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE 28

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he T

SPIRIT of the SEASON

FINE AN TIQUES JEWELRY HOME F RAGRAN CES HOLIDAY DECORA TIONS PRE-LIT CHRISTM AS TREE S SYMPLI CLOTHIN G CHRISTO PHER ORNAME RADKO NTS DON’T FO TO ORDE RGET R HOLIDAY YOUR CAKES! Ser ving L u Monday-S nch aturday

Open Sundays 12-4

902 Harding Street • Oil Center • LAFAYETTE • 337.234.1116

EASY PARKING • FREE GIFT WRAPPING • GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE 28

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Bed Stu “Bruges.” Rugged hand crafted leather and wood wedge boots get a kick of cozy with a sweater-knit shaft. Both available at Shoe La La, $172.99. TERRI FENSEL

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These boots are made for

walking & stylin’ BY KRIS WARTELLE

F

ace it. Even though you already own several pairs, you can’t help shopping for one more pair of great looking boots. You want to make sure you have all the different heights, colors and trends. And, no matter how many you have, you love them all. Ever wonder why that is? So did we. We asked some the ladies of the Daily Advertiser newsroom to weigh in on that question. Let’s start with me and my boot challenge

Chilly weather or not, its time to shop for more footwear

KWARTELLE@THEADVERTISER

w CAITLIN JACOB “Even when you think you’ve got all the boots you need, you find the perfect pair. I still remember I had these houndstooth ankle boots and I wore them into the ground and the heel broke off and I wanted to cry. ” For Caitlin, we found the new suede leopard ankle boot, the number one boot of the season, to be just the thing to lift her spirits. These are available at Brothers for $145.

y MAGGIE SHIPLEY “I am still haunted by a pair of boots I didn’t buy. I would have built outfits around them.” Take heart Maggie, you can still have these adorable boots that will go with just about everything. The “Sugar” by Me Too is avalilable at Shoe La La for $172.99.

x KRIS WARTELLE “I never seem to have just the right shade of brown in a boot. It’s either too light to go with something or too dark to go with something else. When I find it, I have to have it. Unless its a flat boot. I’m short so I need a heel.” Can’t find just the right shade of brown? Try a natural or camel color or even these cognac colored boots that will go with anything. This pair of goldstar ankle boots is available at Brother’s for $74. DECEMBER 2013 L M A G A Z I N E

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Matisse “Crypt” Combat BootStay on trend in these leather lace up combat boots which have an inside zipper for an easy fit. Available at Shoe La La, $169.99. TERRI FENSEL

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x CLAIRE TAYLOR “I always wanted cowboy boots. In fact I was on my way to dinner and I saw a new boot store and I was like “oooohh I have to go there!” I will have a pair of cowboy boots before I die.” OKay, Claire, here you go. Check out these “Nevada” aqua cowboy boots by Old Gringo available at Brothers, $450.

v SUNDRA HOMINIK I have an amazing pair of plum-colored knee high stiletto heel boots that my husband gave me one Christmas. They are fierce. And even though I can only wear them on occassions when I know I won’t be walking or standing for long, they are a perfect addition to my shoe wardrobe. A couple of years ago, I bought a pair of snakeskin cowboy boots in a little town in North Carolina and now I want more. I’m looking for the perfect pair of red cowboy boots. If you see them let me know! Well Sundra, we’ve seen them at Brothers. These “Nevada” red cowboy boots are by Old Gringo and they are to die for at $450. Here are some other great looks you can find locally this season.

v “Freebird” by Steven Drover. Tan Artisanal laces and straps lend renegade attitude to a fierce WesternInspired boot that's handdistressed to look extra authentic. Available at Crazy Charlie’s, $249.99. TERRI

y Matisse “Conquest” crafted in premium leather with subtle stud details, these classic riding boots have just enough edge. This is the gray-and-black knee-high riding boot. Available at Shoe La La, $262.99. TERRI

