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101 great things we love about Louisiana


HEALTHY

NEW YOU FREE Health Education Seminar on Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery Tuesday, March 20 at 6:00pm Glenwood Medical Mall Community Room

Misty of West Monroe lost 115 lbs. with Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery!

For those who have tried dieting and exercise but still struggle with obesity, it’s time to put an end to the battle for good. Bariatric weight loss surgery can help change your life! Feel younger and more energetic, boost confidence and even reverse chronic health conditions. Join us for this FREE health education seminar to get all your questions answered and to see if you’re a candidate!

To register, call 318-329-8448 or visit glenwoodregional.org and click on Classes & Events.

Bariatric Services

Bariatric Services | 1275 Glenwood Drive West Monroe, LA 71291 Most private insurance accepted. Financing is also available.


OUACHITA PARISH LOCATION: 2450 Tower Drive, Monroe Visit, call, or log on today! 318-812-BANK | 318-255-3733

LINCOLN PARISH LOCATIONS: 505 North Vienna Street, Ruston 2109 Farmerville Highway, Ruston

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CHEVY BUICK CAR CLINIC

New and future owners, please join us for demostrations on the NEWEST TECHNOLOGY including:

In Car Wi-Fi . Apple Car Play . Android Auto . Teen Driver Setting Service advisors will be on hand to answer frequently asked questions about your vehicle and to schedule any service.

MARCH 17 12-3PM Prizes to be given away include:

FREE OIL CHANGES FREE CAR WAHES & MUCH MORE!

Drinks and refreshments served

139 GRIMSHAW ST . RAYVILLE,LA . 318-728-6550

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What a Specialty Store Should Be Are you looking for that “Something Special?” Then The Children’s Shoppe, voted Best of the Delta for the past 11 years, is the place for you. The madcap month of March has arrived – the last of Winter and the first of Spring. Blustery winds and soft Spring breezes alternate as we venture out for brisk walks. Can’t March make up her mind? Let us help her! Energize your spirit and set the mood for Spring with a visit to The Children’s Shoppe. Springtime is a busy time; Easter is upon us. There is much to do… frocks and bonnets await your sweet angels. Gather your baskets and hop our way. We have everything you need to prepare for Easter festivities. Spring arrivals are plentiful but are being snapped up as quickly as a hot cross bun – so it would be wise not to dilly dally. Hop on in! The Children’s Shoppe offers a vast array of must-have gifts for babies, birthdays, special occasions, or just for play. We have a fabulous selection of decorative treasures, stylish diaper bags, bibs, burp cloths and blankets. We place particular emphasis on toys and books that are developmental and fun… all great options for Easter baskets. Regardless of season or reason, The Children’s Shoppe is the perfect place to find timeless and fashion-forward clothing for Girls- Newborn to Size 16, and Boys- Newborn to Size 12.

ER BENEFI T H T D E D I NC S I LU V O

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Following are some of the lines that can be found exclusively at The Children’s Shoppe: Magnolia Baby, The Proper Peony, Squiggles, Jack & Teddy, Southern Moon Bowtique, Chus shoes, Feltman, Livie & Luca shoes, and Le Za Me.

Baby Registry Free Gift Wrap Lay-A-Way Monogramming VIP Card

Be sure on your next visit to The Children’s Shoppe to get your VIP Card stamped. After all 15 spaces on the VIP Card are filled, you will receive a credit equal to the average of your 15 purchases. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Instagram (@childrensshoppela) to be in the know about our new arrivals and specials. We are conveniently located at 109 N. Trenton in Ruston’s beautiful historic downtown district, and at 2252 Tower Drive Suite 108 in The Shoppes on Tower in Monroe.

109 N. TRENTON, SUITE A • RUSTON • 251-9599 | 2252 TOWER DR, SUITE 108 • MONROE • 323-7223 8 | MA RC H 2018 | D E LTA S T Y LE M AGA ZI N E


BAYOU DENTAL GROUP

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Lucky Us, Dr. PJ Henderson is now part of our Bayou Dental Team! We are so happy to have him with us!!

New Patient Special

$89

Value: $388 Expires: 4/1/18 *Must bring coupon to appointment*

Exam, X-Rays, & Cleaning Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:00am-5:00pm Fridays 8:00am-2:00pm

2501 Tower Drive Monroe, LA 71201

318-855-2360

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CONTENTS FEATURES

MAR MA ARCH C

7 Letter from Guest Editor Tanya Pesek

34 Love where you Live:

101 Great Things we Love about Louisiana

54 Southern Escape:

Fashion in the Big Easy

58 Green with Envy:

Going green for Spring

59 Accessories to Go 64 Unplug & Connect 78 Montgomery, Alabama: Rich in history with a progressive vision

82 Back to our Roots: Philippines IN EVERY ISSUE Community Chatter ...................... 13 Calendar of Events ....................... 16 Social Scenes ............................... 17 My Favorite Things: Tara Ambrose ................................ 23 Healthy is the New Happy with Angie ...................................... 24 Delta Entertainment .................... 25 Delta Memories ............................ 28 15 Minutes with: Dianne Newcomer ........................ 34 Gardening Tips with Rose ........... 70 Tara’s Taste of the Town .............. 86 WONDERing about Disney with Monroe Travel ............................... 94

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Pain Relief prevention MADE EASY!

NEW PATIENT

SPECIAL INCLUDES CONSULTATION, EXAM & ADJUSTMENT

Our licensed chiropractors help provide pain relief and preventative care so you can live life to the fullest. Chiropractic can help with back and neck pain, joint discomfort, allergies, migraines and more. Stop by a clinic today!

Monroe (318) 737-7682 1870 Forsythe Avenue Monroe, LA 71201 MONDAY - FRIDAY: SATURDAY: SUNDAY:

9:30 AM - 6:00 PM 9:30 AM - 1:30 PM Closed

NO APPOINTMENTS | NO INSURANCE NEEDED | OPEN EVENINGS & WEEKENDS

*Offer valued at $39. Valid for new patients only. See clinic for chiropractor(s)' name and license info. Clinics managed and/or owned by franchisee or Prof. Corps. Restrictions may apply to Medicare eligible patients. Individual results may vary. © 2018 The Joint Corp. All Rights Reserved.

thejoint.com

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Region’s Only Hospital to Offer Mako Robotic Surgery

Robotic surgeries for knee and hip replacements mean precision, accuracy, and comfort. Imagine the possibilities. 318-388-4040 • 312 GRAMMONT STREET, MONROE PSSURGERY.COM • FACEBOOK.COM/PSSURGICALHOSPITAL P & S Surgical Hospital is a joint venture among physician specialists & St. Francis Medical Center


Kevo Meredith and Chris Brown have announced the opening of 2Dudes Brew & Que. The two started the food truck and catering business two years ago and are happy to extend their brand. It will be located in downtown Monroe next to Iron Cactus.

Joan Hampton, founder of S.O.S. Pets of Ouachita, spoke at the NELA Young Professionals luncheon about efforts to raise money for a new shelter.

Chennault Aviation and Military Museum launches Jeep raffle for heroes. The tickets are on sale now and the drawing will be held on July 4. Get your ticket today!

The Children’s Coalition along with First National Bank held the launch for the 2018 Dragon Boat Festival. Members of both teams ‘paddled it out’ as they learned winning techniques from InFit Fitness trainer Cesar Camacho.

Macaroni Kid honors Louisiana native Tiffany Olmstead as 2018 Publisher of the Year. Congratulations, Tiffany!

Do you love to play golf? Play for a good cause! St. Francis Medical Center Foundation is hosting its annual golf classic on April 26. Gather your team and sign up today!

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MARCH COMMUNITY EVENT CALENDAR

MARCH 3 • RIVER RUMBLE

UPCOMING EVENTS

10-4:00PM Downtown RiverMarket

MARCH 3 • LA HEAT DESSERT PAIRING COMPETITION

MARCH 17 • WOOFSTOCK

MARCH 17 • ST. PADDY’S DAY BICYCLE PARADE

MARCH 21 • MEDCAMPS MADNESS 2018

MARCH 23 • SHINDIG 2018

MARCH 23-25 • 20TH ANNUAL SPRING MARKET MONROE CIVIC CENTER

MARCH 24 • DOWNTOWN SPRING ART FESTIVAL

MARCH 31 • ZOO EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA 2018

10-1PM Kiroli Park

7-9:30PM Landry Vineyards

8-2PM Ruston Farmers Market

10-5PM Antique Alley in West Monroe

10-4PM Downtown RiverMarket

7PM-12AM MBH Farms

10-1PM Louisiana Purchase Gardens & Zoo

March 17 - JIM TAYLOR CHEVROLET MEMORIAL SALES EVENT OPEN HOUSE MARCH 14 • PI DAY 10-1PM Louisiana Tech University MARCH 17 • ST. PATRICK’S 5K/WALK & 1K KID’S FUN RUN 8-11AM St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church

MARCH 17 • HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE EVENT 9-1PM Ike Hamilton Expo

MARCH 22 • IMAGES OF CHRIST EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION 5-7:30PM Biedenharn Museum & Gardens of Monroe

MARCH 29 • PAINTING WITH A PURPOSE 2018 7-9PM Painting with a Twist

MARCH 21 • MUNCHKIN MARKET/SUMMER KID CONSIGNMENT EVENT MARCH 31 • 15TH ANNUAL SMOKIN’ ON THE BAYOU RIB COOK-OFF 10-3PM The Grove at Warhawk Stadium 10-6PM Pine Grove Church 16 | MA RC H 2018 | DE LTA S T Y LE M AGA ZI N E


97th Annual Meeting and Banquet with the Monroe Chamber of Commerce | February 13th | Monroe Civic Center Conference Hall

Mike McGee, Ashley Doughty, Billy Justice

Paul West, Randy and Arita Stone

Dr. Nick Bruno, Sue Nicholson, Linda Holyfield

Jake Branch, Dianne Moore, David Moore

Chris Holtzclaw, Judy Babb, Cody Baumen

Jay Caskey, Sherry Eidt, Mike Walsworth

Alyson Futch, Carolyn Clampitt, Esther Daily

Ashley Busada, Liz Pierre, Alberta Green, James Moore

Amanda Regan, Jamie Underwood, Justin Underwood, Linda O'Neal

Judy Haddad, Caroline & Alan Brockman

Daryll Berry, Kelvin C. Horne

Alise Oliver, Cindy Rogers, Morris Mintz, Melinda Mintz

Northeast Louisiana Food Bank Empty Bowls | January 27th | Ouachita Candy Co. Warehouse

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Downtown Gallery Crawl | February 1st | Downtown Monroe and West Monroe

Leah Reitzell, Burg Ransom

Kim Sherrill, Lisa Harp, James Harp, Nancy Miller

Nelita Bailey, Ruthanne Bailey, Willetta Bailey, Lily Harris

Nick Bustamante, Leigh Buffington

Phillip Thompson, Michelle Thompson, Joshua Comer, Cheyenne Comer Brad Arender, Kelsea McCrary

Meghan Maynard

Keith Matthews

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Patrycja Adamowicz, Callie Cummings, Jessica Horne, Morgan McCullin


Dancing with the Louisiana Stars | February 2nd | Monroe Civic Center Arena

Kelli Cole, Joann Powell, Angela Grubbs

Dillon Foster, Lindsay Abshier

Courtney Wetzel, Wendy Napoli, Jennifer Haneline, Heather Yetes, Alpa Patel, Michelle Anderson Thompson, Aleta Eley, Simran Dhaliwal Emaus

Mary Edna Tanksley, Sara Beth Howard, Cherie Morara, Donna Winters, Olivia Condrey

Gloria Millwood, Missy Crain

MacKenzie McComas, Madi Underwood, Courtney Crain

Mike Downhour, Laryssa Bonacquisti

FIND YOURSELF with a personal shopping experience at Dusty & Company, ranging in sizes S - 3XL

Meet Your Personal Shoppers Today! Dusty 318-348-5649 Cindy 318-348-8184 2201 Liberty Street Monroe, LA “A smile is the prettiest thing you can wear!” MN-1000679707

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Krewe of Janus Mardi Gras Parade | February 3rd | Monroe and West Monroe

Krewe of PAWS Mardi Gras Parade | February 3rd | Downtown West Monroe

Chad Phillips, Amber Griffin, Tori Davis, Caty Martin

Daisy Armstrong (dog), Heather Armstrong, Aubree Jones, Lexi Cox

Thom Rogers, Sarah Sellers

Debbie Copeland, Janet Breard

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Beards & Beers | February 10th | Flying Tiger Brewery

Dan Dutcher, Harry Flanagan, Tony Nieves, Joe Lang, Monty Minter, Felix Delagarza

Angela Webb, Joy Hale

Joel Istre, Ronnie Scott

Zach Raybourn, DJ Fortenberry

Logan Lewis & Morgan Decelle

Skye Vera, Sarah Vera, Adam McCarty, Penny Simon, Erin Simon, Gary Williams, Rogér Nelson

Steven Drewry, ,Brittany Drewry, Julie Dowden Caylan Dowden

Brandon Muey, Hannah Muey, Christina Hill

Tom & Nancy Shutt

Let’s Unite! 2018 Go Red for Women Luncheon & Runway Show | February 15th | West Monroe Convention Center

Janet White, Missy Amy, Evalyn Ormond

Todd Werner

Brenda Gregory

Hope Anderson

Claudia Wade, Darra Jung, Dianne Davidson

Jeremy Tinnerello, Sharon McClain, Jeffrey Harris MD, Evalyn Ormond, Tim Smith

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MY FAVORITE THINGS Tara Ambrose

Owner - Tara’s Taste of the Town, LLC; Owner - Ambrose’s Antiques & Fine Things, LLC; Owner - Tara’s Ties, LLC; Senior Corporate Paralegal to Corporate Counsel, Joe D. Guerriero; Staff Writer – Culination Magazine in Las Vegas, NV; and, Regional Correspondent and Contributor – Louisiana Kitchens & Culture Magazine in New Orleans, LA

Favorite Book: “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by Oscar Wilde

I am the proud Mother of 5 kids, blessed to be the wife of an amazing husband and a culinary journalist/photographer. Since 2015, I have also been the primary caretaker for my beloved grandmother, who struggles daily with Alzheimer’s and advanced stage Dementia. In my spare time, I hand tie fishing lures for freshwater crappie and bass fishing, as well as having an antique booth located in Southern Style Antique Mall in West Monroe. I live for volunteering and have the utmost honor and pleasure serving as the Secretary for the Executive Board for the Louisiana Zoological Society, on the board for the Louisiana Restaurant Association’s Northeast Chapter, the President of LANEL (Legal Assistants of North East Louisiana), a volunteer for SOS Pets of Ouachita, and a member of the Monroe Junior League.

Favorite Sport: FISHING!

Favorite Quote: “Live! Live the wonderful life that is in you! Let nothing be lost upon you. Be always searching for new sensations. Be afraid of nothing!” – Oscar Wilde Favorite Qualities to Possess: Meeting new people, community involvement, not being fearful of the unknown, and the ability to express yourself articulately through the written word. Favorite Louisiana Travel Destination: Breaux Bridge, St. Martinsville, Lake Arthur, Empire, Venice, Hackberry, Covington and of course Nola – anywhere in Louisiana I can find SOMETHING to do. Favorite Thing about Louisiana: Our food, our people, our culture and our deeply rooted history. Favorite Louisiana Food: The Louisiana black drum, red drum or speckled trout. Favorite Pastime: Fishing, collecting antique cookbooks, cooking, time with friends and family, culinary journalism and planning fund raising events

Favorite Hobby: Collecting antique cookbooks and culinary journalism.

that involve food. Favorite Way to Unwind: Laughing with friends over a glass of wine. Favorite Fashion Statement: Dare to be different by embracing your own style, never conform to images others have for you. Favorite Things in my Bag: My notebook that I use to interview/take notes with and my screwdriver combo set my husband found for me. Favorite Perfume or Candle Scent: “Tyler” by the Tyler Candle Company Favorite City to Visit: Breaux Bridge and Nola Favorite Local Shopping Spot: Gene Cox Grocery and P&M Hardware Favorite Life Experience: Culinary Journalism Favorite Way to Give Back: By volunteering with the many organizations I have had the privilege to be a part of – Member of the Monroe Junior League, Secretary for the Louisiana Zoological Society, board member for the Louisiana Res-

Favorite Movie: “Gone With The Wind,” for which I was named after.

taurant Association Northeast Chapter, Volunteer with SOS Pets of Ouachita, President of LANEL (Legal Assistants of Northeast Louisiana). Favorite Place to Buy Clothes: Freebird Boutique Favorite Skin Products: Mineral Fusion from Fiesta Nutrition Center Favorite Beer: Burma Blonde and Heroic Hops by Flying Tiger Brewery Favorite Professional Sports Team: New Orleans Saints and Dallas Cowboys Favorite Band or Singer: Roses & Revolvers (locally) and the late Amy Winehouse Favorite Holiday: Halloween Favorite Animal: ALL OF THEM! Favorite Way to Start the Day: Telling my children I love them before they go to school and counting my blessings. Favorite Celebrity: Past – Paul Prudhomme or Justin Wilson /

Favorite Party Game: Hungry, Hungry Hippo.

Present: Andrew Zimmern (host of Bizarre Foods) or Don Wildman (host of Mysteries at the Museum) Favorite Hobby: Collecting antique cookbooks and culinary journalism. Favorite Person in the World: My Mamow, Frances H. Glass. If I could be one quarter of the lady she is, my goal in life will be complete. Favorite Song: Für Elise by Ludwig Van Beethoven. Favorite Adjective to Describe Yourself: BUSY! Favorite Way to Spend the Weekend: My favorite way to spend a weekend would be with my husband, Vince Ambrose, and our two children, Sydnee & Jace, fishing off the coast of Louisiana in either Empire, Hackberry or Venice. The brackish waters are perfect for speckled trout, red fish and black drum, not to mention the people are so welcoming and hospitable. When we go, I make certain to seek out the local restaurants and explore their menus.

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Introducing new monthly feature focused on wellness When the editors of Delta Style approached me with the idea of writing a monthly feature on health and wellness I couldn’t say yes fast enough! I look forward to sharing information and insights that I am fortunate enough to learn through my daily interactions with health professionals, reliable research sources, and customers in the aisles of my store. My plan is to use this forum to share information on tools to live a healthy and happy lifestyle with the use of natural foods, supplements, herbals and community access to activities that benefit total body wellness.

To go along with this month’s DeltaStyle Louisiana Travel Issue theme we’re featuring products from a true Louisiana original , ANDI LYNN’S PURE AND CUSTOM FORMULARY. Andi Lynn’s formulas originate from Livingston, Louisiana, and are now sold worldwide. The PURE ELDERBERRY SYRUP (organic black elderberries and local honey) was put to the true test this flu season. The FIRE CIDER TONIC is a traditional recipe of apple cider mixed with the power of ginger, garlic and turmeric. If you’re looking for a side-effect-free sleep aid, the PILLOW DEEP SLEEP DROPS should be on your bedside table! Angie O’Pry Blades is owner of Fiesta Nutrition Center in Monroe.

Elderberry Syrup, Pillow Deep Sleep Drops and Fire Cider Tonic from Andi Lynn’s Pure and Custom Formulary.

Located in Fiesta Nutrition Center | 1211 N. 18th Street | Monroe, LA | fiestanutrition.com | MN-1000681538

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15:17 to Paris

10 movies in 2018 based on real-life drama As the cliché goes, truth is stranger than fiction. These movies based on true stories prove, at the very least, that truth serves as a compelling movie script. Get to know the real drama behind these 10 movie picks debuting in 2018. The 15:17 to Paris The Clint Eastwood-directed movie focuses on the three Americans who thwarted a terrorist attack on a train to Paris in 2015. Eastwood cast the three real heroes from the incident, Alek Skarlatos, Spencer Stone and Anthony Sadler, to play themselves in the movie. First Man Ryan Gosling is shooting for the moon as Neil Armstrong in this biopic (in theaters Oct. 12) about the astronaut's life. Based on James R. Hansen's official biography, First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong, the movie is set to focus on Armstrong's life and the space mission that resulted in him being the first man to walk on the moon. Fighting with My Family The comedy-drama is based on a 2012 documentary about WWE wrestler Saraya-Jade "Paige" Bevis and her family, all of whom are professional wrestlers. Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, who is executive-producing the movie (in theaters Sept. 14), is also climbing back into the ring on screen. Chappaquiddick Jason Clarke stars as Ted Kennedy in this drama based on the true story of the then-Massachusetts senator's car accident in Chappaquiddick, where a passenger died trapped underwater in the car that Kennedy drove off the road. Kate Mara, Ed Helms and Bruce Dern also star in the film (in theaters April 6). Hotel Mumbai Oscar-nominated Dev Patel stars in this drama thriller about the 2008 attacks at a hotel in India and the subsequent terrorist strikes around Mumbai. Armie Hammer, Anupam Kher and Nazanin Boniadi are set to co-star. Boy Erased Lucas Hedges, Russell Crowe, Nicole Kidman and Joel Edgerton star in the coming-of-age drama (in theaters Sept. 28) based on Garrard Conley's memoir about his childhood experience of being outed as gay to his parents and enrolled in conversion therapy. Can You Ever Forgive Me? The dark comedy (in theaters Oct. 19), starring Melissa McCarthy as author Lee Israel, looks at the

writer's life of penning profiles on high-profile women before her spiral into a criminal career of forging letters from deceased celebrities and stealing. My Dinner with Hervé The movie focuses on the final days of actor Hervé Villechaize, played by Game of Thrones star Peter Dinklage, who committed suicide in 1993. Jamie Dornan and Andy Garcia are set to co-star in the HBO drama. White Boy Rick White Boy Rick (in theaters Aug. 17) is based on an almost unbelievable true story about the teenage undercover FBI informant who established himself in the drug world, and was later sentenced to life in prison after a drug trafficking arrest. The real "White Boy Rick," named Richard Wershe Jr., was paroled in July 2017. Richie Merritt is set to star as the title character, with Matthew McConaughey as his father and Bruce Dern as his grandfather. Mary Queen of Scots Saoirse Ronan has signed on to star as the young queen at the center of Mary Queen of Scots. Based on John Guy's biography My Heart Is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots, the historical drama (in theaters Nov. 2) also stars Margot Robbie and David Tennant.

