Page 1

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

1


2

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013


inside

Q

news & features

The candidates for Charlotte mayor are both friendly, but lacking in some areas. Read our endorsement editoral on page 4.

  6   9 10 14 15 15 17 18 22

qnotes arts. entertainment. news. views.

News Notes: Regional Briefs Mayoral candidates on gay marriage Mayoral Q&As NASCAR driver fined Faith leader to lecture LGBTs win ‘Best of’ Wilmington bar closed Non-believers come out S.C. Guard benefits

a&e / life&style

Charlotte Roller Girls gave back to the community, donating $2,000 toward the work of the Regional AIDS Interfaith Network at a recent bout in Charlotte. Read more about their group philanthropy on page 6.

17 19 20 22 22 25 26 27

Jane’s World Lesbian health Playing the Field Art projects to be funded Pride Winston-Salem Tell Trinity Q Events Calendar Our People: Teresa Davis

opinions & views   4 Editor’s Note   4 Guest Commentary / Baldock  5 TalkBack   4 Guest Commentary / Kingston 24 QPoll

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

3


Q

qnotes connect Oct. 11-24, 2013 Vol 28 No 12

arts. entertainment. news. views. goqnotes.com twitter.com/qnotescarolinas facebook.com/qnotescarolinas

contributors this issue

Elizabeth Arrerio, Kathy Baldock, Paige Braddock, Matt Comer, Jane Goble-Clark, Charlene Lichtenstein, Lainey Millen, Ryan Kingston, Gavin Off, Trinity

front page

Graphic Design by: Matt Comer & Lainey Millen Pride Publishing & Typesetting, Inc., dba QNotes P.O. Box 221841, Charlotte, NC 28222 ph 704.531.9988 fx 704.531.1361 Publisher: Jim Yarbrough Sales: x201 adsales@goqnotes.com Nat’l Sales: Rivendell Media ph 212.242.6863 Editor: Matt Comer x202 editor@goqnotes.com Copy Editor: Maria Dominguez Production: Lainey Millen x205 production@goqnotes.com Printed on recycled paper. Material in qnotes is copyrighted by Pride Publishing & Typesetting © 2013 and may not be reproduced in any manner without written consent of the editor or publisher. Advertisers assume full responsibility — and therefore, all liability — for securing reprint permission for copyrighted text, photographs and illustrations or trademarks published in their ads. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers, cartoonists we publish is neither inferred nor implied. The appearance of names or photographs does not indicate the subject’s sexual orientation. qnotes nor its publisher assumes liability for typographical error or omission, beyond offering to run a correction. Official editorial positions are expressed in staff editorials and editorial notations and are determined by editorial staff. The opinions of contributing writers and guest columnists do not necessarily represent the opinions of qnotes or its staff. qnotes accepts unsolicited editorial, but cannot take responsibility for its return. Editor reserves the right to accept and reject material as well as edit for clarity, brevity.

charlotteobserver.com/1166/ a local news partner of The Charlotte Observer

upcoming issues: 10.25.13: InFocus: Charlotte/QList Advertising Space Deadline: Oct. 16 11.08.13: Annual Holiday Gift Guide Advertising Space Deadline: Oct. 30

4

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

editor’s note by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com

Mayoral candidates friendly, but lacking in some areas This issue, qnotes prints the sit-down interviews we recently held with both the Republican and Democratic candidates for Charlotte mayor. It’s the first time the newspaper has had the opportunity to speak to mayoral candidates of both major parties, the first time both parties’ candidates have spoken so candidly on LGBT issues and the first time LGBT voters, generally, will have the option to choose between two candidates both relatively favorable on local LGBT equality issues. The latter is an astonishing feat given Charlotte’s less-than-LGBT-friendly political history. Until 2009, the city was led for 14 years by now-Gov. Pat McCrory, a Republican whose cold-shoulder approach to LGBT organizations and causes stifled the city’s progress on a range of issues. After McCrory, Democrat and former Mayor Anthony Foxx was outspoken with his support for LGBT equality, but only so in front of friendly audiences, doing his best to straddle the line between progressive leadership and Charlotte’s more traditionallyconservative nature. But, now, both mayoral candidates are unafraid to sit down with the city’s LGBT press and speak openly on a variety of issues. It’s an achievement long in the making, heralded by advocacy — both organized and that of a more personal nature — from LGBT residents who have long worked to cultivate an accepting, progressive and LGBT-inclusive Charlotte. In past campaigns for City Council, Democrat Patrick Cannon and Republican Edwin Peacock III have both been endorsed by the Mecklenburg LGBT Political Action Committee (MeckPAC). Peacock garnered qnotes’ endorsement in 2011. Both are supportive of an LGBT-inclusive non-discrimination policy implemented by former City Manager Curt Walton. Both supported domestic partner benefits for LGBT employees, their spouses or partners and their families.

In our interviews, both Cannon and Peacock say they are open to taking a look at further LGBT protections in the city’s Commercial NonDiscrimination Ordinance and public accommodations and fair housing ordinances. But, on two particular issues, the candidates, I believe, prove lacking. First, neither candidate seems as educated or as aware as they might probably should be on general topics relating to LGBT people and equality. I was dismayed that Cannon referred to sexual orientation as a “lifestyle” and other similar language. I was disappointed Peacock didn’t readily understand why anti-gay discrimination might have been a problem before the city adopted its newer, more inclusive employment policy. That’s not to say Cannon or Peacock aren’t friends to our community. I genuinely believe they are. Yet, friends and allies — and even LGBT residents and activists themselves — can benefit from more education. But, I did expect better. I expect my candidates — especially for mayor — to understand the issues that affect our community, and I definitely wasn’t prepared to hear Cannon use loaded terms like “practicing,” “exploring” or “engaging in” a “lifestyle” when describing LGBT people and their lives. Second, the candidates’ positions on marriage equality were disappointing. I was delighted to hear that Cannon voted against Amendment One, last year’s anti-LGBT marriage amendment to the state’s constitution, in keeping with his general outlook against discrimination. Peacock’s opposition to the amendment has been long known, ever since he denounced it two months before voters approved it in May 2012. Yet, I was not satisfied by either candidates’ answers on where they stood personally on full equality under the law for same-sex couples. Cannon says “to each his or her own” and that he’s “not here to be anybody’s judge,” but ultimately, “it’s something that personally I don’t

subscribe to.” Peacock supports civil unions and domestic partnerships, but believes each state should be left to decide the matter on its own — a prospect becoming more and more tenuous as more states recognize same-sex couples’ marriages and more couples are left living in the frightening legal limbo between federal recognition and being treated as mere strangers in their home states. The candidates’ positions on marriage equality, in particular, are explored more in our story on page 9. University of North CarolinaCharlotte political science professor Eric Heberlig provides some interesting insight. Ultimately, the issue of marriage is one neither Cannon nor Peacock will likely address if either are elected mayor. But, it does remain an increasingly important indicator and lens through which voters, LGBT citizens in particular, can judge their candidates’ worldview. And, if either Cannon or Peacock aspire to higher office — much like McCrory or Foxx — it is a question that will likely face them in the future when they are in the position to make a tangible difference. Both Cannon and Peacock deserve applause and gratitude for helping to make local LGBT history in Charlotte. LGBT voters can rest easy knowing that either will operate with an open door, open mind and open ears if they are elected to lead our fair city. Their positions on LGBT equality are nearly identical, and we’re glad we were able to engage them in conversation on a much wider range of issues affecting our city. But, based on the two concerns discussed here — primarily, the candidates’ positions on marriage — and after consultation with the rest of the qnotes staff, we have chosen to endorse neither Cannon nor Peacock in their race for mayor this year. The candidates’ full interviews can be viewed in their entirety online at goqnotes.com/ in/election-2013/, where LGBT voters can read about the candidates’ views in their own voices and determine their choice for mayor based not solely on LGBT equality initiatives, but also on the candidates’ positions on topics like economic development, business incentives, transit and more. : :

guest commentary by Kathy Baldock

Brown misleads on his advocacy, relationships [Ed. Note — This commentary was submitted to qnotes on Sept. 27 as a comment in response to Dr. Michael Brown’s Sept. 27 commentary, “Sharing God’s goodness is never a failure.” It has been edited for brevity and clarity.] Dr. Michael Brown insists he is reaching out with “love.” The water bottles he says his group passed out in 2011 did have the “Jesus Loves You” message on them, but also had a link to a site directing people to Exodus International for reparative therapy. The bottles might as well have said, “Oh, come let me hug you in Christian love and stab you in the back with razors telling you that you must change for God to accept you.” Of course, Exodus is now closed after 37 years of not changing orientation and reparative therapy is stated as harmful by medical health professionals. All that aside — Jesus DOES love you. I spoke to the man who protested at Brown’s church and had dinner with Brown. He paints a tolerant picture. But, I wonder if Brown has followed up at all to establish relationship with that couple? As far as I know, the answer is no. But, golly, we sure do hear about the one dinner an awful lot. Brown talks alot about being among his gay and lesbian Christian brothers and sisters and his outreach to them. But, if he is truly desirous of such a relationship, has he ever truly reachd out? There are many LGBT-inclusive churches. You can find many at gaychurch.org/find_a_church/. No invitation is needed you just show up. In writing his book, as far as I could see Brown

had never attended a service affirming of his gay brothers and sisters. That seems to be a rather large oversight when someone writes a chapter on “queer theology.” I would strongly encourage Brown to visit several of these congregation as he prepares to write a book asserting that people cannot be both gay and Christian and in a mutual relationship. Brown says he is approaching the subject with compassion. I would suggest that he also approach the subject with some knowledge, and some input put from gay Christians and that includes experience and sitting down to make them for more than one meal. It includes building relationship and listening to people. I do not hear of ongoing stories of relationships with LGBT people; I hear the same ones over and over — a person on a plane, the person at an airport, a meal with one person. This is not how you build relationship with the community. This is not how you come to understand where they are in their theology and relationships with God. This is not the basis from which one should be writing a book. It is often from the insights of relationship that one is able to revisit Scripture. With the cultural lenses of discrimination removed, and with the personal insights that relationship with gay people does bring it becomes apparent when one does revisit the scripture that there is a more accurate reading of Scripture then has been present in the last 40 years in the conservative church, with respect to the gay community. : : — Kathy Baldock writes at canyonwalkerconnections.com and is an advocate for LGBT-inclusive faith communities.


views

guest commentary by Ryan Kingston

Brown should do more listening, less talking [Ed. Note — This commentary was submitted to qnotes on Sept. 27 as a comment in response to Dr. Michael Brown’s Sept. 27 commentary, “Sharing God’s goodness is never a failure.” It has been edited for clarity.] I think a big part of Dr. Michael Brown’s problem is that he seems to think he understands this issue when he clearly does not. He has absolutely no idea what it means to grow up in this country being gay, especially in the evangelical community. So, it becomes insulting for him to even pretend he knows anything about this subject much less write a book about it. I spent years of my life isolated and alone in this issue because of the reckless and ignorance views of those in the church. I contemplated suicide many times in my life, the first when I was 15-years-old when I realized I was gay. I spent many years after that thinking God could somehow change me. Those years were excruciatingly painful. I am now 45-years-old and it was only about four years ago that I actually sat down with another gay person and talked about be-

ing gay and then got the help I needed. I have never been more happy and whole than I am now because I can finally just be myself and be around people that love and understand me. That includes being in a church where I do not have to hide who I am. Yet, Brown somehow thinks that this is just about sex. Is his sexuality just a sexual act? Is that all his marriage to his wife is about? As Brown’s friend Andrew Marin once said, “Christians reduce being gay down to a sexual act and then blame them for it.” I know gay couples that have relationships that many couples in the evangelical church could learn a great deal from. Yes, Brown does contribute to the harm of many in the gay community through his shortsighted views. Just because he is “polite” or has good intentions does not mean what he says is not damaging. When we have kids not taking their own lives because they are gay then we can sit down and have a friendly debate about this subject. Until then, Brown may want to shut up and do more listening than talking. : :