FENSEL

FENSEL

x Steve Madden “Rockiie.” Black w/brown straps Boost your confidence in these. The crisscross straps look both edgy and elegant, while the moderate stacked heel is perfectly practical. This over-the-knee boot channels utilitarian chic. Availabel at Crazy Charlie’s, $245.99. TERRI FENSEL

x Kenneth Cole “Test Time” in leopard natural/brown. A leopard peep-toe platform bootie features animal magnetism at its best with a lustrous calf-hair finish for scene stealing glamour. Availabel at Crazy Charlie’s, $169.99. BCBGeneration Genie, “Barley.” Flirtatious fringe swings at the side of a trend-right, open-toe bootie in rustic suede. Available at Crazy Charlie’s, $119.99. TERRI FENSEL w Jeffrey Campbell “Andros” in black, $239.99. This trend setting designer covers every fashion statement in this latest ankle boot. It combines the elements of black pony hair with a black patent laser cut leather and adds a slight western flair to make a truly unique statement. Available at Crazy Charlie’s. TERRI FENSEL DECEMBER 2013 L M A G A Z I N E

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Kenneth Cole “Test Time” in leopard natural/brown. A leopard peep-toe platform bootie features animal magnetism at its best with a lustrous calf-hair finish for scene stealing glamour. Available at Crazy Charlie’s, $169.99. TERRI FENSEL

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Kenneth Cole “Test Time” in leopard natural/brown. A leopard peep-toe platform bootie features animal magnetism at its best with a lustrous calf-hair finish for scene stealing glamour. Available at Crazy Charlie’s, $169.99. TERRI FENSEL

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These black booties add just the right amount of sassy and classy to your wardrobe and your closet. Available at Brother’s, $149. Leopard print ankel boots worn by Allison Lavergne. (See page 31 for details about the leopard ankle boots.) TERRI FENSEL

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Mary Ann Mirian with her grandson Wolfgang Andani Delcambre

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Debbie Foreman with granddaughter Evangeline Babineaux, 2, and newborn grandson Deano Babineaux at her home. PAUL KIEU, THE DAILY ADVERTISER

Aren’t They Grand? The holidays are a perfect time for grandmothers to spoil their grandchildren By Patricia Gannon

Over the river and through the woods, to grandmother’s house we go. Nothing says holidays like grandmothers, and the familiar refrain still echoes the same sentiment nearly 175 years later. Grandmothers are still the keepers of holiday history and ritual, and both adults and children turn

toward one’s maternal mecca this time of year. Although the destination may not have changed, grandmas certainly have, and those we’ve collected here are excellent examples. One grandmère is a world traveler and business owner, while two more are Realtors — grandmother’s house hasn’t changed, it’s just that grandmother sells

them now. Fortunately, grandmother’s job of spoiling the grandkids remains unchanged.

Mickie Ainsworth, business owner “For years we’ve celebrated Thanksgiving at our house,” said Mickie Ainsworth, owner of Avenues to Travel. “We’re home base,

and we play a mean game of croquet.” Killer croquet to be more exact, as it involves taking serious bets, 17 trees, a hill and a fish fry. There’s even a going-away breakfast on the last morning. “I serve turkey gumbo and sandwiches; guests eat all day. And there are costumes. One year it was the traditional white, the next it was camouflage, then came

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Hawaiian print — even the babies had little print shirts. We froze that time,” she said. “Then people started moving away. It just wasn’t the same at another house.” Ainsworth said she and her husband Jack visit the grandchildren at Christmas so they won’t have to leave their new gifts. “It gives us a good reason to go hang out in New Orleans, and we’ve been able to go to the bowl games for the past two years,” she said.

Mary Ann Mirian, Realtor & Louisiana Best-Dressed Little Wolfgang Andani Delcambre will spend his first Christmas with grandmother Mary Ann Mirian, or “GG” as she prefers to be called. “He’s doing everything that’s expected and more,” Mirian said. “Very intelligent, and he’s training up. We dropped him off at day care the other day, and he gave me a look that went right through me.” With the important information out of the way, “GG” describes family holidays as typical. They rotate where holiday dinners are held?, everyone brings a dish, and the guys watch sports. Then the real truth comes out. “I decorate the entire house. My husband’s already complaining about my three Christmas trees.” “It’s my favorite time of year,” she said without hesitation. “Ever since I was little, I’ve loved Christmas.”

Debbie Foreman, Realtor Debbie Foreman’s already spent two Christmas with 2-year-old Evangeline, and will add just-arrived Deano, bearer of her maiden name, this holiday season. “We’re expanding the tradition,” she said. 40

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Mickie Ainsworth pictured at Victory Silks & Interiors.