Four tantalizing new mysteries to keep you inside Mysteries up and down the East Coast: an unexpected Russian spy in D.C., drifters in Delaware, a magical survivor in the Adirondacks, and best friends in New York City bound by lies. Charles Finch takes you through some of the most intriguing suspense fiction of the season. Sunburn by Laura Lippman It was a little easier to keep secrets in 1995. When two good-looking strangers arrive separately in a tiny Delaware town that summer in Laura Lippman’s seductive and gripping new novel Sunburn, everyone wonders who they are, but nobody can pop out a smartphone to check. That makes Sunburn something akin to a locked-room mystery: The book slowly metes out the truth of why Polly and Adam, the new arrivals, are lying low, as they circle each other and wonder the same. Lippman excels in the minutiae of trouble — insurance scams, sketchy arson investigations, getting paid in cash — and Sunburn, after a slow first 50 pages, is one of her most compulsive books, an atmospheric two-hander worthy of Raymond Chandler or Alfred Hitchcock.

The Storm King by Brendan Duffy It’s always a good sign when a novelist is up to something weird. Brendan Duffy’s second book mingles horror, historical fiction, supernatural suspense and old-fashioned murder mystery, the rare phantasmagoria whose pieces click into a satisfying resolution. Set in the Adirondacks, it’s about Nate, the sole survivor of a childhood car crash. Far from home, he’s assembled a happy life, career, wife, daughter, but when he returns for the funeral of a high school friend, all of his ghosts await him. The Storm King could be a cleaner book — Duffy’s multiple plot lines sometimes get snarled, and his writing is full of bad habits. (“There was a menagerie of suffering in the cages of Nate’s soul.”) But this is a gutsy, intricate, evocative piece of mischief, much closer than anyone usually gets to that particular spell cast by Stephen King. Grist Mill Road by Christopher J. Yates The list of authors whose books I read automatically is very short, and loses more names than it adds most years. Now, the British writer Christopher J. Yates is on it, thanks to this truly superb second novel, a dark, roving psychological thriller as powerful as anything by Tana French. It takes place in 1982 and 2008: In the earlier timeline, two boys are responsible for a horrific incident in which a girl named Hannah is tied to a tree and shot dozens of times with an air rifle, then left for dead. In the second, Hannah is married to one of them. That’s a hell of a setup. But Grist Mill Road is irresistibly readable for the ways it pulls that initial incident in unexpected directions, rounding out the trio’s histories, reappraising their roles in their awful story. A one-dimensional New York cop and a slightly forced ending drag the book back just slightly, but make no mistake: Yates is the real deal. Need to Know by Karen Cleveland There’s a threatening tone to the blurbs for Need to Know, which solemnly vow that you will not be able to stop reading it. Lee Child, for instance: “You’ll miss dinner, stay up far too late, and feel tired at work tomorrow.” Yikes! Well, its premise is smart —– Vivian Miller, a CIA analyst (as author Karen Cleveland once was), discovers that her boring old husband is a Russian agent. He swears that she and their children have changed his priorities since he went undercover, and as proof convinces her to turn him in to save herself. Will she? Unfortunately, the question never seems urgent. Cleveland’s debut flows nicely and has one wicked, delightful twist, promising signs for her chances of a good career. But the work as a whole is an inexpert and implausible affair, weighed down by Vivian’s unintelligible choices and ridiculous escapes from notice. You’ll feel fine at work tomorrow.

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2 Dudes Brew & Que | Aramark | Bayou Grill | Bayou Landing |Bountiful Foods | Catfish Cabin | Catfish Charlies | Chef Anthony Miletello | Chef Cory Bahr | Coca-Cola | Choice Brands Flying Tiger Brewery | Glazer | Iron Cactus | Landry’s | Marsala Beverage | Ouachita Brewing Company | The Fieldhouse | The Waterfront Grill | Thurman’s

TICKET PRICES: Individual: $50 | Reserved Table for 10: $750 | Patio Table: $1000 Purchase tickets online: eventbrite.com

FLAVORS OF THE BAYOU

GRAND OPENING Friday, March 16th | 7 p.m. Taste and See: FLAVORS OF THE BAYOU

FLAVORS OF THE BAYOU

In partnership with Lt. Governor Billy Nungesser and the Louisiana Seafood Promotion and Marketing Board have graciously partnered with ULM on this event which allows us to showcase specialty dishes from some of the greatest chefs and restaurants in our area. The event will begin at 7 p.m. with music, beverages, and specialty dishes at ULM’s newest facility, Bayou Pointe. All proceeds will go to fund the ULM Top Hawks Scholarship Program.

w w w.u lm .e du / b ayoup o inte • 318.342.1900 • bp e c@ u l m .e du

MN-1000661169

Where Louisiana STILL buys books

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Cheers to Wanderlust! A Delta Girl Grows Up and Sees the World

Jim and Georgiann in Venice on a cold January day. Pictured behind them is the Bridge of Sighs.

GEORGIANN POTTS

Writer’s Note: One of my favorite things to do is travel. Always had been. Always will be, I suspect. In spite of early restrictions on my physical travel --- specifically financial ones --- I still managed to “travel” through my love of reading. In countless books I found myself transported to exotic locales all over the globe. There in print, supported by my imagination, were wonderful characters who came alive for me. I found myself longing to see for myself where they lived, what they loved, and how they worshiped. I feel genuinely sorry for those who can afford to travel, but refuse to do so. I have heard all of the excuses --- too much to do here to leave right now --- too many chances to get hurt and not be able to get help --- too many odd people and inedible foods “over there” for me to want to be around --- and on, and on, and on. Certainly with the advent of what I call the International Georgiann Terrorist Age, it has been even easier for many to just stay Potts home. While that absolutely makes a difference in one’s planning as to where to go and what to see, it should not be the absolute imperative that keeps a person from seeing at least some part of the world. I suppose I have to agree with St. Augustine: “The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” GP

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I am not sure where my lifelong fascination with --- and love for --- travel came from. Neither of my parents was particularly well-traveled. Although they both knew Louisiana well (admittedly my father knew it better because of his work on the Mississippi River with the United States Army Corps of Engineers), so far as I know, they never traveled out of the south, and only rarely out of Louisiana. They did make a lovely trip to Natchez, MS, when they eloped and married there. There were other trips to visit relatives, primarily, but no “vacations” in the sense that we think of them today.

Explore. Dream. Discover. . . . My maternal grandparents, on the other hand, have to be considered well-traveled because of their journey in the early 1900’s from Illinois to Tensas Parish. The geographic distance was impressive in those days, but more impressive to me was the faith in the future that my grandfather and his brother and brother-in-law had. Enough faith to sell everything and stake a new life on a cotton plantation --- Kenilworth Plantation --- that most members of the three families had never even


seen before they moved there. Mark Twain captured my grandparents’ sense of adventure perfectly, or so it seems to me. He said, “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you did not do than by the ones that you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” I have no memory of any discussions either when I was a child or when I was an adult by any members of my family expressing one moment’s regret at making that brave move. Their primary experience when the core family moved down had been as merchants. A general store was one of their means of livelihood, and they were successful with it. They were creative thinkers, too, and established a “rolling store” that went from village to village bringing groceries and “necessaries” directly to the customers’ homes for purchase. Through research, I have recently discovered that my grandmother inherited some property in Illinois early in her marriage, and that may have given the family the financial margin it needed to make the leap. They sold the property, the store, and virtually everything else and went forth to make a new life in a “foreign” place --northeast Louisiana. Here, had it not been for the people already living and working on Kenilworth who literally taught my grandfather and the others how to run a farm, our family could not have survived. To Pink Flowers, Daddy Moore’s overseer and teacher, our family owes a great debt. The main house on Kenilworth was a typical farmhouse of the 1800’s that had originally been built as a country residence for landowners whose primary residences were across the river in Natchez. It must have been daunting to Mom Moore as she had to take charge at a very early age of a very large -- and growing -- household. My grandparents, once they had the farm running efficiently and their children old enough to leave, would take a vacation every fall once the fields were laid by and the crops were in. Their habit was to go to Grand Isle, to enjoy the Gulf and especially the fresh seafood. After spending a few weeks there, they would come back through New Orleans, LA, and enjoy the “city” life before heading back north well-rested and bringing gifts for the family.

ily was spread apart geographically, such trips had a kind of “family reunion” feel. Cousins rarely saw each other, but once a year, and that often only if they were very lucky. Because Kenilworth was large enough to accommodate lots of folks, and because aunts and uncles lived nearby and could house the overflow, more often than not Kenilworth became a “vacation destination” for many. Aunts and uncles and cousins in Mississippi and Alabama joined those from central and south Louisiana to come to their “home place” to rekindle friendships, recall favorite family tales, and --- most important of all --- reconnect with their past. Occasionally, though, I would get to travel with my family to visit kinfolk elsewhere. I remember wonderful trips to Vicksburg, MS, to visit family and to explore the great military park there. Another time we traveled all the way to Alabama to visit family there. Along the way, we drove through the campus of the University of Mississippi so that I could see how beautiful it was. Little did I know that it would one day play a major role in my life!

Jim and Georgiann Potts at Land’s End in England.

A North Carolina Summer . . .

Georgiann standing on the Tintagel cliffs high above the Cornish coast.

Europe Beckons . . .

Kenilworth as Destination . . . When I was born, trips to visit family were the kind of vacations that we enjoyed. Because travel was both expensive and cumbersome in those days, trips had to be planned well in advance and were likely to last several weeks. After going to all of the trouble to make a trip, one did not just stop and run! Because even then --- as now --- our fam-

In late winter of my freshman year at Northeast Louisiana State College, it occurred to me that I could either return to Newellton the following summer or I could find a job somewhere that I had never been, doing something I had never done. Some of my college friends were lining up summer jobs faraway, and I thought I would give it a try, too. The problem was what were my skills? I decided that being a camp counselor for youngsters might be something that I could manage, so I wrote letters of inquiry that I sent together with my meager resume to about 40 camps across the country. Something in my letter captured the attention of the owner of a camp near Asheville, NC, and he asked for additional information. After several telephone conversations, he offered me the job as camp secretary for his exclusive children’s camp. I accepted, packed a trunk with appropriate camp necessities, boarded a commercial airliner for my first ever flight out of state, and had one of the best summers of my life!

Jim Potts standing at the door of Christ College at Cambridge University, England, where he did research on John Milton and the Cambridge Platonists.

After graduation from Northeast Louisiana University (yes, the name changed while I was there the first time), I began my teaching career at West Monroe High School in their English Department. It was there that it occurred to me that I was now in the position that one of my own English teachers had been in when I was in high school. I could now put together a group of students to travel abroad with me for enrichment. I found an excellent program designed for high school students who wanted to travel abroad, put my group together, got another faculty member who also taught

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English there to agree to go with us, and off we went. Absolutely everything that I had imagined that I would love about overseas travel was proved accurate on that first trip. The wonder of it all! Flaubert said that “ . . . travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” That trip helped me to begin to comprehend the vastness of this world, and the unique character of every country. For this trip, Italy was the only country that we visited. It was, I think, the perfect one of them all to experience on one’s “maiden voyage” abroad. The culture was so different, and the sights were simply staggering to this Delta girl and her students.

Have Backpack. Will Travel . . . When I married Jim Potts, I discovered my ideal traveling companion. He was not only beautifully educated and therefore could appreciate what we would see together on our travels, but also was able to help me to understand what we were seeing, too. His love of languages certainly came in handy, as well. I remember one time in particular when we had been out exploring Roman ruins in Germany all day with Jim’s beloved uncle, Pete Mooty. We were pretty tired, and quite hungry. A café near where we were staying looked promising, so we went in. The “menu” was designed with international visitors in mind. The entrees were not only listed in German, but were also pictured in photographs. Pete and I immediately went to the picture of what appeared to be a New York strip. As devoted carnivores, that steak looked like just what we needed to recover our strength. All went well until Jim noticed one of the words describing our choice: “geflugel.” He had some German, but did not know that particular word. What he did know was Old English (Anglo-Saxon). “The word ‘flugel’ in Anglo-Saxon is ‘bird,’’ he said. He called the waitress and asked her to translate the dish that we were trying to order. She did not know, but saw another diner across the room who she thought would be able to translate for us. She shouted across the room to ask him the question. With the dining room now silent, the fellow thought a moment, and then with an apology explained that he couldn’t remember the English equivalent. However, he said, it meant a big bird that runs fast and cannot fly. “Ostrich!” Jim said. Pete and I ordered breaded veal cutlets. James Michener warned would-be travelers about being close-minded about such things as unfamiliar foods. “If you reject the food, ignore the customs, fear the religion, and avoid the people, you might better stay at home,” he said. I admit to foregoing the unfamiliar ostrich, but I have been brave on other occasions. Once while traveling in England, I decided that I should order a classic English dish,

Georgiann seated at the ruins of Tintagel Castle in Cornwall, England. The castle is thought by some to be the castle inhabited by King Arthur of English lore.

with “awful” . . . Through the three–plus decades of our marriage, Jim and I have traveled frequently. We have explored England, Europe, Honduras, and Jamaica as well as a good bit of the United States. Most of the time we have traveled abroad quite simply --- Eurail train pass in hand and with only minimal clothing and supplies. Sometimes, as when we joined 70+ others to travel to Honduras to celebrate the wedding of Chris and Gabriella Cannon, we traveled with significantly more pieces of clothing! For others, such as Jamaica, only swimsuits, shorts, sunscreen, and flipflops were required. Our last trip abroad was to Prague for a long weekend followed by a river cruise along the Danube. That trip was especially educational, because it took us for the first time to eastern Europe. Prague was unlike any city we had ever visited. The mixture of modern with the ancient was evident everywhere. One morning while there we walked through the old city looking for Bethlehem Chapel, the home church of John Hus, an early Protestant reformer. Jim knew that it had to be there, but none of the tourist guides had any knowledge of it or its location. A friendly resident passing by had heard of the chapel and gave us the directions to find it. To stand in it and read the music preserved on the plasterwork walls where the Protestant movement had found refuge was lifechanging. That kind of adventure which connects the present to the past in an offthe-beaten-path kind of way is what makes travel so special to us!

The Value of Travel . . .

Jim and Georgiann Potts join others wandering though the stones at Stonehenge. This was long ago when there were no ropes restricting access to the monoliths.

steak-and-kidney pie. Before you become too judgmental reading this, understand that I was doing this purely as a culinary experiment in English life. Jim just shook his head when I placed my order. When the dish was served, it was looked perfectly delicious. The pastry was golden brown and when I pierced it with a fork, I uncovered a rich, brown gravy holding slices of steak and, well, bits of kidneys. I took one bite and that finished my experiment. During the rest of the meal, Jim and English friends who had joined us spent a good deal of time educating me on “offal” --- the proper name for internal organ meats like kidneys. I noted that it rhymes

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As I remember these adventures, I am reminded of how very fortunate I am to have had these experiences. This Delta girl who loved traveling in books at an early age was lucky enough to get to travel “for real” quite extensively as an adult. The people whom we have met, the sights that we have seen, the cultures that we have encountered and embraced, the experiences we have shared --- all of these have made for a life filled with an education that books, no matter how grandly written or beautifully photographed, could ever have delivered. In Innocents Abroad, Mark Twain expressed what would over time become my own belief about the value of travel. “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrowmindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts,” he wrote. “Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetation in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” I wholeheartedly agree. Even the Delta, cherished corner of the earth though it is, cannot give everything that one needs in order to grow beyond traditional boundaries of geography or thought. Lift a glass to wanderlust!


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MINUTES WITH M

Dianne Newcomer Local travel agent sits down with us to discuss life and the benefits of working with a travel agency EMMA SAGER

T

raveling these days can be stressful! Not to mention, it can be very expensive if you do not find the right deals. The internet is an option we all have used before, but is it the most effective method of planning a vacation? Seeking the help of a travel agent can ensure that you are making the best possible decisions when preparing for your getaway! Local travel agent, Dianne Newcomer, has worked with the Monroe Travel Service for years and can assist you with all of your travel needs. She sat with us for 15 minutes to get to know her and how her position at Monroe Travel Service has helped many locals create the vacation destination of their dreams.


Where are you from and what was your childhood like? I grew up in Winnsboro, TX, a small town that was a whole lot like Andy Griffith’s Mayberry. It was the kind of place where you knew everybody and everybody knew your business. I honestly believe the old African proverb about “it taking a village to raise a child” is so true, and I was very fortunate to have challenging and kind teachers, both at school and church, excellent coaches, and so many other people to know well enough to follow their example. Also, I had the best and coolest parents ever! Our family never had much, but we always had enough. Mama and daddy doted on their three girls, made us believe we were special and taught us that anything was possible if we tried. They also wanted us girls to know there was a bigger world beyond the city limit signs of Winnsboro, which meant we took a lot of road trips. How my parents survived the whining, bickering, and singing of three girls in the backseat of a car without all the techno gadgets of today is honestly beyond me! When it came time for college, my daddy insisted I leave my safe little world in east Texas and head all the way to Lubbock and Texas Tech University. He thought the different culture of west Texas would do me good, and he was right! I loved college and graduated with a degree in English, an engagement ring, and a teaching job at a high school in San Antonio, TX, where my husband-to-be, Rob, was in the Air Force.

fancy website or trip advisor report does not always tell the real story. As a travel agent, we have resources, including client feedback, that can be invaluable to someone planning a trip. We may not have been everywhere, but know where to find the right people with the answers. The business has given us the opportunity to see so much of the world. What a gift that has been for us, as well as our two daughters and now our grandchildren. We are lucky; we travel to make your travels better, so it is a tax writeoff.

How did you get into the travel business? It was easy; I basically married the right person! Rob’s mom, Irene Newcomer Solomon, had been running Monroe Travel Service for years, and we moved back to Monroe so he could finish his degree at Northeast Louisiana University. In the early 70’s, there was a teacher glut, and I could not get a job, so my sweet mother-in-law hired me. I have been here ever since.

client feedback, that can be

What do you love about being a travel agent? It is the best job in the world! Our clients want to come see us. We sell fun, so how could it not be great? Every day is different and brings a whole new set of requests. Of course, the job can be tedious and challenging. We work hard to save our clients time, money and disappointment by knowing as much as possible about new resorts, destinations, tour companies, airlines, and cruise lines. There are so many different ways to experience the world, and the internet can be confusing and frustrating. A

Is there anything that you dislike about being a travel agent? I work too hard and do not have

“There are so many different ways to experience the world, and the internet can be confusing and frustrating. A fancy website or trip advisor report does not always tell the real story. As a travel agent, we have resources, including invaluable to someone planning a trip. We may not have been everywhere, but know where to find the right people with the answers.”

enough time to travel. I am almost 70years-old; time is not on my side. There is so much of the world Rob and I want to see, but this is a job that is hard to walk away from. We like it. Ideally, we would love if someone walked in our office tomorrow, wanted to buy our business, and agreed to let us work for them and travel for about six months out of the year. That would make being a travel agent a totally dream job at this stage of our lives! Why should someone still book with a

travel agency instead of booking a trip online on their own? What are some of the perks? I wish I could give you names of clients who could answer that question better, but let me just give you a quick example. I just saved a couple over $1,000 on a business class airfare to Europe from the price they had been researching. Their friends, who were traveling with them, wanted to fly in Delta Comfort across the Atlantic to Budapest. The Delta website showed it was not possible, but I got it done. I am not saying as travel agents we can manage such good “deals” every time, but why deal with strangers? Not only does our travel agency support your schools and city with our taxes, but we are bonded (your money is safe with us) and we are right here! You can easily find us if you have questions or if anything goes wrong. The bottom line is that it is nice to have someone looking out for you when you travel. To be honest, I could mow my yard, but I do not want to do it. Many of us have a personal CPA, hairdresser, pool guy, landscaper, insurance salesman, trainer, financial adviser, and banker, it just makes sense to have personal travel agent! What make Monroe Travel different from other local travel agencies? I do not know if I can answer that question objectively, but I do think our staff is very professional, extremely conscientious, and very well-traveled. We have all been working together a long time and, to paraphrase that farmers insurance commercial: “When you have seen a lot, you know a lot.” How long have you been writing about travel? I guess it was about 12 years when the News-Star agreed to have a Travel Page every Sunday if I would write a column, and I jumped on the opportunity. The old English teacher in me loves doing it and writing about the wonder in our world is an easy topic for me. What do you want the community to know about Monroe Travel? Monroe Travel Service has been appointed and receives a commission from the major resorts, tour companies, airlines, and cruise lines of the world, so it costs the traveler nothing extra to use our expertise and experience. We are an advocate for you. How you see the world matters to us, and, if you look at the fact that Monroe Travel Service has survived in the competitive world of travel for over 55 years, then I would say we must be doing something right.

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L VE where you live

EMMA SAGER, KATIE BURKE, GEORGIANN POTTS

S

ometimes, we have the habit of over-looking the great state that we live in. There are endless possibilities for exploration all over Louisiana. This month, we decided to take a closer look at what our state has to offer.

