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Apprenticeship Anthology 2019


The Good Schools Guide is the number one trusted guide to schools in the UK and overseas, helping parents in every aspect of choosing the best education for their children.The Guide provides a comprehensive collection of unbiased reviews; advice on education and careers; data on state, independent, grammar, boarding, selective and non-selective schools; information on tutors, special needs, university choice and guidance for parents about career choices for their children.  

Queen Mary University of London is one of the world’s leading universities, with first-class academics delivering inspirational teaching informed by their latest research. For three years, Queen Mary has successfully delivered Degree Apprenticeships to some of the world’s largest and most dynamic enterprises. Vitally, as the first Russell Group institution to adopt Degree Apprenticeships, Queen Mary strives to remain motivated by, and responsive to, the needs of industry.

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Contents 5

FOREWORD - ANTHONY JENKINS, CHAIR IFATE



INTRODUCTION

 

CONTRIBUTIONS STANDARDS UPDATE

Apprenticeship Anthology

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FOREWORD


foreword

5


Foreword Apprenticeships are one of the oldest methods of training and can be traced back to the medieval craft guilds in the Middle Ages. According to the House of Commons library, the first national apprenticeship system of training was introduced in 1563 by the Statute of Artificers, which included conditions which could be seen as an early example of the apprenticeship standards we see today. From the late 1960s there was a call for apprenticeships to be reformed and to focus on the requirements of the employer. This was to ensure apprentices had the expertise to succeed in their career and provide the skills needed in our workforce. Since this time various reforms have come into place to improve the quality and delivery of apprenticeships. In 2017 the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education (the Institute) was established. One of our founding tenets was to be the voice for the employer in the apprenticeship system. The Institute works with employers to identify their skills needs and to establish apprenticeships that address those needs. Since our inception we’ve worked with employers to approve hundreds of standards for apprenticeships with now over 400 standards approved for use. And these employer-led standards are proving popular with both learners and employers. We’ve seen month-on-month increases in the number of starts on standards and recently celebrated reaching over 300,000 in total. These are apprenticeships that work for our employers, improve productivity and ultimately, help our economy thrive. Many are in areas which previously had no apprenticeship route and some are in areas that were previously only accessible through the university route, for example the professional economist apprenticeship. And this year the Institute will use its experience in apprenticeships to deliver the most significant reform in technical education we have seen in 70 years. The Institute will be developing the classroom based element of T Levels – a new two-year technical qualification for post-16 study and a technical qualification that will be on a par with the well-established system of A Levels. This is a huge change in our school system and one which the Institute, alongside the Department for Education, is determined to deliver. The first wave of T Levels are on track to be taught in classrooms from 2020.

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Again we are seeing huge support from employers who welcome this expanded focus in how we can develop skills in our workforce and help individuals achieve in their careers. Even though apprenticeships are one of the oldest methods of learning, with roots in the Middle Ages, the way we develop and manage apprenticeships has changed considerably. Regulating apprenticeships has led to more co-ordinated and consistent standards across the country and across sectors. Ensuring that their development has been led by employers means we are getting the skills our workforce needs and the buy-in from employers across the country. And the Institute’s overview of quality in the system means all apprenticeships - from actuary to watchmaker – can increasingly be sure of consistent high-quality training and assessment. The changes that have been put in place by the Institute are still bedding in but already we are seeing the changes in our system which I am confident will help deliver quality apprenticeships and technical qualifications for years to come.

Anthony Jenkins Chair of Institute for Appenticeships & Technical Education

foreword

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INTRODUCTION 8

_


introduction

9


10

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Apprenticeships in 2019 Two years on from the introduction of the Apprenticeship Levy and it continues to inspire and frustrate in equal measure. This year the agency-led “Fire It Up” campaign did much to improve the visibility and profile of apprenticeships, whilst the “Faster and Better” approach from the Institute appeared to address many of the concerns around development and approval timelines for new Standards. There were also many welcome announcements including increasing the amount of levy allowed to be transferred, introduction of a Top 100 apprenticeship employer league table alongside an Investors in People quality mark for apprenticeship employers. However, with further delays to the opening-up of non-levy provision, rumblings about removal of degree qualifications from apprenticeships and continuing jockeying for quality assurance responsibilities, uncertainty around key aspects of the system remains for employers, providers and apprentices. Full year data for the number of apprenticeship starts in 2017/18 indicates a marked 26% drop since 2015/16, the last full year of pre-levy funding. That said, 76% of the FTSE 100 now have apprenticeship programmes in place, alongside 46% of the FTSE 250. Whilst the employer configuration of both indices has changed marginally since last year’s Anthology, this represents a 5% year-on-year increase for the FTSE 100 and a 10% decrease for the FTSE 250 (increased number of financial services vehicles listed). Both figures compare favourably with graduate provision, only slightly higher for each index, 82% for the FTSE 100 and 59% for the FTSE 250. Public sector data for the same period showed that public bodies reported 1.4% of their workforce had started via an apprenticeship, somewhat short of the 2.3% statutory target.

introduction

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There are now 673 apprenticeship standards approved or in development, a year-on-year increase of 28%. 45% of all standards are now at a Higher Level (4-7), 33% at Advanced Level (3) and 22% at Intermediate Level (2). In 2017/18, the top four sectors accounted for 83% of all apprenticeship starts with 43% of total starts at Intermediate Level, 44% at Advanced level and 13% at Higher Level. Unfortunately, gender and ethnic imbalances are still quite stark in some sectors. For example, Construction, Engineering and ICT are sectors where females make up less than 20% of apprenticeship starts, whereas in Healthcare and Education males similarly make up less than a fifth of new starts. 11.2% of 2017/18 apprenticeship starts were from BAME backgrounds, which compares with 14.9% BAME in the working age population. The most racially diverse sectors for apprenticeship starts were Information, Communication and Technology (19% BAME), Arts, Media and Publishing (18% BAME) and Health, Public Services and Care (17% BAME).

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introduction

13


This year however, focus has shifted from a concern about the number of apprenticeship s tarts to their c hanging type. The data indicates that a growing proportion of apprenticeships are be ing taken at higher levels, for instance in 2017/18 12.8% of starts were at Level 4 or above, compared with 5.3% in 2015/16. In and of itself this shouldn’t present a problem, especially in an employerled system which is designed to allow organisations to respond dynamically to their changing skills needs. However, of the 375,800 starts in 2017/18, only 44% were on the new employer-designed standards and herein lies quite a considerable problem. Given that Government has committed to no longer fund apprenticeship starts on frameworks after 31 July 2020 and recent National Audit Office findings suggest that “the average cost of training an apprentice under the new standards is around double what was originally expected,” the apprenticeship system is likely to become much more expensive to deliver. Whatever policy solution the Department for Education and HM Treasury arrive at, if the Apprenticeships system is to be considered truly “employed-led,” then industry must not be presented with the outcome as a fait accompli. It must work equally for employers and Government, otherwise we risk returning to a system of centrally mandated qualifications rather than those that employers need. At a time w hen Levy paying employers are accessing only 9 % of almost £2.2bn of total Levy funds, Government certainly has an unenviable task before it.

Jamie Hilder, Co-Editor Jamie Hilder is Queen Mary University of London’s Degree Apprenticeship Manager. He looks after the University’s own internal levy as an employer, whilst also coordinating institutional Degree Apprenticeship activity as a training provider to industry. Jamie develops new and existing Degree Apprenticeship programmes and leads the account management function within the organisation.

Sally Everist, Co-Editor

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Sally Everist runs The Good Schools Guide: Careers. As director of the GSGC, her role is to inform parents about the options that are available to their children as they leave schools and move into the workplace. The GSGC are advocates for Apprenticeships seeing them as an exciting alternative to other formal qualifications and ideal for many young people who are more than ready to enter the workplace at 18 but still wish to gain either a degree or another recognised, transferable qualification.


introduction

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ANTHOLOGY CONTRIBUTIONS I.

Sir Gerry Berragan, Chief Executive of the IfATE

II.

Anne Milton, Minister of State (Education)

III.

Jules Pipe, Deputy Mayor of London

IV.

Robert Halfon MP, Chair of Education Select Committee

V.

Helen Grant MP, Chair Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network

VI.

Frances O’Grady, Trades Union Congress

VII.

Mark Dawe, Association of Employment and Learning Providers

VIII.

Adrian Anderson, University Vocational Awards Council

IX.

Greg Wade, Universities UK

X.

Nicola Turner, Office for Students

XI.

Alice Barnard, Edge Foundation

XII.

Anthony Impey, Optimity

XIII.

Bethan Morgan, Barclays

XIV.

Tyrone Upton, Mace

XV.

Feyi Coker, Department for Transport

XVI.

Dexter Hutchings, Edge Foundation

XVII.

Jenny Talyor, IBM

XVIII. Lord Lucas, The Good Schools Guide XIX.

Jamie Hilder, Queen Mary University of London

XX.

Liz Gorb, Manchester Metropolitan University

XXI.

Sarah Banham, Battersea Power Station Development Company

XXII.

Sharon Byfield, Coca Cola

XXIII. Sir Peter Lampl, Sutton Trust XXIV. Joshua Uwadiae, WeGym XXV.

Stephanie Bishop, Cap Gemini

XXVI. Ekansh Sharma, Accenture XXVII. KM Group

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Anthology

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Sir Gerry Berragan, Chief Executive IfATE Delivering on high quality apprenticeships and technical education The Institute is two years old in April and we have grown and developed considerably during that time, alongside the broader apprenticeship system that we are helping employers to shape. Apprenticeships now serve a much broader variety of employment sectors than ever before and are available across the full spectrum of training levels. So apprentices of all ages can train from intermediate level right up to degree and post-graduate level. The data shows that employers are choosing a much wider range of apprenticeships than previously, so the apprenticeships system now increasingly reflects the shape and needs of the modern economy. That has always been the aim of the Government-led apprenticeships reforms since the decision was taken to put employers in the driving seat, following the influential Richard Review back in 2012. I think it’s fair to say that, in the intervening years, better working methods to truly weave employers into the process were needed. The establishment of the Institute in April 2017 made that possible. Harnessing the knowledge and experience of large and small employers to develop amazing apprenticeships remains our guiding aim. Quality is also a key focus for the Institute. We are determined to ensure that the new apprenticeships meet exacting quality standards to cement their standing for generations to come. To this end, we have just published a new Quality Strategy, developed with our partners in the Quality Alliance, which sets out best practice expectations before, during, and after apprenticeships. The Institute chairs the Quality Alliance, and its members include the Department for Education, Ofsted, Ofqual, the Quality Assurance Agency, and the Office for Students. The strategy amounts to a commitment that the training apprentices receive, both on and off the job, should be of the highest quality, leading to an end point assessment that demonstrates that they are occupationally competent. We changed our name in January to the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education to reflect the leading role that we have assumed in the development of T Levels. This is a natural progression. We already have established

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systems in place for approving apprenticeship standards which will inform how we ensure that these world-class, more classroom-based alternatives to apprenticeships truly reflect what employers want and need. We will build on our apprenticeships’ development and approvals system. As with apprenticeships, groups of employers known as T Level Panels use the existing apprenticeship standards to derive the content for T Level pathways. These then go through the same rigorous approvals process by our route panels of industry experts, representing the 15 key employment sectors. The contracts for the development of first three T level qualifications were signed in January, and we have just published the Invitation to Tender for the next 7 T Level pathways, which will be taught from 2021. So 2019 is an exciting year for the Institute, as we forge ahead with apprenticeships and the development and roll out of T Levels.

Sir Gerry Berragan Chief Executive of Institute for Appenticeships & Technical Education

Anthology

19


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Anne Milton MP, Minister of State (Education) This year National Apprenticeship Week ran from 4 - 8 March. National Apprenticeship Week is a celebration of apprentices and their employers. Apprentices make a huge contribution to business and bring enthusiasm, passion and new ideas into the workplace. One of the best parts of my job – and especially during National Apprenticeship Week – is meeting apprentices of all ages and backgrounds and hearing their amazing stories. No one should be denied the opportunity to learn new skills and go on to get a great job and career. Whether it’s a young person looking at their next steps, someone who is looking to get back into work after a break or someone who fancies a career change, an apprenticeship is a fantastic opportunity. Apprenticeships offer people the chance to earn while they learn with the option to train right up to degree level in a huge range of professions and careers. We reformed the apprenticeships system almost two years ago - working with employers to create high-quality apprenticeship ‘standards’ and we also introduced the Levy to create long-term sustainable funding for apprenticeships. Apprenticeships are now longer, higher-quality, with more off-the-job training and a proper assessment at the end. There are now more than 400 new apprenticeship standards available in every profession, such as aerospace engineering, cyber security, data science, law, nursing, and construction. Royal Mail, Channel 4, Barclays, and BAE are just some of the leading businesses offering people of all ages and backgrounds a chance to learn new skills and get a great job. The number of people starting on our new style apprenticeship standards has risen by 22% in the first quarter of 2018/19 compared to the same point last year - a sure sign that things are improving! But outdated attitudes are still putting some people off apprenticeships which means they’re missing out on great jobs and higher salaries. We all - government, employers, careers advisors, teachers and parents - have a role to play to make sure people are aware that an apprenticeship can be a life changing opportunity. Our new apprenticeships campaign ‘Fire it Up’ is helping to challenge these outdated perceptions and raise awareness of the huge variety of options available for people across the country. We had a record breaking National Apprenticeships Week this year, with over 1000 events taking place across the country! Whoever you are, wherever you’re from, there is an apprenticeship opportunity out there for you. I am extremely proud of the progress we have made, but there is still more to do.

Anthology

21


Jules Pipe CBE, Deputy Mayor of London Our mission in London is to increase the number of high quality apprenticeships on offer in the capital. But two years on from the introduction of the apprenticeship levy, it is clear that the levy alone is not the answer. In fact, London saw a 15% drop in the number of apprenticeship starts from 2015/16, the year before the introduction of the apprenticeship levy, to 2017/18, the year after it commenced. This comes on top of London’s historically low levels of apprenticeship starts compared to other regions. Apprenticeships offer a huge range of qualifications, experiences, and opportunities for those who undertake them, as well as making an important economic and social contribution to London. At City Hall, we are working to ensure that all Londoners have access to the opportunities a quality apprenticeship provides, and that the apprenticeship system can better meet the skills needs of the capital’s employers. We have worked with London Councils, London First and the London Chambers of Commerce and Industry to set out a number of a ways in which reform of the system could lead to more quality apprenticeships in the capital, including greater flexibilities in how the levy can be spent, and devolution of apprenticeship funding. But we are also committed to increasing apprenticeships within the current system. Over the next year we will be investing £1.3m to establish three pilots to support businesses to utilise their levy funds, either by providing apprenticeships or transferring their levy funds to another organisation who can use the funds to train apprentices. The first of these pilots will begin in the summer of 2019, in partnership with the Institute of Public Policy Research (IPPR). Jointly Funded by the Mayor and the JP Morgan Foundation, this pilot will focus on the retail, hospitality, and construction sectors, recognising how apprenticeships can improve progression and ensuring employers have access to the skills they need in these rapidly changing industries.

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We will be putting two other pilots out to competitive tender, inviting innovative proposals to support businesses to better utilise their apprenticeship levy in other key sectors. These pilots are rooted in the reality employers face when creating apprenticeships. There is a willingness among employers in London to employ more apprentices. The recent Business 1,000 survey conducted by London Councils showed that while fewer than one in ten employers in the capital currently employ an apprentice, over half believe there could be benefits of increasing the number of apprentices for the company. Alongside this, the survey shows that two in three apprenticeship levy payers plan to access a portion of their levy contributions. But for many of these employers that portion is likely to be relatively small. Few of the large, levy-paying employers in London that we have spoken to are currently using all of their levy funds, and few expect to be able to spend all of their funds in the future. Our pilots aim to get more London businesses accessing more of their levy funding, through targeted and personalised support. We recognise that London’s historically low level of apprenticeship starts will not be solved with quick fixes. We must invest our time and energy in understanding the issues that London’s businesses face in creating and sustaining apprenticeships, and how we can promote apprenticeships to Londoners. We must understand where City Hall can best contribute, working to simplify the process of creating high quality apprenticeships, not further complicate it. As the apprenticeship levy enters its third year, we at City Hall are committed to ensuring that all Londoners can access the opportunities apprenticeships provide, allowing everybody to share in the city’s success.

