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Newsletter of the AAA South Queensland and Northern NSW Region – Region of Many Colors

2017 AUTUMN Edition

The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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2017 Regional Committee PRESIDENT:

Pauline Glasser

P: 02 6647 6454

cpg4764@bigpond.net.au VICE PRESIDENT:

Leanne Tunny

M: 0407 748 477

info@mclarenvalealpacas.com.au SECRETARY:

TBA (volunteers appreciated and accepted) If you would like to more information on how to become the Secretary for the SQNNSW Region please contact Pauline Glasser

TREASURER:

Ann Bright

M: 0428303821

ann_jeff82@bigpond.com MARKETING & MERCHANDISE:

Bob Coxon

P: 02 6645 9092

nattameri@bigpond.com NEWSLETTER EDITOR :

Leanne Tunny

M: 0407 748 477

info@mclarenvalealpacas.com.au WEBMASTER:

Steve Rowley

P: 07 5546 3971

steve@erragolia.com.au COMMITTEE MEMBER:

Jan Krzewina

M: 0435760815

jask@aanet.com.au COMMITTEE MEMBER:

Donna Crone

M: 0419685334

doona_c@hotmail.com FLEECE LIAISON OFFICER:

Julie Hockings

P: 0428661114

alpacagear@activ8.net.au

ASSISTANT FLEECE LIAISON OFFICER Nelly Le Comte nelly@nlcphotography.com.au EDUCATION OFFICER:

TBA (Volunteers accepted)

BIO SECURITY & ANIMAL WELFARE:

TBA (Volunteers accepted)

P: 0266847199 M: 0408990660

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The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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Articles

Page

Calendar

3

Presidents report

5

EDITOR’S REPORT Hello members,

Letter to Members

7

Dos & Donts for Breeders

9

AHA Media Release

12

Camelid Workshop

15

Craft

19

Herd sires

20 & 21

Turkey Guards

22

Rickets Article

27

Breeder Editorial

30

Unexplained Deaths

33 34

Buying Stud Male In the Kitchen

If you always Think the Way You’ve Always Thought, You Will Always Get What You’ve Always Got! (Michael Michalko) It is easy to get stuck in a rut and do the same things year in year out! Sometimes, looking outside the box and taking your blinkers off opens your mind to a vast array of different options. Changing your plans and getting out of your rut may often result in the new plans and ideas turning out to be better than what you used to do anyway. Take a chance and change something in your life, you may find a wonderful surprise awaits you! Thank you to Lehanne Robinson for the Wonder Word preparation and contribution and thank you to Tabitha Carberry for contacting members with Herd Sires in the magazine to confirm pricing and contact details. Many hands make light work! Good luck to all of our members that will be participating in this year’s show season. Participating is only half the fun, the best bit is catching up with all the other breeders and having a wonderful social outing.

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Front Cover: Lorraine Binskin (Kianawah Alpacas) at the CVAG fundraiser

To own an Alpaca = Happy Life Leanne Tunny

The Editor and South Queensland & Northern NSW Region Committee of the AAA accept no responsibility for the opinions expressed, information supplied or advertisements published. All submissions are subject to editing. Copyright : The material published in this magazine is subject to copyright and may not be published in part or whole without written permission of the author.

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Presidents Report

Firstly, welcome all our new members and trust you will all feel welcome and feel a part of a very supportive network of alpaca breeders. We are currently a membership of 76. I commend our members for volunteering to plan and assist in the many areas of promotion of our industry. I attended the AAA Council in Melbourne last month. Each president was asked to present a Power Point of their region. A very positive exercise for myself. We are a Region who achieve a variety of tasks to benefit our industry. Hence my appreciation of the great achievements of our volunteering members. Saying all of that we do have a secretary vacancy – an important role in any organization. Please consider joining the committee a great way to work with a friendly group and support the alpaca industry. The Clarence Valley Alpaca Group, had a successful Bunnings BBQ fund raiser on the 23rd December, Thankyou Cathie Baillie, Lorraine Binskin, Sheryl Simper, Bob & Jackie Coxon and Colin Glasser. A constantly busy day. Funds Raised $1,097.50 (BBQ and Raffle) Well Done CVAG! These funds will support a special project with Grafton Show Committee to cement floor of the Alpaca Pavilion. In January the Showing and Judging Committee released the updated Showing Rules. All members who show are asked to make themselves familiar with this document which is available on the Resources Section on AAA website.:

Happenings since last Report: 

The committee had a Teleconference this week. A decision was made to continue with teleconferencing for our meetings as it is a very efficient and cost effective way to organise regional work.