SUBSCRIBE!

goqnotes.com/to/views

These rates only cover a portion of our true cost, however, our goal is to serve our community Mailed 1st class from Charlotte, NC, in sealed envelope. Subscription Rates:

☐ 1 yr - 26 issues = $48 ☐ 1/2 yr - 13 issues = $34

Mail to: P.O. Box 221841, Charlotte, NC 28222

______________________________________________________ name: ______________________________________________________ address: ______________________________________________________ city: state: zip: ______________________________________________________ credit card – check one: ☐ mastercard ☐ visa ☐ discover ☐ american express ______________________________________________________ card #: exp. date: ______________________________________________________ signature:

talkback Letters to the editor and comments from goqnotes.com. and facebook.com/ qnotescarolinas. Web comments are not edited for grammar or punctuation. NASCAR and LGBT inclusion Readers respond to the online version of our story this issue on NASCAR driver Nelson Piquet Jr. (page 14). I worked with NASCAR for 23 years as a Motor Sports Safety instructor and the one thing they never realized in the past was that Gay people are race fans too. NASCAR is realizing the image of the good ole boy concept is gone and is now starting to accept LGBT as part of the racing community. — Janice Covington, Oct. 2, goqnotes.com I applaud NASCAR for their actions to this matter. I am gay and have watched NASCAR for 25 years. I will not miss a race even if I have to DVR it. It’s about time a national sport stood up for people of a different class no matter there background. Thanks NASCAR you will always be my favorite sport. THANKS….!!!! — Robert Hughes, Oct. 2, goqnotes.com Not bigotry Readers respond to our Sept. 27 poll, “Is it bigotry to believe homosexuality is sin?” (goqnotes.com/25086/) Bigotry is sourced in actions one takes based on their beliefs, not the belief itself. So a person who has a religious belief that homosexuality is a sin, is not bigoted. When that person kicks out a tenant from their property, refuses them service, denies them a raise, hires and fires based on that belief, or commits acts of shame, humiliation, and attack against someone who is homosexual, or someone who does not

agree with their belief, then their belief has lead to intolerance and has become bigotry. — Joseph Arrington, Sept. 27, goqnotes.com A person is free to believe what ever they want to. It’s only bigotry if they use those beliefs as an excuse for treating those with different beliefs in a degrading way. — Justmaryp, Sept. 27, goqnotes.com Student responds A student who participated in anti-gay outreach at Charlotte Pride, Aug. 24-25, responds to Dr. Michael Brown’s Sept. 27 guest commentary (goqntoes.com/25034/). I was one of the students from Dr. Brown’s ministry who participated in the survey at the Charlotte Pride Event. I was with another student and as we were conducting the surveys, we were able to engage in great dialogue with many people. It was refreshing to be able to speak with someone with a difference of opinion but to still be able to treat each other with the utmost respect. We spoke with 3 ladies who actually thanked us for the way we were conducting ourselves and said that there was a clear distinction between how we handled ourselves vs others who are abrasive and condescending. I am glad I was able to participate in the survey so that even though I am clearly no expert, I do have a better understanding of the LGBT community. Matt, thank you for being willing to dialogue with Dr. Brown and for publishing his responses to your articles here on QNotes! — Dylan, Sept. 27, goqnotes.com

join the discussion

We welcome your letters to the editor (200 or words or less) and guest commentaries (600 words or less). Submit them to letters@goqnotes.com.

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

5


news notes:

“LGBT people are less likely to have children to support them as they age, and more likely to age as singles, live alone and be prematurely institutionalized,” Tab Ballis, a clinical social worker and faculty member of UNCW’s School of Social Work who sits on the board of the Frank Harr Foundation, told WHQR-FM. SAGE said that some LGBT seniors encounter obstacles with regard to assessing services that it forces some to become closeted to avoid discrimination within the healthcare system. Ballis hopes the SAGE affiliate will help to stave off this situation. He commented that lesbian, gay, transsexual and transgender people have found the Cape Fear Region to be a suitable place with which to retire, vacation and do business. WHRQ-FM also reported that SAGE was partnering with the Lower Cape Fear Hospice, the Area Agency on Aging, UNCW and the New Hanover County Senior Resource Center, according to Ballis. info: thefrankharrfoundation.com/sage. — L.M. and releases

carolinas. nation. world. compiled by Lainey Millen | Matt Comer

Charlotte Guild celebrates gala

CHARLOTTE — The Charlotte Business Guild will host its second annual gala on Nov. 15 at Brief/Shu, 1426 S.Tryon St. Cocktail hour begins at 7 p.m., with dinner following at 8:15 p.m. Dancing and dessert is set for 9:15 p.m. A live band will be there to entertain attendees, as well as a DJ. The 2013 Community Service Award winners will be honored. The event is catered by Your Custom Catering. Tickets must be purchased by Nov. 5 and are $25/members, students, $40/non-members, $75/ non-member couples and $350/tables of eight. info: charlottebusinessguild.org. — L.M.

Triad

Fundraising events slated

CHARLOTTE — Several fundraising events scatter the Queen City’s autumn social calendar in the next few weeks, each raising money for local LGBT causes. The fifth annual BRIEF! A Fete for Fashion will be held on Nov. 1, 7 p.m., at Extravaganza Depot, 1610 North Tryon St. The event has raised $50,000 for charities over five years. The beneficiaries this year are Time Out Youth and the Human Rights Campaign. Tickets are $35-$125. Audience members can choose from standing, seated or VIP seating located at the end of the runway. The black-tie Haunted Hollywood event benefiting Time Out Youth will be held at the Mint Museum Uptown, 500 S. Tryon St., on Nov. 2, with special guest host Brandi Glanville of “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.” Tickets are $65 or $250 for VIP and can be purchased at Brief, 1426 S. Tryon St., at the Time Out Youth offices, 1900 The Plaza, or by mail. Also on Nov. 2, the Regional AIDS Interfaith Network will host the finale fundraising party for its annual Dining with Friends at Discovery Place, 301 N. Tryon St. A minimum $30 donation is requested at the door. Go online to learn more about attending or to sign up to host your own fundraising house party before the finale. info/tickets: briefafeteforfashion.org. timeoutyouth.org. hrc.org. diningwithfriendscharlotte.org. — M.C.

Coastal Center starts SAGE chapter

WILMINGTON — The Frank Harr Foundation announced on Sept.27 the launch of their local affiliate of Services and Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (SAGE). The announcement was made at the City Council chambers at 102 N. 3rd St. Its official name is SAGE Wilmington of the Cape Fear Coast. “In assessing the needs of LGBT citizens in Southeastern North Carolina, the Frank Harr Foundation has recognized that senior adults in these communities have much to offer, as they experience significant challenges within limited support systems. Therefore, we have made services to these populations an area of priority for our organization, as we cultivate investments from healthcare agencies, local governments,

6

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

ENC gala set

Skaters give back CHARLOTTE — On Sept. 28, the Charlotte Roller Girls finished out its undefeated season. After doing so, it contributed a portion of its game proceeds to Regional AIDS Interfaith Network (RAIN). The $2,000 check was presented after the bout. The Roller Girls selects a local charity each year with which to partner. They provide support through hands-on volunteering, awareness initiatives and donations from game proceeds and external fundraising, Liz McLaughlin, press representative, said. This year they chose RAIN to help further RAIN’s mission and engage the community to promote respect and dignity for all people touched by HIV through compassionate care, education and leadership development, McLaughlin added. “In the past the organization has partnered with groups such as Time Out Youth, the Humane Society and Girls on the Run. But its community involvement doesn’t stop with its annual partner. CLTRG skaters and volunteers are continually finding ways to give back, whether through food drives for Second Harvest, charity walks or blood drives with the Red Cross,” she commented. “I have personally volunteered with RAIN for nine years,” said Roller Girls Director of Promotion Caitin “Rita Maneata” Snead. “I was thrilled with how my teammates and our fans really stepped up to support this great organization.” “It was an exciting year working with the Charlotte Roller Girls,” said Nathan Smith, director of development and marketing for RAIN. “They had some of the craziest spirit wear outfits at our AIDS Walk this year.” In other news, the Roller Girls is in the process of its tryout season. Training workshops are being held on Oct. 12-13 and 27 from 10 a.m.-noon. Open skate gears up on Oct. 14 and 28 from 6:15-7:30 p.m. Participants are invited to stay and watch a scrimmage afterward. Tryouts are Nov. 2, noon-4 p.m. Interested applicants should email join@charlotterollergirls.com for more information. info: charlotterollergirls.com. carolinarain.org. — L.M. and even recreational and cultural venues, in meeting the needs of LGBT seniors,” the Foundation said. “I’m so pleased to welcome SAGE Wilmington of the Cape Fear Coast to our nationwide network of affiliates,” said Michael Adams, executive director of SAGE. “This affiliate’s strong track record of building ties to area healthcare and social service agencies that serve older adults, as well as their understanding of the local community, will ensure that LGBT elders in southeastern North Carolina can now look forward to receiving the services and programs so vital to healthy aging.”

Equipped with the data from a groundbreaking new survey of the health and human service needs of LGBT people who live in Southeastern North Carolina, the Frank Harr Foundation will work with community partners like the Area Agency on Aging, Lower Cape Fear Hospice and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, to assess the needs and resources of these populations, informed and inspired by the mission of SAGE: To improve the overall quality of life for LGBT seniors, to foster a greater understanding of aging in all communities and to promote positive images of LGBT life in later years.

GREENSBORO — Equality North Carolina is holding its 2013 Equality NC Foundation Gala, “A Celebration of Home,” on Nov. 9 at the Elm Street Center’s Empire Room, 203 S. Elm St. The theme embraces the best the state has to offer. On tap will be a pre-Gala party, complete with locally-owned and grown complimentary drink options and entertainment by singer Jessica Mashburn. Afterward, enjoy a host of southern appetizer delicacies: pan-fried eggplant topped with blue crab and hollandaise, smoked bluefish mousse atop endive graced with tobacco onions, sweet potato biscuits with chow-chow, as well as chicken bites with Cheerwine glaze. The decor throughout will shower attendees with Tar Heel ambiance — old time coast, foothills and mountains. The group’s annual Equality Awards will be presented during the evening, along with the addition of the inaugural Jamie Kirk Hahn Ally Award as a lasting memorial. The after-party will be held at the Proximity Hotel’s Print Works Bistro Bar. This year’s gala event will not include an annual conference. The organization is working to present new, regional conferences held throughout the year and plans to announce the new conference events soon. Tickets are $50/active duty military, $160/ early-bird until Oct. 27 (increases to $190 on Oct. 28); $1,500/reserved table of 10. Pre-paid guests (those who are $1,200 plus donors, sponsor guest, etc.) may attend without charge. Accommodations are available at the official host hotel, Proximity Hotel, 704 Green Valley Rd. Call 800-379-8200 for reservations. info/registration: equalityncfoundation.org. — L.M.

It’s bingo time!

GREENSBORO — The Guildford Green Foundation is hosting Green Queen Bingo — Ho Ho Ho Bingo on Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m., at the Regency Room of the Elm Street Center, 203 S. Elm St. This event helps to raise funds for the Foundation’s work. On hand will be drag performances, witty banter and a rousing 10 games of bingo.

see next page u


goqnotes.com/to/views

Ticket purchases will be available online soon. Be sure to bring cash to the event to buy concessions, daubers for $1, raffle tickets and adult beverages. Tickets are also available at the door at 6 p.m. on the night of bingo. Large groups should purchase tickets online. info: ggfnc.org. — L.M.