Anthology

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Robert Halfon MP, Chair of the Education Select Committee Apprenticeships provide an opportunity to earn while you learn, study without incurring debt, and then get a job at the end of it. I have always been a passionate advocate for apprenticeships, the first MP in Westminster to recruit an apprentice, and now employing my sixth apprentice in my House of Commons office. Apprenticeships change lives, give young people the chance to climb up the educational ladder of opportunity and to secure careers and job security. Apprenticeships also have a major role to play in closing the significant skills gaps in our economy. These factors go a long way to explaining why promoting high-quality apprenticeships has been a major focus of the Education Committee and a crucial part of the productivity and social justice agenda to which the Committee is committed. Media stories on apprenticeships often focus on business dissatisfaction with the apprenticeship levy and it’s impossible to deny that the system has proved frustrating for many employers, who would like to train more staff but feel prevented from doing so by the system’s rules. It’s also clear the Government’s official goal of creating 3m new apprenticeships between 2017 and 2020 has been unrealistic. The target failed to recognise the harsh reality that the UK has, for many years, had a poor record of delivering workplace training. As we argued in our report, the crucial issue is to get the quality right, not to meet an arbitrary target. Too many apprentices are currently being let down by a system that fails to deliver high-quality training and the support they need to get on in life. Apprenticeships, including at degree level, have a crucial role to play in meeting the challenges of our job market and the increasing shift to automation. By promoting a broader range of ski lls, boosting the quality of apprenticeships, and breaking down barriers to entry, we can ensure there is a ladder of opportunity for young people, including the disadvantaged, to get the skills to get on in life. Department for Education research showed there were 226,000 skills shortage vacancies across the economy in 2017, two and half times as many as the 91,000 that existed in 2011. Yet the most recent figures from ONS showed that in the first quarter of 2018, there were 322,000 young people aged 16-24 who were NEET and unemployed. Setting these figures alongside each other highlights the need for apprenticeships and for a far closer connection between our education system and the 21st century world of work. Apprenticeships are a great option for young people but schools and careers advisers must up their game in spelling out the benefits. We need to look at ways to make apprenticeships more attractive too by offering bursaries for those from disadvantaged groups and raising the apprentices’ minimum wage, as a prelude to eventually abolishing it altogether. Tackling the long-standing issue of travel costs would be a good move in this respect too. In 2017/18, there were well over 800,000 people participating in an apprenticeship in England and there are more high-quality apprenticeships on offer than ever before. But we have further to go. We need to reform to the apprenticeship levy and we need a redoubling of effort from the Government and all those working in delivering apprenticeship to widen access to quality apprenticeships and ensure that the disadvantaged can climb the ladder of opportunity.

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Anthology

25


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Helen Grant MP, Chair Apprentice Diversity Champions Network The Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network, which I am proud to Chair, is an employer led, action-focussed group whose members share my belief that someone's future should not be determined by their past. We believe in the power of apprenticeships to change lives and are determined to ensure that they are inclusive, diverse and open to all people. The ADCN meets quarterly and our agenda is shaped around the interests and priorities of our members. I am proud that we are not a talking shop and that we judge ourselves on action and the difference that we make. To us, ‘diversity’ is not a tick-box exercise, it is a broad concept and at the forefront of everything that we do. To members of the ADCN, diversity is about opening doors for people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic backgrounds and providing them with an equal opportunity to succeed. It is about enabling people with Learning Difficulties and Disabilities to bring their rich array of skills and experiences into the workforce and supporting them to achieve their full potential. It is about getting more women into Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics roles so we can live in a world where women can express their full talent. It is also about opening up pathways for disadvantaged people, paving the way for greater social mobility, and it is about breaking down barriers so that LGBT+ people are able to flourish in the workplace. Diversity for us is ultimately about ensuring that, whoever you are and wherever you come from, you can access the life changing opportunities which an apprenticeship provides. Our 70 members, including blue chip organisations such as the BBC, Transport for London, Siemens, and Balfour Betty, spearhead new and exciting initiatives

and

lead

the

way

in

developing

meaningful

and

diverse

apprenticeship programmes. Some standout examples include: •

Rolls-Royce operating a series of women-only taster days and “bring your daughter to work” days, leading to a record number of women

applying for their work experience and apprenticeship programmes. Sunmark working with the Bangladeshi Catering Association to increase BAME apprenticeship representation in their 20,000+ restau-

rants. KPMG introducing anonymised CVs during recruitment, increasing the

diversity of their apprentice intake. BT using situation strength-testing during recruitment which has led to an increase in BAME applicants to their programme.

Anthology

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Barclays offering their ‘Able to Enable’ interns access to a Higher Apprenticeship, providing opportunities for people with mental and physical health disabilities.

Together, I am very proud to say, this group has been responsible for over 180 events and campaigns, more than 600 school outreach events, and 400 collaborations with partner organisations. Whilst this is great work which is making a tangible impact, there is still a long way to go. We are currently operating at a seven-year high in terms of BAME representation in apprenticeships but it is still short of the Government’s ambitious commitment to reach 11.9 per cent by 2020. We have also seen a really significant increase in representation from apprentices with a learning difficulty and disability this year, but again, we are still short of the Government’s stretching target of 11.9 per cent by 2020. This means that the ADCN must continue to grow and develop new and exciting ways to reach out to a diverse range of apprenticeship candidates. We welcome those who want to help us make that difference too - so join us, talk about us, and support us. Help us grow even bigger so we, in turn, can help change lives.

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Frances O'Grady, General Secretary of Trades Union Congress The TUC has long campaigned for high-quality apprenticeships to be available to more people. Apprenticeships can be an excellent way for workers to increase their skills and earning potential. And they are a vital part of the UK’s education and skills provision. The apprenticeship levy, which boosts investment in training through contributions from businesses, is, as an idea, good. But we need those funds to be well spent, and that means further action to increase the quality of apprenticeships in Britain. The decline in apprenticeship starts since 2017 is of real concern. Government needs to ensure that the operation of the levy is maximising the benefits for apprentices and employers alike. ‘Earn and learn’ is the mantra for apprenticeships. But too often the reality is neither - this must change. The government’s own surveys show that nearly one in five apprentices are paid below the apprentice rate of the National Minimum Wage of £3.70 per hour. This partly explains why two in five apprentices say it costs them more to do the apprenticeship than they are paid, with basic expenses like work clothes, travel and childcare tipping them into debt. That’s not fair on them – and it’s a barrier to upgrading the skills of the UK workforce. Then there’s the problem of training. One in seven apprentices say they receive no formal training at all. And nearly a third are not even aware that they’re on an apprenticeship programme. The TUC has welcomed the government’s clamp-down on poor-quality apprenticeships, and the requirement that all apprentices get to spend at least a fifth of their working time in training. But more is needed. The lower rate of the minimum wage for apprentices should be abolished, with apprenticeships pay at the same minimum rate for other workers. Landlords, energy companies and transport services do not charge a lower rate for apprenticeships, so it is unreasonable to expect them to get by on a rate well below the living wage. And nobody should be forced to give up a good training opportunity that improves their career prospects because they cannot afford to live on the wage they are paid. Some employers provide excellent apprenticeship programmes – especially when schemes are jointly negotiated with trade unions. But there are still far too many who simply see apprentices as cheap, disposable labour. The employer culture around apprenticeships needs to be transformed so that all fulfil their responsibilities and recognise why it benefits them to do so. Too many people – especially women, BME groups and disabled people - face discrimination when it comes to accessing the best apprenticeships on offer. The TUC and Education Select Committee are both calling for regular high-level equality and diversity reviews of the apprenticeship programme to combat this. Trade unions are committed to supporting employers to deliver high-quality apprenticeships in workplaces all over the country. The TUC’s learning and skills service unionlearn supports our affiliated unions in this and we will make it an even greater priority over the coming year.

Anthology

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Mark Dawe, Chief Executive AELP Apprenticeships are now such a huge success story that the levy from large employers which funds the whole programme is in the process of being exhausted. Currently there are four main drivers which explain the programme’s popularity. Firstly employers are having to respond to the impact of Brexit with the latest quarterly jobs data showing that the number of EU nationals working in the UK has fallen by 61,000 to 2.27 million. Many of those leaving are highly skilled and so British firms are turning to apprenticeships to fill the gap. Secondly, despite small fluctuations in the data over the last 12 months, UK productivity

has

flatlined

overall

but

employers

who

invest

in

apprenticeships report that productivity in their businesses improves. A third factor is the levy itself which operates on a ‘use it or lose it’ basis and over half of the 20,000 employers paying the levy are claiming it back to fund their own apprenticeship programmes. The fourth driver relates to apprenticeships acting as a positive force for social mobility. With many wanting to avoid a mountain of student debt and a 50:50 chance of ending up in a non-grad job, young people are choosing high quality apprenticeships as a route to a successful career. With the arrival of new standards, there are many sectors including the professions where an apprentice can progress from a level 2 starting point all the way up to and including degree level. Six years after starting, the government’s reforms of apprenticeships remain ongoing. At times, it has been an extremely frustrating process, not least because we have regularly witnessed failures in evidence-based policymaking. But the Association of Employment and Learning Providers (AELP remains strongly supportive of the levy’s introduction and the next stage of the reforms should see a further strengthening of the programme’s employer driven principles. This is because the smaller non-levy paying employers will join the levy payers on the government’s digital apprenticeship service where, if desired, they should be free to select an external training provider to help deliver their apprenticeships without impediment from government provider contract and procurement obstacles. The big challenge is to enable this when the levy pot is running dry. While separate funding was set aside this year for SMEs, none is currently planned for after April 2020 and the projected use of the levy by the large employers in future years means that there will no money remaining for smaller businesses to use for apprenticeships unless the government acts.

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In fact a government agency has now confirmed that there is likely to be a £500m overspend on the £2.2bn levy proceeds for 2018-19 and the deficit is projected to rise to £1.5bn during 2021-22. This is very serious because local economies in many areas of the country are almost entirely dependent on non-levy paying SME's and so there is the threat that these areas become apprenticeship deserts for the young people who need to get skills and jobs following Brexit. In his autumn budget, the Chancellor of the Exchequer sensibly ordered a review on how apprenticeship funding should work from next year and AELP is the first to recognise that any skills programme has to operate within a finite budget. Our view is that the government needs to restore the pre-levy £1bn annual budget for SMEs’ apprenticeships as standalone funding for the non-levy payers. To make the system better for social mobility, ministers should also review the funding of apprenticeships for 16 to 24 year olds, especially at lower levels, where starts have fallen. Then we can have an apprenticeship programme that really is a world leader, making an even greater impact on improving workforce productivity.

Anthology

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Adrian Anderson, Chief Executive UVAC Degree apprenticeship is a policy success story. Employers have embraced the apprenticeship reforms and have and are focusing on the development of apprenticeship standards their organisations need to raise productivity. In the public sector, police forces are using the police constable degree apprenticeship to raise skill levels and ensure the recruitment of new police officers better reflects the communities they serve – more women and recruits from BME backgrounds. The registered nurse and social worker degree apprenticeships could well make a major impact on tackling skills shortages and improving the delivery

of

key

public

apprenticeship standards

services. have

In

been

the

private

developed

for

sector,

tech,

degree

construction

and engineering occupations that will help employers develop the higherlevel skills which their new and existing employees need. Universities have responded with gusto, with 107, including a sizeable proportion of the Russell

Group,

registered

by

the

ESFA

to

deliver

apprenticeships.

Apprenticeship may finally throw off its image as the good choice for other people’s children and its primary focus on lower level job roles. Regrettably, there are some who still do not accept the key principle of the Apprenticeship Reforms; employer ownership and choice. Ofsted have, for example, argued for a greater prioritisation of apprenticeship funding for young people without a full level two and claimed employers are spending too much on higher level apprenticeship provision. This is a fundamentally flawed argument which, if accepted, will totally undermine the productivity focus of apprenticeship. prioritise

Is

Ofsted

really

saying

their apprenticeship spend on registered

the

NHS

nurses,

shouldn’t technology

professionals and managers and police forces on police constables? Sure, we need to support young people without a level 2, but isn’t the obvious solution here for Ofsted to raise school performance so that a third of young people don’t leave school without a full level 2, rather than argue for a raid on the Apprenticeship levy pot paid for by employers? The Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education has started "through its mandatory qualification rule" to restrict the ability of employers to specify

a

mandatory

degree

in

an

apprenticeship.

The

Digital

Technology Solutions Professional Degree Apprenticeships illustrates the issue. Employers, according to the Trailblazer, want to include the degree and young people are attracted by the kudos and transferability offered by the degree. Yet the Institute for Apprenticeships seems

to

want

and

Technical

to remove the degree and bin England’s first real

successful approach to ending the

academic/vocational

divide

flagship programme of the Apprenticeship reforms. Why?

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Education and

the


There’s also a big problem with SME access to Degree Apprenticeship. As the Higher Education Commission recently identified the ESFA procurement of Apprenticeship provision for non-levy payers has meant that degree apprenticeship isn’t available from universities in some of the most deprived parts of England and has resulted in a ‘postcode lottery’ in the availability of provision. A pretty damning conclusion, given the importance attached to social mobility in the implementation of the Apprenticeship reforms. So there are challenges but Degree Apprenticeship, if implemented on the basis of the apprenticeship reforms, will make a massive contribution to addressing skills shortages, widening access to higher level occupations and raising productivity. It also changes the perception of Apprenticeship, which could become an aspirational choice and a real English skills success story. Let’s hope this opportunity isn’t lost.

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Greg Wade, Universities UK In a short space of time we have seen the idea of Degree Apprenticeships go from a new, untested policy initiative to a significant success with thousands of degree apprentices in a wide range of employers. The pipeline of future standards is strong, showing the value employers place on higher and degree apprenticeships. This shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone who understands the need for higher level skills and how much they will drive future economic growth. Research from the Resolution Foundation has demonstrated that in the last 18 years 90% of jobs growth has been in professional jobs, requiring higher level skills and the CBI reports that employers see this demand continuing in the future. Yet Degree Apprenticeships aren’t simply about helping to meet the demand for higher level skills. The way in which they are developed and delivered, through close and comprehensive collaboration with employers has been warmly welcomed by both universities and employers. Universities connect and collaborate with many thousands of employers through many different ways including sponsored degrees, placements, visiting lecturers and advice and guidance on course content and delivery. One of the key motivations for universities to get involved in degree apprenticeships has been the opportunity to develop and increase these links with employers. Feedback from employers to the National Centre for Universities and Business has been overwhelmingly positive about this increased engagement with universities. Degree Apprenticeships are also helping to meet key skills needs in shortage areas, boosting productivity and enhancing growth at the same time. The top three areas for the first wave of degree apprenticeships have been leadership and management, digital technology and engineering, all areas with recognised shortages of talent. With a number of public sector Degree Apprenticeships being established they also now have the potential to meet the skills needs and address shortages in key public services such as Nursing, Policing, Teaching and Social Work.