Unique Culture Our culture in Louisiana is unlike any other state. One important aspect of our state is knowing the difference between “Cajun people” and “Creole people.” The terms are often used together, however, they have a history of distinguishing two completely different groups of people who live in Louisiana. First, “Cajun” is a shortened term in reference to those living in eastern Canada, Acadians, that settled in Louisiana in the 17th century. So, the words “Cajun” and “Acadian” are used together to as a term for people that are direct descendants of the deported Acadians from Canada. The Cajuns established “Cajun French” as an official language that is still used in southern parts of Louisiana. The term “Creole” is used in an entirely different manner. Creole people are those that are “natives” of the state. This term was developed by the French to establish the difference between those born in Louisiana and those who were born elsewhere, especially in their motherland, France. These two groups of people developed much of the Louisiana culture that we know and love today. Religion has always played a big part in the world we live in, as we know, our first settlers arrived in the United States fleeing from religious persecu-

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tion. There are many practicing denominations in our state, but Louisiana had a very interesting start with the early influence of Louisiana Voodoo. Also, known as New Orleans Voodoo, this is the use of spiritual folkways that were brought to the our state from western Africa. The spiritual beliefs were often used to worship those ancestors of the people who practiced Voodoo. Also, Voodoo practice was utilized by creating and wearing charms for protection, healing or the harm of other people. These charms were made up of bones, nails, holy water, and holy incense. One of the most important aspects of the Voodoo rituals is the use of singing. Most of the songs used in Voodoo practice have existed for over hundreds of years. Not only does the practice consist of words, but also the use of foot stomping and clapping. It is said that these songs were used to open the gates between humans and spirits to invite the spirits to possess someone. The most famous practitioner of Voodoo was Mistress Marie Laveau, who is now thought of as the “Queen of Voodoo.” She had an incredible impact of the culture that was developing in New Orleans, and she was greatly feared by the community. She was a free creole woman that was born in the French Quarter in 1801. She led a very colorful, intriguing life filled with mystery. Legends of her voodoo practicing are still told today. In 1855, she was laid to rest in St. Louis Cemetery No.1 where tourist, still today, visit her grave and pay their respects.

Music Imagine walking in New Orleans…what is the one of the first thing that you think of? The music. Street performers playing in the background, zydeco music coming from shops along Jackson square, and the echoing of the solo saxophone playing along the river. The music is all around. When establishing our sound, each part of the state has music that was keen to that specific location and differed from other genres in Louisiana. The music of Louisiana is categorized by rural southern Louisiana. New Orleans and north Louisiana. Southern Louisiana is where cajun music, creole music, zydeco, swamp blues and swamp pop originates. Famous Cajun musicians from Louisiana include Dewey Balfa, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, Boozoo Chavis, Clifton Chenier, Stanley Dural, Jr. (as known as Buckwheat Zydeco), Mary Rosezla “Rosie” Ledet, Iry LeJeune, D. L. Menard, Steve Riley, Marc Savoy, Terrance Simien. In the north part of the state, traditional and modern country music were, and still are to this day, predominate. Country stars of northern Louisiana include Tim McGraw, Jimmie Davis, Trace Adkins, Hank Williams, Jr., and Andy Griggs. Now, New Orleans music is considered the most

THINGS YOU WILL MOST LIKELY ONLY FIND IN LOUISIANA Calling a shopping cart a “buggy” All soft drinks are referred to “Coke” Living in a Parish instead of a County Authentic Southern Hospitality Using the word “geaux” for anything related to LSU Reality Shows such as Swamp People, Duck Dynasty, Cajun Justice, Billy the Exterminator, Cajun Pawn Store, Pit Bulls and Parolees.

BEST-KEPT SECRETS Louisiana was named in honor of King Louis XIV, the King of France from 16431715. Until about 1890, City Park in New Orleans was a favorite dueling spot for Creole people. They would gather at the “Dueling Oaks” with a pistol, saber or colichemarde (long sword) and fight with their opponents. Poverty Point in Pioneer has several large earth mounds that were built between 1650 and 700 BCE. They are a complete archeological wonder and were constructed by people who had no access to draft animals or sophisticated tools for moving earth. Mardi Gras colors are purple stands for justice, gold for power and green for faith. Louisiana’s waters are home to 117,518 oyster reefs. The oldest city in Louisiana is Natchitoches. It just celebrated its 300th anniversary in January, 2014. Louisiana is the biggest producer of seafood in the contiguous U.S. The first bottler of Coca-Cola, Joseph Biedenharn, lived in Monroe, where he purchased a small bottling plant to produce the drink. Home of the longest bridge over water in the country. The Lake Pontchatrain Causeway is 24 miles long connecting Metairie with the Northshore.

famous region of Louisiana music. From jazz to the blues, these genres can be heard all over the city today. Jazz music, which was along in the late 1990s, is distinguished by the use of improvisation and interacting with the listeners. The primary instruments used to play jazz music includes keyboards, bass, drums, vocals and guitars. Louis Armstrong is a wellknown jazz performer that started his jazz career in New Orleans. Other famous jazz musicians are Buddy Bolden, Jelly Roll Morton, D’Jalma Ganier, Original Dixieland Jass Band, Benny Goodman, and Duke Ellington. Blues music was also developed in the last 1990s like jazz. However, blues music is distinctive through its usage of lyrics, bass lines and instrumentation. Many elements of blues music formatting can be traced back to the music of Africa. Some prominent blues musicians are Robert Johnson, Ma Rainey, Charley Patton, Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, Otis Rush, and B. B. King. It is no secret that one of the biggest things that represents Louisiana culture is the celebration of MARDI GRAS! This French term is translated to “Fat Tuesday,” which is based on Christian beliefs. In the religion, Fat Tuesday is the last day of feasting before the start of the Lent season. Lent is the religious observance of Jesus’ 40 days of fasting while in the desert. During this time, followers of this religion commit to fasting, or giving up certain aspects of life, typically food, to represent their commitment to Jesus up until Easter Sunday when he was resurrected. The first Mardi Gras celebration occurred in Mobile, AL, which was the French capital of the Louisiana territory during the 17th century. In 1723, the French settlers moved the capital establishment from Mobile to New Orleans. From there, the rest is history. If you have never experienced Mardi Gras in New Orleans, put it on your bucket list! There is nothing else like it in the world! Opportunities for excitement and new experiences are available wherever you go. From Shreveport, to Lake Charles, to Alexandria, to Monroe, to Baton Rouge, and to New Orleans, each city beholds another detail of the Louisiana history that is vital to our culture. In writing this article, we had not even heard of some of these things right here in our own backyard. It made us question, “What are we missing out on that is in reach of our fingertips?” How come it is not our own destination location most of the time? We think part of this is because sometimes we need to be reminded of the awesome things present in our state, which is why we wanted to share 101 GREAT THINGS TO LOVE ABOUT LOUISIANA. We encourage you to take some time and explore, and when you have some time off, enjoy a Louisiana “Staycation.”

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NORTH

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Natchitoches Historic District: The 2 5 3 4 the Cane thirty-three blocks along River includes more than fifty centuries old buildings. Founded in 1714, it is home to museums, restaurants, art galleries, antique shops, trolley and boat rides, book 11stores, and 12 more.13 14 stay in 15 If you visit, a charm- 16 ing Bed & breakfast that are reminiscent of the Natchitoches’ old river port. Or explore the French-Colonial architecture in a Historic District 21 Walking 22 Tour. 23 24 25 1

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Mudbug Madness in Shreveport: Flying Tiger Brewery 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 Mudbug Madness is the celebration of crawfish and Louisiana cuisine over a famous for their 38 39 31 33 32 37family became 40 famfour-day period. The34festival is35 held an- 36area. The ily-operated business called “Duck Commandnually during Memorial Day weekend. er.” The business is a sportsman’s paradise 19 13 12 14 15 16 17 with its18 20calls and duck detop-of-the-line duck Landry Vineyards: Landry Vineyards 2 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 is a locally owned wine vineyard that coys. By 2013, the show was getting the atten48 viewers. 49 Each 50 41 has been 43 42 44 45 47 10 million tion46 of more than epiproducing quality wine sode portrayed the various challenges the since 1999. It offers more than 20 difRobertson family faced in their southern heri28 29 21 22 types 23 25 26 27 30 ferent of wine 24 which includes white, rose’ and red wine anywhere from dry to tage with an abundant sense of humor. The 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 20 in March of 2017 after being one noticed in 56 show ended 58 59 51sweet. One 53 is particularly 52 wine that 54 55 57 60 of the most well-known reality shows of its the community is their Blueberry Merlot. time. We love the Robertson’s for putting us 38 39 33 32 34 35 40 Flying Tiger Brewery: In36down- 37on the map! 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 town 28 29 23 22 24Monroe, 25Flying Tiger 26 Brewery 27 30 Biedenharn Museum and Garestablished its name based of the leg68 69 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 1 2 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 dens: This is a home museum that endary Flying Tigers of World War II. was once the residential spot for the The brewery has a shark nosed plane that rep48 of the49 41 43 42 44 45 46 47 creator 50 first Coca-Cola bottle, resents the history of the Flying Tigers. 18 19Joseph 39 14 15 16 17 20 38 33 34 35 36 37 40 in 1894. His daughter, EmBiedenharn, 78 79 71 73 of the 72 74 American 75 Rose76 ma Louise 77 “Emy-Lou” opened the 80 home for The 18 19 13 6Gardens 12 5 14 7 15 8 16 9 17 10 20 4 historical touring and she was known for her Society in Shreveport: If you ever during want to stop the 57 opera career 58 59 World60War II. 53 52 54 and smell 55 the roses, 56 29 23 where to28do 24 American 25 Rose26Center is27 30 48 Ralph 49& Kacoo’s: 42 it! It43features44more than 45 65 rose 46 47 50 Established in 1969 88 2 8 6 gardens, 5 7 10 928 81 83 82 84 85 86 87 90 3 4 on a marshy bend of the89 old Mississip29 21 20,000 23 22 rose bushes, 24 25 26 27 30 and a variety of sculptures, 18 19 15 16 17 20 pi called False River, it instantly beplants, and fountains. It is home to American came Rose Society and is located at 8877 Jefferson 68 a popular 69 place to 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 visit. With a 38 39wide range 34 35 in Shreveport. 36 37 40 of dishes from blackened alligator Paige Road 58 59 53 54 55 56 57 60 half shell,99 it is Cajun-style cui91 93 92 94 95 96 to oysters 97 on the98 100 101 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 20 38finest. The 39 Bossier 33 32 34 35 36 37sine at its 40City location has 28 Home of Duck Dynasty: Starting in 29 24 25 26 27 30 8 6 5 7 10 9 2012, the hit reality television show on banquet rooms that can seat 200 people, as 79 73 72 74 the lives 75 of the 76Robert-77 well as,78 80 smaller intimate rooms. Today, the resA&E featured 48 49 has multiple 43 44 45 46 47 50 taurant locations across the gulf. Landry Vineyards locals West Monroe 68 69 63 son family, 62 64 65 of the66 67 70 1

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Peach Festival: When June comes ARCHITECTURE: Christ Episcopal 18 19 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 10 everyone knows that it is time around, 1 2 8Church: 9The church 6 5 7 10 was founded dur3 4 for some peaches! This festival that has Tunica-Biloxi Pow Wow ing the Civil War in 1856 in St. Joseph, been held in Ruston since 1951 has LA. Patrick Murphy from Natchez was some of the best local fruit that you have ever the contractor for the church, and it took 28 the building. 29 tasted. Along with the peaches, there are also 21 to construct The 23 22 24 25 26 $3,20027 30 original Centenary 18 19 1 2 8 6 5 of Louisiana: 7 name of 10 9 3 4 College various20 foods, arts and crafts, entertainment the church was “Church at St. Jo18 19 11 13 This 14 12 15 16 17 20 four-year arts and sciences college all rolled into one fun-filled1weekend. seph.” 9However,10in 1888, it was renamed as 2 6 7 3 is4 located 5in Shreveport. Founded in 8 “Christ Episcopal Church.” rd 1825, it is the 43 oldest university in Superior Bar & Grill: This restaurant the32United States. 10 38 9 39Tribe Pow 33 34 35 36 37 40 Wow: LoTunica-Biloxi Shreveport and is known for31its 5 28 29 1is in30 2 8 623 7 10 9 3 421 18 28cated 29 19 22 24 25 26 27 30 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 in Marksville, the Tunica-Biloxi “superior” Mexican cuisine, but mainRuston Maker’s Fair: The first celeTribe Pow Wow celebrates the dance, ly its MARGARITAS. 18 19 11 13 12 14 bration 15 of the16fair was 17 20 in 2016 and is music, arts and food of the Native located in Ruston. This event encourAmericans in the Tunica-Biloxi Tribe. This was ages to 46 48 49 41 43of the local 42 people 44 community 45 47 50 19 20 38 39 40 University of Louisiana in21Mon- 22 one of 28 four recognized 29 40 as30Native American 23 24 26 27 31 33 32 34 artistic 35 36 37 1 14 2 15 8 38 625 People 5 18 7are20 19 9 39 10 3showcase 4 their 11 13 12 16 17 talents. able roe: In September of 1931, the UniTribes in all of Louisiana. The event serves an woodwork, 28 29 22 24 all types 25 of artwork, 26 27 30 versity opened its21 in 423to purchase to celebrate the culture of the 1 2 first classes 8 coffee, 9 opportunity 6 5shirts, word 7 10 3 jewelry, art, soaps, tea, Brown Hall as Ouachita Parish Junior Tribe. honey, and so many more locally-made articollege. 8 58 29 59 30 Through the years, it has changed 51 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 48 49 7 50 38 39 Theater: 31 24 33 26 32 34 27 35 28 36 29 37 30 40 Since Dixie names, 21 and finally of 25 facts. 23the University 22adopted 50 it opened its 11 12 41 13 42 14 43 15 44 16 45 17 46 18 47 19 48 20 49 doors in 1928, Dixie Theater has been Louisiana at Monroe 31 in 1999. 32 The mascot 38 39 33 6 34 7 Chennault 35 8 Aviation 36 9 37 10Military 40 1 2 5 and 3 4 a historic theater-like venue that is lochanged from 18 19 11 “Indians” 13 12 to “Warhawks” 14in 15 Museum: 16 17 20 The museum was estabcated in Ruston. It suffered from a se2006 and the campus continues to grow and lished in Monroe to honor and high- vere fire in 1933 and had to be totally recon39 40 expand every year. 68 69 61 63career 62 65 Claire66 67 70 58 59 31 60 32 light of 38 64 39 33 34 35 36 37the 25 40 48 49name 4152 4354 4253 4455 45General 4657 47 50 the “New Astor 58 56 60 28 29 structed. Its59 original was 21 51 23 22 24 26 27 30 Chennault. It offers exhibits from wars that ARCHITECTURE: Holy Trinity 43 Theater” it was changed to the “Dix49and later50 4620Iraqi28 1 14 241 847 The 29 645 54418 7the 10 948 34216 4 17 from 19 II to27 11 13 12 15 World26 War War. 21 30 Today, it is a great location for all Church: in 1896, Roman- 524range 1 2Built 8 625 7 10 ie Theater.” 9 322 the 423 esque Revival church faces down- Chennault Aviation and Military Museum is types of meetings, concerts, theater perforthe northeast74 Louisiana’s avia- mances, 78 and more. 79 71 48 72hub of 73 75 role in76 77 80 49 50 town Shreveport. It was established plays, 68 69 59 52 54 60 48 56 41 70 42 31 43 51 47 55 38 6750 58 and military history. 39 68 33 6245tion53 34 35 64 36 65 37 6649 57 40 69 6144 Nich6346 70 as a National Historic Landmark in321984. 58 59 51 24the52 53 26 Edgewood Plantation: This planta54 27 55 28 56 29 57 30 60 created architectural 21olas Joseph 22 Clayton 18 38 Festival: 19 39 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 31 23 33 25 32 34 35 Natchitoches 36 37Meat Pie 40 tion was built in 1902 in Farmerville. plan11for the Holy The main15al18 19 13Church.14 12 Trinity 16 17 20 The historic city of Natchitoches celeOriginally, 13 rooms with tar in the church is solely made of marble. 81 88 there were 89 82 84 pies annually. 85 86 87 90 60 brates its83 famous meat 7859 79 There 80 high ceilings and hardwood flooring. are two Gothic side altars next to the 58 59 51 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 78 68 79 69 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 48 41 43 42 44 festival45 46 the Cane 47 Riv- Today, it 49 The occurs along is the site 50 of a bed and breakfast, and main altar. There are more than 60 stained and consists food, 38 of 65 39 music, 31 33that21 32 windows 36 63 40 crafts, 69 61 62 64 66 67 70 28 kids68 29a venue for weddings, reunions and parties. 23 22 35with 24er37 25 26 27 arts, 30 glass can34be viewed various 45 dancing. 50 2847 2948 21 2342 2241 2443 2544 2746 It is a festival games, 26 and you will not3049 scripture messages for the visitors of the want 98 99 91 93 92 to miss! 94 95 96 97 100 101 church. 69 88 70 89 90 8

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Jackson Square in New Orleans: 23 is located 22 Square 24 in the heart 25 Jackson of the French Quarter in New Orleans and was constructed in 1721. It is about 2.5 aches and has over 2 million visitors was de- 36 31each year. 33 Jackson 32 In 1960, 34 Square35 clared a National Historic Park. It is surrounded2by historic 6 3 buildings 4 such as5 the St. Louis Cathedral. The focal point of the square is the Jackson statue of General Jackson on horseback for 41 that was 43 by Clark 42 sculpted 44 Mills 45 $30,000. It was once a location for public exe12 cutions.13Today, Jackson 14 15 Square is a16 hot spot17 for local music, art and culture of the New Or6 5 7 3 4 leans area. 21

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The National WWII Museum in 28 23 24 25 26 27 New Orleans: This museum used to 8 it 5 7 10 9 4 be called the 6“D-Day Museum” and 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 is a military history museum. It fea61 the contributions 63of the Allied 62 64 65 in 66 67 tures Forces 38 32 WWII. 33 34 35 36 37 23

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The Grand Opera House of the 25 26 36 27 37 28 38 29 39 30 40 32 23 33 24 34 South in35Crowley: The opera house 1 2 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 88 89 81 was82 83 by David 84 E. Lyons85us86 87 90 built in 1901 ing cypress, pine and oak so it is most58 59 51 53 52 ly a wooden 54 55 Grand56is well-57 60 structure. The 1 2 known for it as a venue for entertainment 8 6 5 7 10 9 38 39 33 34 35 36 3 37 4 40 48 49 43hospitality. 42 44 This National 45 46 47 50 and Historic Land18 19 11 13 12 14 15 16 20 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 10117 mark spans over 33,000 square feet. After LyDrew Orleans Saints. Grand of the 8 1 closed 5 died in 61940, the7opera house 10 3 Opera House 9 for 4 ons 2 8 Brees of9 the New10 5 South in6Crowley. 7 684 69 61 63 In 1999, 62 60 years. 64 Lazar 65 67 70 over J. Gielen 66 pur18 48 16 19 are available 49 17 15 20 parades are50 created. Tours 7 Frenchmen Street in New Orleans: 43 11 44 12 45 13 46 14 47 to the building wanted 53 chased 52 54 55 and 56 57 restore 28 29 21 58 23 60 22 59 24 25 26 27 Music is the main 30 attraction on the building entirely. Later, the Gielen family days a week to get a sneak peek of what goes Frenchmen Street! With over 20 bars donated the Grand Opera House of the South in to creating those iconic floats. 1811It reopened 1912 its77 14 15 to a non-profit 16 17 2013 to choose organization. 78 14 18 79 15 71 73 19 72 74 75 76 80 16 17 20 from, you can find any Tailgating at Louisiana State Unigenre of music including jazz, blues, funk, hip doors in 2008 after $4.5 million spent in reno28 29 27 30 53 54 21 55 22 56 23 57 24 58 25 59 26 60versity: fans do vations. 38 blues. 39 63 62 64 65 66 31 67 33 69 LSU 32 68 34 70 35not come 36 to Ti- 37 hop, and 40 ger Stadium just for a football game, they also come for an incredNew Orleans Saints: The New OrMardi Gras World in New Orleans: 29 24 25 26 27 30 28 29 Saints are 21 of year8824experience! 30 a professional foot8925 Tents 81 83 are looking 82 84 for 28 8622 8723 9026are put 27 ible tailgating up leans If you a85hub some night beball team that is in the National FootMardi you36 everywhere, 38 even set 39 up the 40 31 33 66Gras34celebration, 32round 35 68 69 37 70 80 65 75 72 63 73 64 74have 76 67 There is 43 food and44 alcohol everywhere Conference division. The found it! Mardi Gras77World 41 is78 fore.4279 49 South 50 45 46 47 ball 48 team’s signature colors are black, gold and one of the top places for authentic floats for you look, it is guaranteed for a good time. 34 91 73