Chorus slates winter concert

GREENSBORO — The Triad Pride Men’s Chorus will present “Winter Comes Anew” on Dec. 7, 8 p.m., at Greensboro Day School, Sloan Theatre, 5401 Lawndale Dr. New Director William Southerland will bring a celebration of lively standards, holiday humor and joyous harmonies. It will also bring its concert to WinstonSalem, N.C., on Dec. 14, 8 p.m., at Hanesbrand Theatre, Milton Rhodes Arts Center, 209 N. Spruce St. Tickets are $15/advance, $20/at the door. Group rates for 10 plus are $13.50 each online only. info/tickets: triadpridemenschorus.org. — L.M.

Western Sisters unite for a cause

HENDERSONVILLE — SisterCare WNC will hold its fall festival fundraiser on Oct. 26, 6 p.m., at Crystal Visions, 5426 Asheville Hwy. Enjoy live entertainment, storytelling, fire pit and drumming circle. Give it a try at the pumpkin carving contest. Or be part of the culinary crowd at the chili cook off or pie baking contest.

Food and prizes will be available. SisterCare WNC provides non-health related services to the community. Tickets are $10. info: sistercarewnc.weebly.com. sistercarewnc@gmail.com. — L.M.

Regional Internship apps open

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Gay & Lesbian Victory Institute’s Victory Congressional Internship and Victory Congressional Fellowships have announced they are accepting applications. Applicants are the new wave of U.S. public leaders. And, as such, their participation in this academic semester initiative allows them to become part of the federal legislative process first hand. College students arrive at the nation’s Capitol for an intensive leadership program. They are assigned to an LGBT Equality Caucus or LGBT-friendly member of congress. This educational experience opens up participants to the possibility of seeking careers in the policy-making process. Each person becomes involved in a community service project. In December, students will attend the Victory Institute’s annual international conference for three days of training, skills building, networking and discussion alongside hundreds of openly LGBT leaders in government, politics, advocacy, business and community organizations. Airfare, hotel and conference fee are provided. The Victory Congressional Internship will prepare young LGBT people to become informed

decisionmakers and influential leaders who can change their communities and the world. Deadlines for 2014 applications are: Oct. 28 for spring, Feb. 10 for summer and May 5 for fall. Program dates are: Jan. 29-April 19, spring (four students); May 28-July 26, summer (eight students); and Aug. 27-Nov. 22, fall (four students). Housing is provided in downtown Washington, D.C. A stipend to cover other living expenses is $1,000 for summer and $1,500 for spring/fall. Transportation costs are handled both at the beginning and end of the program. For those who wish, academic credit for summer internships is available depending upon the participant’s college or university. Application is open to undergraduate students no matter one’s gender, sexual orientation, abilities, race or political affiliation. Each one must meet the requirements criteria: U.S. citizenship or legal permanent residency or work permit (no F-1 foreign student visas); 18-years old before arrival; current enrollment on full-time basis as an undergraduate in a degree program (more available on this through the enrollment process); social sciences major pursuit not necessary; and participate actively in public and/or community service activities. info/applications: victoryinstitute.org/ programs/vci. — L.M.

Campus Scene Online training launched

CHARLOTTE — The Trevor Project, Campus Pride and Kognito have entered into a partnership to bring a trio of online safety

news

net programs to support pre-teens through college-age youth. The simulations are geared toward secondary school personnel and higher education staff and students. The training suite builds skills to support LGBTQ youth in the years when peer pressure, harassment and bullying can have the most devastating results. “These groundbreaking trainings Step in, Speak Up, and the LGBTQ on Campus allow The Trevor Project to expand our reach exponentially, helping more people build the skills they need to create safe schools,” said Abbe Land, executive director and CEO of The Trevor Project. “By making schools and campuses safer for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning students, we can help improve safety for all students.” Campus Pride reported that 63.5 percent of LGBTQ youth in middle school and high school have felt unsafe because of their sexual orientation, and 43.9 percent because of their gender expression. On the college level higher rates of harassment, as well as greater fear for physical safety, are key areas where LGBTQ students and faculty out rank their straight peers. Suicide prevention is a top priority for the trio programs. Kognito Interactive built the simulations using their Human Interaction Game Engine. The simulations are available online around the clock and can be purchased through the developer’s website. Cost is $28.95 for Step In Speak Up!, $25 for LGBTQ On Campus for Students and $32.50 for LGBTQ On Campus for Faculty and Staff. info: kognito.com. — L.M. and releases

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

7


National/Global

Estimated 1.4 million LGBT Latinos in the U.S.

LOS ANGELES — An estimated 1.4 million or 4.3 percent of Latino/a adults identify as LGBT and 29 percent of Latino/a same-sex couples are raising children, according to a report released in early October by the Williams Institute at the University of California Los Angeles. The estimated 146,100 Latino/a individuals in same-sex couples tend to live in areas where there are higher proportions of Latinos/as. A third of Latino/a same-sex couples live in New Mexico, California, and Texas. Nationally, Latino/a individuals in same-sex couples are faring better than Latinos/as in different-sex couples. Twenty-six percent of all Latinos/as in same-sex couples have completed a college degree or more, compared to 14 percent of Latinos/as in different-sex couples. Reported median household incomes for Latino/a same-sex couples raising children are 20% below the incomes of same-sex Latino/a couples without children. Latina/female samesex couples also make close to $15,000 less

8

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

than Latino/male same-sex couples and have lower rates of college completion. Rates of education also vary depending on individual ancestry. Individuals of Spanish or Cuban ancestry report higher levels of educational attainment, while Mexican, Salvadoran and Puerto Rican individuals report lower rates of college completion. Latino/a individuals in same-sex couples are also more likely to be born in the U.S. than Latino/a individuals in different sex couples (59% versus 37%) and more likely to be a U.S. citizen than their counterparts in different-sex couples (80% versus 62%). However, one in seven Latino/a same-sex couples are binational (include one citizen and one non-citizen). The top three countries of origin reported for Latino/a individuals in same-sex couples born outside the U.S. are Mexico, Puerto Rico and Cuba. — Originally published by LGBTQ Nation at lgbtqnation.com. LGBTQ Nation is a qnotes news partner. Reprinted with permission.


goqnotes.com/to/news

news

ELECTION 2013

Mayoral candidates speak on gay marriage positions Political science professor: Charlotte still in the Bible belt by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com

❝ My belief has always been to each his or her own, relative to what they want to practice. However, my personal belief is that I don’t subscribe to it. I am not here to be anybody’s judge relative to what they feel they want to explore and/or engage in, but it’s something that personally I don’t subscribe to. ❞ — Democratic mayoral candidate Patrick Cannon

❝ I really felt like you could have same-sex civil unions or domestic partnerships. ... I’m not in favor of samesex marriage from a 50-states [perspective]. Allow each state to choose how they want to define that. ❞ — Republican mayoral candidate Edwin Peacock III CHARLOTTE — The Queen City’s two mayoral candidates have staked out their positions on gay marriage, standing firm against outright discrimination, but stopping short of full support for across-the-board marriage equality for same-sex couples. Both Republican Edwin Peacock III and Democrat Patrick Cannon were unwilling to offer full support for marriage equality in recent interviews with qnotes, portions of which are published in this issue on pages 10-12. “I would say my belief has always been to each his or her own, relative to what they want to practice,” Cannon said, noting he voted against last year’s anti-LGBT state constitutional amendment on marriage. “However, my personal belief is that I don’t subscribe to it. I am not here to be anybody’s judge relative to what they feel they want to explore and/or engage in, but it’s something that personally I don’t subscribe to.” Peacock, who publicly denounced last year’s amendment, said he supports civil unions. “I really felt like you could have samesex civil unions or domestic partnerships,” Peacock said. “As a moderate, I always felt like, well, maybe that could be the midpoint ground here.” Additionally, Peacock said the matter should be left to states. “I’m not in favor of same-sex marriage from a 50 states [perspective],” he said. “Allow each state to choose how they want to define that.” The candidates’ more moderate positions aren’t necessarily surprising or out of place, according to University of North Carolina-Charlotte

political science professor Eric Heberlig. “In terms of the broader local political culture, we still are in the Bible belt, even if Charlotte considers itself more progressive than more rural parts of the state,” he said. Both candidates, Heberlig explained, must appeal to a constituency that, while more progressive, still includes a “significant element” of conservative thought. Each candidate faces different obstacles. Cannon will rely on heavy support from AfricanAmerican voters. Heberlig said that could pose a problem for Cannon if he expressed full support for gay marriage. “The African-American community and particularly the more religiously-active portion of the African-American community tends to be much more conservative on issues of sexuality than white liberal Democrats,” Heberlig said. “I would say that would be a significant part of where Cannon’s opposition is coming from.” Peacock seems to have found a middle road. It’s enough, Heberlig said, to appeal to Republicans sympathetic to LGBT equality issues without necessarily offending more conservative voters. That marriage law has nothing to do with the job of Charlotte’s mayor doesn’t stop voters from wanting to know where candidates stand, said Heberlig. “Voters want politicians who understand people like them,” he said. “Even if the issue isn’t relevant to the specific job the politician has, voters presume that if they understand the perspective they have, they can apply that

worldview more broadly to other issues that affect them as well.” Those issues could include same-sex domestic partner benefits. The city already has them, but the mayor or City Council could find themselves defending them if state government chose to override the city’s authority. Cannon and Peacock both support the city’s current domestic partner plans for workers. And, for the mayor, his or her role as the city’s chief spokesperson puts them in a special spotlight. “The mayor can go a long way in welcoming diverse communities or signaling to people what type of community we are and who we want to see as residents of Charlotte,” Heberlig said. When now-Gov. Pat McCrory was mayor, he refused to issue welcome letters to LGBT organizations holding events in Charlotte. It’s only symbolic, Heberlig said, “but it’s a very real symbol to the people those communities.” In the short term, it’s likely that neither Cannon’s nor Peacock’s positions will be met with much opposition from most voters. If either aspire to higher office, those positions could come back into debate. Cannon, in particular, has staked a more solid position against marriage equality. But, Heberlig said, positions can change. “It’s not unheard of that when you face a new constituency, there’s an incentive to switch your opinion to match it,” Heberlig said. “As long as this issue is not a high-profile one in the current campaign, he has the flexibility to modify it in the future if he wants to.” : :

Networking Social/Dinner Combined!

Meet Noah Lazes — The Man Behind the NC Music Factory Date/Time: Tuesday, October 15 6 pm networking / 7 pm program Place: The Saloon @ the NC Music Factory, 900 NC Music Factory Blvd. Cost: Free and open to the public

Celebrate the Guild’s 2nd Annual Gala!

Date/Time: Friday, November 15 6 pm networking / 7 pm program Place: Brief/Shu in Southend, 1426 S. Tryon St. Cost: Tickets start at just $25 for dinner, dancing, live music and DJ! Information: Email businessguild@yahoo.com, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CharlotteBusinessGuild, or call 704-750-5CBG (5224)

www.charlottebusinessguild.org Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

9


goqnotes.com/to/news

Patrick Cannon Democrat

What makes you the best candidate for mayor over your opponent? What makes me the best is that I know that in today’s time I am more than ready in terms of being on the ground to move Charlotte forward. I’m more than willing to continue to make the sacrifice that I have over the years, knowing and understanding that I still have a business and, more importantly, a family. I’m able, from the context of already serving in the capacity of mayor pro tem. That has positioned me properly to actually serve as mayor largely in part because that’s what I’ve been doing in the absence of the mayor. How is your relationship with regional governments? If the airport commission goes through, you’ll have to work more closely with regional partners. In the past year, I’ve had the opportunity to work with and be appointed to [the Centralina Council of Governments]. I will tell you that the relationship I have with mayors in the surrounding region is not a bad relationship at all and it’s one I look forward to growing more than what it is today. Largely, in part because regional is what it’s about today. When we begin to have discussions around economic development and transportation and even some aspects of public safety, it only makes common sense to have a good rapport with your neighbors because we’re all in this together for the most part. I look forward to establishing a good working relationship with mayors and even other council members of other parts of the region.