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We are seeing increasing interest from employers in the potential for Degree Apprenticeships to increase opportunities and widen the talent pool, often with impressive results. More needs to be done to use Degree Apprenticeships to increase opportunities to put more people in the path to future success, either getting them into jobs or ensuring increased success for those already in work. This is especially true for those who, for whatever reason, do not find traditional university education appealing. Having a degree as part of the apprenticeship can play a key role in ensuring apprentices have equal status in the labour market. The degree also helps with recruitment of apprentices, recognition from employers about their quality and value and enhances the apprenticeship brand overall. Moves to remove the degree from being embedded in apprenticeship standards, where employers want this, will undermine these positive benefits and some employers have described such moves as a “tragedy� for degree apprenticeships. We are experiencing a resounding success story with Degree Apprenticeships. They meet key skills needs, help build strong university employer partnerships and are opening up opportunities. Policy makers need to make sure that the potential for the development and delivery of more Degree Apprenticeships is realised.

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Nicola Turner, Office for Students Employers, universities and colleges have welcomed degree apprenticeships as a new way to develop and deliver higher-level skills. The rapidly increasing number of universities and colleges offering degree apprenticeships (from fewer than five in 2015-16 to more than 100 in 2018-19) has already improved choice for learners and employers, and demonstrates rapid sector buy-in for this route through higher education. Nonetheless, degree apprenticeships made up less than 3 per cent of the total number of apprenticeships in 2017-18. The government recommends that both the Office for Students (OfS) and the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education should encourage the growth of degree apprenticeships as a means of widening access to higher education for underrepresented groups of people. This is in the context of the industrial strategy’s wider goal of enabling 3 million learners to start apprenticeships by 2020. Can degree apprenticeships deliver on the weight of expectations of multiple stakeholders? They are expected, for instance, to meet economic needs and those of employers; to increase social mobility and diversity in higher education; to bridge the gap between different levels of qualifications; to create a new gateway to the professions; and to imbue a vocational route to education with the prestige accorded to more conventional routes. Some commentators question their value, suggesting they are just an alternative for learners who would have attended university anyway. Others point to barriers which processes for accreditation and funding present to their development. To the OfS, degree apprenticeships are important because they offer learners choice, enable them to achieve high-quality outcomes, and support the needs of employers as outlined in the government’s industrial strategy. We want all learners to be able to consider degree apprenticeships among their options when thinking about higher education and will be promoting and tracking their potential to improve access and participation for those from disadvantaged or underrepresented groups.

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Beyond the hope and the hype, what can we look out for in 2019? • At present, numbers of degree apprentices are very low, but are

expected to increase considerably, especially in public sector

occupations. • Degree apprenticeships are interesting because they could benefit

both school leavers from disadvantaged backgrounds and mature

learners already in the workforce (two priority groups for us),

potentially increasing social mobility. • This year, we will promote degree apprenticeships through our access

and participation work, include them in the scope of our targets and

investment, and actively encourage them through our guidance and

support. • We will work with the government, universities and colleges to build

progression pathways from lower-level apprenticeships to those at

degree level, to remove barriers for underrepresented groups, and to

ensure value for money for all learners. • We will also continue our work with other regulators in pursuit of

reducing barriers posed by the complexity of arrangements for funding,

regulation and the approval of new apprenticeship standards. To give degree apprenticeships a fighting chance of delivering in the face

of all these expectations, we shall be supporting them at every stage – from the work done by universities and employers to develop new degree apprenticeships, though the monitoring of their operation and understanding of best practice, to the raising of awareness among the public. As the portfolio grows and matures we look forward to seeing the picture tilt away from hype, and start delivering on the hope.

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Alice Barnard, Edge Foundation Apprenticeships are seen as the jewel in the crown of technical and professional education. There is no doubt that they are generally perceived positively by businesses and apprentices and for those at the highest levels the returns can outstrip traditional degrees. There is also no doubt that progress has been made in recent years to simplify, give a greater say to business and enshrine key elements of the system in legislation. However, it is also clear that this particular jewel is at risk of becoming significantly tarnished. As we set out in Our Plan for Apprenticeships, the demographics of the programme have changed markedly, with a huge growth in those aged over 25. Two-thirds of new apprentices are conversions from existing employees. We must refocus the apprenticeship programme principally on those aged 16-24 who are new to their sector and occupation. This will add the most value to their lives and careers, as well as to the economy. Rapid changes of government policy and numerical targets for apprenticeships mean that quantity has been set as the driving force for the programme, at the expense of quality. Completion rates have also plateaued at around two-thirds, meaning that even if the government’s three million apprenticeship starts were achieved, this would lead to just two million completions. Quality must be the prime driver of the programme, which means moving away conclusively from a target based on the volume of starts. In place of that target should be a basket of quality indicators overseen by a single organisation that has the ability to set the success criteria for the system. Within individual apprenticeships, mentoring should be included as a proven intervention to increase success rates. English apprenticeships are narrower, shorter and involve less off-thejob training and less general education than our international competitors. We must broaden apprenticeship training and include transferable meta-skills in every apprenticeship, ensuring that they are truly ‘expansive’ not ‘restrictive’. More attention needs to be given to ensuring that the two parts of an apprenticeship – the job and the training – are directly connected, which can also be supported through a personal development plan.

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Schools should promote apprenticeships as an equal route to success and the education system must move away from the EBacc towards a genuinely broad and balanced school curriculum that gives all young people exposure to technical and creative subjects. We should bring back Young Apprenticeships at age 14-16 and adopt the Scottish Foundation Apprenticeships model in England for those aged 16-18 to offer genuine preparation and progression routes. Employers should be able to spend a small proportion of their levy pot on pre-apprenticeship activities such as paid internships to support this. Even as our economy comes to rely more heavily on smaller businesses, the apprenticeship programme has been designed primarily with large firms in mind. We need to rebalance the programme to focus on small businesses as its prime audience, developing clear and simple ‘plug and play’ apprenticeships with minimal bureaucracy. The Apprenticeship Training Agency model should be significantly expanded and cities and regions given more responsibility for tailoring the programme to meet local needs. Finally, degree apprenticeships should be significantly expanded in the coming years, with the future position on funding clarified. More broadly, other higher education provision should also learn from the model to integrate more project based learning and employer engagement to ensure that individuals graduate with the real skills that employers are looking for.

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Anthony Impey, Optimity Since their introduction two years ago, there have been some clear winners and losers from the changes to the apprenticeship system. While levy payers are not entirely satisfied (who is ever happy about having to pay more tax?), they are beginning to get the quality of training that the previous system struggled to deliver. Participation in the development of apprenticeship standards and control of how money is spent with training providers, is starting to yield results for them. The story is very different for small employers, who represent 99% of the businesses and account for 60% of private sector employment. The reformed system is not working for this group who do not pay the levy. Unsurprisingly, the number of small businesses employing apprenticeships has fallen dramatically. Research recently produced by the Federation of Small Businesses found that nearly a third of small employers said that the reforms have had a negative impact on their business, and a similar number were very unhappy with the quality of apprenticeships. Some complained about poor communications with their training provider. Others said that the quality of the training wasn’t good enough, or that they simply couldn’t find anywhere that offered the apprenticeship training that they were looking for. The stark difference between those that do and don’t pay the levy is the result of a system that is designed for the 17,000 largest employers. These levy paying employers operate in a free market for apprenticeship training. They have access to a wide range of courses from a large number of training providers (who have tripled in number since the reforms). In comparison, non-levy paying employers do not have access to this free market. Choice is limited to those training providers that have been allocated funding by government, through a widely criticised procurement process. Many training providers are simply finding that offering apprenticeships to small employers is not commercially viable and have decided to only offer their services to levy-paying employers. It is no wonder that small businesses feel abandoned by the system. Government needs to act quickly to reverse this situation. There needs to be parity in the systems for employers regardless of their size. Small businesses must have control of apprenticeship spending and the same freedom to choose the best training for their organisation.

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This can be achieved by allowing these businesses to manage their apprenticeships through same the digital platform (called the Apprenticeship Service) that the country’s largest employers use. This is one of the major successes of the reforms to the apprenticeship system and would go a long way to remedy the issues encountered by non-levy payers. There is no time to lose. Without a working model to support them, small businesses will simply abandon the apprenticeship system altogether.

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Bethan Morgan, Barclays

My journey to becoming an apprentice has been a somewhat unusual one – I’m not your average school leaver looking to embark on their early career, but rather a mid-career 30 year-old who has stumbled into the best opportunity one could hope for! Upon leaving school I completed a BSc (Hons) in Microbiology at the University of Glasgow. I loved this subject, but graduated at the worst part of the recession when funding within my field for research was limited. In addition, I found myself missing the country life of the hill farm in Mid-Wales that I grew up on. I moved back to Mid-Wales and took up a ‘short-term’ post within the branch network of Barclays Bank, only until I decided what I actually wanted to do with my degree! Six years later I had discovered that I very much enjoyed working for the bank as a Personal Banker, but had set my sights on getting closer to one of my true passions by moving into the Agricultural (‘Ag’) Banking department. As the 'Ag' team tends to attract individuals who really love their jobs, opportunities to join are few and far between. I had a mentor within the team who rang me one afternoon to say ‘there’s an apprenticeship opportunity within 'Ag' – the only thing is I have no idea what it will involve and the applications close tonight!’ Thus I took the plunge and ended up being successful in obtaining one of six Agricultural Relationship Manager Apprenticeship positions following a rather strenuous application process. I was really nervous about this change in career direction – becoming a n apprentice at 30 se emed a huge step backwards and indeed, almost verging on ridiculous! However, the more I learned about the role I had taken on, the more excited I became! To have the chance to achieve a degree whilst being developed at my own pace to do my dream job with really in-depth training means that when the apprenticeship finishes I will be in the best position possible to really make a difference to our farming clients.

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Every day is different within my role - it’s really exciting! I began by shadowing one of my colleagues around a range of farms and now have my own portfolio of clients - dairy, livestock, poultry, kennels - once even donkeys! Quite a few clients I see are also diversifying - it’s a huge part of modern agriculture. We see holiday lets, chalets, biomass plants - the list is both endless and fascinating! I also attend livestock markets, meetings with accountants and agricultural professionals, attend tradeshows, along with time spent studying. I have one day per week of study leave which I use to keep up-to-date with my studies – as part of the apprenticeship we are taking an Honours degree in Banking Practice and Manage-ment with The London Institute of Banking & Finance (LIBF). It’s a really interes-ting degree which is very relevant to our day-to-day roles, and the support recei-ved from LIBF is fantastic – I was concerned that having been out of academia for so long in comparison to my fellow apprentices I would struggle to keep up, but thanks to the excellent teaching and encouragement from LIBF I have achieved a distinction in my first year studies. In addition to virtual classrooms and webinars we have a four-day residential study period per module at LIBF’s London base overlooking the Thames and Tower Bridge – quite a change from the day-to-day round of wellies and calculators! Becoming an apprentice has been the most terrifying and rewarding step in my career so far – I’ve ended up in the best job I’ve ever had with the unparalleled opportunity to obtain a degree which will help my career to grow exponentially. I’ve already gained a promotion into a permanent role at the end of the apprenticeship – I can’t wait to see where it will take me next!

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Tyrone Upton, Mace Group Why you decided to go this route? I decided to pursue the apprenticeship route when I realised the benefits that could be gained through an apprenticeship instead of university. The obvious attraction point for me was that I would not accrue University debt. Joining Mace through the apprenticeship scheme has also allowed me to gain an extra 3 years of experience above my fellow peers, something I would not have had going strai-ght to university. This not only enables me gain on the job experience, but allows me to make contacts and network within a global company. Another benefit is that I get to understand how to apply my knowledge as I am learning. My degree has helped me with work on site, equally my work on site has helped me unders-tand what I am learning in the classroom. What was your experience of the application process? The application process was a little daunting at first. My previous experiences at school and college had not really prepared me for this. The first step was an application form, I spent 1-2 weeks on this section. This was followed by a phone interview, for this section I prepared a few reading cards based on questions I had prepared. Next was an assessment day. This stage was very enjoyable, it involved working in a group to develop a project that Mace had previously completed. Finally a formal interview. Once I had the job I then subsequently applied to the University. It was a relatively quick process between completing a stage and hearing back. The longest wait was about 2 weeks for me to find out if I had passed the initial application stage. Howdoyouratetheexperiencecomparedtoyourfriendswhowentto university,wouldyourecommend? My personal view is that the apprenticeship route is more challenging and the hours are longer than if I was studying full-time. Balancing work and study time requires me to manage my time efficiently. Sometimes, I need to study at the weekends, however this has not stopped me going out for drinks with friends. It is about being able to balance work/study. The flip side of this is that I can actually afford to go out every weekend! I have also been given a large amount of responsibility, which I enjoy. Lots of my friends at university do not have much expe-rience and I have been working on Battersea Power Station for nearly 2 years, one of the largest construction projects in Europe. I would highly recommend this route.

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What did your family and friends think about your choice? At first, the prospect of a free degree seemed too good to be true. I’d heard a lot of negative feedback and views about apprenticeships. My family supported my choice and all of my friends went to university. I don’t think anyone really knew what an apprenticeship involved. I know that none of my friends even conside-red alternatives to university. As far as they were concerned, university was the best and only way forward. I am 100% sure that I have made the right choice and my family certainly agree with me. Most of my friends who have left university wished that they had known about Degree apprenticeships. Conclusion Although balancing work and study can feel intense at times, I am satisfied that I have made the right choice. I have made lots of friends, from apprentices to senior managers within the business. I have been given lots of responsibility, currently in my second year and I already coordinate the design process for all 40 hoists across the Battersea Power Station project. I also have other responsibilities that, if not done correctly or properly, could impact the project. I don’t think I’d have had the opportunities I’ve been given if I’d gone straight to university.

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Feyi Coker, Department for Transport Wheredoyouwork? I work for the Department for Transport. I started working there as a Level 4 Higher Project Management apprentice i n 2 016 until the completion of my apprenticeship in April 2018. Following my completion, I became a fully fledged member of the Midland Main Line Infrastructure Enhancement Programme. Whatdoyou do? I am a Project Manager for the billion pound Midland Main Line Infrastructure Enhancement Programme. My role involves liaising with Network Rail, our key external stakeholder to manage key infrastructure projects such as line speed improvement and platform lengthening that deliver benefits for the passengers. As someone put it to me, the role involves playing a teacher type role that assigns their students homework, and then checking for its accuracy and if it is completed on time. One

of

my

key

responsibilities

includes

running

a

Stakeholder Management workshop in order to understand who the key stakeholders are for the project and plan our communications strategy. The work is quite similar to deciding who you need to friend or unfriend on a social media site. This work is important as it ensures that the project is successful as the Senior Project Managers are able to engage with the relevant parties on whether the completed project meets their approval. Whyyoudecidedtogothisroute? Following A-levels, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to study at university. I feared that I would be picking a random subject to study. The introduction of the uni fees also meant that it was best to not go to university if I was undecided on what career I wanted to pursue. After a bit of soul searching, I remembered that I enjoyed shadowing my MP Simon Hughes and helping with resolving issues that people faced. My sister recommended that I apply to the Civil Service apprenticeship scheme. I applied for a handful of apprentices and I was lucky enough to be chosen to do Project Management at the Department for Transport. Whatwasyourexperienceoftheapplicationprocess? I found the application initially daunting. Luckily, I had support from my friends, family and the local job support team to polish my CV and set up mock interviews. Google is also your best friend. I remembered typing in questions to ask at the end of interview and I was able to use one of the questions to place me in front of the other candidates.

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Howdoyouratetheexperiencecomparedtoyourfriendswhowenttouniversity? Everyone's journey is different. I found that some of my friends had dropped out of university as they didn't enjoy the subject that they initially wanted to study. I also had friends who have gone on to do a masters at university. But, what my friends and I can agree on is how valuable work experience is to the workplace. I think that is where I had the slight advantage over my friends. Wouldyourecommendthisroutetoothers? I have enjoyed being an apprentice. It has offered me an abundance of opportunities to, not only develop my skillset, but engage with other apprentices from different industries. The experience and skillset will also prove useful for future roles. I have had the pleasure of promoting apprenticeships to schools, featuring on BBC and my apprenticeship provider's website. I welcome anyone to apply to be an apprenticeship. Whatdidyourfamilyandfriendsthinkaboutyourchoice? Initially, my mum wasn’t pleased with the idea. I had come from a household where everyone had gone to university. However, she warmed to the idea as she saw me flourish in my career and bringing in income to spoil her (lol!.)