An exercise for each member in charge of the 12 portfolios helped Ann and myself to complete a forecast budget which was very beneficial for me when presenting to the board and council meeting, our regions finance organization.

The 2017 Calendar has been updated, this is a fluid document which changes from time to time throughout the year. The most up-to-date version is available on our Regional website and published in The Advocate Newsletter each edition.

The committee has accepted the addition of Coffs Pet Expo Display in March more information in Bobs Report.

We have 74 members as of January 30. The 2017 Breeders Directory is currently being reviewed. Calls for advertising in this directory have been sent out to all members via mail chimp. The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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The trailer used for Panels in NSW is in disrepair, the committee have asked for quotes to be obtained for a trailer suitable to carry Panels.

NSW Regional Boundaries – group discussion at Board and Council Meeting – Much discussion at our Feb meeting. You would all now have received an email on the Special Ordinary Regional Meeting at Longueville Alpaca Stud 23RD April 2017 and receive Proxy voting forms with this edition of the Advocate. A very important vote which I encourage all to participate.

Shortly the Board will be sending us information re changes to our AAA ltd Constitution. Information about voting and Proxy Votes will be sent to all voting eligible members. There is a need for 75% of membership to vote to pass the changes that the board feel will update the running of the Association.

Ealpaca was presented to Presidents at the Council meeting,(computer program instead of the iar software currently used) this will be a positive step forward for breeders to organise their registrations and monitor their herds. Convenors and Exhibitors alike will also benefit by the ease of entering show entries. Watch this Space!!! Due out in July – planned online training in the pipe line also!

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all our members for their support of the alpaca industry and the amount of time they volunteer to promote the industry in their own community and beyond.

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Good morning members, I attended the AAA Council Meeting recently on behalf of the STHQLD NNSW members, and I must say there was a huge amount of positive energy and enthusiasm at the meeting. There was a special meeting between the current NSW Presidents, the current Board Members for NSW and the Company Secretary were also in attendance. During the day it was a requirement of all presidents to present a Power Point slideshow about their regions, I have attached slideshow for you. What these presentations showed was that all but one region (STHQLD NNSW) recorded declining membership, and most regions had difficulty in relation to volunteers for committees and when it comes to voluntary labour for events. In fact, one region is currently functioning with 2 couples and 1 extra person, in other words the entire committee is comprised of representatives of 3 studs. As a result of the discussions that followed and discussions re financial impacts of our declining membership, it is now apparent that the AAA is in a relatively dire situation - especially in relation to funding, having willing and able volunteers for our events and retaining/growing our membership. Proposal to combine all NSW Regions to make one NSW State Region. 

The NSW Presidents developed a proposal, which is basically the bare bones of what NSW "could look like". If this proposal is supported by the regions.

The proposal has been put forward in order to move towards a more cohesive, profitable, and stable state that the following be implemented - Current regions become "zones", ie Hawkesbury zone, Central West zone etc - these zones can have their own structure based around what they need / geographical areas, or "themes" such as Show Convenor, Marketing, Fibre Coordinator etc.

A State Committee be formed (12 members).- comprising of 2 representatives from each zone (with one vote from each zone (6) as current AAA Ltd Regulations will not allow 12 votes). This will then be governed under the current Regulations "Annexure A" and current Rules in relation to bank accounts, Treasurer, Secretary will all still apply.

State executive will be comprised of members of the state committee and consist of President and Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary - as per current regional structure. However, other roles can be defined at state level such as allocating a Coordinator for Newsletter, or Education, Webmaster etc.

2 representatives from State Committee can represent NSW at Council Meeting (due to membership numbers in NSW).

Some of the pros of the proposal have been identified as: 

the ability for the state entity to apply for grants through Farmers’ Federation / LLS / NSW Govt etc.

Training opportunities could be standardised and expanded from state based direction,

Current regional events can still be coordinated via the Zone structure - this may result in regional members being readily available to help in other zones (due to the breakdown of the 'us and them' approach.)

This Proposal mirrors other livestock bodies that have state based management structures.

Moving forward with a simplified structure may bring members out of the shadows and encourage them to be more active within our industry.

Whilst I acknowledge that AAA President Ian Frith has said that regional amalgamations will not be forced upon the Regions, what became clear to myself and the other NSW Presidents that the current structure is unsustainable, and that a proactive approach is needed if we want to ensure the future of our industry. The proposal received support from all 6 Presidents with Regions in NSW, and we were given an undertaking by the Board members present that If our regions supported our proposal that it would be endorsed by the Board.