ELECTION 2013

Next Mayor? Candidates sit down for Q&A on LGBT, other city issues by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com Come November, voters in Charlotte will head to the polls and choose their next mayor. For the first time since 2009, no incumbent mayor is on the ballot. Citizens will choose between Democrat Patrick Cannon, 47, who currently serves as Mayor Pro Tempore and an at-large member on Charlotte City Council, and Republican Edwin Peacock III, 43, a former at-large council member who served two terms from 2007 through 2011 and ran last year for the Republican nomination in the Ninth Congressional District. Both candidates have long records of public service. For LGBT citizens, Cannon and Peacock represent two of the most vetted candidates to ever appear on the mayoral ballot. Both have received past endorsements from the Mecklenburg LGBT Political Action Committee (MeckPAC) for their LGBT-friendly stances, though neither received MeckPAC’s nod in mayoral primary races in September. Peacock was endorsed by qnotes in 2011. qnotes sat down with both candidates for an in-depth Q&A on a variety of topics, including LGBT non-discrimination efforts, economic development issues, community and neighborhood issues and more. A portion of those sit-down interviews are published here, with the full Q&As available online at goqnotes.com/ in/election-2013/. The candidates’ responses have been edited for brevity and clarity. ———————————————— Meet the Candidates Patrick Cannon Edwin Peacock III Party: Democratic Party: Republican Age: 47 Age: 43 First elected: 1993, City First elected: 2007, City Council District 3 Council At-Large Currently: Mayor Pro Tem, Currently: No elected office; City Council At-Large Blumenthal Performing Arts Education: North Carolina Trustee (2011-Present) A&T State University, Education: University of Communications with a minor Georgia, Political Science and in Business/Marketing. a Certificate in Global Studies Work: CEO, E-Z Parking Work: Vice President, The Pomfret Financial Company

If an employment non-discrimination ordinance had come up for a vote on City Council, would you have voted for it? A couple things. The reason Curt Walton brought the policy that exists today — and I can’t say it is the sole reason he brought it up — was largely in part because I had gone to his office to ask him if he would have any issues moving forward on something as such. Obviously, the answer had to be no, because it exists today. I went there to voice that ask of him largely in part because I really don’t tolerate discrimination on any level. Having been a victim of it myself, that’s not the Charlotte way or at least it shouldn’t be. We should make sure that whether someone is looking for employment, whether they’re looking for just a chance to be included, that we do not allow one’s lifestyle to be a factor in determining whether or not they are qualified to do something one way or the other. I don’t know that I care what you look like, where you’re from, where you’re going — just so long as you’re able to come here and do what needs to be done for the best interest of the company. The same thing should be applicable to the public sector. … I would also say that the Council did vote, with me included, on domestic partner benefits [which were included in the 2012 budget]. I think people can see that there’s worth in everybody regardless of who they are or whatever their lifestyle might represent, there’s worth. I think we have to be able to tap that worth to be the kind of city that we know Charlotte can end up being not just now but in the future. The city’s Commercial Non-Discrimination Ordinance requires businesses seeking to contract with the city to certify they have a non-discrimination policy of their own. Would you support amending that to include sexual orientation and gender identity so that businesses receiving taxpayer funds for services can’t turn around and discriminate against their own employees? As long as a person is a person and they’re there to be able to do a job efficiently and effectively there should be nothing in my opinion to allow them to not be able to participate in providing such services. So, you would consider taking a look at the ordinance? Absolutely, and it probably makes some sense to check on best practices. Is there anything anecdotal that’s out there, something that you can sort of benchmark from to help you in making an informed decision? Would you be open to taking a look at expanding protections in the public accommodations and fair housing ordinances, even if it means you have to go to the state legislature and ask for a local bill allowing you to expand them? see Cannon on 12 Yes. I’m open to that. And, we have our community relations

10

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

news

Edwin Peacock III Republican

What makes you the best candidate for mayor over your opponent? Two things: Vision for the future and an interest in improving and changing the culture of local government. What’s wrong with local government? Partisan, divided and increasingly one-sided and, as a result, ineffective. You told Creative Loafing that you thought having a Republican mayor with a majority Democratic Council would bring balance. I’d like to see balance in the sense of having at least maybe four Republicans on City Council. That would be my ideal scenario. But right now, currently the way we’re districted, there’s only two safe Republican districts. And, with the Democratic majority and the last redistricting we did, there’s really only one district that could be a toss up.

You have, over the course of your public service in Charlotte, proven yourself to be what I think many people would call a moderate Republican. But, for my readers — particularly LGBT readers — some people may be put off a bit by the fact that you are a Republican and the history the Republican Party has. How do you separate your personal positions from your party’s platform? Well, my past experience has definitely shown my independence. I’ve not agreed [with some party platform ideas] since I answered my first MeckPAC questionnaire in 2007. What I noticed is what’s causing our party to atrophy and to recede is that they’ve gone from a party about prosperity and economic opportunity and limited government and fiscally responsible behavior to trying to take what they believe is high moral ground on social issues. That, I think, has done more to damage our party. At the end of the day, the more we’ve gotten into the recession the more people realize those types of social issues are not the most relevant right now. The reason I’ve been so frustrated with my party is that, in order to grow, you have to be an open tent party and an open tent party says that there’s a wide ramp for disagreement on subjects like immigration — there should be a wide range of beliefs even on the gay and lesbian issues. … Right now we have a party that wants to inflame one side or the other. And, they want to take a high ground, whether it’s the Tea Party or whether it’s social conservatives on issues like Amendment One or gun control. … I’m not apologetic about being a conservative, but I am identifying my campaign in the way I’ve conducted myself in my own personal life. We hope that is what voters look for as opposed to a blind party affiliation. You came out against Amendment One, and the mayor’s position doesn’t have anything to do with marriage law, but a lot of people might look to the mayor for guidance and leadership. What’s your personal position on same-sex marriage? I thought the DOMA decision really bounces it back to the states and I felt as though from an LGBT perspective one of the advantages to the way the court set that up was that they struck down the part that really does get us back to allowing each state to identify how they want to be able to conduct themselves. It puts the flexibility back in the states’ hands to do just that. I really felt like you could have same-sex civil unions or domestic partnerships. As a moderate, I always felt like, well, maybe that could be the midpoint ground here. … Tax law is tax law. I do insurance and investment planning for people who are gay or lesbian … When you look at the tax and estate laws and the way the IRS looks at a same-sex couple who have been together for a long time, you have to rewrite a whole lot of things that relate to estate and tax law. When you see what brought DOMA and Proposition 8, these were issues all about the equality of the situation where a [partner in] a same-sex couple dies and one has to pay more in income taxes. That’s a fairness question. So, you are or are not in favor of same-sex marriage? I’m not in favor of same-sex marriage from a 50-states [perspective]. Allow each state to choose how they want to define that. The second part is, I understand what the DOMA decision was about, because it was about fairness in a tax and equality scenario. I thought before the DOMA decision, I felt like civil unions was going to be the ground that the courts would find. As it relates to same-sex benefits at the City of Charlotte as a city see Peacock on 12 issue, I was for it. … I studied it and realized it was not as


Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

11


goqnotes.com/to/news

Cannon

Peacock

continued from page 10 director here who focuses on public accommodations and a part of what they have to operate under is making sure there is no level of discrimination that takes place on any level. I think, in general, we’ve embraced that idea. Now, whether it spells out exactly what you want to have spelled out is another question, but, in general, it covers everyone in terms of discrimination. You were not in favor of using property taxes to extend the streetcar … No new property taxes, right. You were not necessarily opposed to the streetcar idea. The city manager tried to get federal grant money but that did not come through. Are you still committed to seeing the project through and how do you foresee it being funded? I’ve always been for the streetcar, since the inception of the idea. I remain in support of an alternative mode of transit like that that I think can bring about an expansion in our tax base, create jobs and provide a level of retail and housing that’s needed. It makes good sense, I think, to always look to do something that’s going to have a ripple effect in terms of being able to use those other tax dollars on other infrastructure needs. In terms of what has happened relative to the loss of the $63 million that was to come in from a grant from TIGER funds, it’s my hope that we would continue to look toward more grants or identifying a revenue source that would help us to be able to maximize not only the ability to do a streetcar, but also to support our other light rail needs as it relates to the blue line and the red line and we’re talking about even a silver line and a purple line. We practically have every color under the rainbow and get those built. If we can identify a proper funding source, I think we ought to be having that conversation. The economic spinoff of what it will produce and the impact it will have on our environment are too far great for us to ignore. As mayor, I look for us to be able to concentrate on that, but not spend eons trying to figure it out. I think there are so many other parts of this community that need to be touched and taken care of before we let just one thing consume us. Marriage law is not something the mayor of Charlotte can control, but a lot of my readers still want to know where you stand on marriage equality for same-sex couples. You’re right, that’s not within our purview, per se, and I would say my belief has always been to each his or her own, relative to what they want to practice. However, my personal belief is that I don’t subscribe to it. I am not here to be anybody’s judge relative to what they feel they want to explore and/or engage in, but it’s something that personally I don’t subscribe to. How did you vote on the marriage amendment last year? I voted no, which would be in keeping with my personal beliefs. On Eastland Mall, what are your thoughts on the proposal there? Are you excited for it, looking forward to it? Is there anything else the city can do to help revitalize the Eastside? I am excited about it, but I had another vision for it that would have been more of smart-growth initiative much like a Town of

12

qnotes

news

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

continued from page 10 Ayrsley, which exists off I-485 and S. Tryon St., a place where you can go from rental to home ownership, recreate with a Y there, there’s a movie theater, dining. It’s the kind of place, when you get there, you don’t have to leave it. You can do everything right there; live, work, raise your family and recreate — like a mini-Ballantyne which I pushed for when I was a district representative there. I was hoping we’d see something like that for that location, however the proposal before us now is still exciting because it will, I think, offer something to that part of our community that has been long forgotten. What concerns me is what the state will do next year when they reconvene in May to determine if they are going to allow for these tax credits to be extended. If these credits are not allowed, the deal in itself goes south. It’s been in our economic development committee. I asked that question point blank to Bert Hesse, who has been the head of seeing the project through. He concurred and agreed it would not happen if those tax credits aren’t put back into some legislation. What happens beyond that if it doesn’t come into fruition? The city may have to consider cutting its losses and allowing a private developer to come in and who would agree not to come and ask for additional taxpayer dollars to move forward to create or develop what the market will bear. City Council has been criticized for a lot of the economic incentives given to private business. What are your thoughts on balancing economic incentives for private companies versus more investment in maybe smaller businesses or non-profit groups working in neglected neighborhoods? We have to look at not choosing one, but finding a way to balance all. There’s still a role for economic incentives if they make good business sense, meaning good jobs at better-than-minimum-wage standards of pay. There’s a place for continuing our legacy to support small businesses. One of the things I helped to bring back was what we call now the Charlotte Business Inclusion program, which used to be the [a minority and women owned business] program, so now women and minorities have another opportunity to participate in landing city and county contracts. We’re also making sure small businesses have access to capital. They can get up to $75,000 in capital from the city. There’s also an opportunity for them to to gain access for any start up through Grameen Bank. Lastly, there is a web portal that we put together that is called CharlotteBusinessResources.com, a place where anyone who has an interest in starting a small business can go and find out what access to capital is available and beyond that getting help creating a business plan to help them move forward. Small business is what makes this country revolve and we get that right here in the City of Charlotte. Being an entrepreneur and small businessman myself, it means a great deal to me that we continue to be about supporting our small businesses and still engaging in public-private partnerships. : :