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white and their logo is a fleur-de-lis, a symbol Orleans streetcar lines14and each15 car is a historic that 2.8 million 18 than19 11 13 12 16 17 hold more 20specimens. It of 9the City 10 of New Orleans. The Saints began landmark. The newest streetcar addition is the is sure to give you something 1 2 8 6 5 7 10 new to see! 9 3 4 playing games in 1967 in the Tulane Stadium. Loyola Avenue Line that opened in 2013. In Bourbon Street in New Orleans: In 1975, the team moved their home game11lo- 2005, Hurricane Katrina caused15 severe dam18 19 13 12 14 16 17 20 38 39 31 33 32 34 35 36 37 40 Everyone knows that Bourbon cation to the Louisiana Superdome, which to- age to the streetcar lines and vehicles. The re29 24 25 27 you want day is known as the Mercedes-Benz1 Super- 21 from the23 but26 2 covery 22 8 Street is28 6 5 is on-going, 7 10to go if 30 9the place 3 4hurricane 19 dome. 20 to party in New Orleans. The street The fight song for the11professional there is now improved operations, on-time 18 19 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 dates back to the early existence of the city in football team is “When the Saints Go March- performance, and more safety than ever. 28 29 fantastic 21 23 22 24 25 26 1798. There 27 30 music bars, ing In.” Who dat! 48 49 41 43 42 44 45 46 are iconic 47 50 The Louisiana State Capitol buildand classic hotels to experience all up and 10 38 39 31 33 32 34 35 36 37 40 Magazine Street1in New Orleans: At 450 State 18 9the street. 19 10 11 2 13 4 ing:14 12 3 15 6the Louisiana 16 7 17 8 down 20 5 feet, 29 30 28 29 21 23 22 24 25 26 27 30 From shopping, to 1dining, to leisure Capital building is the largest in the 2 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 Millennium Park in Lake Charles: exploration, Magazine Street is31a 38 39 33 This 1932 32 country. 34 Art Deco 35 building 36 37 40 58 59 the side60of 51 53 52 54 55 56 57 This park is located on great place to experience the core hiswas the dream of then Senator, Huey P. Long. 1 2 8 6 5 7 10 9 3 4 Lake Charles endless features 20 tory of New Orleans. There is a vast promi- 41 48 with30 49 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 28 29 21 see all 22 23 24 25 26 27 NOLA Brewing Company: After the such as a playground, splash park, to seen 39nence of 40historical architecture 18 19 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 38 39 31 33 32 34 35 36 37 40 Katrina, New9 lawns picnic areas. It’s a great spot to around. 1 8 18 19 10and 20 11 2 13 4 12 3 14 5tragedy 15 6of Hurricane 16 7 17 Orleans brewing companies had to take the kids! 48 49 41 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 68 69 61 63 62 18 64 66 67 70 Jazzfest: Since New Orleans is one of seek out-of-state assistance to 20 make 65 19 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 30 The USS Orleck Naval Museum in 58 59 51 53 the richest in music places in America, their beer. NOLA Brewery Company was es52 54 55 56 57 60 38 39 31 33 32 34 35 36 37 40 29Lake Charles: 21 celebrate 22 Louisi- 23 tablished 24 to bring 25 back locally 26 27 beer!28 30 The U.S. naval ship 49 what50 better place to 48 49 41 th 43 42 44 45 brewed 46 47 50 28 29 21 23 22 24 25 26 27 30 was in service for the United States anana 11 culture than there? The 49 Their signature brews include a blonde ale, 18 19 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 58 59 51 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 Navy from 1945 to 1982. it is nual music festival will be held on April April HOPITOULAS IPA, and a lemon basil beer. 78 79 Today,80 71 73 28 72 74 75 76 77 29 21 23 22 24 25 26 27 30 used as a historical museum. 4027 – May 6 and will feature musicians such as 6950 in New65 Orleans: 6344 62Street 6445 70 Aerosmith, Aretha Franklin, Sting, Jimmy Buf-6142 41 33 43 35 Performers 46 38 6647 39 6748 40 6849 31 32 34 36 37 59 60 Cafe in New Orleans: 58 59 Du Monde Anything including juggling, danc51 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 fett, and many more! 31 35 26 36 27 37 28 38 29 39 30 40 21 22 32 23 33 24 34 25 Beignets are a Louisiana staple! Esing, playing music, and freezing in 68 62 64 67 88 tablished the café 70 has 89 been 90 81 83on the 65 82 84 85 86 87in 1862,69 The New Orleans Streetcars: Since 61 time can63 be found New Or-66 38 39 31 33 32 34 35 36 37 40 serving up the original French Mar1835, this form of transportation is leans streets be local performers! 50 7859 7960 7152 7354 7253 7455 75 7657 7758 80 51 railroads 56 ket coffee and their famous beignets. They one of the first passenger in 48 49 41 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 69 70 684924 hours 6950a day, 70 Museum His-6748are open 7 days a week! 6142oldest6243 63Louisiana 6546of 6647 39 the country and one33of the 38Natural 44 36 6445 31 32also 41 34 35 37 40 tory in Baton Rouge: There are 16 operating street railway in the world. The St. 78 79 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 collections of natural at LSU Charles Avenue Line is the longest of the New 48 history 49

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Abita Beer: Abita Beer was created by the Abita Brewing Company in 21 23 The 24 22 Springs. 26 Abita company 25 was founded in 1986 by Jim Patton and Rush Cumming. The beer is brewed with wathe artesian wells in Abita Springs. In 49ter from50 its first year, the brewing company produced 31 32 34beer has35Flagship36 1,500 barrels of 33 beer. Abita 2 6 5 7 3 4 Brews, Seasonal Brews, Harvest Series Brews, and Big Bottle Brews.

1 21 32 43 Jungle Gardens on Avery Island: 43 42 44 45 Edward Avery “Ned” McIlheny was 11 13 12 14 15 16 17 born on Avery Island in 1872. He was the son of Tabasco sauce inventor, E. 68 69 McIlhenny. 70 In his youth, he studied plants 11 13 12 14 11 area. 13 12 14 in53 the Then in55 1895, he5615 51 and animals 52 54 21 22 24 sanctuary 25 to protect 26 founded a23 private bird the endangered snowy egrets. In the 1920s, 2 6 5 7 3 4 Ned converted the private island estate into 79 80 1 2 1 2 54170 3 3 4 the Jungle 21 Gardens.22 Today, there 23 21 23 22 are 24 61 of garden 62 and 63 64 areas65that acres bird sanctuary 31 33 32 34 goes along Bayou Petite35 Anse on36 Avery Is-37 It is open15 to tourists 13 land. 14 12 16 every day 17 of the18 88 89 year! 90

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28 29 23 24 sites in 25the United 26 States, 27 St. 30 iconic 100 101 Louis Cathedral sits in the middle of 28Tour: Locally 28 29 Honey 29 21 23 22 24 25 26 Island 27 Swamp 21 23 22 24 25 26 27 30 48 48 49 42 41 Orleans. 43 42The church 44 45 46 8847 the New 8947 Tour90 81French quarter 8241 in 83 8443 8544 8645 8746 owned, Cajun Encounters Com18 19 13 12 14 15 16 17 20 58 pany offers in54 1718 and55 completed 59 53 52 was founded 56 in 1794,57 60 one-of-a-kind tours that

The Mercedes-Benz Superdome: 50 Home of the New Orleans Saints, this venue is also the location for the Sughaving been rebuilt a few times after fires and 1 ar Bowl,2 New Orleans Bowl, and 5 take you deep into the swamp lands 6 3 4 38 39 33 34 35 36 37 40 storms. It is a historic place of worship with many other events. It broke ground in 1966 of southern Louisiana. Be prepared to see al38 38 39 feed60 39 31 conservation 33 restoration. 32 34 35 ligators 36up close 37and personal 40 31 continuous 33 32 34 35 37 40 and To- 36 58 58 as100 they 59 51 53 52 54 55 56 60 its first NFL game in August of 1975. 9251 4 9352 10159 and held 2 91 8 9756 6 9554 5 9453 7 9655 10 9957 9 9857 3 day, 29the boat. 21 23 has over 22 the parish 24 6000 members. 25 26 27 from28 30 This is an acIt was also used as the primary shelter for them the side of 68 south that 69 is not 70 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 in the those seeking refuge after Hurricane Katrina. tivity to be missed! 6 5 Red Dress 10 9 3 4 The Run7 in New8 Or11 13 12 14 15 16 48 49 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 leans: Though the Red Dress Run did ARCHITECTURE: St. John’s CatheNew Orleans Museum of Art: 48 48 49 49 41 43 the city 42New Orleans, 44 45 46 47 50 41 not originate 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 in 68 dral: within this69 mu68 69 61 63 62 64 66 67 70 61 63 18 65 62 64 19 Located 65 66 City Park, 67 70 The Cathedral of Saint John the 13 14 15 16 38seum is20 39 33is definitely 32 34 one of 35 36 40 the most17 enthusi- 37 Evagelist is the mother church of the the oldest fine arts museum 78 79 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 astic participants. The tradition is thought to Catholic Diocese of Lafayette. Origiof New Orleans. It was established in 18 19 14 have begun 15 16 17 20 21 23 22 24 25 26 59 53 54 55 when56 in 1987 a woman57 wearing a58 nally called l’Église St-Jean du Vermilion, the 1911. 60 a high friend in56 was founded in 1821, with the cathe58 58 59 59 51while visiting 53 school74 52 54 55 56 57 60 parish 51 red dress 53 52 54 55 57 60 78 78 79 79 71 73 72 75 77 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 California and up meeting 28 76 29 Louis Saint Cemetery No. 1: Open-80 23 22 24 ended 25 26 “a drinking 27 30 dral erected in 1918. It is located on Cathedral 43 46 8848 group problem” 8949the cemetery 8141 ing in 1789, holds 8242 with83a running 8444 8545named86the 8747 9050 Street in downtown Lafayette. The land was Hash Though 27 she was in28for29 above-ground vaults constructed in 23 24 House25Harriers.26 30 donated by 32 Jean Mouton, planter 31 33 a wealthy 34 35 36 68 69 18th & 19 63 attire, the 62 64 woman 65joined the 66 group in 67run70th centuries. It is known mal the who founded the town of Vermilionville. The ning name Lafor the tomb most famous 68 88 68 Cathedral was built in Dutch Romanesque 88 69 89 89 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 81thus, earning 83 61 anyway, 63 82 84 85 86 87 90 62 65 66 67 70 81 the 64 83 82 “The 84holding 85 86 of the69 87 90 39 priestess 33 dy in Red.” 34 From 35 36 37Run tra- 38 voodoo 40of New Orleans, Marie Lathere, the Red Dress 58 Revival Style and notable features include 59 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 98 99 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 dition has spread globally and has raised milveau. Some say that she continues her work Munich-produced stained glass, oil paintings, 38 39 34 35 36 charities. 37 40 for beyond the 41 43 When44 42 organ. 46 and a Casavant Frères visiting 45 78 form79 73 lions of 74 dollars 75 76 Over the 77 past 10 80 grave. years, New Orleans has raised about 2 million Lafayette, swing by and gaze upon this archi78 98 78 98 Park is 79 99 79 99 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 91 93 71 dollars72 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 74 75 76 77 80 91 93 92 94 95New Orleans 96 97 Park: City 100 101 City for local 73 charities. tecture marvel! 48 49 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 a very place in 68 magical 69 and unique 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 George Rodrigue’s Blue Dog the heart of New Orleans. It dates Sideshow Props: As one of Louisi48 49 43 44 45 46 47 50 51 52 largest 53 54 located 55in 56 88 89 Paintings: George Rodrigue is 83 82 84 85 86 87an 90 making it one of the back to 1854, ana’s prop house iconic from New He oldest the Slidell, it holds a vast assortment of 88home to90 88 89 89 81 artist 83 83 Iberia. 85 82 84 85 urban 86parks. The 87 park is 90 81 82 84 86 87 Garden, Botanical Garfurniture, accessories, lighting fix59 Sculpture 53 54based his 55“Blue Dog” 56 paintings 57 off a58 Besthoff 60 79 72 Cajun 73 74 “loup-garou,” 75 76 legend called which is a77 dens,78 mini-golf, and the80Carousel Gardens tures, and any dressing or prop rental needs. werewolf believed to58 be the re-98 Park. It also holds the largest va59 Amusement It is constantly changing to support the de54 mythological 55 56 57 60 99 93 94 95 96 97 100 101 61 63 62 64 65 66 sult of a curse. Rodrigue passed in 2013, his riety of live oak trees that date back to 600 mands of Louisiana’s film productions. 98 98 99 99 91 today93 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 91 paintings 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 are some of the most recogyears old. nizable in the 68 69 63 62 64 65 67 70 88 89 81 83 82 paintings 84 world.66 85 86 87 90 68 69 64 65 66 67 44 | M A RC H 2018 | D E LTA S T Y LE MAGA ZI NE

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38 39 34 35 36 37 40 8 6 5French Quarter 7 New Orleans: 9 French10Quarter is the 28 57 29 58 30 59 24 53 25 54 in 26 55 27 56 The

oldest section of New Orleans and was founded in 1718 by a French naval officer. The area is the last intact French Colonial and Spanish settlement left in America. The French Quarter is 48 Street and 49 41 43 by Rampart 42surrounded 44 45 Esplanade 46 47 Street, Avenue, Canal 18 19 14 16 17 38for the20 39 the15 entertainment 33 34Mississippi 35 River. It 36is most well-known 37 40 68sec61 63 62 64 65 66 67 tion, famous restaurants, bars and hotels. 52

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Chicot State Park: The wildlife reserve is one of the oldest 58 59 54 55 56 57 60 parks in26 Louisiana. Parish, 29 25 27Located28in Evangeline 30 there are 48 77 going 49on 78 a picnic, 44 73 activates 45 74 such 46as75 47barbequing, 50 79 76 plenty fishing, exploring lodges and cabins. Hiking is also an option when vis8 6iting this7vast park! 10 9

68 63 62 64 65 66 67 Restaurant 38 39 35 Mother’s 36 37 40 55 83 56 84 57 85 58 86 59 87 60 81 54 82 in New Orleans: Since

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83 85 in 86 Voodoo84 Fest: Held 58 59 56 57 60 18Park in76 19 20 78 City75 New Or-77 79 8leans, the 6 7 9 Voodoo10Mu38 39 35 36 sic and 37 Arts Experience, 40 also as “Voodoo 98 93 known94 92 95 Fest,” is96 97 a music27and arts festival29the 28 25 26 30 68 69 63 64 65 66 67 88 83 82 84 86 87 weekend before85Halloween. 18 19 17 20 Louisiana cuisine is easily found 48 49 44 45 46food booths 47 50 with local nearby. 82

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Breaux Bridge Crawfish doesn’t101 love some 98 Festival: 99 Who 96 97 100 58 59 60 Louisiana crawfish? The festival is has become a perfect gath29 30 48 49 for many 50 famous Cajun musicians and crawfish ering location 78 There79are typically loverssince 1960. 77 80 more than 30 bands featured in this event! 68

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LOUISIANA FESTIVALS around the state 50 Black Heritage Festival 69 70 Amite Oyster Festival Louisiana Crawfish Festival Scott Boudin Festival French Quarter Festival Ponchatoula 80 Strawberry Festival Downtown Lake Charles Crawfish Festival Franklin Parish Catfish Festival Baton Rouge Blues Festival 70 Festival International De Louisiane 89 Orleans Jazz New 90 & Heritage Festival Annual Etouffee Festival Breaux Bridge Crawfish Festival Rayne Frog Festival Bayou Cajun Fest 100 Music101 Little Walter Festival Mudbug Madness Jambalaya Festival Louisiana Corn Festival 90 Louisiana Peach Festival Louisiana Catfish Festival Beauregard Watermelon Festival Louisiana Cajun-Zydeco Festival Cajun101 French Music & Food Festival Annual Lebeau Zydeco Festival Delcambre Shrimp Festival Gueydan Duck Festival Louisiana Shrimp & Petroleum Festival Natchitoches Meat Pie Festival Riverbank Downtown Annual Louisiana Sugar Cane Festival Alligator Festival Annual Red River Revel Arts Festival Louisiana Cotton Festival Louisiana Cattle Festival & Fair Louisiana Gumbo Festival of Chackbay World Championship Gumbo Cook-off International Rice Festival Harvest Festival State Fair of Louisiana French Food Festival Louisiana Seafood Festival Louisiana Pecan Festival Atchafalaya Basin Festival

Lake Charles, Louisiana Amite, Louisiana Chalmette, Louisiana Scott, Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Ponchatoula, Louisiana Lake Charles, Louisiana Winnsboro, Louisiana Baton Rouge, Louisiana Lafayette, Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Arnaudville, Louisiana Breaux Bridge, Louisiana Rayne, Louisiana Larose, Louisiana Alexandria, Louisiana Shreveport, Louisiana Gonzales, Louisiana Bunkie, Louisiana Ruston, Louisiana Des Allemands, Louisiana Deridder, Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Lake Charles, Louisiana Lebeau, Louisiana Delcambre, Louisiana Gueydan, Louisiana Morgan City, Louisiana

March 9-11, 2018 March 16-18, 2018 March 22-25, 2018 April 6-8, 2018 April 12-15, 2018 April 13-15, 2018 April 13-15, 2018 April 14, 2018 April 14-15, 2018 April 25-29, 2018 April 27 - May 6, 2018 April, 2018 May 4-6, 2018 May 10-12, 2018 May 11-13, 2018 May 24-25, 2018 May 24-27, 2018 May 25-27, 2018 June 7-9, 2018 June 22-23, 2018 June 22-24, 2018 June 29-30, 2018 June 23-24, 2018 July 20-21, 2018 July, 2018 Aug 15-19, 2018 Aug 23-26, 2018 Aug 30 - Sept 3, 2018

Natchitoches, Louisiana New Iberia, Louisiana Luling, Louisiana Shreveport, Louisiana Ville Platte, Louisiana Abbeville, Louisiana Thibodaux, Louisiana New Iberia, Louisiana Crowley, Louisiana New Roads, Louisiana Shreveport, Louisiana Larose, Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana Colfax, Louisiana Henderson, Louisiana

Sept 14-15, 2018 Sept 27-30, 2018 Sept 27-30, 2018 Sept - Oct, 2018 Oct 9-14, 2018 Oct 11-14, 2018 Oct 12-14, 2018 Oct 13-14, 2018 Oct 18-21, 2018 Oct 19-21, 2018 Oct 25 - Nov 11, 2018 Oct 26-28, 2018 Oct, 2018 Nov 2-4, 2018 Nov 10, 2018

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Donner-Peltier Distillers: Louisiana libations are their fin40 59 60 est! This is the home of Rougaroux Rum made from Louisiana 88 85 86 87 Even though sugar cane. the89distillery90 was only established in 2012, the history behind the company goes back 75 years in the 78grandfather 79 of the 77 80co-founder, Henry Peltier, purchased making. The 48an abandoned 49 50 mill in 1937. Today, the Donner-Peliter Distillers sugar 68 69 67 70 use of the finest 98 to produce 99 some 96the same 97sugar mill 100 101 rums and other liquors you can find in the south. 39 58

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Louisiana Pirate Festival: Located in Lake Charles, this is a 58 59 57 60 festival you will not want to miss! It features the celebration of the legend pirate Jean Lafitte. The myth is that he buried 88 89 84 85 86 87 90 48 46 47 50 shore. treasure along the49 Lake Charles This two-week long 19 20 38 consists 39 of all types 40 festival of games, music, events, and activities for any family! 68

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88 89 87 90This restaurant was opened by Middendorf’s Restaurant: 60 79 Middendorf, 80 Louis a traveling salesman. After he lost his job in

the 1929 stock market crash, he moved to the tiny fishing of Manchac. With the help of the former mayor of New Orleans, Louis their 98family opened 99 97 and his 100first café 101in 1934. Since then, the restaurant has changed hands a few times but kept their timeless recipes 68 69 70 88 89 87 90 served by the original family.

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Barataria Preserve: The Barataria 68 69 65 outside 70 66 of Marrero 67 Preserve offers a scapes make the perfect location for taste of Louisiana’s marshy wetlands. a vast number of species of birds. The preserve is 23,000 acres that inMany cludes bayous, forests, swamps, marshes; with 58 parks 59 resorvoirs 88 60 have 89 observa90 86 87 and tion decks trails for bird 78 of birds. 78 There 79 79 71 73 80 72 perfect77 74 alligators 75 and over 76 200 species 77 74 and nature 75 76 watching. Some common birds that can be are boardwalks and trails throughout to exspotted in Lousiiana are the tricolored heron, plore the ever-changing array of plant life. yellow-crowned night-heron, Roseate Ranger-guided tours are available to navigate Black Bayou Lake National Wild98 69 99 greater white-fronted 61 91 62 92 63 93 64 94 65 95 66 96 spoonbill, 67 97 68 70 100goose,101 you through the marsh, or you can explore life Refuge: This stunning refuge 88 88 89 81Dove, 86 83 81 83 90 82 84 a cell phone 85 86if you prefer. 87 82 84stilt, Inca 85 87 black-necked Scissor-tailed with tour was founded in 1997 and is one of 545 flycatcher, white-eyed vireo, and the Northrefuges in the National Wildlife Refern Parula. uge System, governed by the U.S. Fish and 78 79 73Service.74 80 72 Wildlife 75 is covered 76 with77 Black Bayou 98 98 99 99 91 93 91 93 100 101 92 94 95 96 97 92 94 95 96 97 cypress trees and marshy swamp lands, at sunset, the views are breath-taking! There are To navigate through the outHow to get there: 2018 Chevrolet Silverado doors, this truck is perfect for multiple observation decks to watch and phodriving through tough terrains tograph wildlife such as herons, alligators, 88 89 81 83 90 82 84 85 86 87 and towing boats. The doubleducks, and many others. Not happy observcab, 4 wheel drive LT Z71 ALL ing, take a canoe or kayak and navigate STAR Edition is available at Jim through the beautiful waters. 92

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view of Louisiana, or looking for the perfect photo opportunities of the wetlands, the Creole Nature Trail is a perfect 88 89 90 43 41 71 way42to72 spend the covers452675miles46 of76 73 day.44It74 beaches along the Gulf of Mexico 61 and offers 62 many different options to explore. Visiting Lake Charles from May to September, you can grab net and bait to catch blue crabs. 99 100 a dip101 51 52 81 53 82 54 83 55 84 56 85 57 Check out www.visitlakecharles.org for GPS 71 73 72 coordinates to know where to catch the crab and for other outdoor activities.

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the Gulf is for you! Yellowfin tuna, amberjack, warsaw grouper and many other fish in caught in abundance in Grand26 Isle. 21 69 22are52 24 54 25 70 23 51 There 55 are many 53 charter companies that can56 41 42 take you out, teach you how to fish, and even clean your catch!