She calls her Christmas tradition a mix, but decorating begins at the exact moment the Thanksgiving dishes are cleared away. Then it’s off to the tree lot. “We choose it that night,” Foreman said. “A big, homey Frazier fir, not glitzy — homemade kindergarten ornaments, cross-stitch done by the girls in junior high, completely eclectic. It won’t win prizes. It’s the

DECEMBER 2013

memories.” Then the children fly in, and there’s cooking for days. Foreman’s a baker, which means there are always sweets. Christmas Eve finds her dressing for church and a family outing at a nice restaurant. “I relax the rules on Christmas Day,” she said. “My four adult children from (ages) 27 to 33 all love it. We play games, my hus-

band Randy’s always in costume. They answer trivia questions for monetary gifts. They really get into it.” Foreman won’t say on record what the surprises are this year, only that there are some. “I don’t want to spoil it,” she said. That’s the first grandmother we’ve known who didn’t want to spoil something.


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Visitors enjoy Christmas lights, music and food during Noel Acadien au Village in 2011 at Acadian Village in Lafayette. LESLIE WESTBROOK, THE ADVERTISER

Lights, music and displays create festive feel in Acadian Village Annual event continues through December 23 By Jessica Goff

For 33 years, staff and volunteers have transformed LARC’s Acadian Village into a yuletide extravaganza. There’s plenty time to visit and enjoy the holiday tradition. It features half a million Christmas lights, festively decorated front porches and doorways, carnival rides and live music at the rustic 19th-century south Louisiana village. The celebration this year is keeping with its traditional holiday light display with the addition of new attractions including a gingerbread house, 20-foot-long 42

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animated alligators, Santa’s sleigh, oil rig displays and Christmas trees that float on the bayou. Last year, about 35,000 people visited the village during the celebration. “It’s become an Acadiana family tradition,” said Jeanne Lousao, LARC assistant director. Droves of tourists from neighboring states also make a special trip to visit the village during the holiday season, she said. Every year each Acadian-style house is decorated in a different theme from Mardi Gras to “Santa’s helpers.” This year carolers will greet guests on the porch of the Castille home, one of the main buildings in the village. Along with new light displays on the bayou, the

DECEMBER 2013

WANT TO GO?

MORE INFO

The final night of Noel Acadian au Village is Dec. 23. Advance tickets are $7 at each Acadiana Shop-Rite and $9 at the gate or online. Children younger than 4 get in free. For more information, visit acadianvillage.org.

Noel Acadian au Village is a key fundraiser for LARC, an organization dedicated to providing services, housing and employment to Acadiana residents with mental and developmental disabilities. All proceeds from ticket sales and sponsors go directly to LARC.

park has been improved to allow better access for crowds on its busiest evenings, Lousao said. “We’ve improved walkways and our entrance to cut down on the wait time on our busy weekend nights,” she said. Dec. 6 is expected to be the Christmas village’s busiest night as Chubby Carrier and Cupid join the festivities. No matter what night you go, there will always be

a chance to meet Santa. He’ll be there each night for photos and to hear Christmas present requests from youngsters. “It just a really wonderful experience,” Lousao said. “I always tell moms to bring their young children Monday through Thursday so they can get to experience the whole park. There’s so much to see. “This is really special because everything goes to support LARC,” she said.


Greg Louganis and Johnny Chaillot and family. From left, Suzanne Chaillot Breaux, Mimi Chaillot Ortego, Janie Chaillot Zahra and Jackie Chaillot Hanisee. SUBMITTED

California Dreamin’ and giving back make for perfect wedding Chaillot and Louganis plan trip to South Africa

John Cahillot and Greg Louganis with friends Barbara Eden and her husband John Eicholtz

By Kris Wartelle

From a sunset ceremony overlooking the Pacific Ocean to a South African adventure, Acadiana native Johnny Chaillot and Olympic diver and gold medal winner Greg Louganis are starting their married life together in a way many of us would envy. Chaillot and Louganis wed in October during a beautiful sunset ceremony at Geoffrey’s in Malibu, Calif. Chaillot said the couple chose Geoffrey's because every seat in the house has a panoramic view of the ocean. “The weather was perfect,” elder sister and Lafayette costume designer Suzanne Chaillot-Breaux said. “We spent the day at Greg’s house. It is perched on a hill overlooking the