Read the full unabridged interviews online at goqnotes.com/in/election-2013/

significant of a financial matter as it was previously billed to be. I couldn’t come up with a hard argument that this was going to ruin us. Would you support expanding protections on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity under the Commercial Non-Discrimination Ordinance, so that businesses that are receiving taxpayer dollars for services they provide will then be prohibited from anti-gay discrimination? I don’t have a problem with that. I just want to make sure we are trying to do business with more people within the City of Charlotte and make it fair for anybody who’s bidding to do that. I’m just always cautious when you put another layer on trying to do business with the city. Are you throwing stuff out or giving an unintended consequence? I’m with you on the fairness scenario. You know, Wal-Mart goes out and they can change the market place by just who they are dealing with… I think activists would say the same thing about the city, that it could have the same effect. Clearly, I’d want to see — I understood very clearly in 2007 when [former MeckPAC Chair] Phil Hargett was sitting here in this very office explaining to me the problem, the problem of not having sexual orientation [in the employment policy]. I said, well, it’s just a word. I’m with you on it. What’s the big deal? He went into depth on why it’s such a big deal. … I understood the retention needs there. I just want to understand, is there a real problem that we’re doing business with people right now that are discriminating? Is it a big problem? I don’t know. But, if it is a big problem, I want it to be an equal playing ground. We don’t need to be doing business with people that are discriminating. Would you be in favor of looking at changing the public accommodations and fair housing ordinances, even if it means you have to ask the state legislature for permission to make those changes? I don’t have any objection. That’s also something you’d have to coordinate, of course, with the real estate industry. This is a real estate issue. You’re talking about the apartment association, the realtor association and their policies. You’re hitting on what I’m about. I want to be consistent on fairness. There’s been a lot of discussion in the city about the economic incentives given to private businesses like Chiquita, the Carolina Panthers and Carowinds. What’s your position on these incentives. Chiquita, I voted no. Panthers, I would have said no. Carowinds, I would have said no. I’m pretty much across the board no. That doesn’t mean I’m against incentives. What I am for is the business investment grant program. That’s the program that we’ve had since 1998 that has worked very well for Electrolux, Rooms To Go, MetLife, Husqvarna. They’ve all used that program and it had specific criteria. … With incentives, we can no longer afford to be in this race to the bottom. How is your relationship with regional city council members, mayors, county commissioners outside of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County? I’m friends with and have the endorsement

of Miles Atkins, mayor of Mooresville, Duane Gardner, mayor of Waxhaw, who is a friend of mine and would endorse me. I know Michael Alvarez in Indian Trail. I haven’t asked him for an endorsement, but I like the guy and have a good rapport with him. I know the mayor of Weddington. … What you’re talking about there is the urban-suburban relationship. One of the things a mayor has got to be really sensitive to, and it comes out the most in the discussion of transit, is that the urban core is most analogous to the heart. We have a strong heart. … But you’ve also got all these arteries which are all those other little towns and other entities and how you’re treating them when you do decisions like my opponent has done by flip flopping like he’s done on the streetcar. He’s sending the signals to all these other partners that we are willing to not listen to the priorities of the people who are paying for the tax that is paying for the light rail and the bus system. We are willing to leapfrog over you to get pet projects done for political reasons. That has caused the divisiveness and the partisanship has all been surrounded by one issue: The streetcar. What is your position on the streetcar? No surprise. Against it. Completely? I want a streetcar. I just want to be able to pay for it. My opponent accepted a circulator grant for $35 million from the federal government, but there’s no money to pay for it. So, I put it to the analogy of you bought a house with somebody who gave you the down payment, but you can’t pay the mortgage. That disrupts the regional partnership. But, the more important relationship is what signal does it send to that place that thinks we’re the Great State of Mecklenburg. It says, you can take care of your own transit problems and that’s exactly why we created the MTC, was to say that Charlotte is not the only player here. That has been disruptive to our fault, not to our advantage. On Eastland Mall, what are your thoughts on the Studio Charlotte development there and the film industry tax credits? I support the current proposal. … And, it’s not going to return back to a retail mall. We know that. So, again the film incentives decision that will be before the legislature in the short session, I think is another breaking point here that we can’t — I hope the legislature will look at this. I know there’s a fiscal argument. There’s also a lot of misinformation about film incentives. But, at the end of the day, you have to ask yourself, do you want this business going to Georgia because that’s where they’re going. … If I’m a legislator and I don’t know anything about the film business and all I see is all this money coming out for incentives or whatever they see, the view of the pro-film people is we are giving them a quarter and they are giving us back 75 cents in our community here. And, by the way, they are not taking up any space in our schools. They are spending pure spend, which is definitely true. And, if that project should fail, is there anything else the city can do? I’m certainly a big believer in green space. I’m certain that Parks and Recreation on the county side would be pretty be pretty interested as well. : :


Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

13


Charlotte-area NASCAR driver fined for anti-gay slur Driver Nelson Piquet Jr. placed on indefinite probation, must take sensitivity training by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com CHARLOTTE — A NASCAR Nationwide Series driver, whose team is based in Mooresville, has been fined $10,000, placed on indefinite probation and ordered to attend sensitivity training for using an anti-gay slur in social media, according to a report from USA Today. Nelson Piquet Jr. used a three-letter antigay slur in an Instagram message to fellow driver Parker Kligerman, who had posted a “selfie” after a workout. The comment was caught in a screenshot by fan Matthew Breuer. Kligerman seemed to laugh it off. Piquet, in a separate, now-deleted Twitter message to a fan, said the comment was a joke between friends. “Don’t act like if u have never called your friends names,” Piquet said in the tweet. “Were (sic) not living in the 50s anymore bud.. jokes are jokes.” “I sincerely apologize to everyone for my poor choice of words last week,” Piquet said in a statement on Oct. 1. “I did not mean to hurt or offend anyone. This has been a cultural learning experience that will make me a more sensitive person moving forward.” NASCAR officials say Piquet violated its

14

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

Code of Conduct, which says a driver ”shall not make or cause to be made a public statement and/or communication that criticizes, ridicules or otherwise disparages another person based upon that person’s race, color, creed, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, age, or handicapping condition.” Piquet, 28, drives in NASCAR’s Nationwide Series, often considered a launching pad for drivers aiming to compete in the more wellknown Sprint Cup Series. His team, Turner Scott Motorsports, is based in Mooresville. The team also released a statement and said they had spoken to Piquet about his “insensitive comment” and that he “understands that such remarks will not be tolerated.” “TSM expects those associated with the team to uphold professional standards that we can all be proud of,” the company’s statement said. “Nelson has assured the team that he has learned his lesson and he knows what it means to represent TSM.” Other drivers have run afoul of NASCAR’s conduct code before. Earlier this year, Nationwide Series driver Jeremy Clements used a racist slur against African-Americans. He was suspended for two races. : :

NASCAR Nationwide Series driver Nelson Piquet Jr. has been fined $10,000 for an anti-gay slur. Photo Credit: Royalbroil, via Wikipedia. Licensed CC.


goqnotes.com/to/news

news

Lesbian faith leader to discuss black v. gay debate San Francisco’s Rev. Yvette Flunder presents lecture at UNCC Oct. 22 by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com

CHARLOTTE — A popular, AfricanAmerican and lesbian religious leader from San Francisco will present a lecture at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte this month, addressing politics, sexuality and religion. Bishop Yvette Flunder, founder of the City of Refuge United Church of Christ, says the fight for gay rights has been used to divide the black community. She’ll speak on that topic and more at the Oct. 22 “OUTSpoken” lecture event. “Given Bishop Flunder’s strong ties to Charlotte and her national — even international — reputation as an engaging speaker and tireless advocate for the most vulnerable members of our society, she was a natural choice when we were looking for an OUTSpoken speaker who could help the community think about religion and sexuality in new ways,” Kent Brintnall, associate professor of religious studies and UNC Charlotte faculty representative for OUTSpoken, said in a release. The annual OUTSpoken event was created to focus on LGBT issues. University leaders

hope the event positively influences the campus climate to make it a more accepting and affirming place for LGBT students, faculty, staff and community. Flunder, a native San Franciscan, is widely known for her HIV/AIDS work, LGBT advocacy and social justice outlook. She founded the Ark of Refuge, a non-profit organization providing housing, direct services and education for those affected by HIV/AIDS. Flunder is also a trustee and adjunct professor at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley Calif. She also serves as a board member for the National Sexuality Resource Center and works with the Religion Council of the Human Rights Campaign. The Oct. 22 lecture is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UNC-Charlotte’s Cone University Center, McKnight Hall. The event is free and open to the public. A reception and book signing will follow. Paid parking is available on campus; visit pats.uncc.edu for parking information. For more information on the OUTSpoken event, visit outspoken.uncc.edu. : :

LGBT community nets ‘best of’ wins CHARLOTTE — Creative Loafing, the Queen City’s alternative newsweekly, has released the results of its annual Best of Charlotte contest. Local LGBT businesses and groups have racked up quite a few honors, from readers and critics alike. Readers chose Plaza Midwood, the city’s closest-thing-to-a-gayborhood it has, as Best Area to Live in Charlotte. They also chose BethAnn Phetamine as Best Drag Performer, along with Shiprocked, Snug Harbor’s weekly LGBT party, as Best Nightlife Event. Shiprocked also won critic’s choice for Best Weekly Party. The Scorpio won both readers’ and critic’s choice for Best Gay/Lesbian Bar. Gay-owned

Dish won critic’s choice for “Best Gut-Busting Lunch.” An individual honor went to Scott Bishop, critic’s choice for Best LGBT Advocate. Perhaps funnest of all is the staff pick for “Best Display of Sheer Strength in a YouTube Video.” The newspaper chose the viral video of the gay awards ball that went all-too-wrong earlier this year. To see the extended list of honorees, videos and more, visit the newspaper’s website. qnotes will release its QList – Best of LGBT Charlotte in the Oct. 25 print edition. info: clcharlotte.com. — Matt Comer

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

15


Understanding the Affordable Care Act

by Laurie Youron & Natan Shemesh, Rosedale Infectious Diseases Staff So what is the Affordable Care Act? How does it affect me? Am I going to have to buy an expensive insurance package? These are just some of the questions that our patients have been asking in our office recently. The Affordable Care Act (ACA), which has been referred to as “Obamacare,” is a federal bill that will go into effect on January 1, 2014. It will require almost all Americans to be insured in some form. The federal government will offer a Health Insurance Marketplace where people who qualify can purchase insurance and receive government-funded subsides to ensure that they receive healthcare. The goal of this bill is to give each citizen increased access to healthcare with a focus on prevention. The open enrollment for these new insurance options in the Health Insurance Marketplace began on October 1, 2013. Who qualifies for the Health Insurance Marketplace? The Healthcare Insurance Marketplace is designed for people who do not otherwise have access to health insurance. People are eligible for the Marketplace if they are not offered insurance by their employer or if the cost of insurance is more than 9.5% of their income. Additionally, if your income is between 100% of Federal Poverty Level (FPL) and 400%, you are eligible for the Marketplace subsidies. (See chart below.) Household 100% 133% 150% 200% 300% 400% Size 1