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Evergreen Plantation: gor28 This 70 29 24 26 27 30 68 69 65 6625 geous 67 most intact 48plantation 49 is the50 5 46 47 11 plantation in the south boasting over 30 buildings that includes 22 slave 18cabins. 19 17 20 plantation is a privatelyToday, the 78 cane 7938 where 7534 7635owned77sugar 8039people 40 36 37plantation 56 57 still live58in work.59 60 down south in It is located 8 the9town of10 Edgard, on the west bank on the Mississippi River Baton Rouge. 28 29 near 30 27

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8847 in New 8948 Orleans: 8645 Garden 8746 District 9049 68 69 67 70 Underneath the canopy of oak trees

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40 25 26 19 in uptown New Orleans lies unique, 20 Victorian style man19th century, 38 39 40 Once the98location99 for many planta-101 Clockwise, from top left: Oak Alley Plantation, Laura Plantation and Evergreen Plantation 96 sions. 97 100 58 59 55 56 57 60 sold off in80pieces to wealthy 78 were79 77 tions, they 41 43 42 44 31 45 32 46 33 47 34 th 48 35 49 36 50 37 current name from a 19 century plantation Americans looking to live near, but not in, day, it is the location for concerts, plays and 28 29 30 21

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located close to the site. Ironically, for many the French Quarter. Before the 1800’s each other special events. 48 a huge 49garden attached 50 decades the site itself was routinely plowed lot had to the home, Preservation Hall in New Orover to make the land easier to plant. In the therefore dubbing it, “The Garden District.” 68 69 64 65 66 67 70 88 89 86 87 90 58occurred. 59 When it60was process, some Since then, the gardens have been convert51 leans: 53 venue 52 This musical 54 was estab55 56 57 damage 44 45 lished in 1961 to preserve, protect 41 declared42 a National43Historic Landmark in 1962, 46 38 39ed to more 40 homes and urbanized buildings. and perpetuate the tradition of archeologists began a comprehensive study of Today, the Garden District is a hot spot for 58 59 57 60 original New Orleans Jazz. Musicians around the site and began collecting artifacts. Louisiana culture, architecture, shopping, 78 a number 79 74 75and dining 76 experiences 77 The five-mound complex is believed to with of 80 the world travel to Preservation Hall for the 98 99 96 97 100 101 opportunity the musical 69 3100 61 to experience 63 62 64 lega66 created movies being shot within. 51 65 have 53 67 between 52 been 54 68 3700 55and 56BP70 57 48 49 cies that happened and are still occurring in 7 50 in the Late Archaic period. A museum on the Oak Alley Plantation: Easily the the building. site showcases the site’s history and artifacts. 68 69 67 70 most recognizable of southern planThere are guided tours, demonstrations, and 88 89 3 84 85 86 87 90 Poverty Point State Historic Site: tations, Oak Alley is located on the programs offered plus 78 a 2.6 mile 79 hiking80trail. 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 Nestled in the rural fields of northwest bank of the Mississippi River in The site is open daily from 9:00am to655:00pm,66 61 63 62 64 58 59 60 east Louisiana near Pioneer, LouisiVacherie. The iconic plantation is most welland closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and ana, lies an archeological wonder, a 78 known79 77 80 for its canopy of large, live oak trees New Year’s Day. 98 99 about 300 94 95that are96 97 years old. 100treasure! 101 Poverty Point World Heritage Site received81 the World 88Originally Laura Plantation: 89named,90 82Heritage83Site designation 84 85 86 87 71 73 72 74 75 12,000-acre 76 77 Shreveport Municipal Memorial in 2014, marking the end of a long campaign l’Habitation Duparc, this 68 69 70 Auditorium: In 2008, the Shreve- to get that recognition. AS of this date, there sugar cane plantation was construct88 87 90 Memorial Auditoriare only three other archaeological sites in port89Municipal ed in 1804 by Guillaume Duparc. The um was declared a National Historic the United States that have that UNESCO U-shaped structure was approximately 24,000 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 Landmark. It holds 3,200 seats and was built designation. square feet and was uniquely 81 83 82 84 painted 85 bright 86 78 79 during80 The site is shrouded in mystery as is almost the 1920s. It was established as a mecolors. Today, it is open for tours if you want to for the servicemen of World War I. To- always the case with ancient ruins. It got its 98 morial 99 97 100 101 experience first-hand the rich creole history.

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Gators & Friends Alligator Park 78 79 74 75 76 77 80 38 39to 36 37 40 8 Zoo: Are 6 5 7and Exotic 10 9 you looking take your kids on a memorable ad29 17 27 do15 venture not28 want16 to break the 30 18 19 1 24 12 25 13 26 14 but 20 bank? Gators & Friends is the answer for the 58 59 53 54 55 56 57 60 perfect day to spend in nature! Located right 87 88 89 81 83 82 84 85 86 90 48 49 43 44 45 46 47 50 outside of Shreveport in Greenwood, the park 18 19 16 17 20 has go-karts, more than 150 alligators, and an 38 39 35 36 37 40 27 28 29 21 23 zoo.24 22 30 exotic petting After you25 feed the 26 animals, 69 get your adrenaline 63you can64 62 65 66pumping 67by soar-68 70 98 99 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 58 59are ing55 over a gator-filled swamp habitat. You 54 56 57 60 28 29 25 26sure to create 27 30 Global Wildlife Center memories to last a lifetime!

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Splash Pad at Louisiana Purchase 78 79 76 77 80 Gardens and A splash pad 48 Zoo: 49 45 46 47 50 is an open play area filled with sprinklers 58 59 1 64 52 65 53 66 55that 56 constantly 57 70 68 are and 54 fountains 69 67 98 99 93 94 95 This is96a fun opportunity 97 100 spraying water. for right here 88 89 83 84the kids 85 86in Monroe! 87 90 74

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Prehistoric Park: Have you ever 78 68 69 61 75 63 77 62 76 64 65 79 66 80the 67 70 dreamed of walking amongst most feared predators on the planet? Feeding fallow deer at Gators & Friends 98 94 95 97 Park located 100 the101 The96 Prehistoric in 99 Hen68 any child’s 69 imagination 65 66derson 67 70 will light up as Global Wildlife Center: The Global wander 12 acres of land with 23 differ88 89 84 72 85you73 86 the 87 79 74 75 76 77 90 78 80 Wildlife Center is the largest freeent dinosaur exhibits. roaming wildlife preserve in the United States. Located at 26389 Hwy 40 in Lafayette Science Museum: Locat78 79 76 77 80 ed in downtown Lafayette, the mu- Folsom, it is home to over 4,000 endangered, 101 and 88 animals 89 from around the world. 81 95 83 97offers 82 96 84a 98 85 99 science 86 100ex- 87exotic, 90 seum planetarium, hibits, and so much more. There is Guided safari wagon tours will take you to exeven a virtual reality lab for the kids to experi- plore over 900 acres of countryside while see88 89hand! 90 ing giraffes, zebras, camels, and much more! 85 86ence science 87 discoveries first 92

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Chevrolet 99 2018100 97How to98get there: 101 Suburban 1500 LT With three rows of seating available, all the kids can be along for the ride around the state. Luxury and entertainment options available at Jim Taylor Chevrolet in Rayville to keep the little ones happy and the adults comfortable.

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28 23 24 25 26 27 18 19 15 30 20 49 16 50 17 43 42 44 of 11 45 12 46 13 47 Southern Sweets: Atop the best 80 Cajun and creole dishes in the coun48 41 43 42 44 45 46 47 try, many sweet treats got their U.S. 18 19 13 14start right 15here in 16 17 20 Louisiana. The King 3933 24 4034 25 35 26 36 27 37 28 38 29 39 30 40 33 32 34 to New 35 36 3731 22 3832 23 58 69Cake was 70 brought 21 56 59 51 53 5 52 54 6Orleans 55 from 57 9 60 8 7 10 3 4 and90banana foster was created in 88France 891870 at Brennan’s in New Orleans in 1951. 58 59 51 53 52 54 55 56 57

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28 29 23 24 25 26 27 30 Original Louisiana Seasonings: It 1 2 80 6 44 36 7 45 37 543 35 50 3 41 33 48 4 42 34 49 31 46 43 42 wouldn’t 45 be6344 Louisiana a 32 6647 68 69 61 62 64 without 65 67 70 100 101 18 19 8 6 5 lot15 7 10 9 16 17 20 499 14while of spice! Through the years,

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many local seasoning have made 68 69 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 38 39 are available nation-wide! 33 their mark 34 and 35 36 37 40 a staple56for any5751 58 59 52 54 55 56 57 60 5953 5390 popular 5289The most 54 that is5511 6016 48 20 15 49 417613 4378 425814 4479 458017 46 18 47 19 50 71 southern 73Tony Chachere’s. 72 food is 74 7512 28 77 29 23 22 24 25 26 Others 27in30 18 13 14 clude Chef 15 Hans,16Zatarians, 17 and Emeril’s 20 Sea-19 78 79 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 soning Blend. 48 49 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 Creole Shrimp and Grits 99 100 Boudin: 101 Boudin is composed of mul28 58 67 29 59 68 21 23 53 68 22 24 54 69 25 55 70 26 56 90 27 30 60 69 61 63 62 64 65 57 66 70 51 52 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 88 89 81 83 82 84 85 86 87 38 39 32 23 33 24 34tiple 35 36 37 40 types of sausages ranging from 28 29 25 26 27 30 Muffuletta Sandwiches: This Cajun style, crawfish boudin, and 88 89 81 83 82 84 85 86 87 90 unique sandwich originated from even alligator boudin. If you are look-58 59 53 52 54 55 56 57 60 Italian immigrants that settled in New ing for it around the state, try Jerry Lee’s Ca78The sesame 79 bread80 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 38 39Orleans. 33 32 34 35 36 37 is typically 78 79 71 73 72 74 7531Billy’s 76 77 80 98 99 91 jun Foods 93 Rouge, 92 in Baton 94 95 96 97 100 101 Boudin & 68 40 69 61 63 62 64 65 66 67 70 layered with ham, salami, provolone cheese, 48 49 43 42 44 45 46 47 50 38 33 34 Cracklin’ 35 in Scott, 36 or right 37 here in Monroe39 40 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 mustard, and a minced olive salad. made by Chef Cory Bahr. 32 5188

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Fresh Louisiana Seafood: Our Gulf Cajun 88 Muffaletta 89 Sandwich 84 85 87 90 coast produces more 86 seafood than 91States. 92 93 94 95 anywhere else in the United 61 63 62 64 65 78 79 73 74From Crawfish, 75 76 77 80 shrimp, soft shell 68 69 63 64 65 66 67 70 crabs, to over 100,000 oyster reefs are within 98 99 93 the state. 94 95 96 97 100 101 83

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Johnny’s Pizza House: Johnny 83 84 8541 71 8642 72 8781 43 73 8882 44 74 8983 45 75 9084 46 76 Huntsman founded the first Johnny’s58 59 53 54 55 56 57 60 48 49 43 44 Pizza45in Monroe 46 in 1967. 47 Since then, 50 they have spread all over the state. 79 73 With their 74 signature 75 sweep 76the swamp 77 pizza, 78 80 I 91 93 92 94 95 93 92 think everyone 94 agree that 9551the pizza 9652is some can 56 8510157 81 9753 82 9854 83 9955 84100 of the best they have had! 62 54 63 55 64 56 65 57 66 58 67 59 68 60 69 70

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71 72 made 73 74 Zapp’s Potato Chips: Cajun 88 89 83 75 84 76 85 77 86 87 80 with a kettle crunch! They78 come in a79

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fish Etouffee, Gumbo, Jambalaya, Red Beans and Rice, Shrimp & Grits, Oysters Rockefeller, Bisque, Shrimp 94 95 96 Creole, Rice and Gravy, and91Po'boys.92 Enough 93 Mardi 98 99 New Orleans 94 said. 95 96 97 100 101 Gras King cake

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Louisiana Kitchen: 98 99 97Popeyes 100 101 88 60 89 87 59Founded 90 Orleans by in 1972 in New

owner Al Copeland. The original name of the restaurant was "Chicken on the Run" until Copeland rebranded the 98 as "Popeyes" in100 reference to Popeye 99 97 company 101 68 69 67 70 Doyle of the French Connection. In the beginning, it sold traditional mild fried chicken to compete with Kentucky Fried Chicken. The restaurant established its tagline "Love That 78 Chicken" 79 in 1980. 80 Popeyes became a global sensation when it opened its first franchise in Toronto, Canada in 1984. 88

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68 69 70 49 50 88 89 87 Marinated 90 Crab Fingers at Ernest’s Orleans 70 Restaurant & Cocktail Lounge

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58 51 52 This53 55 Cajun 56 Country 57 Southern Hotel: hotel is 54 the Cottages in59 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 58 Bridge: 59 Breaux 53 romantic 54 55 57 60 Bridge perfect getaway in 56 the Breaux 78 79 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 quaint town of Covington. The buildoffers the unique opportunity to ing, originally, was a physical and explore authentic Cajun culture in spiritual retreat and was opened in 1907. The bed 86 and breakfast 81 82 Af- 83south Louisiana. 84 85 87 61 a hotel,62other businesses, 63 64 overlooks 65 a five-acre 66 100 ter previously 101 being lake67and you68can 69 61and it stood 63 62 64 67 70 in 2014, 66 quaint environment! 88 89 81 vacant 83 Then65 82 for a while. 84 85 fully relax 86 in the68 87 107 years to the date that it opened, Southern Ernest’s Orleans Restaurant & Hotel opens its doors. 98 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 Cocktail Lounge: You 78 will find 79 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 Maison Reve Farm: This Frenchthat “Old World Charm” feeling 78 79 71 73 72 74 75 76 77 80 98 99 91 93 breakfast 92 94 95 in 96 97 the Sicilian 100 style bed and located from inspired food. Folsom is a private estate on more This family owned and operated restauthan 30 acres of land with walkways, rant in Shreveport serves up fresh seafood 81 sanctuary. 83 are 84and US85prime steaks. 82 86 87 offer 88 gardens, and a bird If you They true 88 and hospitality 89 81wanting82a true country 83 84relaxing85experi- 86 southern 87 elegance 90 all and for ence, the Maison Reve Farm is the perfect des- your romantic date needs! tination for you! The Mansion at Red Hill Bed & 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 The Steel Magnolia House in Breakfast: Escape the chaos of 98 99 91 93 92 94 95 96 97 100 101 Natchitoches: Build along the Cane the day-to-days stressors in Delhi River in the 1830s, the Steel Magnolia at the Mansion at Red Hill Bed House is full of rich history and cul- and Breakfast! It consists of 85 acres of ture with unique architecture from the Civil grasslands and large ponds. There is an exWar times. Famous for being featured in the ecutive suite, three bedrooms, two living classic movie, Steel Magnolias, it has now rooms, a dining room, a library, a staircase been converted into a bed &breakfast. A foyer and a courtyard. You and your loved great spot to stay when exploring the historic one will enjoy the simple life while at the city of Natchitoches with that special some- mansion! one.

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How to get there: 2018 Buick LaCrosse Ride comfortably around the state with your sweetheart in this full-size, luxury sedan with a 100 101 sleek and modern design available at Jim Taylor Chevrolet in Rayville.


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The Tree of Life in Audubon Park: 48 78 49 79 50 80 98 99 97 100 The Tree of Life located in New Or28 29 leans is believed to be between 10027 30 8 10 9 500 years old. Its official name for it is the Étienne de Boray Oak and is named after 59 of88New mayor This 60 Orleans. 89 85 57 86the58first87 90tree is one of the city’s most notorious tree-climbing 38 39 locations and40for giraffe watching. 46 76 95

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98 99 101 68abandoned 69 brick 70 fort100 was built in

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the sea in the War of 1812. Fort Macomb was built to guard the Chef Menteur Pass into 9 77 10 78 79 80 Lake Pontchartrain. Years later, it was used by a Confederate 58 59 60 States Army in the Civil War. 39 40 the ruins were furthered damaged durAfter ing Hurricane Katrina in 2005, it is now closed 88 A 89 wonderful 86 20 87to the public. 90 Louisiana asset that you will unfortunately have to admire 68from afar! 69 6748 70 49 50

Cat Island National Wildlife Ref99 100 101 uge: Cat Island is a tranquil refuge nestled in the backwoods outside of 78 79 80 59 60 St. Francisville. The beautiful moss trees make the island look like an oasis that can be enjoyed by fishing, swimming, or just 9 40 lounging on the shores. It is home of one of 88the biggest 89 trees east 87 90 of the Sierra Nevadas. It 68 69is worth70 the day trip when adventure calls and you want to explore nature! 29 97

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Irish Bayou Castle: This castle lies 100 101 and will make you near New Orleans feel like you are in a fairy tale! Driving East towards Slidell from New Or60 leans, you have probably spotted this unique landmark. Simon Villemarette built the castle of the world’s fair in 1981. The 89in anticipation 90 castle is privately owned, but you are allowed to take photos of the outside.

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Ruins of Fort Proctor: Fort Proctor, 101 also known as Beauregard’s Castle, is a unique, castle-like fort located on the shore of Lake Borgne in St. Bernard Parish. During the 1850’s, construction on the fort began. However, once it was completed, Fort Proctor was heavily damaged by a hurricane and was never repaired due to the eruption of the Civil War. Fort Proctor can be 90 accessed by kayak or a small boat since it sits on the shallow shores of Lake Borgne. 100

Sabine Pass Lighthouse: Also known as the Sabine Pass Light, this is a historic light house located in Cameron Parish on the Louisiana side of the Sabine River. Its foundation is made of shell-crete and wooden piles and is constructed of brick. The idea for the lighthouse began in 1849 when the U. S. Congress allocated 101

Fort McComb

$7,500, and the construction began in 1855. The Sabine Pass Lighthouse is now abandoned. Today, it stands as the oldest brick structure in southwestern Louisiana.

Sabine Pass Lighthouse

DELTA STYL E MAGAZIN E | MARCH 2018 | 51


Event Calendar Delta Destinations Social Scenes Art & Culture Healthcare Heroes

Tara’s Taste of the Town Health & Fitness Non-Profit Features Best of the Delta Community Chatter

#morethanamagazine

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY FOR OVER 20 YEARS

52 | M A RC H 2018 | D E LTA S T Y LE M AGA ZI N E

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5 Answers About Renters Insurance

Gotta love a good combo

By: Paulen Luttgeharm Moving day has come and gone. Your furniture is in place, the utilities are hooked up, and your rental unit is starting to look like a home. Is renters insurance next on your to-do list? If you answered no, you’re not alone. According to the Independent Insurance Adjusters & Brokers of America (IIABA), almost two-thirds of residential lessees in the United States don’t carry renters insurance. Yet a renters insurance policy is more important, accessible, and affordable than you might think. But renters are often unclear about what renters insurance is and what it covers.

Here are the top 5 myths—and the facts—about renters insurance: 1. The landlord’s insurance covers your possessions. Don’t count on it. Most landlords’ insurance covers only the building and damages due to negligence. Coverage for some of the most common causes of property damage and loss, such as theft, vandalism, and fire, is entirely up to you. Without renters insurance, you may have to bear the financial burden of a loss on your own. 2. Renters insurance is expensive. In this case, the numbers speak for themselves. According to the IIABA, the average renters policy costs just $12 a month for up to $30,000 in personal property coverage. That’s solid coverage for less than the cost of a couple of cups of coffee a week. 3. Still concerned about price? Your insurer will work with you to find the combination of coverage and costs that suits your needs. You might even qualify for a discount by taking some simple home safety precautions or purchasing another policy, such as auto insurance, with the same insurer. 4. You don’t need insurance if your stuff isn’t expensive. Most renters’ belongings cost more than they think. In fact, the average person has over $20,000 worth of belongings that are probably not covered by a landlord’s policy.

5.

6.

7.

Think that number is too high? Take a moment to add up the approximate cost of your computer, television, stereo, furniture, jewelry, and clothing. If a fire gutted your apartment tomorrow, would you have the cash to replace it all? Renters insurance covers only your possessions. In fact, renters insurance covers much more than just your personal property: The average policy also includes up to $100,000 in liability coverage. That means in the event of a covered loss your insurer will help cover the costs if you’re held responsible for injuring another person or damaging another person’s property, including your landlord’s. Moreover, this coverage applies whether the incident occurred within your residence or elsewhere. Renters insurance is hard to get. The Internet makes getting renters insurance easier than ever. You can research providers, compare quotes, and even find an agent online. Or, just as easily, you can place a quick call to an insurance representative. Answer a few questions and you’re likely to get a rate quote almost immediately.

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DELTA STYL E MAGAZIN E | M ARCH 2018 | 63


Canoeing in Broken Bow, Oklahoma

Unplug & Connect Enjoy time with your family with a digital detox. Slow down, unplug, and connect with nature and the outdoors.