Whatlevelofsupportisavailabletothosewithlearningdifficulties? I am dyslexic so I find grammar quite difficult and it takes me longer to process sentence structure compared to my peers. However, both my workplace and apprenticeship provider, were really helpful in providing an assessment for my condi-tion to understand the level of adjustment that would be needed. I was given extra time for my exam and I was provided with the latest grammar checking tools to resolve any errors. Whendidyoucompleteyourapprenticeship? April 2018. My workplace set up a graduation ceremony for apprentices that had finished. In the graduation ceremony, apprentices got given a goody bag that includes fancy pens, notepads as well as an inspirational book, and I got given a graduation hoody by my apprenticeship provider. I believe a hoody is much cooler than a ceremonial robe and hat. Howistheapprenticesociallife? Apprentices don’t have freshers' week. However, there were several social networking events to meet apprentices from different organisations. The Department for Transport also has an apprentice forum to discuss issues that may need resolving and welcome incoming apprentices to the organisation. What’snext? I hope to use my project management skillset to work on other exciting projects. I a m keen to use t he skillset to become the Jay-Z of musicals as I am a fan of musical theatre.

1. Do some research in finding out what you like to do or what career routes interest you 2. Use every opportunity to build up your CV either through volunteering, signing up for activities and learning skills from watching YouTube videos 3. Practise your interview skills by having a "mock video interview" with yourself and sending it to friends and family for feedback 4. Enjoy making and learning from your mistakes – Life is journey not a destination 5. Learn what you can from your organisation and apprenticeship provider 6. Give back by offering advice and support to future apprentices after you.

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Dexter Hitchings, Edge Foundation My journey from GCSEs to an apprenticeship took, what felt like, a very long two years. At school the message was unequivocal. The key to success is simple – get your A-levels and go to university. I never felt I had the information I needed to make a well-informed decision about my future. I chose to go to sixth-form, but quickly realised this wasn’t the right choice. I moved to my local FE College, but felt let down by the lack of contact hours. Finally I decided that, having worked or volunteered from the age of 14, an apprenticeship might suit my needs better. My search for an apprenticeship was time consuming. Not having received any careers advice or guidance, I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do for what could be, the rest of my working life. There is so much choice and applying can be a long process. I found checking the ‘Find an Apprenticeship’ website regularly not only allows you to stay on top of the high volume of apprenticeships added daily, but also means you can be one of the first to apply. Another tip I would suggest is to find a provider or college who offers a range of apprenticeships that interest you. Meet them, tell them what you’re looking for, and they can play an active role in helping you find it. I thought about what I enjoyed most and decided on a digital marketing apprenticeship. In February 2017, I was extremely happy to accept a Level 3 apprenticeship with the Edge Foundation. On completion, 12 months later, I was offered a full-time role. My journey wasn’t plain sailing. My training provider was 3aaa, who, we now know, were not as ‘Outstanding’ as we all thought. Luckily for me, I had an incredible employer. Edge have not just been understanding, but have always offered me support and extra training. They chose to pay me the market rate from the day I started and have always made me feel like a valued member of the team. I have had the support and opportunities to excel. I have been given projects to look after and the responsibility and trust to work independently, as well as part of the larger team.

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Because of my experience at school, I decided to become a member of the Young Apprentice Ambassador Network (YAAN). The YAAN is a community of inspiring, highly-driven apprentices and former apprentices, who share their apprenticeship stories with students in schools. It has given me lots of opportunities including my essay, Gaining the edge: reflections on an apprenticeship journey, being chosen for publication in the Learning and Work Institute’s report on the quality of, and access to, apprenticeships. I was invited to be a member of the discussion panel at the report’s launch at the House of Commons last year. I have also given speeches at the National Apprenticeship Awards 2018 and at the Army Foundation College in Harrogate. My apprenticeship changed my life and got me back on track. My options are more open than ever before and instead of rejecting education, because it made me feel inadequate and a failure and because I couldn’t jump through the exam hoops, I am ambitious, confident, resilient and open to the idea of further study. Not only am I open to the idea, but I am now committed to it having recently started my Level 6 in digital marketing at London South Bank University. When I walked out of school, never did I think I would come quite so far. I am proud of what I have achieved and so glad I chose an apprenticeship.

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Jenny Taylor, IBM At IBM, we love our apprentices. They bring energy, commitment and innovation into the workplace – and they are loyal employees. We started our apprenticeship programme in 2010, by offering Level 3 technical apprenticeships. It was a considered risk as we had previously only employed graduates into client facing roles, but our new apprentices showed us they were up for this challenge and delighted us with the speed in which they learned on-the-job and became valuable and contributing employees. We then expanded our programme to include business related apprenticeships and in 2015 became one of the first employers to offer the new Digital and Technology Solutions Degree Apprenticeship. We now offer Level 3, 4 and 5 Trailblazer apprenticeships in a range of job roles within Software Test, Management Consultancy, Software Development, Infrastructure Technology and Cyber Security, in addition to management and technology Degree Apprenticeships partnering with six universities. We firmly believe in the “Ladder of Opportunity” whereby apprentices can move up the levels of apprenticeship qualification and several of our early Level 3 apprentices are now studying for Degree Apprenticeships. As Chair of both the Digital Technology and Solutions Degree Apprenticeship Trailblazer group and the Digital Sector Standards Steering Employer group, I am also proud of the immense progress employers and learning organisations have made in developing new Digital Standards across all levels for our Sector. With the support of the Tech Partnership (now TP Degrees) we were able to plan a co-ordinated and structured approach to develop a range of new apprenticeship standards. It’s well known that the UK faces a serious challenge in recruiting sufficient, high quality digital employees and these new standards are a great boost to driving recruitment and skills in the Sector. There have been challenges and potential setbacks too. A funding band cut to our Digital and Technology Solutions Degree Apprenticeship was robustly contested but is still going ahead with the potential risk to the quality of future delivery and universities’ continued commitment to the programme.

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The uncertainty generated by funding band reviews also caused recruitment for apprentices to pause as it is unclear whether learning establishments will be able to offer apprenticeships of the same quality at the new lower funding band. It’s damaging to turn recruitment pipelines off especially considering the immense amount of ambassadorial activity in schools and colleges over the past few years which is finally starting to build up some impetus. We now face the potential challenge of the degree being taken out of degree apprenticeships. How will that help recruitment for what is arguably our “golden ticket” for growing Digital Skills in the UK? Looking forwards, stability and transparency in process and decision making will be crucial. bringing appren-tices

At the moment, long term workforce planning for into

the

business

is

difficult because

of

the

ever-changing business landscape. The uncertainty caused by Brexit is exacerbated with even more uncertainty in terms of constant policy and funding changes. Employers want to bring apprentices into the workplace and we are committed to growing the UK’s digital skills. To achieve this, we need to be able to plan longterm recruitment strategies that we can then execute to maximum effect.

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Lord Lucas, The Good Schools Guide When you move house, do you wrap your glassware and pack it carefully, or pile it in a box and if it breaks, well, it was not much good anyway? If the former, then you will understand what I am on about. Joining a business straight from school is one rough, rattling move. From the home you grew up in, friends you have got used to, and rules and expectations you have learned to navigate, to life in a new town with new rituals, with roles and skills that you have never come across let alone attempted. Of course we mostly survive. A few cracks and chips, but we learn to fit in and get on. For goodness sake, some teenagers make it to their new lives across thousands of miles of desert and sea to entirely new countries and languages – what’s to fuss about moving from Eastbourne to Coventry and just having to get on with it? No fuss, just that there is a better way of doing things, one that works better all round. A harmonious and happy workforce is a good thing, I think. That’s an argument that has been gaining ground for the last couple of decades, to the point where even the government are recommending it for schools, not that it can be said to apply to government itself yet. Or the opposition. Adding pastoral care to your recruitment recipe makes the best of all the money you have invested in recruiting your apprentices, and are about to invest in training them. Give each apprentice a mentor: someone who knows the ropes, someone who can be confided in and trusted. The apprentices learn much faster how to do things your way, and with fewer bruises. The mentors love it too, a first taste of running a team if they are young, the pleasure of guiding the young is they are old “I was trudging through my last ten years, counting down to retirement, now each day is a delight.” Be open about your health and wellbeing processes, what they are, how they work, how to access them, with lots of the human touch: stories from people who have used them and flourished.

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Socialise your apprentices into your way of doing things, into all the new skills that they will need, and with each other. Everything will be strange to them. Make feeling at home easy. Help them with their wider surroundings somewhere to live, what goes on. That way they come back to work in good order. Give them each a clear understanding of what is expected of them, what their prospects are (in all their range and possibility). Set this all out on your website, so that pupils, their teachers and their parents can get to know what you are offering, in their own time, over several years. Pastoral care is something that both parents and teachers feel competent to judge. They may have no experience of your business, or (in the case of teachers in particular) any business at all, but they know what good pastoral care looks like and, in the end, that is most of what parents want for their children: that they will be looked after, kept well, set up for the world, encouraged to make the best of themselves. It’s a pretty attractive thing for school pupils too.

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Jamie Hilder, Queen Mary University of London In pausing to reflect on developments in the apprenticeships space over the previous year, I can safely say it has been another busy one for the Apprenticeships team at Queen Mary University of London! This year alone, we have doubled the number of Degree Apprentices enrolled with us, cemented new employer ties and worked to develop and launch bespoke programmes with industry. Last month we were also incredibly proud to be announced as one of the successful applicants in the Department for Education, Institute of Technology competition. This means that through the creation of a stateof-the-art teaching facility at Albert Island in London’s Royal Docks, Queen Mary will continue to deliver transport engineering, digital and data science Degree Apprenticeships for at least another decade. And yet despite the gathering momentum with employers, students and parents, it has been impossible this year to ignore the hardening rhetoric around Degree Apprenticeships and their place within the wider apprenticeships mix. Whether the incendiary call to remove Degree Apprenticeships from the auspices of Apprenticeship Levy funding, a succession of aggressive funding band decisions from the IfATE or suggestions that degree qualifications be removed from Degree Apprenticeships entirely, fundamental questions have been raised about the role of Universities in delivering apprenticeship training altogether. For Degree Apprenticeships to survive as a viable study option that Universities can both afford to and can practically deliver, we need to mount a more audible and robust defence of their value. The employer voice in this discussion is key, especially at a time of heightened need as a result of Brexit. Because when Degree Apprenticeships are truly employer led, address wider sectoral needs and utilise University partners in their broadest and most comprehensive sense, they become invaluable socio-economic assets.

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Our Chartered Manager Degree Apprenticeship (Social Change) is a case in point. Launched back in January, this programme was specifically designed for those seeking to enter/ currently working in the charitable and voluntary sectors. Working with the Chief Executive of the Scouts Association and 18 other charities, we developed a bespoke curriculum that seeks to address skills challenges across the sector. With its first intake this September, the programme will also focus on increasing the attractiveness of the charitable/ voluntary sector as an employment destination for young people, with a particular focus on increasing BAME employment in the sector. Employers will own the curriculum through a dedicated employer board and our intention is to build an employer ecosystem which feeds into our research and community engagement work also. The IfATE and HM Treasury are right to raise concerns about rebadging of existing provision, especially given recent concerns around affordability of the Apprenticeship reforms. However, in an employer-led system where employers are empowered as consumer in an education marketplace, these practices are unlikely to last for long. Indeed, we are already beginning to see early signs of employers exercising their power over modular content, vendor qualifications and ultimately price. As the reforms mature, and the debates play out, it is sometimes easy to forget that the apprenticeship reforms are only in their second year of implementation. Placing the apprenticeship reforms on a more sound financial footing will undoubtedly be the focus of DfE over the next 6-12months. In that effort, I sincerely hope that in twelve months’ time as we publish the next edition of this anthology, we continue to speak of the value that Universities add within the apprenticeships mix and the young people’s lives they have changed and empowered.

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Liz Gorb, Manchester Metropolitan University Evolution and Future direction It is undisputed that the UK is in the midst of a productivity crisis when compared to many of our other G7 peers – fuelled by underinvestment, the slow pace of innovation and importantly a workforce who do not have the skills required for the 21st century economy. The lack of available skills is not only holding back our economy, but also public services, with health and science particularly affected. Apprenticeships at all levels have an immensely important part to play in addressing this, both in upskilling the existing workforce through life-long learning and providing an exciting pathway for the 50% of young people who do not – for a variety of reasons – go to university. However, Universities, in our role as drivers of innovation, growth and prosperity, should be encouraged and supported to bring that higher level skill expertise to the delivery of apprenticeships which are so crucial to productivity gains. At Manchester Metropolitan University, we have a long history of employer-led education and quickly identified that Degree Apprenticeships could contribute to our strategy of working with employers and the community, and contributing to the regional economy. We started with 60 Degree Apprentices in our inaugural September 2015 cohort , and have worked hard to grow that number to over 1,200 today. This has not been easy and there have been challenges along the way, but by following an employer-led process, combined with our capabilities in work-based higher education we are confident we are getting things right. Apprentices’ successes Among the many successes of our Degree Apprentices in regional and national awards, we are particularly proud of the diversity that we have achieved on Degree Apprenticeship programmes. The programmes have delivered significant uplift in the number of female students choosing STEM subjects. On our Digital & Technology Solutions Degree Apprenticeship, we have double the number of female students compared to the national average for Computing Science degrees.

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Also nationally, 30% of degree apprenticeship entrants come from areas under-represented in Higher Education, higher than similar full-time courses (26%). Our intake is almost exactly in line with this. We see every day the impact that Degree Apprenticeships are having on these students as individuals and the benefits enjoyed by their employers. Overall, Degree Apprentices are achieving outstanding results, with the majority of apprentices on track to achieve a first-class degree and demonstrating the skills and behaviours for their chosen occupations . We are also experiencing very high rates of progres-sion, a credit to the dedication of apprentices and employers who have recognised the importance of encouraging a positive work and study balance. The Importance of degrees We are determined that our programmes will continue to meet the needs of our more than 260 employer partners. It was employers who led the development of Degree Apprenticeships and almost universally, they continue to tell us that they have engaged with programmes at this level because of the value they place on a degree qualification in combination with the work based learning. Conversely, they assert that their interest could quickly evaporate if these apprenticeships were watered down or had degrees removed. They share their frustrations that their choices could be limited, when they are often the ones leading the way with developments and making the largest financial contributions. The benefits of breaking down the old barriers between universities and business; academic and vocational; work and education are clearly demonstrated by all of the research on Degree Apprenticeships and we are committed to continue to passionately make the case for this innovative and highly impactful model. Where next for Degree Apprenticeships There are challenges ahead for Degree Apprenticeships, but they are also things that we should celebrate as an example of our innovative education sector. These globally ground-breaking programmes have attracted interest from Canada, Australia, Spain and New Zealand - the latter two, we are supporting to roll out pilot programmes. We must also strive to understand the programmes impact and start to develop the evidence that will support, not only the continued development of Degree Apprenticeships, but make a compelling case for growth. We need to continue to share best practice across the sector so that Degree Apprentices, no matter which institution they choose, can be confident of a positive experience and a great career ahead.