$11,490 $15,282 $17,235 $22,980 $34,470 $  45,960

2  15,510  20,628  23,265  31,020  46,530   62,040 3  19,530  25,975  29,295  39,060  58,590   78,120 4  23,550  31,322  35,325  47,100  70,650   94,200 5  27,570  36,668  41,355  55,140  82,710  110,280 6  31,590  42,015  47,385  63,180  94,770  126,360 For each additional person, add

16

$ 4,020

qnotes

$ 5,347

$ 6,030

$ 8,040

$12,060

$ 16,080

How will this affect the Ryan White Program? The Ryan White Program provides assistance to patients who are HIV positive and meet certain financial requirements and residency requirements. Many people are asking if patients who receive Ryan White services will be expected to get an insurance plan or if they will continue to receive medical care under Ryan White’s federally-funded programs. The answer is simply that no one knows yet. The government has not yet answered this question.We cannot predict how the new insurance programs will roll out, and we hope that programs will leave leeway for use of Ryan White funds for clients who opt out of insurance. The government will give guidance after these programs begin. We encourage our patients to be patient as we all figure this out together. How does the ACA affect our gay and transgender community? Section 1557 of the ACA extends federal non-discrimination protections to the healthcare system for the first time. These protections include no discrimination on the basis of sex, which includes gender identity and sex stereotyping. In addition, the National Prevention Strategy created under the ACA states that “all Americans should have the opportunity to live long, healthy, independent, and productive lives, regardless of their … sexual orientation or gender identity”. Through this National Prevention Strategy, grants have been awarded for community-based prevention programs that include the gay and transgender population as a priority population. The ACA prioritizes building a culturally competent and diverse health care workforce. How does the ACA help those living with HIV/AIDS? The new law prohibits insurers from denying insurance coverage based on pre-existing conditions or charging higher premiums based on health status. Also, it removes the requirement that people with HIV have to wait for their AIDS diagnosis before they can qualify for medical coverage, and promotes patient centered medical homes in which providers work together as a team to coordinate high-quality and timely care for people with chronic conditions. In addition, a major aspect of the ACA is making prescription drugs more affordable, which will help people living with HIV/AIDS afford medications. Where can I find more information? Kaiser Family Foundation . http://kff.org/health-reform North Carolina Department of Insurance . http://www.ncdoi.com Don’t forget to visit our website at www.rosedaleid.com, friend us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for community and clinical updates! — Sponsored Content —

Oct. 11-24 . 2013


goqnotes.com/to/news

news

Wilmington bar closed after patron’s fatal car accident State officials revoke bars license by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com

WILMINGTON — A bar, The Tool Box, 2325 Burnett Blvd., popular with gay patrons, has lost its alcohol license after a fatal accident involving a local DJ. The bar’s manager has said they have closed and are hoping to retain an attorney. Will Harry “Bill” Simmons, 42, was killed in a fatal car accident on Sept. 27. According to a Facebook post by The Toolbox Bar manager Phil Sopranos, Simmons had one beer and three shots of liquor before leaving the bar, driving downtown and then driving home. He was killed during the 25-mile drive from downtown and his home, the bar said. On Oct. 3, Sopranos announced on the bar’s Facebook profile that it was closed “because of what happened to Dj Bill.”

In a follow-up message on Oct. 5, Sopranos said its license had been revoked by state alcohol officials. “Dj Bill Simmons came in on a Thursday night he had one beer and three shots of liquor then he went to downtown Wilmington for nondisclosure reason then he proceeded to drive 25 miles to his house where he had a fatal car wreck,” the bar said on Facebook, “therefore ALE came in tonight and took our temporary license so until further notice we cannot sell liquor but we are returning on Monday to find out if they can do that I will update everybody next week.” Sopranos declined further comment to qnotes.

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

17


goqnotes.com/to/news

news

Non-believers hold coming out party in Charlotte Conference celebrates launch of local organization by Gavin Off :: goff@charlotteobserver.com CHARLOTTE — Atheists across the Carolinas held a coming out party at a weekend conference meant to show support for non-believers living in the Bible belt. About 80 people attended the third annual Carolinas Secular Conference held on

18

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

Oct. 4-6 at the Hilton Hotel in Charlotte near Interstate 77. The reason: “It’s the one time of the year they get to be surrounded by people who think like them,” said Jennifer Lovejoy, an Asheville resident and president of the Carolinas Secular

Association. “They shouldn’t have to move to New York to find a community.” The mix of speakers and discussion sessions touched on discrimination against non-believers and how group members felt that religious fundamentalists were taking over public education. Workshops gave group leaders, who came from across the Carolinas, tips on how to build local support for atheists in their communities. And individuals shared their own “coming out” stories. Lovejoy’s story began about 15 years ago, when she was talking with her husband about finding a church. Why find a church, her husband asked. You don’t believe in God, anyway. That’s when it clicked for the mother of two who was raised Christian but never thought the religion made sense. She simply wasn’t a believer. “Coming out is the No. 1 thing we can do to change social discrimination,” said Joseph Stewart, association co-founder. Stewart said many people are still afraid of coming out — afraid they could lose their job or be ostracized from friends and family. But acceptance is growing, he said. Stewart made waves in 2010 when he

helped erect billboards across North Carolina reading: “One nation indivisible.” Vandals later painted “under God” on one of the billboards on the Billy Graham Parkway. Despite the backlash, the attention worked. Charlotte alone now has eight groups for non-believers, the largest being Charlotte Atheists and Agnostics, said Steve Bivens, coordinator for the Charlotte Coalition of Reason, which celebrated its launch at the conference. Bivens runs Charlotte’s Exploring Humanism Group. The group rejects beliefs in supernatural or superstitious and lives with the saying “good without God.” Bivens said he wasn’t sure how many people in the area consider themselves nonbelievers, but he thinks the number is increasing and the weekend’s conference will teach leaders to reach out to more of them. “It’s growing. It’s becoming more lively,” Bivens said of the atheist community. “People are afraid to say what they believe. We’re showing people it’s okay.” : : — Originally published by The Charlotte Observer on Oct. 5. qnotes is a member of The Charlotte Observer’s Charlotte News Alliance. Reprinted with permission.


goqnotes.com/to/life

life

WELLNESS SERIES

October a focus for Lesbian Health Women’s and lesbian health more than breast cancer awareness by Jane Goble-Clark :: qnotes contributor

A patient’s blood pressure is checked during a women’s health fair. Lesbian women are at higher risks of heart disease, obesity, cancer and smoking, all of which can affect heart health. Photo Credit: Jen Rynda/Fort Meade (U.S. Army)

Every community has its own sets of strengths and challenges. This is not a surprise to those of us in a minority group, whether our minority status is based on culture, race, gender or sexuality. Luckily, our society is now at a point in time where specific research is available to help guide the wellness of many minority groups. This wellness series offers opportunities for awareness, insight and education for the LGBT community. This month, we explore Lesbian Health. Lesbian health and wellness issues differ from the larger population. Awareness and education are key elements to preventing problems with illness, substance abuse or violence. Knowledge is power. Empower yourself with this information and be brave enough to share it with your friends, family or health providers. Lesbians and Heart Disease — Factors that raise women’s risk for heart disease include physical inactivity, obesity, and smoking — all of which have been found to be more prevalent among lesbians than other women. Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking can reduce your risks for heart disease and other serious health problems. Lesbians and Cancer — Lesbians are at significantly higher risk for developing breast cancer than heterosexual women. Risk factors for breast cancer among lesbians include fewer full-term pregnancies, fewer mammograms and/or clinical breast exams and being overweight. Traditionally, lesbians and bisexual women have been less likely to bear children and, as a result, may not fully benefit from hormones released during pregnancy and

breastfeeding. These hormones are believed to protect women against different types of cancers. Also, lesbians are less likely to visit a doctor or nurse for routine screenings than heterosexual women. Schedule your routine exams to be proactive about your wellness. Lesbians and Fitness — Some research has indicated that adult lesbians are not sufficiently physically active. Some barriers to participating in exercise identified by one study included being too tired, not having a physical activity partner, finding a lack of lesbian-focused physical activity groups and lacking same-sex family memberships to fitness facilities. Lesbians also tend to possess somewhat different attitudes about beauty than do heterosexual women. As a result, lesbians’ current weight, and perceptions of being overweight, may not necessarily contribute to their likelihood of engaging in frequent exercise. Lesbians & Obesity — Some groups of lesbian women are more likely to be overweight and obese than females of other sexual orientations. Specifically, higher prevalence rates of obesity have been found among lesbians who are: African-American; live in rural or urban areas; have lower levels of education; and are from a low socioeconomic status. Routine health assessments are an easy way determine and maintain a healthy weight status over time. Lesbians, Injury and Violence — Lesbian women and gay men report experiencing harassment or physical violence from family members due to their sexual orientation. When compared with straight adults (17.5 percent), a

see Women’s on 24 Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

19


SPORTS

Playing the Field Match-ups from across the Carolinas: Seasons rock and roll by Jon Hoppel :: qnotes contributor

Charlotte Royals were joyous after their huge win against Tablerock. Photo Credit: Alex Aguilar

Welcome back! Its fall, and a lot of team sports in the Carolinas have started their fall seasons. So, whether you are into softball, rugby, roller derby or all of the above, go check them out before the season is over!

Rugby The Charlotte Royals have started the second half of the year in dominant form. On Sept. 14, Charlotte took on the Nashville Grizzlies for their semi-annual Juggfest match in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., and crushed the once formidable Grizzlies, 85-7. The match showed off the talents of Garrett Jordan, a forward making the transition to backline player. Taking to his new position like a fish to water, he rumbled down the field for multiple scores, leaving several Nashville players in his wake and earning Man of Match honors from both teams. This huge win gave the Royals a ton of momentum heading into their second match of the season, against Table Rock Rugby Club on Sept. 28. Table Rock and Charlotte have played many times over the years and Table Rock has come out victorious every time and usually by big margins. But, going into the game, Coach Amanda Vestal had a feeling that this might be the year that the Royals vanquished their most vaunted of opponents. And, she was right. Charlotte came out aggressive and matched Table Rock’s intensity from the beginning, stopping them twice near their own goal line before charging down the field and scoring the first try of the match by Josh Whaley. Both teams continued to grind it out, but Charlotte was able to put another score on the board right before halftime, leading to a 12-0 score. Table Rock came out in the second half like a new team, catching the Royals in a sluggish temperament and scoring in the first two minutes. But, that was the wakeup call the Royals needed, answering with a score of their own five minutes later. The game was a slugfest after that. Both teams grew more physical and the war of attrition began for the rest of the half until Table Rock was able to capitalize on a Royals turnover deep in their own end and scoring, lessening the gap in score 17-12 with 10 minutes left in the game. Knowing that Charlotte’s lead was tenuous

see next page u

20

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013


goqnotes.com/to/life

life

Royals Josh Whaley winning a lineout. (inset) BJ Smith making a pass. Photo Credit: Alex Aguilar

at best against a team like Table Rock, captain Danny Wadsworth urged his team to press and stay aggressive. Which they did, leading to a final try by Garrett Jordan to seal the game with two minutes left. 24-12, Royals! Next up for the Charlotte Royals is the Atlanta Buck’s Ruck-a-Buck tournament the on Oct. 14, followed by a slew of home matches to finish out the year. For more information, go to charlotteroyals.org. Kickball Raleigh’s newly formed Stonewall Kickball league began their first season on Sept. 29. The 8-team league “is an LGBTQ & Ally communitybased, non-profit sports league that strives to raise funds for the LGBT Center of Raleigh and other local non-profit organizations. Our league values each player for who they are and what they bring to the league’s community.” The league runs for 8 weeks, until Nov. 17, every Sunday from 1-4 p.m. at Halifax Park and Community Center in Raleigh.