SUBMITTED

Pacific Ocean in Malibu. There was a brunch that featured classic Greek and Cajun cuisine. The food was fabulous and there were hair and makeup artists on hand to ensure everyone was picture perfect.” Breaux said the wedding party wore blue lace in honor of the grooms who had chosen Greek blue and white as their colors. Chaillot said Louganis designed the intricate wedding rings that they exchanged. “He wanted something really unique and spiritually based,” Chaillot said. “This is a design that Greg came up with himself that represents love, justice and

peace. Greg is a true artist in every since of the word.” During the ceremony, Louganis was escorted by his coach Ron O'Brien and longtime friend, Maggie Stern. Chaillot was escorted by his four sisters, ChaillotBreaux, Mimi Chaillot, Jane Chaillot-Zhara and Jackie Chaillot-Hanisee. Chaillot is one of eight children. His family still lives in Lafayette and the Acadiana area. For him, the wedding was a chance to host Louisiana family along with California friends and celebrities that included Barbara Eden, French Stewart and fellow Olympians Janet Evans, Nadia Comaneci and Bart Conner.

Louganis said he’s fitting in with the Chaillot family. “It was wonderful to meet Johnny's family,” Louganis said. “(It) kind of reminded me a bit of my Mom's side of the family. I seemed to find my comfort within the group.” Chaillot and Louganis will take a trip to South Africa when their schedules allow. They plan to go to a leopard sanctuary and spend time volunteering there. That spirit of giving also dictated how they wanted guests to remember their special occasion. Rather than gifts, Louganis and Chaillot asked their wedding guests to make donations to the Human Rights Campaign, which works to ensure equal rights for the LGBT community, and Mending Kids International, which provides surgical health care to needy children. “We’ve reached a certain age where we just wanted to give back to the community,” Chaillot said.

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Tiffany’s brings luxury, elegance to New Orleans By Kris Wartelle

Jewelry lovers, take note. The jewelry store that has captured the hearts and fingers of many soon-to-be brides and served as the backdrop for movies (“Breakfast at Tiffany’s”), plays and books has made its way to Louisiana. Tiffany’s has opened a new location in New Orleans just in time for Christmas. A few baubles The new retail shop, Tiffany & Co., to consider from Tiffany’s with eye-popping » A 2.75ct jewelry, is located yellow diamond next door to Saks Fifth Avenue in the ring in platinum and 18k gold. Canal Place shop$115,000. ping center in » A 127.86 ct downtown New diamond neckOrleans. The store lace for $2.8 is approximately million. 3,900 square feet. » A sterling It’s should be no silver bracelet surprise that the for $125. space is elegant. Drawing from the iconic architectural elements of the New York flagship store, guests are greeted at the New Orleans store with an illuminated facade of the Tiffany wheat-leaf design motif in Tiffany Blue. Much like the Aquamarines, Fifth Avenue flagdiamonds and ship, the magnolia platinum. motif is on display throughout the space in hand-forged and hand-leafed sconces. “In the tradition of the fashion salon, the Tiffany design element of fluting is apparent in a mirrored feature wall and a dragonfly carpet on the ground below,” said Diane Brown, Tiffany & Company vice president. “Intimate jewelry salons with contemporary seating and Tiffany archival-inspired lighting fixtures create a gracious environment.” So now the Tiffany experience is just two hours away. And of course, there’s always the catalog. 44