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Sarah Banham, Battersea Power Station Development Company Once complete, Battersea Power Station will be London’s newest town centre. The redevelopment of the 42-acre industrial Brownfield site and restoration of the Grade II* listed building will bring over 20,000 jobs, inject £20bn into the UK economy and hundreds of apprenticeship opportunities to the local community. Employment has and will always be at the heart of this development. We cannot deliver this project alone. To play our part in dealing with the skills shortage facing our country we are committed to ensuring we train and upskill the young people of the future. We have established our own Battersea Academy of Skills & Employment (BASE) for long term jobs. Launched in July 2016 and incorporated as a Community Interest Company in the same year, our Academy has trained over 70 long term unemployed job seekers on our pre-employment training courses, and place over 100 people in long term jobs in hospitality, retail, estate management and security. We work with the local authority, further education colleges, universities, training providers and the Department of Work and Pensions to offer a programme that delivers skills, qualifications and leads to long term careers on the Battersea Power Station project. BASE has also received match grant funding from the GLA for an ESOL Plus Employer Partnership project and to date put over 20 members of staff through ESOL accredited training. In construction, we have created over 100 apprenticeships through our contractors with more coming on our books this year and in future years. Apprenticeships are a great way to learn and earn at the same time. Our apprentices benefit from the opportunity to work on a unique and interesting project learning their trade and earning at the same time. The project benefits from creating advocates of the project who will want to work hard to see the project complete.

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The Communities Team at Battersea Power Station work with local primary and secondary schools educating the local young people about the history of the Power Station, the construction period we are in at present and what the project will be when complete. This informs and excites them about what is happening on their doorstep and encourages them to get involved, creating the next generation of apprentices and full-time employees. For anyone interested in applying for an apprenticeship at Battersea Power Station in construction can send their CV to Karen Gray at kgray@bpsdc.co.uk and for interest in apprenticeships in hospitality, retail, estate management can visit the BASE website www.baseskillsacademy.co.uk.

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Sharon Byfield, Coca Cola At CCEP we believe by investing in people, businesses can drive progress and innovation from the inside out. Central to our early careers strategy is the value we place on nurturing our people to realise their potential. We see apprenticeships as enabling the growth of these future skills, allowing individuals an alternative career pathway. This notion is the driving force behind our award-winning apprenticeship offering at CCEP, with the company investing over one million pounds in the apprenticeship programme in 2018. By dedicating specific budgets, time and effort, we have delivered an industry leading offering in the apprenticeship space, which saw our recruits increase by more than 50% last year. Fundamental to our apprenticeship programme is a focus on inclusivity, with huge importance placed on the value that every individual brings to the business. We feel it is important for companies to work closely with relevant organisations to ensure both inclusion and diversity are being considered across any apprenticeship initiative. At CCEP we are closely aligned with the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance (BAMEAA), which has created opportunities to regularly attend networking meetings to understand the latest insights and to align with industry standards. Diversity is something we celebrate in all its forms at CCEP and as such we open our doors to individuals from all walks of lives regardless of background. As a company we are committed to increasing BAME representation, with a goal of 13% of the Coca-Cola GB workforce to be ethnically diverse by 2025. For us goals like this are vital, a workforce that is ethnically diverse, multi-generational and one which truly represents the communities we operate in, is of most value to us as a business. As such, last year we also set a goal of achieving a 50/50 gender balance for (2018) our early career apprenticeship recruit, something we are proud to have succeeded with. Since 2014, CCEP has recruited 72 apprentices, and with the apprenticeship levy we hope that we can continue to grow this number to encourage a diverse workforce in Great Britain. Our primary focus is always empowering employees to acquire new knowledge, it’s at the heart of all that we do at CCEP. We are therefore always looking for ways to evolve our apprenticeship offering and as such we fully back the government apprenticeship levy. The levy will allow us to expand the people we reach and act as a catalyst for CCEP’s ambition to broaden the range of skills training we offer. As such we have created a dedicated ‘Invest in You’ programme, providing us with a clear direction and set of goals to work towards in relation to the levy. The programme will enable us to realise the potential of the apprenticeship levy and we look forward to sharing more on the positive impact this has on our people and business.

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Sir Peter Lampl, Sutton Trust High level apprenticeships offer great opportunities to young people of all backgrounds. This is because with a higher or degree level apprenticeship you earn while you learn, come out with little or no debt and with skills the marketplace wants. They come with financial rewards too. Our research has shown that these apprentices earn more over a lifetime than the average nonRussell Group graduate. It’s clear that apprenticeships have the potential to be powerful drivers of social mobility. Yet despite recent growth, there are fewer than 10,000 degree apprenticeship starts each year for young people compared to 330,000 new undergraduates. For apprenticeships to truly offer an alternative to a university degree, there need to be more higher and degree level apprenticeship opportunities available, as well as parity of esteem between academic and vocational education. Our polling has shown how perceptions of apprenticeships amongst young people and their parents have improved over the last four years. However teachers are still unlikely to recommend apprenticeships to their highest achieving pupils, suggesting there is some way to go before vocational routes are given the same status as higher education routes. Part of this is about dealing with the snobbery around apprenticeships and giving teachers access to the information they need.

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Stephanie Bishop, Capgemini As the Apprenticeship Levy remains to be widely discussed in media and during HR conferences, it’s great to see how some organisations affected by the skills gap have started to think creatively about using it to open up new talent pools. The removal of the age restrictions, for example, could be one of the triggers for such thinking. At Capgemini, a global consulting, technology services and digital transformation company employing over 8,000 in the UK alone, we noticed the value that apprenticeships can bring early on this journey. In 2011 we decided we needed to do something radical to close our digital skills gap – and one of the solutions was to develop an apprenticeship programme. Our vision was to invest in our talent strategy at a junior level and create opportunities for those who were looking for an alternative to University. This resulted in building a market leading Degree Apprenticeship programme together with Aston University, enabling us to grow our technologists of the future. In 2017, we were the first employer in the technology industry to see 11 of our Degree Apprentices graduate - this number has now gone up to 76 with 88% achieving a 2:1 or above and 39% achieving a 1st. This clearly demonstrates that applied learning in the workplace and degree apprenticeships can result in great academic results while adding real value to our organisation and our clients. However, there continues to be a shortage of digital skills at graduate level and above, with the Institute of Coding suggesting that 500,000 more digital specialists are required by 2022. The demand significantly outstrips supply, which makes recruitment a challenge at many technology companies. This has forced us to think differently about the apprenticeship scheme. Since there are no longer any restrictions around age and, using the Apprenticeship Levy, we commenced a pilot in 2018 and recruited graduates who had not studied Computer Science but had a real passion and aptitude to learn how to code. These graduates are now learning code through a Software Development Apprenticeship. In addition to helping us fulfil our graduate demand, 3 out of the 4 apprentices were female, which supports our ambition of achieving an equal gender split on the apprenticeship programme.

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Introducing apprenticeships is not an easy thing. For example, building a business case that allows apprentices to spend 20% of their working time focusing on their development is quite tricky for many organisations. Also, they are not going to have the required skills from when they join. However, when the skills are not available immediately, we need to think creatively and long term otherwise resource challenges will just continue to be a problem. At Capgemini we plan to continue to invest in apprenticeships, as we see them as the talent of our future, aiming to hire an additional 120 in 2019 alone, to grow and prepare our business for whatever changes we and our clients might face in the years to come.

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Ekansh Sharma, Accenture I chose the apprenticeship route as, after studying at sixth form level, I wanted more. Following on from 13 years at school, I had always enjoyed the problem-solving aspect of subjects, the subjects I opted for were Physics, Maths and Economics since all those involved a great deal of problem-solving. Having been inspired by one of my economics lessons, I went about doing a cost-benefit analysis on going to university against alternative routes into the professional world. The numbers in my case just did not add for the case for going to university. This led me to research the alternatives available in the professional world. This was when I came across degree apprenticeships. The fact that I could get a 360 credit Honours BSc in 3 years (the same amount of time as a full-time student), amazing work experience, no student debt involved at all and all of the above while earning a fantastic salary. It was a no brainer in my case since I had a particular career goal in mind which was to work at a technology firm. This was when I decided to apply for the degree apprenticeship at Accenture, who is a leading global management and technology consulting firm. The process itself was rather self-explanatory. Well signposted and you are kept in the loop throughout the process. The process itself involves submitting your CV online and completing a basic psychometric test. Once through, you are invited to an assessment centre where you are given activities in teams. This leads onto a HR interview which was the final stage in my case. After going through the process, I received the great news that I had been accepted into the programme which was an exhilarating moment for me as I was looking forward to all the opportunities I would have shortly ahead of me. While applying for my apprenticeship, I knew to an extent I was taking a risk. This was made evident by my friends and family, who were very sceptical about apprenticeships and repeatedly told me that it would be a sub-standard qualification which would not be recognised when I finished my apprenticeship. However, when I speak to my friends now, there is an element of regret on their part because they have substantial student loans and no job and or experience at the end of it and they regret not exploring their options at the crucial decision-making stage. A lot of them say if they could make the decision again, they would be extremely inclined to do an apprenticeship over going to university. My family had a similar story where their scepticism was ended when they saw me perform well in my career and get opportunities such as chairing a national network or serving on the board for a Global firm as a Non-executive director. My family has turned into advocates for apprenticeship taking every and any opportunity to tell people with family members at the crucial decision-making stage of all the benefits that an apprenticeship has to offer.

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Joshua Uwadiae, WeGym •

What was your experience of the application process?

The application process was really straight forward. I applied and was accepted to come in for an interview with the with QA, the training provider. I did an assessment and was offered a place on the apprenticeship program. They then started sending me to interviews. I didn’t get the first job I applied for but the second was where I found my apprenticeship opportunity! •

How do you rate the experience compared to your friends who went to university?

Ironically all of my college friends laughed at me when they heard I had dropped out to do an apprenticeship. I got the last laugh : When they were finishing college I had a full time job and by the time they had finished one year at University, I had become the company's head of technology after working there for 18 months. So I think I made the better decision amongst my peers! •

Would you recommend this route to others?

Hand on heart it’s so underrated but so amazing. It’s a limitless opportunity because unlike academia you are in the driving seat of your career from day one - I love how you are in control; if you want faster progression, you can work harder just like in any job - it’s the perfect blend between learning and doing... oh and you get paid :) I think it’s the primary reason why I’ve managed to start WeGym.co.uk because the mindset of being in control and taking action instilled in me through my apprenticeship has helped me build the business! •

What did your family and friends think about your choice?

My parents were very against it. Coming from a culturally academic household, it was the most important thing. I have three super smart sisters who all had gone to university so it wasn’t acceptable for me to not go t o university and not follow the cultural template. I personally fought back and did my own thing, what I thought was best and once my family started seeing the fruits of my apprenticeship they became advocates too!

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KM Media Group Dan Wright The job advert promoting the first editorial apprenticeship at the KM Media Group couldn’t have come at a better time. I had just finished my A-levels in the summer of 2013 and was looking to get into journalism, but didn’t want to go down the costly university route. Helped by providing the KM sport desk with motorsport reports during sixth-form, I became part of the first cohort of NCTJ journalism apprentices and began work in September 2013. After spending three months at the Kent Messenger office in Maidstone, I went on a tour of the company’s editorial departments, stopping off for three-month stints at each. The two-year course offered a day-release programme at Lambeth College, and I worked hard to pass my 100wpm shorthand exam at the first attempt while balancing revision for my other exams. From news to multimedia via sport and the features desk, I won the national NCTJ Apprentice of the Year award in 2015, not long after stepping up to trainee reporter at the Whitstable Gazette. I spent a year covering the Whitstable patch before switching to the busier Herne Bay, during which time I passed my NQJ in April 2016 and became a senior reporter aged 21. I worked hard to put myself in a position to pass the exams, before moving to my home patch with the Kentish Express in September last year. Little did I know then that I would be appointed news editor of my hometown paper just months later, but it goes to show how valuable the apprenticeship initiative is. I am under no illusions that taking on a management role and leading the news team was quite a leap —  but I also knew the apprenticeship had provi-ded a fantastic grounding. So far I am loving the new role and I do not feel my age has held me back at all - the team know what I lack in age I make up for in experience. The KM has been involved with the apprentice scheme from the very start and long may that continue.

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Josie Hannet My career in journalism started in September 2014. I finished sixth form and joined The KM Group as an editorial apprentice at the Kentish Express. I learned how to become a decent print reporter, built up contacts in my local area, found out the big issues in Kent and learned about how local councils work. I enjoyed working with a wide range of people, from trainee reporters, to seniors and editors. I learned so much from each and every one of them along the way and had the hands-on experience from day one of my apprenticeship. After around six months at the newspaper, I moved to the online and radio team. I learned the importance of multimedia in our ever-changing industry. I got to read live radio bulletins and write breaking stories and features for KentOnline. As part of my apprenticeship I went to KMTV for more multimedia training. At this point (2015), KMTV (a joint partnership between the KM and the University of Kent) was only streaming bulletins online. I spent about a week there and loved it. I was out shooting packages and learning how to use the gallery when we recorded the bulletin in the evenings. A job came up at the time so I applied for it and became a trainee reporter before my apprenticeship ended. I learned so much there and was shortly after that promoted to senior reporter. It was then decided that we’d launch on television on July 10th 2017. We were then full steam ahead to get ready for launch — with an hour-long news programme to produce each night. After a few months into launch I was made senior broadcast journalist at KMTV. A full team of staff were employed to get the show going. My role at KMTV evolved into becoming the producer of our news programme Kent Tonight. This involves making sure the cogs are in place so the show is ready each night and manage a gallery of staff in the live broadcast. I also produced a half-an-hour sports show and business show. I also presented some of our evening news bulletins and had my own music show which aired every Thursday, giving me more experience in presenting. As part of my apprenticeship I spent one day a week at Lambeth College to gain a gold standard NCTJ diploma in journalism. I was lucky enough to win Kent Young Journalist of the Year 2017 and was highly commended as Broadcast Journalist of the Year 2016 and 2017. In June 2018 I joined the Sky News team as an output producer on Sunrise. I would never have got to this point at this age without the apprenticeship. I’ve made so much progress since I started as an apprentice four years ago. I’ve covered some fantastic stories, won awards and been bitten by a pig in a piece to camera along the way! I can’t thank the apprenticeship scheme enough, it’s fast-tracked my career and given me the hands-on experience I would never have got had I gone to university. Also being able to earn as I learn has meant I’ve been able to save money and not worry about having debt from getting a degree. To be a producer at 22 I feel very proud and can’t wait to learn so much more as my career develops.