The first week’s standings are as follows: 1. Oak City, Pitch 2. Raleighwood Ballers 3. I’ll Cut a Pitch 4. Free Ballers 5. Pitch Slap 6. The Horns 7. The Southern Balls 8. Sir Walter If you would like to support their league, go to Facebook at facebook.com/stonewallsports and check out the Stonewall Kickball — Raleigh page for more information. Softball Carolina Softball Alliance also started up their fall season on Sept. 29 at Revolution Park, 2425 Barringer Dr., in South Charlotte. The league has five very competitive teams and will be playing every Sunday thru Nov. 17 as well. If you’d like to join, support or get more information for next year’s spring season, check out their website at carolinasoftball.org.

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

21


goqnotes.com/to/arts

a&e

Charlotte groups launch public art initiative Five projects to be funded; applications due Nov. 15 by Elisabeth Arriero :: earriero@charlotteobserver.com Three Charlotte groups have partnered together to bring more neighborhood-based public art to the city. The City of Charlotte, the Public Art Commission and the Arts & Science Council have launched the Neighborhoods in Creative pARTnership initiative, which will allow neighborhood groups within the city to apply for public art projects specific to their communities.

Five projects of up to $23,600 each will be awarded based on a variety of criteria, such as neighborhood participation, geographic distribution, the strength of the project idea and the potential impact on community growth. Priority will be given to groups representing areas without city-funded public artwork. The selection panel will include elected of-

ficials, city staff and urban planning and design professionals. “We look forward to bringing neighborhoods and artists together to explore and create,” the Arts & Science Council’s Public Art Program Director Nicole Bartlett said. Representatives with the Arts & Science Council are available to attend scheduled neighborhood meetings to discuss project

eligibility guidelines, the selection process and the artist selection and design process. For more information, visit ArtsandScience. org. Applications are due by 5 p.m. Nov. 14. — Originally published by The Charlotte Observer on Oct. 7. qnotes is a member of The Observer’s Charlotte News Alliance. Reprinted with permission.

Local Pride to celebrate arts

connect to goqnotes.com

Pride Winston-Salem is scheduled for Oct. 19. The annual local event is back for its third year, including its parade. This year, the event aims to celebrate the local arts scene. The festival will be held in Downtown Winston-Salem’s arts distsrict. A great line-up of entertainers, vendors, exhibitors and more will join food trucks and family-friendly activities the whole day. A kid zone will also be presented. The event is organized in assication with DADA, the Downtown Art District Association. Festival opens at 10 a.m. and runs through 7 p.m. More info at pridewinstonsalem.org. — Matt Comer

daily news, blog posts and lgbt community event listings

Sign up for our weekly e-newsletter: goqnotes.com/subs

Facebook facebook.com/ qnotescarolinas

Twitter twitter.com/ qnotescarolinas

Calendar goqnotes.com/ calendar

22

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013


news

goqnotes.com/to/news

S.C. National Guard won’t process gay couples’ benefits at state facilities State Guard leader says decision complies with federal law, anti-gay state constitution by Matt Comer matt@goqnotes.com

COLUMBIA — The South Carolina National Guard announced on Oct. 1 that it would not process benefits for legally-married same-sex couples at state-owned facilities. Instead, the state guard will direct all family benefits applications to federal installations. South Carolina Adj. Gen. Robert Livingston told The Greenville News that South Carolina will comply with U.S. Department of Defense directives to begin providing benefits to all legally-married couples, regardless of sex, following June’s U.S. Supreme Court marriage striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. The guard’s decision, Livingston said, allows the state to follow its constitution, which bans gay marriage, while giving same-sex couples access to benefits. Four other states — Texas, Oklahoma, Mississippi and Louisiana — have refused to offer benefits, citing their own anti-gay state constitutional amendments. Despite having a similar anti-gay amendment, North Carolina announced in September its national guard would offer benefits to same-sex couples. The American Military Partner Association, a national support organization for LGBT military spouses and families, said South Carolina’s decision could threaten gay families’ access to state activities and benefits. The group also wants President Barack Obama and the Department of Defense to address the situation. “This supposed conflict between state and federal law when it comes to the National Guard needs to be addressed by the Administration and the Department of Defense,” Stephen Peters, president of the group, said in a release in the evening of Oct. 1. “We are very concerned that this same rationale will be used to deny our military spouses access to family readiness groups, marriage enrichment retreats, and other events at National Guard facilities in these minority of states that are refusing to comply with the Defense Department direction.” [Ed. Note — An original online version of this article omitted the words “at state facilities” in the headline. Maj. Jim Roth of the South Carolina National Guard told qnotes the state has not stopped benefits, but simply transferred their operations. “To avoid violating state law while ensuring our Servicemembers who are married to members of the same sex receive the benefits they clearly deserve, we are processing their benefits using our federal personnel and our federal facilities,” Roth said. We regret the error.]

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

23


goqnotes.com/to/life

life

Women’s, lesbian health more than breast cancer awareness continued from page 19 significantly higher percentage of lesbian or gay adults (56.4 percent) and bisexual adults (47.4 percent) report experiencing intimate partner violence. It is okay to seek help if you’ve experienced domestic violence and/or victimization. Lesbians and Mental Health — Many factors affect the mental and emotional health of lesbian women. For example, a research study found that adverse, punitive and traumatic reactions from parents and caregivers in response to their children’s sexual orientation were closely correlated with poor mental health and an increase in substance use. Mental health and medical health are correlated. Don’t be afraid to ask for information about mental wellness topics when consulting with your medical doctor. Lesbians and substance abuse — Studies have found that lesbians are between 1.5 and

2 times more likely to smoke than heterosexual women and are significantly more likely to drink heavily than heterosexual women. Among lesbians, younger women are more likely to smoke than older women, while “butch� lesbians are much more likely to smoke and use marijuana than young “femme� lesbians. The difference between the two age groups may be explained, in part, by younger women being more likely to socialize in bar settings. Call the Center for Prevention Services’ Drug Line for information on treatment or cessation: 1.704.375.DRUG (3784). : : — Portions based on “Top Health Issues for LGBT Populations Information & Resource Kit� from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

— Breast Cancer Informational Resources — American Cancer Society ~ cancer.org Avon Walk for Breast Cancer ~ avonwalk.org Cancer Care ~cancercare.org

qpoll Do you think that women’s health takes a back seat to gay men’s health issues in the LGBT community? See the options and vote: goqnotes.com/to/qpoll

16/5:653(>6--0*, 3HYY`>1VOUZVU (;;695,@

7OVUL! -H_!  

76)V_ /PJRVY`5*

31VOUZVU'31VOUZVU3H^6MĂ„JLJVT

24

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

National Cancer Institute ~ cancer.gov National Institute of Health ~ nih.gov Susan G. Komen for the Cure ~ komen.org


goqnotes.com/to/arts

tell trinity

choices which you can get a big tip from when you look at my cartoon.)

by Trinity :: qnotes contributor :: trinity@telltrinity.com

Transsexuals, cross dressers and drag queens, oh my Dear Trinity, I just moved from the country to the city and I’m confused about the differences between transsexuals, cross dressers and drag queens. TransConfused, Minneapolis, MN Dear TransConfused, A transsexual (TS) and/or a trans person are women or men who, for many reasons decide

to change their birth sex to the opposite sex. However, a trans person does not always change his or her sex organs, while a transsexual does. Cross dressers are straight men that dress as women from time to time. And, drag queens change their appearances, not their sexual identity, for performance purposes only and sometimes for a bar tab. That’s the cut, I mean the tuck of it, sweetie. Hello Trinity, I love my boyfriend, but he makes more money than me and he bugs me to get a better job or go to school to get a trade. Money means a lot to him. How do I get him to see that life is simple and not all about money? Money vs. Life, Albuquerque, NM Hello Money vs. Life, It sounds more to me like he wants you to achieve greater things and become more successful for yourself and your relationship before the arthritis sets in. Yes, it’s great to be simple, but struggling your whole life is nothing to strive towards. So, pumpkin, use his love (and money) to become more successful and less complacent. (I sure know how to weigh the two

Dearest Trinity, I’m gay and have a physical handicap. How do you suggest I find dates? Handicapped & Dating, Cleveland, OH Dearest Handicapped & Dating, I’d start searching the internet for groups of similar folks and start making dates. And, honey, on that first date don’t talk about your handicap as an issue, but rather about the good things that have come from it. But, you probably knew that already! Hey Trinity, I was with the same guy for months, then he suddenly breaks up with me for someone else. I’m so mad. I wish him more harm than he could ever imagine. Am I wrong to wish such things? Unkind Thoughts, Las Vegas, NV Hey Unkind Thoughts, Being vengeful may be wrong, but being mad and/or thinking nasty thoughts is normal after a murder, I mean a breakup. So, baby, wish away, but never get too carried away… and read: Trinity’s Wishes You’re Not Allowed And Are Allowed, After A Break Up   1. Y ou’re not allowed to wish that he ends up a cancer patient helplessly dying in a lonely hotel room because of a bad HMO.   2. B  ut, you are allowed to think of him as a witch in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692 who is

a&e

being wrongfully and painfully prosecuted for being a witch.   3. You’re not allowed to wish that she ends up in a terrible car accident crippling herself and her new lover.   4. But, you are allowed to think of her as a laboratory rat, being given a new experimental drug to see if her fat cells multiply rapidly.   5. You’re not allowed to wish that he becomes a hate crime victim, beaten by the religious right and left at the Republican campaign office.   6. But, you are allowed to think of him as a Third World criminal who’s been dumped on an island without food, fire or sex for two years.   7. You’re not allowed to wish that she ends up a kidnapped slave who is raped then buried alive.   8. But, you are allowed to think of her as Tippi Hedren from Hitchcock’s “The Birds” where thousands of birds peck her to near death.   9. Y ou’re not allowed to wish him slowly tortured by Shiite Muslims, then beheaded on the internet in the name of Allah. 10. But, you are allowed to wish him, her or the both of them a simple life, far, far away from you! info: With a Masters of Divinity, Reverend Trinity hosted “Spiritually Speaking,” a weekly radio drama performed globally, and is now minister of sponsor, WIG: Wild Inspirational Gatherings, wigministries.org. Learn more at telltrinity.com.

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

25


Q

C A L E N DA R

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2013 To see more upcoming events, visit goqnotes.com/calendar/ Submit your event at goqnotes.com/eventsubmit/

Autumn Jubilee The LGBT Community Center of Charlotte 2508 N. Davidson St. 7-9 p.m. The LGBT Community Center of Charlotte hosts their inaugural annual fundraising event, Autumn Jubilee. Event includes dinner, dancing, music and drinks. Opening address will be delivered by Charlotte Mayor Patsy Kinsey. Keynote address delivered by Christopher J. Carmichael, senior vice president at Fifth Third Bank. Tickets are $50 and includes dinner and drinks. lgbtcharlotte.org.

SEP OCT

12

Charlotte Primetimers SEP OCT Wedgewood Church 4800 Wedgewood Dr. 5-6:30 p.m. Primetimers of Charlotte hosts its monthly business meeting and dinner, discussing topics and issues of concern to all men, but particularly seniors and mature men. primetimersww.com/charlotte.

13

Victory Reception Foundation for the Carolinas 220 N. Tryon St. Charlotte. 5:30-7 p.m. Jay Everette, Krista Tillman and John Arrowood host a reception with Chuck Wolfe, president and CEO of the Gay and Lesbian Victory Institute. Tickets begin at $150, with friend, sponsor, host and cabinet levels starting at $250 and ranging through $1,500. Tickets: victoryinstitute.org/charlotte. Ryan Loney. ryan.loney@victoryinstitute.org. 202-567-3314.