KATIE BURKE

D

o you get tired of seeing your kid glued to their cell phone? Or an X-Box game stealing all their attention when you want to talk to them? With modern-day, mind-numbing technology, kids can get enveloped in games of Candy Crush, or can order a movie of their choice in seconds. What happened to going outside to play until dusk or playing actually board games? Long gone are the laughs and giggles that come from playing freeze tag with friends or riding bicycles. Children today may not know how to play “red rover,” or even know what it is. Our old-school traditions simply cannot compete with today’s trends and technology. As a parent of three children, I know that I am guilty of letting my kids be distracted with electronics. It is so easy just to stick an iPad in their hands, or tell them to go to their room where their phones, a flat screen, and Xbox await. Do we, as parents, conform to this new norm? Or am I being too traditional wanting my kids to turn off their phones and be present? With social media connecting the planet, are we losing a part of our humanity by not connecting emotionally and in person with our friends and family? I decided a while ago that my life would not be ruled by computers or social media. While it will be ever present, it will be limited. Anyone that knows me knows that I am the world’s worst at answering text messages! With a demanding work schedule, on the weekends or time off, I want to unplug, turn my phone off and just be with my family and friends. One way that I do that is through our vacations. I love to travel! It is my absolute favorite thing in the world. I love to visit new places, meet new people, explore their culture and why they call a particular place home. I know some people thrive on monotony, they visit the same destinations every year at the same time and love it. It is comforting and reminds them of all the memories made in that place and it is what they look forward to all year. While that may suit most, and as much as I try, I simply cannot get on board with that way of thinking. I do try, but my overly zealous, sometimes erratic way of thinking constantly has me dreaming of places I haven’t been yet. Every few months a serious, insatiable “travel bug” hits me and I need to get out of town. My kids and I have been on our fair share of “cookie cutter” vacations. We have been to the beach, Disneyworld a few times, LEGOLAND, and other multiple amusement parks across the U.S.; but, to me, it doesn’t even compare to the trips we have taken in the outdoors. Camping… A word that can make people shutter. Bugs, sleeping on the ground in the elements, no electricity, or bathrooms…a

Rylie and Parker getting ready to head camping in Yellowstone National Park

nightmare, right? If you are looking for tips on primitive camping and how to survive, this is not the article to read. I love the outdoors, but I prefer “glamping.” While we do camp in a tent, water and electricity are usually readily available as well as bathrooms and showers. The stigma of going camping has to be completely off the grid is silly. Our country has some AMAZING National Parks with very nice tent sites, yurts, and facilities. If we ever take a vacation where we do not camp, we still tend to stay outdoors. A trip to an urbanized city can still be spent exploring. Last year, my husband and I visited San Francisco and spent most of the time outside. Being a history buff, it is the perfect place to stroll through the city and take in the remarkable, elaborate architecture. But, once we walked up and down the massive hills a few times, we were praying for the next streetcar to come along so we

could hop on! While we were there, we took a break from the city and visited Muir Woods. It is a short drive over the Golden Gate Bridge and it was a great place to hike and walk among the giant California Redwood trees. The dense-aired woods were so peaceful with the sound of the creek flowing and roaring throughout, one can easily marvel for hours inside the shade cast from the canopy. Memorable walks are always great, but my favorite way to leave it all behind and enjoy the sweet sunshine is kayaking. For families, tandem kayaks are perfect to keep kids at an arm’s length. Most State and National parks have them readily available for rental if near water. One of the most memorable, happy moments of my life was sea kayaking with my kids in Southern California off La Jolla Beach. Cliffside, in crystal clear water with sea lions swimming all around, I will never forget the smiles on my

DELTA STYL E MAGAZIN E | M ARCH 2018 | 65


kids’ faces as they giggled and laughed and were truly overwhelmed with joy in that moment. As a parent, that is all you can ever ask for. After years of traveling with my kids, I think one of the questions that I get asked the most is, “How do you afford to travel so much?” If you take your kids to connect with nature and spend quality time with them, it is very reasonable. It is possible, folks! For example, when we took our children to Yellowstone National Park, people were shocked that we would take such an “elaborate” vacation. We camped for 10 days at Grant Village inside the park. The drive is long, but if you like road trips, it is totally worth the drive. It is a full 26 hours to reach the park, but there are so many things along the way! We stopped in hiked in the Grand Teton Mountains, and WOW, it is God’s handwork at its best. It was breathtaking. We visited several other things along the way from dinosaur museums to Wild West Villages. Arriving in Yellowstone, we had bought a tent and other camping equipment, and paid $20 a night inside the park. We cooked our food over campfire every night and packed sandwiches and light lunches to bring hiking and exploring with us throughout the day. Yellowstone National Park was hands downs one of the most amazing places I have ever visited. All in all, after gas ($300), equipment ($200), camping fees ($200), and food (around $150); we spent less than $1000 for a vacation that my kids will remember forever. Next time you are planning a trip for your family, I encourage you to unplug, disconnect from your distractions and love on your kids and family. I promise that it is possible to go without Snapchat and Facebook for a few days, even though my teenager disagrees. There are many options to have an active, happy retreat that will bring you closer to your family and help instill the love of the outdoors in them. Go camping, kayaking, hiking, canoeing, fishing, rafting…whatever you choose, just GO OUTSIDE and make memories for your kids to treasure!

Rock climbing in Estes Park, Colorado

Tips to Camp like a Champ Location. With 3 children, primitive camping is out of the question. If you are camping in a state or national park, the maps are all online. When booking consider how close you are to bathrooms and showers. No one likes to make a 1⁄2 mile trek in the middle of the night if facilities are needed! Choose the right wind direction. The last thing you want is to be directly downwind from other people’s campfires or to have your tent blow over in the middle of the night. Prepare for the unexpected and have a backup plan. Last year while camping in the Rocky Mountains, we brought steel grates and had planned to cook our food over

Kayaking in La Jolla, California

66 | M A RC H 2018 | D E LTA S T Y LE MAGA ZI NE


Exploring waterfalls in Yellowstone National Park

campfire. The first day we were there, they issued a burn ban for the area. Luckily, I had brought along an all-in-one electric toaster over/griddle/coffee maker. It was a life saver! Prep your meals. You can make meal time easier in camp by prepping all your meals prior to leaving your home. Have a schedule of what meals to cook each morning and evening. Chop, dice, or mix what you need to complete your meal. Activities. Nothing makes camping more uncomfortable than unhappy little campers. Keep younger kids and teens engaged with games. We bring cards and board games and encourage our kids to hang out with us. Weather. Prepare for any weather at any time of the year! We were in the Rockies last year in June, at the base of the mountains it was sunny and 80 degrees. When driving up the mountain and getting out at the top, it was FREEZING. Thirty degrees with strong winds and snow. We also encountered a snow storm in the middle of August in Wyoming a few years back. You never know what weather will hit while traveling. Buy a GoPro. Out of all the cameras that I own, my kids thoroughly enjoy using the GoPro. They can do anything with it from swimming underwater to roller-coaster rides. I promise the entertaining footage is well worth the price!

American Bison in Yellowstone National Park

Hiking in Muir Woods, outside of San Francisco

DELTA STYL E MAGAZIN E | M ARCH 2018 | 67


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OGLESBY FINANCIAL GROUP Two Ideas Worth Thinking About When Markets are Moving

Darren Oglesby, Registered Financial Consultant

Here’s a number most people would like to see on an annual statement: 21.6 percent. That was the annual return for the Standard & Poor (S&P) 500 Index during 2017. In general, U.S. stock indices did quite well last year – and the year before, too. For instance, the S&P 500 Index was up 11.8 percent in 2016.1 While no one can invest directly in an index, recent returns make it easy to understand why U.S. stock markets have been popular with investors. Morningstar reported record amounts of money were invested in various types of U.S. stock investments during 2017.2 Whenever large numbers of investors are doing the same thing, a prudent course of action is to step back, take a breath, and evaluate the situation. Here are two questions that deserve some thought: 1. Is the price or return above average or below average? Usually, being above average is considered a positive state of affairs. That’s not the case with investing. Mean Reversion Theory (MRT) suggests prices and returns eventually move back toward the average. In other words, when annual returns are above long-term averages, they’re likely to move lower. The reverse is true, too. When returns are below long-term averages, they may move higher.3 Consider the S&P 500 Index. It returned 21.6 percent last year. The historic average annual total return for the Index over the last 89 years, from 1928 through 2017, was 11.7 percent. During the last 40 years, the average total return was 11.4 percent.4 Therefore, 2017 returns were well above average.

That doesn’t mean 2018 returns will be below average. It simply suggests investors may be buying high. In addition to prices and returns, MRT can also apply to interest rates and price-to-earnings ratios.3 MRT is the bucket of cold water that can help restore sanity when investments trade well above (or well below) historic averages. 2. Are animal spirits informing investors’ opinions? Animal spirits is a term economists use to describe investor behavior. The blog Organization and Markets explained, “The new behavioral economics literature uses the term to refer to a range of behavior which falls outside what is normally understood as rational.”5 In Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters, co-authors George Akerlof and Robert Shiller said animal spirits are often inspired by ‘new era’ stories that “purport to describe historic changes that will propel the economy into a brand new era.”6 You don’t have to think very hard to remember one of the greatest new era stories ever. The story was about the future of the Internet, and it led to the dot.com bubble. The storytellers weren’t wrong. The Internet was important new technology that ushered in a new era. However, investors were so inspired they got carried away and the world experienced one of the biggest stock market bubbles of all time. 6, 7 Back to Basics It’s not difficult to identify today’s new era stories, either. Peruse the research of any bank or investment house and you’ll find captivating tales about the potential of self-driving cars, facial recognition software, space exploration, and lifeextending medical innovations.8 There is no shortage of investment opportunities with the potential to deliver attractive returns. In fact, there are so many it can be easy lose sight of basic investment principles. When you find yourself inspired by the potential of new era stories, and you consider moving more of your savings

(perhaps, all of it) out of investments that have been chosen specifically to help meet your financial goals, it’s time to remember the foundational principles of investing. These include: 1. Defining measurable and attainable financial goals.9 Typically, your goals should describe what your money should do for you. Every goal should be measurable so you know if you are saving enough. Additionally, every goal should have a time frame attached. For example, a goal might be: • A retirement income of $5,000 each month for the rest of your life • $100,000 in savings to put toward your child’s college tuition in 14 years • Leaving a million dollars to each of your children or grandchildren • Providing lifetime income for a child with special needs • Being able to afford healthcare in retirement 2. Developing allocation strategies to reach your goals.10 Choosing an asset allocation strategy and diversifying investment holdings may help manage risk effectively. Typically, asset allocation strategies blend stocks, bonds, cash, and other investments to balance risk and potential reward. 3. Maintaining a long-term perspective.11 Animal spirits often inspire impulsive investment decisions – the kind that can undermine the success of any financial plan. When market gyrations tempt you to make significant changes to your portfolio, even though your financial goals remain the same, contact your financial advisor. He or she may need to talk you down. The basic principles of investing remain fairly constant. Human emotion, however, is quite variable. When emotion tries to jump into the front seat and drive your investment choices, apply the brakes by evaluating MRT and animal spirits. If you would like to talk about markets or review your financial plan, give us a call.

Sources: spirits&f=false (or go to https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/peakcontent/Peak+Documents/Mar_2018_Animal_ 1 http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/datafile/histretSP.html Spirits-Book_Excerpt.pdf) 2 http://www.thinkadvisor.com/2018/01/29/passive-investments-drive-record-fund-flows-in-201 7 http://money.cnn.com/2017/12/08/investing/bitcoin-tulip-mania-bubbles-burst/index.html 3 https://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/meanreversion.asp 8 http://www.goldmansachs.com/our-thinking/pages/what-if-i-told-you-full/index.html 4 https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2018-01-29/low-volatility-stock-returns-aren-t-the-long-term-norm 9 https://www.saveandinvest.org/military-everyday-finances/set-smart-goals 5 https://organizationsandmarkets.com/about/ 10 https://www.forbes.com/sites/rickferri/2012/12/03/asset-allocation-basics-for-investors-part-1-of6 https://books.google.com/books?id=2Rz_cuu88DwC&printsec=frontcover&dq=Keynes+animal+spirits&hl=en& 2/#4080e75612c4 sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwidx5ahlYDZAhVEwYMKHWxlCnYQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=Keynes%20animal%20 11 http://news.morningstar.com/classroom2/course.asp?docId=145666&page=2&CN=sample Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investing involves risks including possible loss of principal. No investment strategy or risk management technique can guarantee return or eliminate risk in all market environments. The information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but we do not guarantee the foregoing material is accurate or complete. Every investor’s situation is unique and you should consider your investment goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon before making any investment. Prior to making an investment decision, please consult with your financial advisor about your individual situation.

Securities offered through Oglesby Financial Group, Member FINRA/SIPC. This material was prepared by Carson Group Coaching. Carson Group Coaching is not affiliated with the named broker/dealer.

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Splendor plendor in Spring A Profusion of Azaleas Afton fton Villa in Saint Francisville

ROSE YOUNG-LEE

Let’s face it; this winter cold spell leading up to spring is getting to be rather monotonous, what with the consecutively cold and overcast days interrupted only sporadically by a few sunny days here and there, as well as the bare trees and stark landscapes that encompass our exterior views. I guess, based on the regularly mild temperatures we have Rose experienced over the past Young-Lee several years, we were overdue for a real winter; and now we are getting just that. However, it will not be long before spring will be here in full force, and the landscape will burst forth with the beauty of early spring blooming trees, shrubs, ground covers and other greenery. Just as Louisiana is arguably one of the best places to enjoy this rebirth of nature, azaleas are by many accounts the most beautiful and popular harbingers of spring to signal its arrival. Hence, it is only fitting that in this month’s travel issue homage is paid to one of Louisi-

R.W. Norton Art Gallery in Shreveport

ana’s favorite shrubs. As noted in the Louisiana State University (LSU) AgCenter website publications, azaleas typically bloom in Louisiana from early March to late May, with early April being the peak flowering season for this popular shrub across the state. Therefore, this is an opportune time to plan a tour of Louisiana gardens in the spring for an up close and personal view of the spectacular displays of

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these spring beauties. From bed and breakfast inns to art galleries; and from stately plantation mansions to the remaining grounds of once grand and beautiful structures; the plantation homes and botanical gardens located across Louisiana invite visitors to immerse themselves in the beauty of azaleas and other indigenous plants that abound in our magnificently landscaped state. An added bonus is that


many of these locales also offer winding paths, hills, waterfalls, and trickling springs throughout their grounds. With so many beautiful sites to see in our state, another benefit of pre-planning is that more than one venue can be visited during a single trip. For example, a planned visit to the R.W. Norton Art Gallery in Shreveport, LA, can be extended to include a visit to the headquarters of the American Rose Society also located there. Likewise, a trip to Saint Francisville can encompass a visit to several stately mansions, all of which are flanked by grounds and gardens filled with azaleas and other lush plants indigenous to our state and reflective of the beauty of days gone by. Careful planning can lead to an enjoyable, economically affordable tour of the profusion of azaleas that will be in full splendor across our state over the next month or so. Whether enjoyed as a structured, docent-led tour at one of the historic sites listed on the National Registry of Historic Places, or a leisurely, self-guided stroll – either with a tour group or as an individual trek – around the grounds of plantation homes and botanical gardens, the displays of azaleas at each venue are sure to amaze. Because of the relatively brief blooming period for many azalea varieties, for maximum viewing enjoyment during the peak

Houmas House Plantation along River Road

Shadows-on-the-Teche in New Iberia

blooming period, tours should be scheduling within the immediate future. For more information on growing and caring for azaleas in your own landscape, visit the LSU AgCenter website at www.lsuagcenter.com. In home landscapes, along tree- and shrub-lined paths, as well as in lush gardens and well-manicured lawns, the many varieties of azaleas offer a panoply of colors and hues to stimulate the senses in our natural landscapes.

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2018 Annual Meeting and Banquet

2018 Monroe Chamber Chairman Billy Haddad, Origin Bank, addresses Chamber members and community leaders

Janet Durden was awarded the 2017 Rambin-Silverstein Memorial Civic Award MN-1000680027

William Smart (standing in for 2017 Chairman Ann Hayward)

John R. Hunter was recognized as the 2017 recipient of the Kitty Keynote speaker for our Annual Banquet was Peter Muriungi, DeGree Foundation Lifetime Achievement in Business Award Head of Servicing, Chase Home Lending, joined in this picture by Tania Hilburn, Executive Director and Site Manager, Chase Home Lending-Monroe

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Montgomery, Alabama

Rich in history with a progressive vision Contributing writer, Jennifer Schmeer, visits Montgomery on the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination.

The airport is small which makes for an easy arrival and while getting my suitcase at the baggage claim I ask a gentleman how far was the Renaissance Montgomery Hotel from the airport. He shared it was only about ten minutes away and told me this was a really nice hotel. The locals seem proud of what they have to offer new guests.

ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY JENNIFER SCHMEER

We arrived in the evening, so our first glance of the city was under the night sky and the historic and modern buildings lit up the night. Downtown felt alive with people walking around; stopping at the plethora of restaurants and shops. Driving around downtown was exciting and I noticed the Court Square Fountain that was built on top of an artesian well and is the location where two communities, Alabama Town and New Philadelphia had grown together to form would be called, Montgomery. On top of the fountain is a statue of Hebe,

Like I always say, don’t turn down an invite to explore a city which brought me to Montgomery, Alabama for the first time. As the plane was landing, a well-dressed woman sitting beside me shares with me that she lives on Lake Martin which is just outside of downtown and shared all of the new venues Montgomery has added such as a river walk. She was proud of her city and the direction it was heading.

Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa…

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the Greek goddess of eternal youth. Across from the fountain is the bus stop that Rosa Parks famously refused her seat thus starting the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a crucial part of the early Civil Rights Movement. You are surrounded by history when in Montgomery. As we pulled into the Renaissance one word came to mind, grandiose! This modern hotel with a rooftop pool and spa is walking distance to the new river walk and I can see the river from our room on the high floor. My teenager will order room service which will promptly bring us her favorite wings and a chicken ceasar salad for me with crème brulees for dessert. We have a full two days planned of site seeing, so we will relax and get a good night sleep for our upcoming adventures.

Shashy’s Bakery… After a comfortable nights rest, we head to Shashy’s Bakery for breakfast. When we pull up, I notice the metal exterior of this building and love how it has been converted


into a modern bakery inside. The benefits of reuse. When I walk inside, the chandeliers sparkle and you can smell the fresh pastries. Scrambled eggs, home fries, pancakes and pastries quickly arrive to give us fuel for our busy day. The black ceiling and booths give the interior a modern feel with the chandeliers adding a touch of glamour. I thought about all of the older buildings we have around our town and how it would be so cool to revamp; keeping the exterior façade while adding modern interiors.

Rosa Parks Museum… Montgomery is filled with history and we begin our exploration at the Rosa Parks Museum located at the Troy University. Mrs. Parks worked as a seamstress at a Montgomery department store in 1955 and her decision to not give up her seat would create change. The museum walks you through her life and the design of the museum creates an interactive experience. You are able to relive the moment Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat. It was a frightening situation where bravery shinned through. If I would not have visited, I would have not known about the five other brave women including a pregnant fifteen year old who also refused to give up their seats prior to Mrs. Parks. Montgomery has been touched by heroes. I felt so fortunate to be able to share this interactive experience with my impressionable daughter as Rosa Parks is a true hero. We made our way to the gift shop and I will buy my daughter a shirt that holds the numbers across the front of the shirt that show Rosa’s arrest numbers. On our way out, we will leave a small donation to show support of this impressive museum.

Alabama Department of Archives & History

Students was held in this lower unit of the church. Services and the Lord’s work continue at this church to this day. My daughter and I walked into Dr. King’s office and you can only imagine all of the coordinating and guidance that was being conducted from this very location. Dr. King directed much of Montgomery’s early civil rights activity including the 1965 Bus Boycott from this very office in the lower unit of the church. Pamphlets were handed out providing instructions regarding this boycott that lasted 381 days which meant daily coordinating had to take place, so that people could get to work and home. People had to work together by organizing other means of travel. It was a peaceful protest that resulted in the changing of laws to protect the equal rights of all people regardless of race. A simple office for an extraordinary hero and leader.

Dexter Ave King Memorial Baptist Church… I knew a little bit about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but definitely not the full story. March represents the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, so this was a perfect time for us to be educated. This is someone who dedicated his life to selfless acts with a tremendous dedication to positive change in order to uplift his fellow man & woman and a true leader by every sense of the word. Our guide will be Wanda Battle, who is filled with love, scripture with the goal to lift us up higher than when we walked inside the front door. Her energy and positive messages are contagious and Dr. King would be so proud to have her on the team. Walking into the church where Dr. King preached was powerful and as I looked around; I imagined all of the sermons that uplifted and guided his congregation. I thought about all the lives that he had

The inside of Dexter Ave King Memorial Baptist Church

Derk’s Filet & Vine…

touched, inspired and souls lifted. The Victorian architecture is remarkable and memorable. It is a beautiful church that has been preserved and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1974. With history dating back to Oct. 3, 1887, the first registration of students for the Normal School for Colored

After our inspiring visit at the Dexter Church which was very educational, we will decide to head to Derk’s Filet & Vine, who has been serving real southern fare since 1997. With a hot bar of fried pork chops, grilled fish, BBQ pork, country fried steak, there is something for everyone. It is quaint and I enjoy all of the southern accents while we sample fried chicken,

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mashed potatoes & gravy and macaroni & cheese. The market carries gourmet groceries, salads, casseroles, fresh produce to name a few. The Bottleshoppe which is part of Filet & Vine as well has central Alabama’s largest selection of wine & beer with over 15,000 bottles of wine and over 750 types of beer. It really has everything you need and the simplicity of it all makes you feel comfortable and gives you a feeling of being transported back to a country store.

The Scott & Zelda Fitzgerald Museum… I will admit to not really knowing much about Zelda Fitzgerald, who is a native of Montgomery, but I was familiar with the works of Scott Fitzgerald as a huge fan of The Great Gatsby. This Fitzgerald Museum is a one of a kind treat that walks you through the lives of these individuals who lived a life filled with excitement and tragedy. It is the last of four homes that survived their travels across the world. They lived a gypsy life while experiencing New York, Paris, Italy, Minnesota and Montgomery to name a few. The home was built in 1909 as a single family home which is now converted into a museum with a top floor unit that will soon be available for rental via airbnb, so everyone can experience this history. Highlights for me included learning about the lives of these two lover birds and reading hand written love letters between the two. Truly inspiring and you can read just how much they truly loved one another. I was also very impressed with the painting talents of Zelda as the Museum holds some of her art work. She was a very gifted painter. It is the mission of the Museum to preserve and protect this home and artifacts in order to educate visitors about the lives and legacies of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. They also sponsor writing and author mentoring programs in continuing Scott’s traditions. I am very grateful for this experience and was inspired by the love story and all of their accomplished works.