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Ian Carter - Editorial Director KM Media Group has been running successful apprentice scheme for more than five years. Four years ago 18-year-old Josie Hannett walked into the KM Group’s office in Whitstable and told us she was our next editorial apprentice. She was right, too. We found her combination of drive, determination and bolshiness irre-sistible and snapped her up. Her time with us has seen her working on weekly newspapers, our kmfm radio stations, KentOnline and latterly KMTV. Josie has now left the KM after landing an amazing job as an output producer on Sky’s flagship Sunrise programme. It’s an incredible achievement for Josie, who has racked up a huge amount of real-life experience — I can’t imagine there are any other 22-year-olds regularly producing an hour-long live television programme. I was sad to see her go but also enormously proud. By coincidence, the week after Josie landed her new job our first editorial apprentice, Dan Wright, was continuing his own rise through the ranks. He has been appointed news editor of one of our biggest titles, the Kentish Express, at the age of 23 and now regularly edits the title when his boss is absent. When we asked Dan during his interview how he felt he would hold his own at such a young age he said — quite rightly — that his apprenticeship has given him more experience than people many years older. I couldn’t be prouder of them both. I’ve always been a firm believer in offering alternative routes into journalism. My own background meant university was never a realistic option, and I am eternally grateful for the bursary that enabled me to start working on the Colchester Evening Gazette while attending a course at Harlow College. That’s certainly not a criticism of those who choose to go the university route. We have a close, symbiotic relationship with the University of Kent’s acclaimed Centre for Journalism, with whom we jointly run KMTV. It’s just not the only route. We’re now looking for our next apprentices ,  if you want to find out more about how you can follow in Dan and Josie’s footsteps, drop me an email at icar-ter@thekmgroup.co.uk

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Standards Update 426 Approved Standards 161 Standards In development

75 Proposals In development LEVEL 2: 149 STANDARDS LEVEL 3: 225 STANDARDS LEVEL 4: 99 STANDARDS LEVEL 5: 41 STANDARDS LEVEL 6: 112 STANDARDS LEVEL 7: 61 STANDARDS 71


Agriculture, Environmental & Animal Care (37 Standards)

72

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

GOLF GREEN K EEPER

YES

YES

YES

2

LAND-BASED SERVICE ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

2

SPORTS TURF OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

ARBORIST

YES

YES

YES

2

HORTICULTURE A ND L A NDSC A PE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

FOREST OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

A NI M A L C A RE A ND WELF A RE A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

COUNTRYSIDE WOR K ER

YES

YES

NO

2

E Q UINE GROO M

YES

YES

YES

2

FLORISTRY

YES

YES

NO

2

PEST CONTROL TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

2

POULTRY WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

2

S T O C K P E R S O N ( B E E F, P I G S , S H E E P, D A I R Y )

YES

YES

YES

2

UNDER K EEPER

YES

NO

NO

2

LAND-BASED SERVICE ENGINEERING TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

A RCH A EOLOGIC A L TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

CROP TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

F A RRIER

YES

YES

NO

3

L A NDSC A PE / HORTICUL TURE SUPER V ISOR

YES

YES

YES

3

P A C K HOUSE LINE LE A D ER

YES

YES

NO

3

POULTRY TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

RESOURCE TECHNIC A L MANAGER (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

3

SENIOR E Q UINE GROO M

YES

YES

YES

3

V ETERIN A RY NURSE

YES

YES

YES

3

A D V A NCED GOLF GREEN K EEPER

YES

YES

NO

3

W A TER EN V IRON M ENT WOR K ER

YES

YES

NO

3

DOG GROO M ING STYL IST

YES

NO

NO

3

K EEPER A ND A Q U A RIST

YES

NO

NO

3

A NI M A L TR A INER

YES

YES

YES

4

GOLF COURSE M A N A G ER

YES

YES

NO

5

PROFESSION A L A D V ISER - A G R I C U LT U R E / H O R T I CULTURE

YES

NO

NO

6

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

EN V IRON M ENT A L PR A C TITIONER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

ECOLOGIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

7

EN V IRON M ENT A L M A N AGER (DEGREE) (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

7

A RCH A EOLOGIC A L SPE CI A LIST

YES

YES

NO

7

S U S TA I N A B L E B U S I N E S S SPECI A LIST

NO

NO

NO

7

HISTORIC EN V IRON M ENT A D V ISOR

NO

NO

NO

7

Business and Administration (41 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

RECRUIT M ENT RE SOURCER

YES

YES

YES

2

BUSINESS SUPPORT ASSIST A NT

NO

NO

NO

2

PUBLIC SERVICE OPER A TION A L DELI V ERY OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

TE A M LE A DER / SUPER V ISOR

YES

YES

YES

3

HR SUPPORT

YES

YES

YES

3

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATOR

YES

YES

YES

3

I M PRO V E M ENT TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

LE A RNING A ND DE V EL OP M ENT PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

YES

3

LEISURE DUTY M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

3

RECRUIT M ENT CONSUL T A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

L I B R A R Y, I N F O R M AT I O N & A RCHI V E SER V ICES A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

PUBLIC SECTOR COMPLIA NCE / IN V ESTIG A TOR OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

DENT A L PR A CTICE M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

J UNIOR M A N A GE M ENT CONSULT A NT

YES

YES

YES

4

A SSOCI A TE PRO J ECT M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

CO M M UNITY ENERGY SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

4

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

73


S TA N D A R D N A M E

PROPOSAL APPROVED

S TA N D A R D APPROVED

ASSESSMENT PLAN APPROVED

LEVEL

I M PRO V E M ENT PR A CTI TIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

RE V ENUES A ND WEL FA R E B E N E F I T S P R AC T I TIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

POLICY OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

4

REGUL A TORY CO M PLI A NCE OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

4

SCHOOL BUSINESS PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

4

E M P L OYA B I L I T Y P R A C TITIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

INFOR M A TION M A N A GER

YES

YES

NO

4

OPER A TIONS / DEP A RT M ENT A L M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

5

HR CONSULT A NT / P A RTNER

YES

YES

YES

5

I M PRO V E M ENT SPE CI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

5

LE A RNING A ND DE V EL OP M ENT CONSULT A NT / B U S I N E S S PA RT N E R

YES

YES

YES

5

CO A CHING PROFES SION A L

YES

NO

NO

5

Q U A LITY M A N A GER

NO

NO

NO

5

CH A RTERED M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

6

C A REER DE V ELOP M ENT PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

NO

6

I M PRO V E M ENT LE A DER

YES

YES

YES

6

PROJECT MANAGER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

PRO J ECT CONTROLS PROFESSION A L

NO

NO

NO

6

HOUSING A ND PROPER TY PROFESSION A L

NO

NO

NO

6

Q U A LITY LE A DER

NO

NO

NO

6

SENIOR LE A DER

YES

YES

YES

7

SYSTE M S THIN K ING

YES

NO

NO

7

SENIOR PEOPLE PRO FESSION A L

NO

NO

NO

7

SCRU M M A STER

NO

NO

NO

TBC

TR A DE UNION OFFICI A L

NO

NO

NO

TBC

Care Services (10 Standards)

74

S TA N D A R D N A M E

PROPOSAL APPROVED

S TA N D A R D APPROVED

ASSESSMENT PLAN APPROVED

LEVEL

A DULT C A RE WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

2

LE A D A DULT C A RE WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

3

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

DO M ESTIC V IOLENCE WOR K ER

NO

NO

NO

3

CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE & F A M ILIES PR A C TITIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

LE A D PR A CTITIONER IN A DULT C A RE

YES

YES

NO

4

CHILDREN, YOUNG PEOPLE & F A M ILIES M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

5

LE A DER IN A DULT C A RE

YES

YES

NO

5

CHURCH M INISTER

YES

YES

NO

6

SOCIAL WORKER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

YOUTH WOR K ER

YES

NO

NO

6

Catering and hospitality (12 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

CO M M IS CHEF

YES

YES

YES

2

HOSPIT A LITY TE A M MEMBER

YES

YES

YES

2

BAKER

YES

YES

YES

2

M A RITI M E C A TERER

YES

YES

YES

2

PRODUCTION CHEF

YES

YES

YES

2

HOSPIT A LITY SUPER V I SOR

YES

YES

YES

3

SENIOR PRODUCTION CHEF

YES

YES

YES

3

CHEF DE P A RTIE

YES

YES

YES

3

H E A D B A R I S TA

NO

NO

NO

3

HOSPIT A LITY M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

SENIOR CULIN A RY CHEF

NO

NO

NO

4

V ISITOR E X PERIENCE A ND ECONO M Y LE A DER

NO

NO

NO

6

Construction (106 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

PROPERTY M A INTE N A NCE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

DU A L FUEL S M A RT M E TER INST A LLER

YES

YES

YES

2

HOUSING / PROPERTY M A N A GE M ENT A SSIS T A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

75


76

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

HIGHW A Y ELECTRIC A L M A INTEN A NCE A ND IN ST A LL A TION OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING INST A LLER

YES

YES

YES

2

STEEL FI X ER

YES

YES

YES

2

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING DUCTWOR K INST A LLER

YES

YES

YES

2

A S B E S TO S R E M OVA L OPER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

GROUNDWOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

2

CONSTRUCTION A SSE M B LY T E C H N I C I A N

YES

YES

NO

2

DE M OLITION OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

F A CILITIES SER V ICES OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

NO

2

F A LL PROTECTION TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

2

FENCING INST A LLER

YES

YES

YES

2

FLOORL A YER

YES

YES

YES

2

FOR M WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

2

HERIT A GE C A RPENTER A ND J OINER

YES

NO

NO

2

HIGHW A YS M A INTE N A NCE S K ILLED OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

INDUSTRI A L CO A TINGS A PPLIC A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

INTERIOR SYSTE M S IN ST A LLER

YES

YES

NO

2

LIFTING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

2

B R I C K L AY E R

YES

YES

YES

2

M ET A L DEC K ING IN S TA L L E R ( D E C O M M I S SIONED)

NO

NO

NO

2

P A INTER A ND DECOR A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

PILING A TTEND A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

HIRE CONTROLLER ( P L A N T, T O O L S A N D EQUIPMENT)

YES

YES

YES

2

POWERED PEDESTRI A N DOOR INST A LLER A ND SER V ICE ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

2

ROOFER

YES

YES

NO

2

SC A FFOLDER

YES

YES

YES

2

STEEPLE J A C K

YES

NO

NO

2

STRUCTUR A L STEEL WOR K ERECTOR

YES

YES

YES

2

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

STRUCTUR A L STEEL W O R K FA B R I C AT O R

YES

YES

YES

2

TE M POR A RY TR A FFIC M A N A GE M ENT OPER A TI V E

NO

NO

NO

2

CO M M ERCI A L THER M A L INSUL A TION OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

TUNNELLING OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

W A LL A ND FLOOR TILER

YES

YES

YES

2

WIRELESS CO M M UNIC A TIONS RIGGER

YES

YES

YES

2

C A RPENTRY A ND J OIN ERY

YES

YES

YES

2

TR A M W A Y CONSTRUC TION OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

IN SITU FLOORING OP ER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

RO A D SURF A CING OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

D A M P CONTROL A ND T I M B E R P R E S E R VAT I O N OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

NO

2

M A STIC A SPH A LTER

YES

YES

NO

2

CONSTRUCTION PL A NT OPER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

FENESTR A TION IN ST A LLER

YES

YES

NO

2

LIGHTNING PROTEC TION OPER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

TH A TCHER

YES

NO

NO

2

GL A Z IER

NO

NO

NO

2

TELECO M S FIELD OPER A TI V E

NO

NO

NO

2

M O D U L A R & P O R TA B L E B U I L D I N G O P E R AT I V E (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

2

INST A LL A TION ELECTRI CI A N / M A INTEN A NCE ELECTRICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

R A ILW A Y ENGINEERING DESIGN TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

SUR V EYING TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

J UNIOR ENERGY M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

3

G A S ENGINEERING OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

3

HIGHW A YS ELECTRI CI A N / SER V ICE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

3

FIRE E M ERGENCY A ND SECURITY SYSTE M S TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

F A CILITIES M A N A GE M ENT SUPER V ISOR

YES

YES

YES

3

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

77


78

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING CR A FTS PERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

BUILDING SERVICES DESIGN TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING DUCTWOR K CR A FTSPERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING SER V ICE A ND M A INTEN A NCE ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

3

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING V ENTIL A TION HYGIENE TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

DIGIT A L ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

HOUSING / PROPERTY M A N A GE M ENT

YES

YES

YES

3

CI V IL ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

ENGINEERING CON STRUCTION PIPEFITTER

YES

YES

YES

3

A S B E S T O S A N A LY S T/ SUR V EYOR

YES

YES

YES

3

ELECTRICAL, ELECTRONIC PRODUCT SER V ICE A ND INST A LL A TION ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

3

ENGINEERING CON STRUCTION ERECTOR / RIGGER

YES

YES

YES

3

GEOSP A TI A L SUR V EY TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

HIGHW A YS M A INTE N A NCE SUPER V ISOR (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

YES

NO

3

PL A STERER

YES

YES

YES

3

M ILIT A RY ENGINEERING CONSTRUCTION TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

PLUMBING AND DOMESTIC HE A TING TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

S M A RT HO M E TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

INDUSTRI A L THER M A L INSUL A TION TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

A D V A NCED C A RPENTRY A ND J OINERY

YES

YES

YES

3

CURT A IN W A LL IN ST A LLER

YES

YES

NO

3

D A M A GE M A N A GE M ENT PRACTITIONER (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

3

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

SENIOR HOUSING / PROPERTY M A N A GE M ENT

YES

YES

YES

4

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

CONSTRUCTION DESIGN AND BUILD TECHNICIAN

YES

YES

NO

4

CONSTRUCTION SITE ENGINEERING TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

CONSTRUCTION SITE SUPER V ISOR

YES

YES

NO

4

CONSTRUCTION SUR V EYING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

4

F A CILITIES M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

A COUSTICS TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

NO

4

BEMS (BUILDING ENERGY M A N A GE M ENT SYSTEMS) CONTROLS ENGINEER

YES

YES

NO

4

L A NDSC A PE A SSIST A NT

YES

NO

NO

4

CH A RTERED SUR V EYOR (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

BUILDING SERVICES DESIGN ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

CIVIL ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

A RCHITECTUR A L A SSIS TA N T ( D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

BUILDING SERVICES ENGINEERING SITE M A N AGEMENT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

CI V IL ENGINEERING SITE MANAGEMENT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

CONSTRUCTION DESIGN MANAGEMENT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

CONSTRUCTION Q U A N TITY SURVEYOR (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

CONSTRUCTION SITE M A N A GE M ENT

YES

YES

NO

6

SENIOR / HE A D OF F A CILITIES M A N A GE M ENT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

GEOSP A TI A L M A PPING A ND SCIENCE SPECI A L IST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

BUILDING CONTROL SURVEYOR (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

FIRE ENGINEER

NO

NO

NO

6

ARCHITECT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

CH A RTERED TOWN PLANNER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

79


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

L A NDSC A PE PROFES SION A L

YES

NO

NO

7

Creative and Design (44 Standards)

80

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

BOOKBINDER

YES

YES

NO

2

LE A THER CR A FTSPER SON

YES

YES

YES

2

J UNIOR J OURN A LIST

YES

YES

YES

3

LI V E E V ENT RIGGER

YES

YES

YES

3

BROADCAST PRODUCTION A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

SPECT A CLE M A K ER

YES

YES

YES

3

J UNIOR CONTENT PRO DUCER

YES

YES

YES

3

BESPOKE SADDLER

YES

YES

YES

3

ORGAN BUILDER

YES

YES

YES

3

BLACKSMITH

YES

YES

NO

3

BROADCAST AND COMM UNIC A TIONS TECHNI C A L OPER A TOR

YES

YES

NO

3

CLOC K M A K ER

YES

YES

NO

3

CULTUR A L LE A RNING A ND P A RTICIP A TION OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

CRE A TI V E V ENUE TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

F A SHION STUDIO A S SIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

J EWELLERY M A K ER

YES

NO

NO

3

LI V E E V ENT TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

M USEU M S & G A LLERIES TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

PHOTOGR A PHIC A SSIS T A NT

YES

YES

NO

3

PROPS TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

P U B L I S H I N G A S S I S TA N T

YES

YES

YES

3

A SSIST A NT PUPPET M A K ER

YES

YES

NO

3

STONE M A SON

YES

NO

NO

3

W A TCH M A K ER

YES

YES

YES

3

COSTU M E PERFOR M A NCE TECHNICI A N

YES

NO

NO

3

JUNIOR 2D ARTIST (VISUAL EFFECTS)

YES

YES

YES

4

A SSIST A NT TECHNIC A L DIRECTOR (VISUAL EFFECTS)

YES

YES

YES

4

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

CULTUR A L HERIT A GE CONSER V A TION TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

P O S T- P R O D U C T I O N TECHNIC A L OPER A TOR

YES

NO

NO

4

HISTORIC EN V IRON M ENT A D V ICE A SSIS T A NT

YES

YES

NO

4

M EDI A PRODUCTION C O - O R D I N AT O R

YES

NO

NO

4

J UNIOR A NI M A TOR

YES

NO

NO

4

B E S P O K E TA I LO R A N D CUTTER

YES

YES

YES

5

BROADCAST AND MEDIA SYSTE M S TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