SEP OCT

14

STAND UP TO BULLYING Spirit Day SEP OCT All day! Everywhere! Millions wear purple on Spirit Day and stand in unity against bullying and to show their support for LGBT youth. Take the pledge at glaad.org/spiritday.

17

Blurred Lines Marigny Dance Club 1440 S. Tryon St. 10 p.m. Two of Charlotte’s hottest women party promoters united for Pride and are returning in October for an encore presentation of their popular Blurred Lines party. facebook.com/hollyjevents facebook.com/pages/SUGAWALLSENTERTAINMENT-INC/117076128318347 —————————— Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Chemistry Nightclub 2901 Spring Garden St., Greensboro. Time Out Youth and community partners 11 p.m. present this conference bringing The Sisters of Sacred Insanity, a lotogether college students, high school cal chapter of the national Sisters of and middle school students, teachers, Perpetual Indulgence, host a special counselors and other practitioners. celebrity drag show featuring Season Registration is free for all participants; 4 “RuPaul’s Drag Race” finalist Phi Phi conference is open to all community O’Hara. Monies raised benefit the local members. Breakfast and lunch provided. Sisters chapter. Admission is $10 for Register online at Chemistry members and $12 for 18-20. ccqy-efbevent.eventbright.com. sistersofsacredinsanity@gmail.com. Have questions? 336-247-0036. Email conference@timeoutyouth.org. —————————— MeckPAC Candidates SEP OCT HRC Fright Night Reception Carowinds Amusement Park Private Location 14523 Carowinds Blvd., Charlotte The Mecklenburg LGBT 5:30 p.m. Political Action Committee The Human Rights Campaign invites hosts a reception with candidates for you to a special VIP experience at Charltote mayor and Charlotte City Scarowinds, Carowinds’ annual Council, an opportunity to talk one-onHalloween-themed attraction. Two one with local candidates. The group admission options at $33 and $40. will also announce its general election facebook.com/events/515857881840055/. endorsements and make campaign —————————— contributions to candidates. Event is Pandora Boxx being hosted at a private home; contact Rainbow In MeckPAC to RSVP and for location 4376 Charlotte Hwy., Lake Wylie details, to make a donation or become 8 p.m. a reception sponsor at meckpac1@ Rainbow In hosts “RuPaul’s Drag Race” yahoo.com. Season 2 contestant Pandora Boxx. meckpac.org. $15 cover. facebook.com/therainbowin. Carolina Conference on Queer Youth UNC-Charlotte Student Union 9201 University City Blvd. 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

SEP OCT

SEP OCT

18 19

22

Pride Winston-Salem Downtown Arts District 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Pride Winston-Salem returns for a third year, featuring its festival and parade and moving to Winston-Salem’s downtown arts district. Festival is slated from 10 a.m.-7 p.m., with the parade scheduled for 11 a.m. Entertainment includes headliner Hannah Thomas accompanied by members from Indigo Girls. pridewinstonsalem.org.

SEP OCT

19

Open Mic and Comedy The Nickel Bar 2817 Rozzelles Ferry Rd. 9 p.m. Charlotte’s Nickel Bar hosts a weekly Open Mic and Comedy Showcase. Interested in performing? Call 704-916-9389 for details. Doors open at 9 p.m. Show starts at 10 p.m.

Submit your event to our calendar! 26

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

SEP OCT

24

Halloween Barn Dance SEP OCT Hartigan’s Irish Pub 601 S. Cedar St. 9 p.m. Southern Country Charlotte hosts its Halloween Barn Dance. Doors open at 9 p.m. $5 cover with free entry for Southern Country Charlotte members. southerncountrycharlotte.com

Dining with Friends Discovery Place 301 N. Tryon St., Charlotte 9 p.m. The Regional AIDS Interfaith Network hosts its closing party for Dining with Friends, presented by Wells Fargo and Kiss 95.1. Proceeds benefit RAIN’s continuing HIV/AIDS work. diningwithfriendscharlotte.org timeoutyouth.org

SEP NOV

25 02

SEP OCT

Sidelines Halloween Sidelines Sports Bar 4544 South Blvd., Charlotte 7 p.m. It’s Sidelines’ “Creepy Slumber Party,” their annual Halloween celebration. thesidelinesbar.com —————————— Good vs. Evil L4 Lounge 2906 Central Ave., Charlotte 9 p.m. L4 Lounge hosts its Halloween party with a Good vs. Evil costume contest and drink specials. $5/21+. $10/18-20. facebook.com/L4Lounge —————————— Sleepy Hallow The Bar at 316 316 Rensselaer Ave., Charlotte 9:30 p.m. Ghosts, goblins and creatures of fright at The Bar at 316’s Halloween party! Costume contest with $300 cash prize. facebook.com/bar.threesixteen

26

Haunted Hollywood SEP NOV Mint Museum Uptown 500 S. Tryon St., Charlotte 7:30 p.m. A special fundraiser benefiting Time Out Youth featuring Photo Brandi Glanville Credit: Bravo of “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills.” Black-tie attire or costume inspired by a classic Hollywood horror/thriller film is request. General admission is $65 with a special $250 VIP admission including a reception with Glanville. All proceeds benefit Time Out Youth. Tickets available by mail or at Time Out Youth offices and at Brief, 1426 S. Tryon St. timeoutyouth.org

02

Recurring Charlotte Events: PRISM Young Adults: Weekly discussion held each Monday, 5 p.m.-7:30 p.m. For young adults ages 18-25. LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. lgbtcharlotte.org.   Men’s Yoga: Weekly yoga sessions for men hosted by certified instructor. Each Monday, 7:30-8:30 p.m. LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. Time Out Youth: Weekly support and discussion groups, Tuesday-Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Monthly group for youth ages 11-14. timeoutyouth.org. MeckPAC: Monthly meeting of local LGBT political action committee. First Tuesdays of each month, 6:30-8 p.m. LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. StillOut Photography: Local LGBT photography club. Meets monthly on fourth Tuesdays, 7-8:30 p.m. LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. facebook.com/ StillOutPhotography. Friends Indeed: Men’s depression support group. Every other Tuesday, 6:30-8 p.m. LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. Weekly HIV & Syphilis Testing: Hosted at the LGBT Community Center of Charlotte each Wednesday, 5-7 p.m. HIV Support Group: Open support group for men and women who are HIV-positive. Hosted second Wednesdays of each month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Different Roads Home. differentroadshome.org. LGBTQ Adult Education and Discussion Group: Weekly on Thursdays, a safe place for LGBTQ adults to meet and discuss important issues and topics. Hosted at LGBT Community Center of Charlotte. Each Thursday, 6-8 p.m. PFLAG Charlotte: Monthly support group meeting. Second Thursday of each month, 7 p.m., Christ Episcopal Church. pflagcharlotte.org. Tradesmen: Monthly social meeting first Saturday of each month. 10 p.m.-2:30 a.m. The Woodshed Lounge. charlottetradesmen.org. Have a recurring weekly or monthly event, social, support or discussion group? Let us know. Submit your event at our online calendar at goqnotes.com/eventsubmit/.

You can submit your event to our comprehensive community calendar presented by qnotes, the LGBT Community Center of Charlotte and Visit Gay Charlotte. Submit your event at goqnotes.com/eventsubmit/ and get a three-for-one entry. All Charlotte-area events will appear on each of the three calendars at qnotes (goqnotes. com), the LGBT Center (lgbtcharlotte.org) and Visit Gay Charlotte (visitgaycharlotte.com).


goqnotes.com/to/life

life

OUR PEOPLE

Q&A with Teresa Davis President of the Charlotte Business Guild by Matt Comer :: matt@goqnotes.com anymore. We call it non-exempt. So, my boss is exempt which means she is doing the work for three people — herself and two non-exempt people. Well, the media didn’t get the memo on “essential” v. “exempt,” did they? Yeah, they don’t like “essential” and “nonessential” because it might hurt our feelings. But, trust me, it’s not. If I’m not essential, fine. Call it what it is. How long have you worked for the feds? I became an Air Force lawyer — JAG — in 1993. Then, did that for a number of years before working for the Department of Justice for Janet Reno for five years. Then my spouse, Victoria, and I, we moved here in 2003. I’ve worked for my current agency ever since. Are you originally from Charlotte? No, but all of my relatives on both sides of my family are from Rutherfordton County.

Teresa Davis, 50, has been involved as a community leader in Charlotte for years. She’s served on the board of the LGBT Community Center of Charlotte and founded the GayCharlotte Film Festival and Series. She currently serves as president of the Charlotte Business Guild. She’s a great, fun-loving community organizer and chats with Teresa are never boring. I thought it’d be great to catch up with Teresa and ask her to share a bit about herself with you. And, it seemed it was perfect timing! She had plenty of time to meet up, since, as a lawyer for the federal government, Teresa was furloughed during the partial government shutdown. So, what kind of work do you do? Well, right now I am furloughed. I’m writing an article on what its like to be furloughed day by day. The first day is, like, great. The second day is, like, cool. And, the third day is, like, ummm. So, lawyers are not essential? Some lawyers are essential and some are not essential. But we don’t call it non-essential

Where did you move here from? From Washington, D.C. That’s where Victoria and I met each other. We hung out for a while. After 9/11, the anthrax, the sniper and everything, Victoria, even more than me and she’d lived in D.C. for 30 years, she said it’s time to move. What was your favorite children’s TV show? It was Captain Kangaroo. It taught me to say the Pledge of Allegiance when I was two. And, your favorite childhood toy? Barbie. I loved playing Barbie dolls. Some of my friends and I, even when we were in junior high, we would sneak around and play Barbie dolls covertly. We knew our reputations would be destroyed if anyone found out that in junior high school young women were still playing with Barbies. But, we did. When did you and Victoria marry? We were married in August in Annapolis. We highly recommend it. If you’re looking for an awesome place that’s inexpensive, easily located and very easy access in and out. It’s

charming. A charming courthouse. It was so romantic. And, Victoria’s 90-year-old mother was our wedding witness. Are you soap opera or sitcom girl? Sitcom. Although, I used to watch plenty of “Guiding Light” in my day. Radio? Or, CDs and MP3s? It’s changing. Ever since I moved to Charlotte, more and more I’ve listened to the radio. I never used to do that. Favorite music? I have a bachelor’s and master’s in piano performance, so that’s a loaded question. Because, at one time, it would have obviously been classical. But now, we love Bluegrass. Do you like any sports at all? I love the Panthers. That’s who you’ll always root for? Even if they always lose? Absolutely. Unequivocally. So, what’s up with all these losing seasons here lately? Well, it’s nice to have a team. When you grow up in Johnson City, Tenn., and you don’t have a team, it’s nice to have a team. When I lived in St. Louis, I was a Cardinals fan. That’s just the way it is. You have to be loyal. You have to be loyal to your team. What are you most proud of? If you look at the ethnic and age diversity of the Charlotte Business guild right now, being a part of that has been my number one, crowning glory, although I didn’t do it. My board did it. It’s a board of diversity. The fact that I have been a part of a board where I can say, and I challenge you if you can prove me wrong, I truly believe that if you look at our board of directors and our ethnic and age diversity right now, I challenge you to find a more diverse board that has ever existed in Charlotte’s LGBT community. Maybe there is. I’d like to know what it is. I don’t think there is. I think we’ve got it. We’ve nailed it! I’m so proud to be a part of that. : :

Oct. 11-24 . 2013

qnotes

27


28

qnotes

Oct. 11-24 . 2013


QNotes Oct. 11-24, 2013  

QNotes publishes our interviews with Charlotte mayoral candidates Patrick Cannon and Edwin Peacock III, explores their positions on LGBT iss...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you