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GENERATIONS

Raoul Blanco and Sully Urbina From Puerto Rico with love “Sorry for my delay, what would you like?” Sully Urbina is all Latin charm and exactly on time as we meet for a cup of coffee. An industrial electrician and crew foreman, he generates a considerable wattage of his own. And that’s just the son. “When I was growing up, I was really impressed by his art,” said Urbina of couturier and father Raoul Blanco. “I tried to figure out how he does it. I’ll never be able to. It’s like magic.” Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, 35-year-old Urbina is also a drummer on the side and looks every bit the part. “I love the Rolling Stones,” he said, unexpectedly old school. Although he’s lived both east and west, Urbina followed the economy and once he saw Louisiana, it was the Gulf Coast for him. “I love it here,” he said, and has since acquired a pretty wife, Jennifer Thibodaux. “Now I am here forever,” he said with a laugh. It’s his father’s laugh. So are his hands, apparently. “When I saw him for the first time, it was a click,” Raoul Blanco says of the moment his son arrived in the world accompanied by a twin sister. “‘Look at his hands,’ I said, ‘They’re mine.’” Blanco has plenty of presence of his own on any given day along with the same Latin manners. A model for Valentino in his youth, he was much more than just a pretty face, and his artistic talent caught the eye of several couture icons in both Puerto Rico and the U.S. He’s since had his own ateliers in New York, San Francisco, Napa Valley, St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans and now Lafayette, a place he’s adopted with the same enthusiasm as his son. “Wherever I am, he’s there,” Blanco says and jokingly wonders if the filial migratory pattern will continue. It’s clear both father and son do anything to support the other. “He’s done a day’s work and then beadwork by hand for me until 3 in the morning,” says Blanco with paternal pride. And just as clearly, he considers fatherhood a lifetime occu-

Blanco

Urbina

pation. “He always has my focus, and he doesn’t ask for it,” he said. Then, like a sharp runway turn, Blanco’s all seriousness. “He’s not perfect, but he is to me.” Both father and son were interviewed separately and neither has seen the other’s answers before publication. What’s the best advice your father ever gave you? Sully: He said to never let myself down. Anything you want to do, don’t give up. Raoul: My father said, “Don’t waste your talent and respect people today, because you don’t know where you’ll be tomorrow.” I miss him. What has required the greatest acceptance? Sully: I would never change him, but he used to be more into sports. I’d love to have him come back to the gym with me. Raoul: He’s impatient, and I have to say, “be careful.”And he knows he can get away with many things. He has my number (laughing). What do you admire most about each other? Sully: His love for me. He always chose well for me; he never lets me down. Raoul: His compassion and his acceptance. His mother did a good job. What do you dislike? Sully: (laughing) I guess it’s his job, but he still tries to correct me. C’mon, I know what I’m doing; I’m getting old. I know my limits. Raoul: When he pinches me. I hate that. What would you like for the other one to know? Sully: I want to go into business with him. His line or mine, it doesn’t matter. Raoul: I’m an open book, and no matter what, I’ll always be here.


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PARTY PIX

Triton King honors court King Triton XXXV Dr. Fernando Alemany honored his merry men with a cocktail soiree at Café Vermilionville. His Majesty handed out his own beads at the door and the theme for the evening? Moustaches. “This gives me a lot of pleasure,” said Alemany. “About a third of my guests said they’d never been to Café V.” Experiencing the good life were Rocha and Laura Alemany, Randy Guliuzo, Queen Triton Kyla LeMaire and Chris Bishop, Sam Landers, and dukes Blaine Goodrich, Edward Turner, Patrick Doucet, Blake Ritchey, Tim Arceneaux and Mike Casey—a manly bunch if there ever was one.

2. 1. First row, from left: Blaine Goodrich, Edward Turner, Fernando Alemany, Blake Ritchey; Back row, from left: Patrick Doucet, Mike Casey, and Tim Arceneaux. 2. Chris Bishop, Kyla LeMaire

1.

Chefs Gala a delicious event

1.

The March of Dimes hosted its annual Signature Chefs Gala, the better to honor its VIP patrons. Lead Chef Colt Patin was ready on the line and event organizers Skeet and Vanessa Anseman made sure it was standing room only at the Petroleum Club. Enjoying the fine dining and even finer silent auction that evening were Ann Knight, Roz Kenny, Jay and Therese Culotta, Kyle and Virginia Johnston, Blue Rolfus, Dee Stanley, Mitchell and Sandy Landry, and Carlos and Bobbi Jo Mendez with daughter Rosie.

1. Sally Burdette and Ann Knight. 2. Pat Boudreaux, Gay Hopkins, Jennifer Hopkins, Denise Clary. 3. Kyle and Virginia Johnston. 4. Martha Grant, Colt Patin, Ava Kopieczek.

3.

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PARTY PIX

1.

2.