5

JOURNEYMAN BOOKBINDER

YES

YES

NO

5

BROADCAST AND MEDIA SYSTE M S ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

R E G I S T R A R ( C R E AT I V E & C U LT U R A L )

YES

YES

NO

6

JOURNALIST (DEGREE)

YES

NO

NO

6

O U T S I D E B R OA D C A S TING ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

BROADCAST AND COMM UNIC A TIONS PRIN CIP A L TECHNOLOGIST (DEGREE) (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

7

CRE A TI V E INDUSTRIES PRODUCTION M A N A GER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

7

STORYBOARD ARTIST

YES

NO

NO

7

C U R AT O R ( C R E AT I V E A ND CULTUR A L HERI TA G E )

YES

NO

NO

7

CULTUR A L HERIT A GE CONSER V A TOR

YES

YES

NO

7

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

INFR A STRUCTURE TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

SOFTW A RE DE V ELOP M ENT TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

UNIFIED CO M M UNIC A TIONS TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

DIGIT A L SUPPORT TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

IT SOLUTIONS TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

Digital (28 Standards)

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

81


82

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

NETWORK CABLE INST A LLER

YES

YES

NO

3

R A DIO NETWOR K TECH NICI A N

YES

NO

NO

3

D A T A TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

CYBER SECURITY TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

DIGIT A L DE V ISE REP A IR TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

SOFTW A RE DE V ELOPER

YES

YES

YES

4

NETWOR K ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

4

CYBER INTRUSION ANA LYST

YES

YES

YES

4

D A T A A N A LYST

YES

YES

YES

4

UNIFIED CO M M UNI C AT I O N S T R O U B L E SHOOTER

YES

YES

YES

4

SOFTW A RE TESTER

YES

YES

YES

4

CYBER SECURITY TECHNOLOGIST

YES

YES

YES

4

I S B U S I N E S S A N A LY S T

YES

YES

YES

4

DIGIT A L CO M M UNITY M A N A GER

YES

YES

NO

4

ACCESSIBILITY AND DIGIT A L INCLUSION

NO

NO

NO

4

DE V OPS ENGINEER

NO

NO

NO

4

DIGIT A L A ND TECH NOLOGY SOLUTIONS PROFESSIONAL (INTEG R AT E D D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

CYBER SECURITY TECHNIC A L PROFESSION A L ( I N T E G R AT E D D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

D ATA S C I E N T I S T ( I N T E G R AT E D D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

DIGIT A L USER E X PE RIENCE (UX) PROFESS I O N A L ( I N T E G R AT E D DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

CRE A TI V E DIGIT A L DE SIGN PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

NO

6

DIGIT A L A ND TECHNOL OGY SOLUTIONS SPE C I A L I S T ( I N T E G R AT E D DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

A RTIFICI A L INTELLI G E N C E ( A I ) D ATA S P E CIALIST (DEGREE)

NO

NO

NO

7

_


Education and Childcare (13 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

PL A Y WOR K ER

NO

NO

NO

2

LE A RNING M ENTOR

YES

YES

YES

3

TE A CHING A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

E A RLY YE A RS EDUC A TOR

YES

YES

YES

3

EDUC A TION TECHNI CI A N

YES

NO

NO

3

A SSESSOR / CO A CH

YES

YES

YES

4

E A RLY INTER V ENTION WOR K ER

NO

NO

NO

4

E A RLY YE A RS SENIOR PR A CTITIONER

YES

NO

NO

5

LE A RNING A ND S K ILLS TE A CHER

YES

YES

YES

5

TE A CHER

YES

YES

YES

6

E A RLY YE A RS LE A D PRACTITIONER (DEGREE)

YES

NO

NO

6

A C A DE M IC PROFES SION A L

YES

YES

YES

7

EDUC A TION A L LE A DER SHIP

NO

YES

NO

7

Engineering and Manufacturing (158 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

NUCLE A R HE A LTH PHYSICS M ONITOR

YES

YES

YES

2

G A S NETWOR K TE A M LE A DER

YES

YES

YES

2

R A IL ENGINEERING OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

GENERAL WELDER (ARC PROCESSES)

YES

YES

YES

2

FOOD A ND DRIN K PRO CESS OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING (NDT) OPERA TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

FURNITURE M A NUF A C TURER

YES

YES

YES

2

A V I A TION M A INTE N A N C E M E C H A N I C ( M I LI TA R Y )

YES

YES

YES

2

M INER A L PROCESSING M O B I L E A N D S TAT I C PL A NT OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

A UTOC A RE TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

2

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

83


84

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

CASTINGS, FOUNDRY & P A TTERN M A K ING OPER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

LE A N M A NUF A CTURING OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

NO

2

M A RITI M E ELECTRIC A L / M ECH A NIC A L M E CH A NIC

YES

YES

YES

2

M INER A L A ND CON STRUCTION PRODUCT S A M PLING A ND TEST ING OPER A TIONS

YES

YES

YES

2

M INER A L PROCESSING WEIGHBRIDGE OPERATOR

YES

YES

YES

2

NUCLE A R OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

SCIENCE M A NUF A CTUR ING PROCESS OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

SEWING M A CHINIST

YES

YES

YES

2

FOOTWE A R M A NUF A C TURER

YES

YES

YES

2

SPECI A LIST TYRE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

S TA I R L I F T, P L AT F O R M L I F T, S E R V I C E L I F T ELECTRO M ECH A NIC

YES

YES

NO

2

TE X TILE C A RE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

TE X TILE M A NUF A CTUR ING OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

WOOD PRODUCT M A N UF A CTURING OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

NO

2

A B AT T O I R W O R K E R

YES

YES

YES

2

ENGINEERING OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

BICYCLE MECHANIC

YES

YES

YES

2

F E N E S T R AT I O N FA B R I C A TOR

YES

YES

NO

2

GL A SS PROCESSOR

YES

NO

NO

2

A NI M A L FEED & GR A IN TR A DE PROCESS OPER AT O R ( L E V E L 2 )

NO

NO

NO

2

M INER A L PROCESSING GENER A L SITE OPER A TI V E

NO

NO

NO

2

POWER UTILITIES OP ER A TI V E

NO

NO

NO

2

CONSTRUCTION IN DUSTRY M A INTEN A NCE M ECH A NIC

NO

NO

NO

2

POWER NETWOR K CR A FTSPERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

SCIENCE M A NUF A CTUR ING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

FOOD A ND DRIN K M A INTEN A NCE ENGI NEER

YES

YES

YES

3

W A TER PROCESS TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

SCIENCE INDUSTRY M A INTEN A NCE TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

REFRIGER A TION A IR CONDITIONING A ND HE A T PU M P ENGINEER ING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

UTILITIES ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

G A S NETWOR K CR A FTS PERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

M OTOR V EHICLE SER V ICE A ND M A INTE N A NCE TECHNICI A N (LIGHT VEHICLE)

YES

YES

YES

3

NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

B O AT B U I L D E R

YES

YES

YES

3

R A IL ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

ENGINEERING DESIGN A ND DR A UGHTSPERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

M U LT I - P O S I T I O N A L WELDER (ARC PROCESSES)

YES

YES

YES

3

P A PER M A K ER

YES

YES

YES

3

SUR V I V A L E Q UIP M ENT FITTER

YES

YES

YES

3

FOOD A ND DRIN K A D V A NCED PROCESS OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

3

BUS AND COACH ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

HE A V Y V EHICLE SER V ICE A ND M A INTE N A NCE TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

M A INTEN A NCE A ND OP ER A TIONS ENGINEER ING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

CO M POSITES TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

A CCIDENT REP A IR TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

PRO J ECT CONTROLS TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

ENGINEERING TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

ENGINEERING FITTER

YES

YES

YES

3

A UTO M OTI V E GL A Z ING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

85


86

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

M E TA L C A S T I N G , FOUNDRY & P A TTERN M A K ING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

M E TA L FA B R I C AT O R

YES

YES

YES

3

LIFT TRUC K A ND POW ERED A CCESS ENGI NEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

GL A SS M A NUF A CTUR ING OPER A TOR

YES

YES

NO

3

HERIT A GE ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

LEISURE & ENTERT A IN M ENT ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

LIFT A ND ESC A L A TOR ELECTRO M ECH A NIC

YES

YES

YES

3

M A RINE ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

3

M OTORCYCLE TECH N I C I A N ( R E PA I R A N D MAINTENANCE)

YES

YES

YES

3

F A SHION A ND TE X TILES P A TTERN CUTTER

YES

YES

YES

3

PRINT TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

V EHICLE D A M A GE M E CHANICAL, ELECTRICAL AND TRIM (MET) TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

V EHICLE D A M A GE P A INT TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

V EHICLE D A M A GE P A N EL TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

W A TER TRE A T M ENT TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

A DVA N C E D B A K E R

YES

YES

YES

3

GUNS M ITH

YES

YES

NO

3

DRIN K S DISPENSE TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

FITTED FURNITURE DE SIGN TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

NEW FURNITURE PROD UCT DE V ELOPER

YES

YES

NO

3

A D V A NCED UPHOL STERER

YES

YES

NO

3

A D V A NCED FURNITURE CNC TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

3

BESPOKE FURNITURE M A K ER

YES

YES

NO

3

CO M M ERCI A L C A TERING E Q UIP M ENT TECHNI CI A N

YES

NO

NO

3

SP A CE TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

CO M PRESSED A IR A ND V A CUU M SYSTE M S ELECTRO M ECH A NIC

YES

NO

NO

3

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

SIGN A GE TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

FURNITURE Q U A LITY TECHNICI A N A ND PRO DUCTION LE A DER

NO

NO

NO

3

CONSTRUCTION E Q UIP M ENT M A INTEN A NCE TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

PIPE WELDER

NO

NO

NO

3

PL A TE WELDER

NO

NO

NO

3

G A R M ENT M A K ER

NO

NO

NO

3

LIFTING E Q UIP M ENT TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

3

NUCLE A R WELDING IN SPECTION TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

R A IL ENGINEERING A D V A NCED TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

A IRCR A FT M A INTE N A NCE CERTIFYING ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

4

ELECTRIC A L POW ER PROTECTION A ND PL A NT CO M M ISSIONING ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

4

RO A D TR A NSPORT EN GINEERING M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

BREWER

YES

YES

YES

4

ELECTRIC A L POWER NETWOR K S ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

4

F A SHION A ND TE X TILES PRODUCT TECHNOLO GIST

YES

YES

YES

4

HIGH SPEED R A IL & IN FR A STRUCTURE TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

PROPULSION TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

TE X TILE TECHNIC A L SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

NO

4

V EHICLE D A M A GE A S SESSOR

YES

YES

NO

4

A UTO M A TION & CON TROLS ENGINEERING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

4

TECHNIC A L DYER A ND COLOURIST

YES

YES

NO

4

PROCESS LE A DER

YES

YES

YES

4

M A NUF A CTURING ENGI NEERING TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

4

ORDNANCE, MUNITIONS A ND E X PLOSI V ES TECH NICI A N

NO

NO

NO

4

ENGINEER SUR V EYOR

NO

NO

NO

4

INFR A STRUCTURE A SSET M A N A GE M ENT TECHNICI A N

NO

NO

NO

4

A D V A NCED D A IRY TECHNOLOGIST

YES

YES

YES

5

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

87


88

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

NUCLE A R TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

5

M INER A L PRODUCTS TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

5

FOOD A ND DRIN K EN GINEER

YES

YES

NO

5

R A IL & R A IL SYSTE M S ENGINEER

YES

YES

YES

5

CONTROL / TECHNIC A L SUPPORT ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

ELECTRIC A L / ELEC TRONIC TECHNIC A L SUPPORT ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

M A NUF A CTURING ENGI NEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

PRODUCT DESIGN A ND DE V ELOP M ENT ENGI NEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

A EROSP A CE ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

A EROSP A CE SOFTW A RE DE V ELOP M ENT ENGI NEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

NUCLE A R SCIENTIST A ND NUCLE A R ENGI NEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

EMBEDDED ELECTRONIC SYSTE M S DESIGN A ND DE V ELOP M ENT ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

FOOD A ND DRIN K A D V A NCED ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

M A NUF A CTURING M A N AGER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

PROCESS CONTROL SYSTE M S ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

NO

NO

6

R A IL & R A IL SYSTE M S SENIOR ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

SCIENCE INDUSTRY PROCESS / PL A NT ENGI NEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

ORDN A NCE M UNITIONS AND EXPLOSIVES (OME) PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

6

NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

P A C K A GING PROFES SIONAL (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

M A TERI A LS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIST

YES

YES

NO

6

M A RINE SUR V EYOR

YES

NO

NO

6

TOOL PROCESS DESIGN ENGINEER

YES

NO

NO

6

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

A IRWORTHINESS M A IN TEN A NCE ENGINEER

NO

NO

NO

6

NUCLE A R RE A CTOR DES K ENGINEER

NO

NO

NO

6

R A DI A TION PROTEC TION SCIENTIST

NO

NO

NO

6

ENGINEERING GEOLOGY DEGREE A PPRENTICE SHIP

NO

NO

NO

6

ELECTRO-MECHANICAL DESIGN A ND DE V EL OP M ENT ENGINEER (DEGREE)

NO

NO

NO

6

S PAC E E N G I N E E R ( D E GREE)

NO

NO

NO

6

INFR A STRUCTURE A SSET M A N A GE M ENT LE A DER

NO

NO

NO

6

SYSTE M S ENGINEERING M A STERS LE V EL

YES

YES

YES

7

POWER ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

POST GR A DU A TE ENGI NEER

YES

YES

YES

7

PROCESS A UTO M A TION ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

R A IL & R A IL SYSTE M S PRINCIP A L ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

RIS K A ND S A FETY M A N A GE M ENT PROFESSION AL (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

M A RINE TECHNIC A L SUPERINTENDENT (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

7

ELECTRONIC SYSTE M S PRINCIP A L ENGINEER

YES

YES

NO

7

THROUGH LIFE EN GINEERING SER V ICES SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

NO

7

LIGHT W A TER RE A CTOR SCIENTIST A ND ENGI NEER

YES

NO

NO

7

M A TERI A LS PROCESS ENGINEER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

POWER A ND PROPUL SION ENGINEER

YES

NO

NO

7

ORDN A NCE M UNITIONS A ND E X PLOSI V ES SPE CI A LIST

NO

NO

NO

7

ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (MASTERS DEGREE)

NO

NO

NO

7

ENGINEERING PROCESS INDUSTRIES PROFES SION A L

NO

NO

NO

7

TECHNIC A L SPECI A LIST IN NUCLE A R ENGINEER ING, SCIENCE OR TECHNOLOGY

NO

NO

NO

8

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

89


Hair and Beauty (7 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

H A IR PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

2

BEAUTY THERAPIST

YES

YES

YES

2

N A IL SER V ICES TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

2

BEAUTY AND MAKE UP CONSULT A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

A D V A NCED A ND CRE A TI V E H A IR PROFES SION A L

YES

YES

NO

3

A DVA N C E D B E AU T Y PROFESSION A L

YES

NO

NO

3

HOLISTIC THER A PIST

NO

NO

NO

3

Health and Science (88 Standards)

90

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

HE A LTHC A RE SCIENCE A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

HE A LTHC A RE SUPPORT WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

2

CO M M UNITY A CTI V A TOR CO A CH

YES

YES

YES

2

LEISURE TEAM MEMBER

YES

YES

YES

2

OPTIC A L A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

PH A R M A CY SER V ICES A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

2

L A B O R AT O R Y T E C H N I CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

D E N TA L L A B O R AT O R Y A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