Central… After a wonderful day of exploring, we are ready for a nice evening at Central which is an upscale restaurant located in the heart of Montgomery’s downtown entertainment district. This is another building that has been converted keeping the original brick exterior with a modern interior. I loved the expose brick inside and clear view of the kitchen where you can see the chef working on creating new dishes. Chef Brandon Burleson utilizes local produce to ensure freshness. Central has won the number one rated restaurant in Montgomery for the last four years, so we know we are in for a true dining experience.

Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts located in The Blount Cultural Park

Vintage Year…

Filet & Vine

Chef Brandon Burleson will bring out for starters a new dish called, Nashville Hot Popcorn Chicken on steam buns, house pickles and Central’s special sauce. It was so good! I could have stopped at this dish and been satisfied. We will also try for an appetizer the Fett Sow Fries which held smoked and fried pork belly with South Carolina bbq sauce and chilton county peach chutney. This will be a favorite for my teenager and me. For our main courses, I will have the 24 Short Rib with butter poached dumplings, honey crisp brussels and sauce bordelaise. Pure heaven and you can taste the love that goes into every dish. My teenager will order the Filet Mignon as evidence of her expanded knowledge and taste buds of delicious foods. Blessings! The atmosphere is comfortable and also holds a private bar and private dining rooms for those special occasions. Bravo to the talented Chef Burleson! We had a wonderful evening and we slept like babies.

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We are ready for round two of our stay in Montgomery and we will start by visiting Vintage Year for brunch. Vintage Year is an upscale restaurant with a southern twist. Again, I love the exposed brick and modern interior with white booths and sleek lighting. Chef Eric Rivera serves as the Executive Chef at Vintage Year and provides exciting dishes for all that walk through the doors. My daughter desires to try the Vintage Year Cheese Plate and inhales it faster than I can imagine. I had no idea she was such a cheese fan. This held the Chef’s selection of three cheeses, seasonal accompaniments and grilled baguette. This will inspire me to buy some cheeses when we return home; however, I have not had the same success as Chef Rivera. I will have the Crab Cake Benedict with poached eggs, tomato, watercress, crab cakes and hollandaise with a side of fruit. I thoroughly enjoyed this dish with a southern twist. My teenager will have the Chicken & Waffles for a true southern experience. Alabama Department of Archives & History… Our second stop for this day will prove to be an educational experience once again. We explore the Alabama Department of Archives and History with the assistance of Mary Jo Scott, the Archives Division Director. The building is breath taking and I am in awe of all of the architectural design elements. The Alabama Department of Archives & History was founded in 1901 and was the nation’s first publicly funded, independent state archives agency. With the mission of preserving and making records accessible


and preserving artifacts of historical value, the ADAH promotes education specifically regarding Alabama’s history. Mary Jo Scott will provide us with a tour of this massive location that holds so much in history as well as interactive areas for youth. You are guided through Alabama’s history and proved to be an interesting stop during our exploration of Montgomery.

E.A.T South… As we continue to explore Montgomery, we come upon E.A.T South which is the City’s organic garden with outdoor kitchens for visitors to experience local, fresh produce. I am so impressed! E.A.T South is an urban teaching farm that engages the local community by gathering and learning about growing food. They empower people to make healthier changes. They offer interactive field trips with Alabama state standards-based lesson plans sharing how the farm works to sustain a healthy ecosystem. There is two new learning stations with an interactive kitchen to cook produce harvested from the farm in order to create nutritious meals and a history garden that highlights the historical agriculture of Alabama from ancient Native American practices to present day agricultural practices. With Alabama’s mild climate, they are able to grow year around and produce over 70 different varieties of fresh fruit, vegetables, flowers and herbs. The Montgomery Curb Market is the city’s oldest farmers market that is shared with other sustainable farmers and local businesses as well as E.A.T participating on Saturday’s. I was so impressed with the idea of a city organic garden and recognized so many benefits including providing fresh produce to local schools and educating the public. Job well done Montgomery!

Cahawba House… It is time for us to refuel and we will choose the Cahawba House which is a family owned restaurant located in downtown. Downtown seems to have everything! With a focus of infusing local fresh produce with traditional recipes, we are looking forward to another southern, flavorful meal. For us, it is all about the BBQ! We will enjoy the BBQ Chicken Sliders that bestowed pulled chicken tossed in BBQ sauce on three slider buns. And we had to try the fried green tomatoes with balsamic glaze. We are feeling very southern at this moment and enjoying it to the fullest!

Carolyn Blount Theatre… Our next steps will be at the Carolyn Blount Theatre that will remind me of something you might find in New York and a private tour has been scheduled just for us!

Farm-to-table dinner at E.A.T. South

Backstage at the Carolyn Blount Theatre

This was a perfect timed trip as my daughter just finished reading, Romeo and Juliet and shared how she cried at the end, so I knew she was a fan! In 1972, Martin Platt, the founding Artistic Director had a dream of a classical theatre and then The Alabama Shakespeare Festival was born! Originally located in Anniston in a un-airconditioned high school auditorium, ASF ran for six weeks during the summer months. When the Festival faced bankruptcy in the early 1980’s, it was Board Member, Carolyn Blount & her husband, Wynton Blount, who stepped in and saved the day! The State of Alabama was about to lose a great cultural asset if they had not stepped in and built a new home for ASF in a 250-acre park (Blount Cultural Park); opening doors in December, 1985. The Blount’s donation was the largest single donation in the history of American theatre and it was money well spent. The theatre is beautiful and inspiring! The theatre houses two theatres (792seat Festival Stage and the 262-seat Octagon), production shops, rehearsal halls, and administrative work spaces. This is now the largest professional, producing theatre in Alabama and one of the largest Shakespeare festivals in the world! The tour took us through the theatres and backstage amongst all of the costumes and props. It was so much fun and inspiring! This was the most impressive theatre I had even been in and I will never forget it! The Blount Cultural Park is the most impressive park I have ever seen! It also holds the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts which we visited right after our tour of the theatres. This Museum holds several art collections and beautifully located on a small lake. The permanent collection includes 19th & 20th-century American paintings and sculptures as well as an interactive area for

youth & children. Founded in 1930 with the mission to collect, preserve, exhibit and interpret art of the highest quality for enrichment & enlightenment. Walking through this art museum relaxes my soul while stimulating my mind and I feel fortunate to share this experience with my daughter, who is one of the most talented artists I know. Art inspires! After a busy two days of exploring, we return back to our hotel and I will end the day with a trip to the Spa at Montgomery located on the top floor of the Renaissance for a relaxing massage. I will be fortunate enough to speak to Mayor Todd Strange of Montgomery, who shared all of the projects and new venues that have been added creating a revitalized city. He shared how they bridged the gap for investors allowing for investments in the city. They have worked closely with local, regional and national developers that have made positive impacts creating economic growth. The new river walk provides residents with water activities such as boat rides, kayaking and paddle boarding as well as fishing tournaments. The new outdoor amphitheater provides endless entertainment with outdoor concerts along the river with art shows and festivals. Mayor Strange also shared how they utilize federal funding to create trails & bike paths for the residents to have healthy activities. After beautification comes growth! Now Montgomery downtown is booming with new retail, new hotels being developed and now they are moving into the tech sector. Montgomery created a progressive vision and everyone is benefiting! I had no idea Montgomery was filled with so much history and so many heroes. And when we were walking through the airport about to board our plane, I noticed on a wall a painting of Dr. King’s quote, “One day the South will recognize its real heroes.”

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Meg is employed by Lagniappe Media as an account executive. Lagniappe Media is a local media company in North & Central Louisiana operating 9 radio stations statewide and helping businesses worldwide through their Digital Marketing services. In addition to serving as a Diplomat to the WMWO Chamber and serving on multiple committees, she is a member of Ad Club of NELA, the Monroe Chamber of Commerce and several local focus groups. Of the WMWO Chamber, Meg says, “Absolutely, I have been blessed to meet many new business owners along with local charities that have been helped through the WMWO Chamber. I have been in the media business for over 30 years and meeting new people through the Chamber has helped me keep a fresh perspective on our industry.”

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DeltaStyle photographer, Gary Guinigundo, tells his story of visiting his family in the Philippines for the first time in 18 years.

Back to Our Roots The Philippines Mt. t. Banahaw

STORY & PHOTOS BY GARY GUINIGUNDO

Two wo and a half weeks in the Philippines is ot a long time to visit. There are so many not places to see and Filipinos all have a mustsee recommendation that is usually out of reach because of time constraints or transportation issues (traffic). I was blessed to visit a few of these destinations this past January. I have not seen some of my relatives in 18 years so it is time to catch up in person since Facebook and Instagram can only go so far. The following is an abbreviated description featuring two highlights from my trip. The flight to the Philippines takes us to Atlanta, Tokyo, then Manila. My traveling companions, mom and dad, requested wheelchairs so we get to board the planes before anyone else. The Atlanta to Tokyo

Gary flying Delta One to the Phillipines

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flight is the longest leg at 14 hours, then four and a half hours from there to Manila. Thankfully, the flights have plenty of ovies, food, and drinks. Did I mention this movies, is Delta One? So the seat folds flat into a bed and you have two pillows, a full-size blanket, headphones, a box of toiletries, and slippers. On our layover in Tokyo, Japanese TSA agents must be the most polite people in the world. Arriving in Manila, two gentlemen pushing the wheelchairs whisk us through the crowds and to the head of the line at immigration. We head to baggage claim where our luggage is already on the carousel and ready to be picked up. Again, our two helpers grab the bags and get two carts for transport. One of them pushes both wheelchairs, one takes one cart of luggage, and I take the other as we head towards the pas-


senger pickup area. I see my aunt and uncle waiting along with their drivers. Tito Diwa (Uncle Diwa), is my dad’s youngest brother and the youngest of nine. He and my aunt, Tita Apple (Aunt Apple) are the Manila relatives closest to us. My parents have traveled here every year since the late 1990's and my aunt and uncle always greet them at the airport. By this point there are about five people helping place the luggage into the van and car. We have not even touched our check-in luggage since we arrived. I miss this kind of service. Leaving the airport, we get onto the main thoroughfare in Manila, EDSA, which stands for Epifanio de los Santos Avenue. It is around 11:00 PM and there is bumper-tobumper traffic, and we are moving at about five milers per hour. If this was your first time to the Philippines, the traffic would probably shock you. Lane discipline is quite lax, traffic lights on smaller streets are mere suggestions, and there is liberal use of the horn. After about 45 minutes, we arrive at our hotel which is only six and a half miles from the airport. Our first day, we do nothing as our jet lag has kicked in because the Philippines is 14 hours ahead. The breakfast buffet downstairs serves up a giant selection of Filipino, Japanese, and American food. The hotel is connected to a huge five-story mall so we just spend the day looking around and eating. Baguio City is our first road trip and is located about 140 miles north of Manila in the Province of Benguet. It used to take five to six hours to get there traveling smaller roads, but a new highway system cuts that down to less than three hours. We leave Manila at 3:00 AM when traffic is at a minimum. The new highway is state of the art. There are rest areas at regular intervals with everything you need in one location. There is the gas station, usually a Shell or Petron, surrounded by perhaps five or six restaurants. There are also a few shops within the whole complex. We pass through a confusing number toll booths along the way and arrive in a small town before the long 20 mile climb up the small mountain. Baguio is 5,050 feet above sea level and although the road is winding, it is in good shape. There are narrow shoulders littered with vendors, numerous cyclists, and hikers. And everywhere along the way, there are non-stop people, walking or just sitting around. Arriving in the city, we navigate the narrow streets filled with tourists and head straight to the Baguio Country Club hotel. For me, the best feature of Baguio is its mild temperature. While Manila is in the upper 80s this time of year, it was only in the low 60s at this elevation. We enjoy a huge breakfast buffet at the outdoor dining area, check into our room, then prepare to see the sites. The usual tourist spots prove difficult to

Narrow Streets with Tricycles

Lucban

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Up the Mountain

photograph with so many people everywhere. Starting at Wright Park, we take in the obligatory postcard shots in front of the rectangular fountain. Nearby is The Mansion, the residence of the Philippine President when he is visiting. It was originally built to house the U. S. Governor-Generals. It was destroyed in 1945 and rebuilt in 1947. Mines View Park offers a scenic panorama of Benguet’s gold and copper mines. To reach the observation deck, you have to descend a winding stone stairway and fight the crowd for an unobstructed view. One more quick, panoramic stop at Teachers Camp, a summer training center for teachers from all over the country. We make one more unique stop at a construction site for a branch of the Central Bank of the Philippines. My uncle, the Deputy Governor of the Central Bank, inspects the progress of construction. I put on my hardhat and photograph the buildings and land for my uncle’s progress report. Incidentally, because of my uncle’s position in the government, one of the three vehicles in our convoy consists of an armed security detail that follows us everywhere. A week later into our trip, we head to the other side of Manila, 75 miles southeast to Lucban, where my mom grew up. Again, we

Guinigundo Family Reunion Dinner

leave our Manila hotel early, around 4:00 AM to beat the traffic. Our van arrives about three hours later in the densely packed small city. The streets are narrow, and yet, cars and tricycles are parked on either side. The tricycles in the Philippines are small, for-hire motorcycles with an enclosed sidecar for carrying passengers, and they are everywhere. In fact, I think a lot of the traffic in Lucban can be blamed on these tricycles as they can only travel about 20 miles-per-hour. We locate my aunt’s house

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and see that she is waiting by the doorway. I have not seen these relatives in 18 years, but thanks to Facebook, I recognize them right away. Our time here is limited so we catch up quickly, take some pictures, then drive to a nearby restaurant for Filipino food. We order up some Pancit Lucban (noodles), Sisig (fried pork in chili peppers and calamansi, then mixed with egg and onions), and Bangus (milkfish), and rice. After a satisfying lunch, dad suggests we drop my mom off at


her family’s house while we go inspect the artesian well. Dad donated the money to build the pump and faucet for this well to provide a clean source of water for those in the area that need it. I had no idea what this well looked like so I grabbed my camera and a few of us got in the van and drove to the well. It is located next to what I think was a motorcycle repair shop. Basically a faucet with a pump placed into the ground, the well looks well used as the handle looks like it had broken off and was welded back into place. There is a dirt covered plaque with the build date and dad’s name. We clean it up a bit so you can see the words. I take some pictures to document the well, as the locals stare at us probably wondering why all the effort for a pump. We drive back to my aunt’s house, say our goodbyes, and drive back to Manila. It has been lightly raining all day and there are low clouds, but from the van, I finally get a glimpse of Mt. Banahaw, an active volcano that last erupted in 1909. The two and a half weeks ends with a family reunion dinner at my aunt and uncle’s house. The last time I saw some of my cousins was in 1999. Everyone does their best to catch up before we start eating. My aunt has prepared a large buffet style meal with Japanese and Filipino food. The evening concludes with a group picture which takes some coordinating for the seating arrangement. During the Uber ride back to the hotel, it feels like our time here was too short. There are many more things to do and other places that need to be visited. I will not wait another 18 years before visiting again.

Artesian Well donated by Gary’s father, Noli

Traffic in the Philippines

Baguio Country Club

Wright Park

Mines View Park

Build inspection

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GaryG u i n i g u n d o

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GaryG u i n i g u n d o

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Fried Frog Legs

Fishing, Food & Fun Take A Little Trip to the Southern End of the Boot… 86 | M A RC H 2018 | D E LTA S T Y LE M AGA ZI N E


T

his past year has been one of great travels with my family all through the southern portion of our great state. Being a huge fan of our states fishing scene, my family and I opted to travel to one of my personal favorite southern most cities and take in a little red drum and speckled trout fishing. In the past, my hobby has taken my husband and I to such wonderful places as Hackberry, LA, visiting with Mr. Steve Turrentine at Steve’s Marine & Guide Service; however, this trip would take us to the other side of the great boot and a little further south, specifically to the Venice\Buras area of the state. In years past, we have opted to fish out of Empire, LA, with a wonderful guide service, Captain Jody Donewar and his amazing deck hand, Heather Beresford, but for circumstances unforeseen, they were already booked for this particular trip, but I knew Heather’s expertise and connections would not let us down! With a contact number in hand, I hastily dialed the number and anxiously waited for a voice on the other end to answer. “Hello, this is Jon Lemle, how can I help you?” the voice stated. “Hi, Jon, this is Tara Ambrose, and I am desperately seeking a guide to take our children out into the gulf during the holiday weekend and was given your name by Heather as being just the man to help us out!” Thankfully, Jon had a spot for our family and I quickly took him up on his opening. Now this is where I will also interject for those travel fans in the midst who adore a great fishing trip to two, when you are attempting to book an excursion of this type, one most certainly should also inquire of lodging accommodations in remote locations with the local people – with this information in check, Captain Lemle was happy to also lodge our family at his camp, which was located within just minutes of the Venice Marina, in Buras, LA. These are key points that one will want to keep in their memory bank for later, as fishing with guides generally begin at the crack of dawn, so you will want to utilize every moment of your adventure on the water with your guide. Upon our arrival, I had already made plans to have dinner in Buras with Captain Jody Donewar and Heather at the Black Velvet Oyster Bar & Grill located at located at 105 Everard Lane. With nothing to do when we arrived at Captain Jon’s camp but unload our Tahoe, secure our lodging and head out to dinner, we took our time in our departure. Discussing the menu along the way, our children anxiously talked about all the fresh seafood they wanted to try, while my husband and I could think of nothing better than the Black Velvet’s scrumptious sounding fried Louisiana frog legs and fresh gulf shrimp! Walking in the door, the

Vince Ambose, daughter, Sydnee.

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Calamari

kids could barely contain themselves for their first meeting with our two dear friends, and with their mouths from watering at the succulent smells emanating from within the doors of this rather neat looking establishment. My first view inside, I immediately saw Heather and Jody, while my husband walked in front of me with his hand extended in a typical Louisiana greeting. I rounded the table and hugged Jody and Heather and we quickly delved into how the days fishing was for them and their charters. “We maxed them out,” Heather said with a grin, and this is when my “fishing bug” kicked into over-drive! As the tea and water glasses emptied, our appetizers arrived – tender strips of fried duck breast, succulent jumbo frog legs, fried calamari, marinated crab claws and seafood kickers filled our table like a seafood spread. But the nights indulgences did not end there, as the Black Velvet wowed us with seafood quesadillas, seafood stuffed loaded baked potatoes, steak, as well as some of the finest tuna steak imaginable. Needless to say, we all left the Black Velvet fully satisfied and sassy! Moving forward into the journey, it was

Stuffed Mushrooms

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time to hit the hay for the evening and get some shut eye for the big adventure which was set to unfold promptly at 5:00 on the morning following. The kids were so excited, they could barely close their eyes, but as soon as their heads hit the pillows, it seemed that Mr. Sandman did his job with the utmost of dispatch. Up before the dawn, we packed our lunches for a long day and headed out the door with a shot. Captain Jon met us at the Venice Marina and we packed all of our gear into his rig without haste. Cranking up what appeared to be “country style rap” we slowly made our way out of the channel, careful not to disturb the “no wake” ordinance that is put into place. His CB began to go off with random chatter of other guides, chirping in about the locations that they would be taking their respective charters to that day, commenting on who would be starting where and the like. It reminded me of the chatter of the beautiful birds having their “social hour” prior to their morning baths in our fountain in the mornings. The cool moist salt air splashed all around us as we took in the beauty of the morning sunrise, which is something that cannot be explained in words. The gold hues in the horizon, the faint blues and the sun streaming through the clouds in a way that can only be envisioned as Poseidon reaching through with his trident, randomly poking holes in the cloud cover. I glance around the center console of Captain Jon’s vessel and peered at my children who are taking in every moment of this boat ride into bliss and then back at my husband, who seems to be, yet again, back in his element as I am in mine. Shortly after the breaking of dawn, we finally reach our first point of interest along a marshy little stretch of grass that leaks out onto the waters’ edge in almost a way that southern people greet their neighbors to say hello – each walking half way across until the reach the other and standing just close enough to laugh and smile before bidding farewell. First things first, Captain Jon called the morning to order with his list of rules and boat regulations for the boat. Rule No. 1, absolutely NO saltwater catfish are permitted into the boat – PERIOD! For those readers who are familiar with fresh water catfish, the saltwater variety are not so tasty, and they are most certainly more of a danger and hazard to fishermen than some might be aware, hence the strong warning against pulling them into the boat. Jon related an event that transpired from a prior charter not too terribly long ago, wherein a fisherman pulled one into the boat and let his guard down only for a moment. In that moment, the catfish finned him and the pain was so excruciating that it ended up shutting down the charter for the day. The rea-

Captain Jody

If you go Empire, La. What to fish for: red drum, black drum and speckled trout Who: Captain Jody Donewar, telephone: (504) 453-1519, www.captainjodydonewar.com, email: captainjody@aol.com Port: Delta Marina in Empire, LA Lodging Accommodations: Available at the Delta Marina, 317 Rose Marie Drive, Empire, LA, call (504) 657-5116 for lodging availability.