Rio Royalty hosts cocktail bash in Broussard Prissy Whatley Wilson and Lawrence Svendson celebrated their reign over Rio at a cocktail bash in Broussard. Dom Pedro IX and Queen Isabel welcomed their guests at The Madison, while Mojeaux helped them dance the night away. One thing about Broussard parties: the police come and everyone has fun, including Greg and Julia Gachassin, Jay and Therese Culotta, Katy Svendson and pretty daughters Clare, Courtney and Shea, Kiki and Rick Frayard, Chef Brian Blanchard, and the Queen’s husband, David Wilson, the man paying for it all. Rio’s theme this year is secret agents.

3.

6.

7. 1. Clare, Courtney and Shea Svendson. 2. David and Prissy Wilson. 3. Rick and Kiki Frayard. 4. Jay and Therese Culotta. 5. Greg and Julia Gachassin, Brian Blanchard. 6. Katy Svendson, Julia Gachassin. 7.Prissy Wilson and Lawrence Svendson.

5.

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PARTY PIX 1.

2.

LGMC goes black tie

7.

3.

4.

There was no doctor white at Lafayette General Foundation’s annual gala and art auction, save for the white of tuxedos. The third event of its kind, the fundraiser invests its proceeds not in repairs, but in medical technology. “That’s what we want, the latest and greatest,” said LGMC’s Daryl Cetnar. The Lafayette General family was there, including President and CEO David Callecod, Dr. Nick Cavros, Carolyn and Clarence Huval, Foundation executive director Geoff Daily, and law-abiding Clay Allen and Danielle Cromwell. Sen. Fred Mills auctioned the art, much of which was done by the doctors themselves. “They have good hands,” said Cetnar.

6.

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1. Pat Olson, Kim Carter. 2. Danielle Cromwell, Tammy Heim. 3. Jerry and Betsy White. 4. Stephanie and Wayne Weilbacher. 5. Rae Brodnax, Ellen Gill, Jeanne Kramer. 6. Ji and Geoff Daily. 7. Carolyn and Clarence Huval.


PARTY PIX

Lourdes hosts cocktails The Lourdes Foundation held its cocktails-for-a-cause in the Our Lady of Lourdes Meditation Garden, and the prayed-for weather was perfect. Doctors, donors and directors crowded the outdoors where artist Michael Israel later performed a few miracles of his own onstage. The event thanked major supporters but included a fundraising element, with all proceeds benefiting health care for those in need, such as St. Bernadette’s Clinic. In the mix: Lourdes CEO Bud Barrow, executive director Jeigh Stipe, Sr. Betty Lyons, Drs. Lisa David and Patrick Welch, and Jim and Penny McGehee.

1.

3.

2. 1. Richard Foard, Ted Viator, Mitch Reed. 2. Richard Foard, Michelle Killeen, Tom Foard. 3. Robert Foard, Dr. Patrick Welch. 4. Jim and Penny McGehee.

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PARTY PIX

Bonaparte parties on The Krewe of Bonaparte assembled at City Club for its annual fall social, and included were a host of new faces. President Hunter Trahan explained the krewe has nearly a 100 percent retention rate but had been chasing that younger crowd. “Everyone accepted the offers we made,” said Trahan. “We made a concerted effort to recruit and have a lot of good people to be involved with.” Among those good people were Anthony and Angelle Adams, Patrick Poupart, Challece White and Aristos Anastassiades, ball captain Andre Comeaux, Marshal and Patricia Montgomery, Kim Landry and Junior Gonzalez.

1.

5.

2.

4.

3.

1. Dave and Cindy Comeaux. 2. Challece White, Aristos Anastassiades. 3. Patrick Poupart, Brian Blanchard. 4. Hunter Trahan, Kim Landry, Junior Gonzalez. 5. Anthony and Angelle Adams.

Apollo keeps the pre-parties glamorous You know it’s close to Mardi Gras when Apollo says so. Ted Viator, Billy Evans, and Jimmy Pool hosted an elegant pre-party for royal pair Mitch Reed and Kendrick Benoit. Their majesties ran late as majesties often do, and what better way to enjoy the cocktails courtesy of the Dynamic Trio. Putting on the ritz were Apollo President Phillip LeBlanc, ball captain Sherman Mire, former kings Rusty Phillips, Michael Perioux and Robert Montgomery, Jamie Graves, Lillian Thornhill of Shreveport and Darrell Frugé.

2. 1. Billy Evans, Kendrick Benoit, Mitch Reed, Ted Viator. 2. Rusty Phillips, Jamie Graves.

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