DENT A L NURSE

YES

YES

YES

3

FOOD TECHNOLOGIST

YES

YES

YES

3

SENIOR HE A LTHC A RE SUPPORT WOR K ER

YES

YES

YES

3

A NI M A L TECHNOLOGIST

YES

YES

YES

3

M ETROLOGY TECHNI CI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

CLINIC A L CODER

YES

YES

NO

3

CO M M UNITY SPORT A ND HE A LTH OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

OUTDOOR A CTI V ITY INSTRUCTOR

YES

YES

YES

3

PERSON A L TR A INER

YES

YES

YES

3

PH A R M A CY TECHNICI A N ( I N T E G R AT E D )

YES

YES

NO

3

SPORTING E X CELLENCE PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

NO

3

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

AMBULANCE SUPPORT W O R K E R ( E M E R G E N C Y, URGENT AND NON-URGENT)

YES

YES

YES

3

PROSTHETIC A ND OR THOTIC TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

E Q UINE A THLETE

NO

NO

NO

3

A D V A NCED CO A CH (SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY)

NO

NO

NO

3

HE A LTHC A RE SCIENCE A SSOCI A TE

YES

YES

YES

4

A S S O C I AT E A M B U L A N C E PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

M A M M OGR A PHY A SSO CI A TE

YES

YES

YES

4

OR A L HE A LTH PR A CTI TIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

ORTHODONTIC THER A PIST

YES

NO

NO

4

INDEPENDENT SE X U A L V IOLENCE A D V ISOR

NO

NO

NO

4

FORENSIC COLLISION I N V E S T I G AT O R ( D E C O M MISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

4

HYGIENE SPECI A LIST

NO

NO

NO

4

DENT A L TECHNICI A N ( I N T E G R AT E D )

YES

YES

YES

5

L A B O R AT O R Y S C I E N T I S T (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

YES

YES

5

HE A LTHC A RE A SSIS T A NT PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

YES

5

CLINIC A L DENT A L TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

NO

5

HE A RING A ID DISPENS ER

YES

YES

YES

5

NURSING A SSOCI A TE

YES

YES

YES

5

R E H A B I L I TAT I O N WORKER (VISUAL IMPA I R M E N T )

YES

YES

YES

5

SENIOR M ETROLOGY TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

5

TECHNICI A N SCIENTIST

YES

YES

YES

5

A SSOCI A TE CONTINU ING HE A LTHC A RE PR A C TITIONER

YES

NO

NO

5

SPORT PERFOR M A NCE A N A LYST

NO

NO

NO

5

HE A LTH PL A Y SPECI A L IST

NO

NO

NO

5

M E A T HYGIENE INSPEC TOR

NO

NO

NO

5

A D V A NCED FORENSIC COLLISION IN V ESTIG A TOR

NO

NO

NO

5

N U R S I N G A S S O C I AT E NMC 2018

YES

YES

YES

5

-

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

91


92

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

HE A LTHC A RE SCIENCE PRACTITIONER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

REGISTERED NURSE DEGREE (NMC 2010)

YES

YES

YES

6

FOOD INDUSTRY TECH NIC A L PROFESSION A L (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

CLINIC A L TRI A LS SPE CIALIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

DIETITIAN (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

OCCUP A TION A L THER A P I S T ( I N T E G R AT E D DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

OPER A TING DEP A RT M ENT PR A CTITIONER ( I N T E G R AT E D D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

PA R A M E D I C ( D EG R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

PHYSIOTHERAPIST (INT E G R AT E D D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

P O D I AT R I S T ( D E G R E E )

YES

YES

YES

6

PROSTHETIST / ORTHO TIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

PSYCHOLOGIC A L WELL BEING PRACTITIONER

YES

YES

YES

6

SONOGRAPHER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

SPEECH A ND L A NGU A GE THERAPIST (DEGREE)

YES

NO

NO

6

DI A GNOSTIC R A DIOG R A P H E R ( I N T E G R AT E D DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

THER A PEUTIC R A DIOG R A P H E R ( I N T E G R AT E D DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

L A B O R AT O R Y S C I E N T I S T (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

EN V IRON M ENT A L HE A LTH PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

NO

6

P U B L I C H E A LT H P R A C TITIONER

YES

YES

NO

6

M IDWIFE

YES

YES

YES

6

DISPENSING OPTICI A N

NO

NO

NO

6

OPTO M ETRIST

NO

NO

NO

6

CRITIC A L C A RE PR A CTI T I O N E R ( A D U LT )

NO

NO

NO

6

REGISTERED NURSE DEGREE (NMC 2018)

YES

YES

YES

6

P E , PA A N D YO U T H SPORT SPECI A LIST

NO

NO

NO

6

PHYSICI A NS A SSOCI A TE

YES

YES

NO

7

REGUL A TORY A FF A IRS SPECIALIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

A D V A NCED CLINIC A L PRACTITIONER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

B I O I N F O R M AT I C S S C I ENTIST

YES

YES

YES

7

SPECI A LIST CO M M UNI T Y A N D P U B L I C H E A LT H NURSE

YES

YES

NO

7

ARTS THERAPIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

7

DISTRICT NURSE

YES

YES

NO

7

RESE A RCH SCIENTIST

YES

YES

YES

7

A D V A NCED FORENSIC PRACTITIONER (CUSTODY OR SE X U A L OF FENCE)

YES

YES

NO

7

CLINIC A L PH A R M A COL OGY SCIENTIST

YES

NO

NO

7

HE A LTH & C A RE INTEL LIGENCE SPECI A LIST

NO

NO

NO

7

CLINIC A L A SSOCI A TE PSYCHOLOGIST (DEGREE)

YES

NO

NO

7

HU M A N F A CTORS INTE GR A TION

NO

NO

NO

7

HE A LTHC A RE SCIENTIST

NO

NO

NO

7

PH A R M A CIST

NO

NO

NO

7

PHYSIC A L A CTI V ITY A ND SPORTS DE V ELOP M ENT PROFESSION A L - DEGREE APPRENTICESHIP (DECOMMISSIONED)

NO

NO

NO

7

CLINIC A L A C A DE M IC PROFESSIONAL (DEGREE)

NO

NO

NO

8

Legal, Finance and Accounting (41 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

FIN A NCI A L SER V ICES CUSTO M ER A D V ISER

YES

YES

YES

2

IN V EST M ENT OPER A TIONS A D M INISTR A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

CREDIT CONTROLLER / COLLECTOR

YES

YES

YES

2

A CCOUNTS / FIN A NCE A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

NO

2

FIN A NCI A L SER V ICES A D M INISTR A TOR

YES

YES

YES

3

SENIOR FIN A NCI A L SER V ICES CUSTO M ER A D V ISER

YES

YES

YES

3

WOR K PL A CE PENSIONS ( A D M I N I S T R AT O R O R C O N S U LTA N T )

YES

YES

YES

3

IN V EST M ENT OPER A TIONS TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

93


94

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

P A R A LEG A L

YES

YES

YES

3

INSUR A NCE PR A CTI TIONER

YES

YES

YES

3

M ORTG A GE A D V ISER

YES

YES

YES

3

A SSIST A NT A CCOUN T A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

CO M PLI A NCE / RIS K OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

A D V A NCED CREDIT CONTROLLER / DEBT COLLECTION SPECI A L IST

YES

YES

YES

3

M OTOR FIN A NCE SPE CI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

3

P A YROLL A D M INISTR A TOR

YES

YES

YES

3

DEBT ADVISER

YES

NO

NO

3

A CTU A RI A L TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

IN V EST M ENT OPER A TIONS SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

4

CON V EY A NCING TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

P A R A PL A NNER

YES

YES

YES

4

INSUR A NCE PROFES SION A L

YES

YES

YES

4

PROFESSION A L A C COUNTING / T A X A TION TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

4

FIN A NCI A L A D V ISER

YES

YES

YES

4

INTERN A L A UDIT PR A C TITIONER

YES

YES

YES

4

P R O B AT E T E C H N I C I A N

YES

YES

YES

4

P A YROLL A SSIST A NT M A N A GER

NO

NO

NO

5

REL A TIONSHIP M A N A G ER (BANKING)

YES

YES

YES

6

LICENSED CON V EY A NC ER

YES

YES

YES

6

CH A RTERED LEG A L E X ECUTI V E

YES

YES

YES

6

SENIOR CO M PLI A NCE / RIS K SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

6

SENIOR INSUR A NCE PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

6

FIN A NCI A L SER V ICES PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

6

PROFESSION A L ECONO MIST (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

SOLICITOR

YES

YES

YES

7

A CCOUNT A NCY / T A X A TION PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

7

INTERN A L A UDIT PRO FESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

7

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

SENIOR IN V EST M ENT / COMMERCIAL BANKING PROFESSION A L

YES

YES

YES

7

A CTU A RY

YES

YES

YES

7

SENIOR PROFESSION A L ECONO M IST

YES

NO

NO

7

Protective Services (19 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

H M FORCES SER VICEPERSON (PUBLIC SERVICES)

YES

YES

YES

2

BUSINESS FIRE SAFETY A D V ISOR

YES

YES

YES

3

CO M M UNITY S A FETY A D V ISOR

YES

YES

YES

3

CUSTODY & DETENTION OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

E M ERGENCY SER V ICE CONT A CT H A NDLING

YES

YES

YES

3

OPER A TION A L FIRE FIGHTER

YES

YES

YES

3

P R O B AT I O N S E R V I C E S PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

NO

3

S A F E T Y, H E A LT H A N D EN V IRON M ENT TECH NICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

SECURITY FIRST LINE M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

3

NON-HOME OFFICE POLICE OFFICER

YES

NO

NO

3

INTELLIGENCE A N A LYST

YES

YES

YES

4

POLICE CO M M UNITY SUPPORT OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

4

SPECI A LIST RESCUE OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

NO

4

FIRE S A FETY INSPEC TOR

YES

YES

NO

4

COUNTER FR A UD IN V ESTIG A TOR

YES

YES

NO

4

P O L I C E C O N S TA B L E (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

SERIOUS A ND CO M PLE X CRI M E IN V ESTIG A TOR (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

P R O B AT I O N O F F I C E R

YES

YES

NO

6

CORPOR A TE IN V ESTI G A TOR

NO

NO

NO

TBC

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

95


Sales, Marketing and Procurement (31 Standards)

96

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

BUTCHER

YES

YES

YES

2

RET A ILER

YES

YES

YES

2

CUSTO M ER SER V ICE PR A CTITIONER

YES

YES

YES

2

FISH M ONGER

YES

YES

YES

2

FUNER A L TE A M M E M BER

YES

YES

YES

2

J UNIOR EST A TE A GENT

YES

YES

YES

2

TR A DE SUPPLIER

YES

YES

YES

2

DIGIT A L M A R K ETER

YES

YES

YES

3

TR A V EL CONSULT A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

RET A IL TE A M LE A DER

YES

YES

YES

3

IT TECHNIC A L S A LES PERSON

YES

YES

YES

3

A DVA N C E D B U TC H E R

YES

YES

YES

3

E V ENT A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

3

BID AND PROPOSAL C O - O R D I N AT O R

YES

YES

YES

3

CUSTO M ER SER V ICE SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

3

FUNER A L DIRECTOR

YES

YES

YES

3

A D V ERTISING A ND M E DI A E X ECUTI V E

YES

YES

YES

3

M A R K ETING A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

NO

3

PROCURE M ENT & SUP PLY

NO

NO

NO

3

RET A IL M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

M A R K ETING E X ECUTI V E

YES

YES

YES

4

P U B L I C R E L AT I O N S A N D CO M M UNIC A TIONS A S SIST A NT

YES

YES

YES

4

S A LES E X ECUTI V E

YES

YES

YES

4

CO M M ERCI A L PRO CURE M ENT A ND SUP P LY ( F O R M E R LY P U B L I C SECTOR CO M M ERCI A L PROFESSIONAL)

YES

YES

YES

4

BUYING AND MERCHANDISING A SSIST A NT

YES

YES

NO

4

BUSINESS TO BUSINESS S A LES PROFESSION A L (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

M A R K ETING M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

6

RET A IL LE A DERSHIP DE GREE A PPRENTICESHIP

YES

YES

YES

6

DIGIT A L M A R K ETER IN TEGR A TED DEGREE

YES

YES

YES

6

A S S I S TA N T B U Y E R / A SSIST A NT M ERCH A N DISER

YES

YES

NO

6

_


ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

L 6 PROCURE M ENT A ND SUPPLY

NO

NO

NO

6

Transport and Logistics (39 Standards) ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

A B L E S E A FA R E R ( D EC K )

YES

YES

YES

2

A V I A TION GROUND OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

SUPPLY CH A IN OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

L A RGE GOODS V EHICLE (LGV) DRIVER

YES

YES

YES

2

SUPPLY CH A IN W A RE HOUSE OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

A IRSIDE OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

R A IL INFR A STRUCTURE OPER A TOR

YES

YES

YES

2

P A SSENGER TR A NSPORT DRIVER - BUS, COACH A ND TR A M

YES

YES

YES

2

E X PRESS DELI V ERY OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

M A R I N A A N D B O AT YA R D OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

M ET A L RECYCLING GEN ER A L OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

NETWOR K OPER A TIONS

YES

YES

YES

2

P A SSENGER TR A NSPORT O N B O A R D & S TAT I O N TEAM MEMBER

YES

YES

YES

2

PORT OPER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

W A STE RESOURCE OP ER A TI V E

YES

YES

YES

2

E X PRESS DELI V ERY S O R TAT I O N H U B O P E R A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

2

A V I A TION GROUND SPE CI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

3

TR A NSPORT PL A NNING TECHNICI A N

YES

YES

YES

3

CABIN CREW

YES

YES

YES

3

INTERN A TION A L FREIGHT FORW A RDING SPECI A LIST

YES

YES

YES

3

M A RITI M E OPER A TIONS OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

3

PORT A GENT

YES

NO

NO

3

PORT PL A NT M A CHIN ERY OPER A TI V E

YES

NO

NO

3

4 2 6 A p p r o v e d S ta n d a r d s

97


98

ST A ND A RD N A M E

PROPOS A L A PPRO V ED

ST A ND A RD A PPRO V ED

A SSESS M ENT PL A N A PPRO V ED

LE V EL

SUPPLY CH A IN PR A CTI T I O N E R ( FA S T M OV I N G CONSUMER GOODS) [ P R E V I O U S LY O P E R A TOR/MANAGER]

YES

YES

YES

3

W O R K B O AT C R E W M E M BER

YES

YES

YES

3

B O AT M A S T E R -T I D A L I N L A ND W A TERW A YS

YES

NO

NO

3

TR A IN DRI V ER

YES

YES

YES

3

TR A NSPORT A ND W A RE HOUSING OPER A TIONS SUPER V ISOR

YES

NO

NO

3

A V I A TION OPER A TIONS M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

P A SSENGER TR A NSPORT OPER A TIONS M A N A GER

YES

YES

YES

4

PORT M A RINE OPER A TIONS OFFICER

YES

YES

YES

4

A IR TR A FFIC CONTROL LER

YES

YES

NO

5

M A RINE PILOT

YES

YES

YES

5

TR A NSPORT A ND W A RE HOUSING OPER A TIONS M A N A GER

YES

NO

NO

5

FIRST OFFICER PILOT

YES

YES

YES

6

E X PRESS DELI V ERY MANAGER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

SUPPLY CH A IN LE A D ERSHIP PROFESSION A L (DEGREE)

YES

YES

YES

6

TR A NSPORT PL A NNER (DEGREE)

YES

YES

NO

6

HARBOUR MASTER

NO

NO

NO

6

_


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Apprenticeship Anthology 2019  

The anthology – the second such to be released by Good Schools Guide: Careers and Queen Mary University of London – contains contributions f...

Apprenticeship Anthology 2019  

The anthology – the second such to be released by Good Schools Guide: Careers and Queen Mary University of London – contains contributions f...

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