Venice, LA What to fish for: red drum, black drum, speckled trout, and snapper Who: Captain Jon Lemle, telephone: (504) 3296309, email: lemlejp@gmail.com, wwwrunngunoutfittersllc.com. Port: Venice Marina, 237 Sports Marina Road, Venice, LA. Lodging Accommodations: Contact Captain Jon Lemle at (504) 329-6309 or Venice Marina at (504) 534-9357 for lodging availability

Black Velvet Oyster Bar & Restaurant Where: 105 Everard Lane, Buras, LA 70041 Phone: (504) 657-9990 Website: www.blackvelvetrestaurant.com

son for the excruciating pain is due to the fins from the saltwater catfish not being smooth, like a hook so to speak, but instead being jaded like a saw blade. This enables the toxins excreted by the fish to more quickly enter into the offending predator’s system, with the bottom line being it will cause an insurmountable amount of pain to the unlikely foe who stumbles upon them. Moving right along, it was time for the first casts of the morning. Fresh, live, gulf Louisiana shrimp are generally the first choice to an angler in the jetties. Comprised of a mixture of salt water and fresh water

(called brackish water), one is sure to find species from the prized red drum, black drum, cobia (ling or lemon fish), southern flounder, mackerel, striped mullet, or the spotted seatrout (speckled trout) in this region. But you will want to discuss your seasons and limits with your captain, and ensure that you have properly obtained your fishing license for whatever species you are in pursuit of. As our day began to unfold, and after what seemed like an eternity, the fish were finally turned-on! Casting just along the waters’ edge of a marshy, grassy area along the inlet, each cast seemed to bring in one after another of the prized red drum, so it was not long until our limit was reached and we had two children who were quite literally “hooked” for life! Winding down the day, we finished up around 2:00 p.m. with a little open channel fishing for speckled trout, which is quite tasty grilled, broiled or fried, and finally headed back inland to clean our haul for the day. Tired from a long days trip, the kids were anxious to get back to the camp, shower and relax, and I could think of nothing finer myself. Driving back from the fabulous time we had with Captain Jon Lemle, I could not help but think about the fishing trip we had with Captain Jody Donewar and Heather a little more than a year prior. Recalling our coming back in from the time that we spent in Empire, with red drum, black drum and speckled trout. Thinking back on how I could not wait to get back to Delta Marina and take the photos of our prizes, and I believe this is where it all began with me. South Louisiana and its majestic jetties are where I first began my love of all things saltwater, and are where the “fishing bug” first bit, but do not take my word for it, book your own excursion out of Empire, LA at the Delta Marina or out of Venice, LA at the Venice Marina, where you too may very well get “hooked.”

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A Tale of Two Gardens Monroe Garden Club Meets for the First Time in 2018 GEORGIANN POTTS

When the ladies of the Monroe Garden Club and their guests convened for their first meeting of 2018, everyone was excited and eager to learn something — anything — that would take their minds off gray days and cold winds. Their guest speaker, Betsy Savitz, was just the breath of spring air that they needed! Savitz is a remarkably creative person. To limit her tagline as “gardener” is really a misnomer that does not begin to cover all that this energetic lady does. More than a few of those who heard her presentation wondered aloud if she ever sleeps! Most of us have one garden to tend, if we are lucky. Savitz maintains two, and they are in different states! Fall through mid-spring finds her “at home” in Tampa, Fla., where she has completely reworked both her hardscape (filled in her pool so that she could have a rose garden) and landscape (created amazing groupings of plants perfectly suited to the Florida climate). Late spring through the summer months find her tending her other garden, “Wild Thymes Farm,” located near the tiny village of Cashiers, NC. Here she tends a robust vegetable garden, a collection of amazing flowers including hollyhocks that reach to the sky, and once upon a summer, boarded two horses. Both of Savitz’s gardens reflect her creative spin on life. Admittedly mostly selftaught through trial and error, Savitz clearly was a quick study. Her gardens are lush and inviting. Savitz’s presentation was based on her two gardens. She told of her personal journey that led her to create the two gar-

dens, and throughout the talk never failed to give her husband credit for “… supporting my habit.” With considerable wit and self-deprecating humor, Savitz convinced her audience that anyone can do what she does. As if gardening were not enough — and on such a grand scale — Savitz discovered the art of Raymond Isidore. Isidore, a Frenchman, covered his entire home with china shards and glass bits that he found either thrown away or was given. With these, he created beautiful mosaics that he used to cover both the interior and exterior of his home. When Savitz visited his home near Chartres, she was “hooked” and began making her own mosaics. Her first project was a free-standing fireplace that was an ugly eyesore in their North Carolina cabin. Her mosaic design for this piece tells the story of “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Her slides of this work-in-progress were delightful! Once her presentation was over, many of those present engaged her in an informal question-and-answer session. Savitz answered each cheerfully, and encouraged everyone to pursue their own gardening and craft dreams. Setting the tone for the lovely morning were floral designs created by the Monroe Garden Club (MCG) hostess committee. The twin French doors at the entry of Bayou DeSiard Country Club were flanked by identical urns that were beautifully decorated. At the base of each was a wreath crafted entirely from fresh green foliage. The urns’ bowls were filled with lovely blooms in shades of white and purple, with ivy spilling over the edge and tall paperwhites standing above. In the club’s foyer, a stunning arrangement of twin “trees” made from natural ma-

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Kathleen Hunt, Carolyn Rester, Brenda Rowan, Kay Baughman, and Lynn Jacobs PHOTOS BY GEORGIANN POTTS

MGC president Therese Nagem with guest speaker, Becky Savitz

MGC chairmen Lana Forte and Gayle Shepard

Dianne Walters, Ann McClendon, and Linda Taylor

terials shaped into teardrop shapes stood tall, each holding a cascade of tiny white lights reminiscent of old willows or moss-draped cypress. In between, a duck sat on a base of greenery and natural materials including pine-cones and artichokes. An animal pelt provided an abbreviated table-top covering in the Great Hall and provided the perfect natural base on which to stand the central arrangement. On the pelt was a petite arrangement of pinecones, seedpods, fungi, and other natural elements. Sharing space was a single stone footed urn filled with an abundance of natural elements reflecting the woodlands theme. A duck is seen attempting to land in the midst. White roses softened the beautiful look. Pine-cones made shiny with silver glitter hung from the leafless branches intermingled with those left natu-

ral. Silver balls further enhanced the overall effect. Both before and after the meeting, the ladies enjoyed chatting over a delicious brunch. An egg and sausage casserole, a fresh fruit tray, and several tempting desserts including mini-muffins and pound cake meant that there was something for everyone. The gathering was cochaired by the very talented duo, Gayle Shepard and Lana Forte. Working with them were committee members Brenda Adams, Donna Aron, Sharon Brown, Dianne Cage, Jana Graves, Annetta Hill, Lynn Jacobs, Beverly Jarrell, Vickie Krutzer, Joy Loomis, Tiphanie Maxwell, Carolyn Myrick, Cindy Rogers, Dana Taliaferro, Dianne Walters, Pat White, and Allison Wilkes. For more information, please visit www.monroegardenclub.com and like us on Facebook.


5 Melrose Court, Monroe. Great neighborhood, motivated seller. Home has recently been painted inside and out. One owner first time to be listed. High ceilings throughout, lots of natural light, open living area to the kitchen, breakfast area and sunroom. Schedule your showing today!!!!!!

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The Disney

WONDER Disney’s isney’s newest ship sets sail this fall for a WONDER-FILLED vacation! DIANNE NEWCOMER

Haven’t made it to DisneyWorld yet with the kids or grand kids? Not really interested in standing in lines, the heat, or worrying about Fast Pass reservations ? Well, today is your lucky day, because Mickey and Minnie are B-A-C-K — and they are playing in our neighborhood! Unfortunately, Mickey and his gang’s stay in our neck of the woods will not be for a very long time, so, as your friendly local travel agent at Monroe Travel Service, I wanted to make sure you had heard the big news: the recently transformed cruise ship — The Disney WONDER — will be sailing from Galveston this fall. Because we want you to call Monroe Travel Service to get on-board before all those Texans hear the big news, let me give

you some quick details. The 83,000 ton WONDER will arrive in Galveston on November 2 and her last sailing is a one way 5-night cruise from Galveston to San Juan on January 9. In between those dates, the WONDER will be cruising the Caribbean on the following dates from the port city of Galveston: » 4-night cruise to Cozumel only: Nov. 8 and 12 » 6-night cruise to Cozumel and Grand Cayman: Nov. 2, 12, 21, and January 3 » 7-night cruise to Key West, Castaway Cay and Nassau: Nov. 16, 23, Dec. 7, 14, 27 » 7-night cruise to Cozumel, Grand Cayman, and Jamaica: Nov. 30 Now, folks, I must tell you, there is no water ride on the Disney WONDER like the AquaDuck on their newer ships; she did not even get the AquaDunk like you find on the

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MAGIC. During her last drydock renovation time, Disney spent that money elsewhere. For example, the WONDER got three new pool areas. They also added and changed some topside features to keep your kids wonderfully happy and very occupied. If you have sailed on the Disney MAGIC, you will see Dory’s Reef Splash Zone, the AquaLab and a Twist ‘n Spout water slide has been replicated on the WONDER! Yet, one area that has not changed on the WONDER — and it is an area most adults want to access along with their kids — is the Oceaneer Club. On the new and improved WONDER, this space has been completely “re-imagined.” The Club now includes Andy’s Room, Wandering Oaken’s Trading Post and the extremely popular Marvel Super Hero Academy. If you ever misplace your kid — or husband — the first place you will need to check is this amazing interactive gameroom where adults and kids alike can spend hours working with the Avengers who are trying to destroy an invading force. All of the action takes place in front of a big screen


video display, where body gestures are used to fire repulsers ( just like Iron Man). A frequent visit by Spider-Man is another reason for the Club’s popularity; he drops in to help kids and adults hone their web-slinging skills! Still, this upgraded Super Hero Academy is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the WONDER’s new look. From Monroe Travel Service clients who sailed on the ship in Alaska last summer with their grandkids, we learned about the jazzy restaurant called “Tiana’s Place.” “Inspired by Disney’s “Princess and the Frog” movie, Tiana’s was one of our most favorite changes. The decor is straight from the movie, but what makes Tiana’s Place so unique is its live entertainment during dinner. We were serenaded by the Crooning Crawfish. This jazz ensemble performed while we ate food that was New Orleans and southern inspired,” laughed Marjorie Jackson. “Our favorite part of the Tiana’s evening was when the Crooning Crawfish led the guests and servers in a New Orleans style line parade, complete with Mardi Gras beads and twirling umbrellas. Everyone loved it, and we felt very proud to be from Louisiana at that point!” “Since we had taken the grand kids on the Disney MAGIC, one of the oldest ships in the Disney fleet and also a sister ship to the WONDER, they very quickly felt right at home. The ships are very similar in design features and layout after this makeover, but the difference is in the decorating styles, the themes of the restaurants, and the adult entertainment areas. Yet, the biggest and most unique change I liked on the WONDER was the two-story coffee bar in the Concierge Lounge. Disney made this a really nice viewing and sunning area-- and it is for adults only.” Of course, everyone knows there is no way to out-imagine Disney. Expect the entertainment and fantasy surprises that magically delight children of all ages to happen on the WONDER’s sailing from Galveston this fall. A very special musical production of “Frozen,” which is sure to blow your minds, will inevitably be the highlight. From what we hear from travelers who

have already seen this 55-minute production, it is Broadway taken to a new level! When you consider mezzanine tickets at the St. James Theater in New York City for “Frozen” are going for $235 each for the Broadway production, then, that is just one more reason to not just sit around “frozen,” wishing you could really “let it go,” and have some fun with your kids or grand kids. Make the time! Check your calendars now and plan for the holidays, then call Monroe Travel Service to make it happen, because, like us, the Disney WONDER will not be around forever! If a cruise to the Caribbean does not float your boat or maybe you want to try something entirely different in the way of family fun, then, perhaps you should go a little wild and head way up north to Alaska this summer. Cruises depart weekly from Seattle, Vancouver, and Anchorage from May to September and visit cool little places like Ketchikan, Juneau, Skagway and Glacier Bay National Park on a 7-day run. Today’s state-of-the-art cruise ships have something for everyone. From rock climbing walls, ice-skating rinks, roller blade tracks, swimming pools, hot tub, exercise facilities, movie theaters, internet cafes,

sports bars, libraries, video arcades, kids programs, spa services, shopping, gambling, cooking classes, guest lecturers, computer classes, to yoga and more, you are sure to have a good time, plus, there is another bonus: you get to sit down to a delicious dinner every evening! For a whole week, dinner becomes family time again--no phones, no friends, no distractions — and no clean up! How nice it is to re-connect. It will probably not come as a surprise, but, statistically, cruises have the highest guest satisfaction rating of any family vacation we sell at Monroe Travel Service. One of the main reasons cited is because families actually enjoy dining with one another! Furthermore, studies show families who travel together on a cruise return again as a family within two years of their first trip--and those are pretty impressive statistics, especially when you consider all the fun does not just happen on the boat! On an Alaskan cruise, there is no need to have a Mouse or a Duck running around the deck, although the WONDER is in the Alaska every summer if that is what you want, but there is plenty of wildlife to enjoy on shore. Go kayaking alongside glaciers accompanied by seals in Glacier Bay. Hike, fish, glacier walk, or maybe enjoy a whale watching in Juneau. In Skagway, go to the dogs. Give the kids the chance to roar down a hill like a a commuter train in rush hour while riding on a sled pulled by huskies, or let the dogs pull a sled cart ride through the fields and forests to simulate the sled experience. In Alaska, everything becomes an adventure: take a steam train journey to the Yukon, go bear watching, visit salmon runs, watch log rolling, raft a river in an eagle preserve, try totem pole carving or hike a zillion nature trails. With so much to do and see, the kids will soon forget about snapchatting and all their hand-held video games, and, mom and dad, this means a WONDER-FILLED vacation for all of you! Call Monroe Travel Service soon. It is time to get started! Dianne Newcomer is a travel agent at Monroe Travel Service, located at 1908 Glenmar. For your next vacations call 318 323 3465 or email dianne@monroetravel.com.

k o o b to mer y a d o 's sum t s u Call family on! your vacati

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The Great Flood of 1889 Anderson Reviews for Potpourri Book Club Article & Photos by Georgiann Potts

Members of the Potpourri Book Club gathered for their first meeting of 2018 in the lovely home of member Joy Loomis. As they approached the home’s entrance, they were greeted by a lovely cross created from moss and related greenery hanging on the front door. The simple piece was a gentle reminder of the season to come. Once indoors, the ladies enjoyed sharing their news since last they had met. The book review for the day was presented by the multi-talented Martha Jane Anderson. Anderson’s reviews are always eagerly anticipated and never disappoint. In keeping with the club’s theme for the year — “Disasters and the Lessons Learned” — Anderson reviewed author/historian David McCullough’s first book, The Johnstown Flood: The Incredible Story Behind One of the Most Devastating Disasters America Has Ever Known. Published in 1968, the book was well-received both critically and by the general public. McCullough, a Yale graduate, worked as an editor and writer for a number of years before venturing into the social history genre full-time. After underscoring McCullough’s credentials, Anderson began her review by setting the stage for the disastrous Johnstown, PA, flood. She explained that Johnstown was a growing town in 1889, with coal and steel as its primary products. The beauty of the geography did not escape the notice of the wealthy and influential members of America’s exclusive eastern society. “Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Mellon were just several of the tycoons who flocked to the mountains above Johnstown,” Anderson explained. A group of 61 members formed the South

Fork Fishing and Hunting Club, an exclusive conclave for the very wealthy. “There were a series of cottages,” Anderson said. “But the smallest was three stories!” The members bought an abandoned reservoir and the old dam that had created Lake Conemaugh, the center of the recreation enjoyed by them. According to Anderson, there was some work done to care for the dam, but everyone in Johnstown said each spring that the dam would likely break with the spring thaw and rains. In spite of the collective fears (and the offer to pay half for restoration of the dam by John Morrell, the president of the steel mill who was not a member) no serious work was done to shore up the dam. “On May 31, 1889, residents in Johnstown hard a rumble that increased quickly,” said Anderson. “Within 10 minutes, debris and a wall of flood water 60-feethigh and 20,000,000 tons in volume roared down the mountain leveling everything.” Approximately 2,009 people died and much of the town was destroyed. Anderson explained that none of the South Fork club property sustained damage. One of the few positive elements of the tragedy was the way the people reacted immediately in the aftermath. “They identified places where people could gather – a church, for example – and then began the process of setting up committees to address needs both immediate and long-term,” Anderson said. When asked if there were lawsuits, Anderson said that there were, but that they were unsuccessful. “The failure of the dam was designated an ‘act of God’ and therefore the South Fork members were not held liable,” she said. “But Americans stepped in to help, donating $3,000,000 and 7000 pairs of shoes to the Johnstown

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Barbara Cattar, Lisa Nelson, Allison Cattar, and Denise Smith

Martha Jane Anderson, reviewer, and Joy Loomis, Potpourri president

Martha Jane Anderson reviewing for Potpourri Book Club

Dianne Cage and Sharen Henry

Kathy Patrick and Martha Hayden

residents.” Following the review and an extensive question-and-answer session, the ladies retired to the dining room to enjoy refreshments. The Loomis dining table was centered with an exquisite arrangement of pink lily stems held in a modern gold and crystal epergne flanked by twin cutglass vases holding garden greenery. Placed discretely near the lily arrangement was a stone cross and votive. A magnificent King Cake bought in Port Allen just for the occasion delighted everyone. Other

Carole Kilpatrick and Kathy Hart

foods offered included petite tea sandwiches — one cucumber; the other black olive, a spicy cheese ball with green grapes, peppery cheese straws, and tea cakes. Coffee and assorted beverages completed the offering. Everyone agreed that the hostess committee — Joy Loomis, Allison Cattar, and Denise Smith — had done an outstanding job.


P.E.O. Honors Its Founders ARTICLE & PHOTOS BY GEORGIANN POTTS

Members of P.E.O. chapters located in the area gathered with guests on a rainy Saturday morning to celebrate the 149th year since the organization was founded. The theme of the gathering was perfectly appropriate to honor the seven founding members — a tea party! When the ladies entered Bayou DeSiard Country Club, they were invited to enjoy a cup of tea and a freshly baked scone, the ideal beginning for a lovely luncheon! P.E.O. Chapter AK hosted the occasion and left no detail untouched. From the gleaming silver tea service to the glorious arrangements of pink roses centering each table, everything underscored the importance of the gathering. Mistress of ceremonies for the luncheon was Judy Willis, president of Chapter AK. Willis welcomed the group and said the blessing before inviting them to enjoy their lunch. There were two members of AK seated at each table throughout the room, and their responsibility during the meal was to encourage “table talk” — i.e., sharing among the ladies at their table “secrets” or facts about each one present that most, if not all, of the others did not know. The result was a high level of chatter and laughter as the meal progressed. When dessert was served, Willis recognized each chapter president who in turned introduced that chapter’s new members and guests. Then Willis asked all present who had been P.E.O.s for fifty or more years to stand. Carolyn Seegers, AZ, stood as one who had been in 50 years. Willis then asked all present who had been P.E.O.’s for sixty years or longer to stand. Daisy Daniels, BB; Mary Elizabeth McLaughlin, AK; and Gladys Thompson, AO, were recognized. Special guests for the luncheon included Janie Keller,

Past State Presidents Dibble McLaughlin, Margaret Berry, Loura Barr, Shirley Douglas, and Carolyn Seegers.

Eva Colvin and Brenda Rowan

Arleen Mayoux, Louisiana State Chapter treasurer; Loura Barr, AE treasurer and Past State President; and Janie Keller, Louisiana State Chapter secretary.

Chapter AF from Baton Rouge, serving as Louisiana State Chapter secretary; and Arleen Mayeux, Chapter AU from Natchez, Louisiana, serving as Louisiana State Chapter treasurer. Past Louisiana State Chapter presidents were also recognized. Present were Loura Barr, Annette Carroll, Dibble McLaughlin, Carolyn Seegers, Shirley Douglas, and Margaret Berry. Berry, Chapter AG, traveled from Natchitoches to attend. A 4th generation P.E.O., Connie Thompson Cline, Chapter AO, was present for the gathering. Her mother, Gladys Thompson, attended Cottey College, the college owned by P.E.O. Cline’s late grandmother, Grace Grantham, and late great-grandmother, Nelle Horner Grantham, were P.E.O.s and were both past state presidents in their home states. There is a wing at Cottey College named

Barbara Potts and Amy Dewees

Paula Napper, Vicki Robinson, and Sally Rose

Founders’ Portraits

for Horner. AK member Lynn Hodge introduced the program for the day, an original skit entitled “Then and Now” written by AK Lisa Lawrence. The skit featured the seven founders seated together having tea and reminiscing about how things were when they formed PEO in 1869. In a clever combination of “how it was then” with “how it is today,” the skit provided a blending of the organization’s history with fun facts about the Founders. Performing the skit were Linda Taylor, Paula Napper, Lisa Lawrence, Sue Rainer, Sally Rose, Vicki Robinson, and Sheryl Potts. Chairing the luncheon from AK was Linda Taylor. Joining her were AKs Ann Brown, Cathie Bryant, Betty Carlton, Lisa Lawrence, Paula Napper, Sue Rainer, and Vicki Robinson. Favors for each one present were lovely bookmarks.

P.E.O. (Philanthropic Educational Organization), one of the pioneer societies for women, was founded on January 21, 1869, by seven students at Iowa Wesleyan College in Mount Pleasant, IA. Today, P.E.O. has grown from that tiny membership of seven to almost a quarter of a million members in chapters in the United States and Canada. The P.E.O. Sisterhood is passionate about its mission: promoting educational opportunities for women. Our sisterhood proudly makes a difference in women’s lives with six philanthropies that include ownership of a two-year women’s college, Cottey College; and five programs that provide higher educational assistance: P.E.O. Educational Loan Fund, P.E.O. International Peace Scholarship Fund, P.E.O. Program for Continuing Education, P.E.O. Scholar Awards, and P.E.O. STAR Scholarship.

DELTA STYL E MAGAZIN E | M ARCH 2018 | 97


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Delta Style March 2018  
Delta Style March 2018