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Our Region As we all realise we are a combined region and a solution, is not as easy perhaps as our southern counterparts. All members need to be comfortable with the change and Queensland Region need to be approached as to their involvement and support of our Queensland members.I have sought the opinions of STHQLD NNSW members at our meeting on Sunday the 19 th of February 2017. There was much discussion after my presentation. It was obvious that the STH QLD NNSW Region was well placed in moving the Alpaca industry forward in comparison to the other Regions. This made it difficult for members to see the reason for change. The general consensus to NSW State Region discussion was: 

Why change when our Region is growing and functioning extremely well?

What would be the advantages for the members of our Region?

There was concern about what happens to the members living in South Queensland?

Not enough members to form a region and a forced merge with Queensland without any discussion would be poor form.

Is one President enough representation for all members of NSW to the Board. (would we have a say being small breeders)

Discussion of changing to three regions, Northern NSW, Central NSW, Southern NSW instead of one. We have so many differing environmental factors across NSW.

What will the structure be like? Any changes need to be fully explained in terms of advantages to our membership.

If $ are a problem, could our regions subsidise the President to attend council meetings.

Members can elect to be in any region they want.

The AAA Ltd Regulations "Annexure A: No 6: If more than 50 percent of the members at a Regional Meeting with the inclusion of proxies resolve to adjust a regional boundary of that Region, the Regional Committee may request in writing that the Directors adjust the boundaries of the Region or Regions, to divide a Region into two or more Regions or to consolidate two or more Regions. In each case, the Directors must make that adjustment, division or consolidation if: a)

No Regional Committee of any Region that is affected by that adjustment objects on reasonable grounds to that adjustment and;

b)

The Directors do not determine, on reasonable grounds, that the adjustment is not in the best interests of the company.

Action: Your Committee have called an Extra Ordinary Regional Meeting to be held on the 23rd of April, at Longueville Park, 3 Christies Rd, Palmvale. N.S.W at 10am.To discuss the possibility of NSW having one Region, after discussion the following motion will be put to the members to vote. Motion: As a member of QLD NNSW AAA Ltd Region do you agree to the movement of our Northern Border from the Brisbane River to the NSW Border. This would amalgamate our Region with other Regions to become a NSW State Region. YES / NO Moved: Pauline Glasser, Seconded: Bob Coxon. A vote will be taken at this meeting as to the direction of our Region. Proxy Votes will be taken, however, they must be to the Returning Officer by closing of business on 21st April 2017. Proxy information will arrive by post shortly, for those who wish to proxy vote a stamped addressed envelope has been included for your convenience. NB: Only Full and Joint Members (2 votes) may vote. Please reply or phone with any questions, queries you may have, although I cannot guarantee all ideas would be adopted, I welcome and invite ideas from members and will represent those ideas to the NSW Presidents Working Group. Kind Regards

Pauline Glasser, President. STHQLD NNSW AAA Ltd Region. M: 0419986554 cpg4764@bigpond.net.au

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SOME DO’S AND DON’T’S FOR NEW (AND NOT SO NEW) BREEDERS Rosemary Eva - Longueville Park, Here are a few little hints that may be of use to help you with some “tricks of the trade”. DON’T brush or comb your alpacas as it destroys the character of the fibre as well splitting the hairs/fibres. If the alpaca needs vegetable matter to be removed do so by brushing with your hand: some may say to use a “flicker” but use with care as overuse may also destroy the character of the fleece. DO pull the fleece apart when removing vegetable matter for dispatch to a processor. This should help reduce the cost of processing as well as providing a better outcome in the final product. DON’T undertake this for showing purposes rather lay the saddle on a wire mesh table whereby dust can fall out and vegetable matter can be removed by hand or tweezers. Maintain an intact saddle – clean fleeces gain points and ribbons. DON’T let the sun set on an alpaca in labour – there may well be a problem. Bring her close to the house in to a shed. Assess her progress and if not advancing seek veterinary assistance – this may well save the life of a dam and a cria! Remember alpacas are not dissimilar to horses and can be easily spooked at night and thus difficult to move. DON’T remove the wax from the dam’s teats- that is the first lesson in the chapter of life for the newborn cria DON’T leave alpacas with hypothermia in an open paddock; they need to be sheltered from the wind and the rain. Bring them in to a shed, if unable to maintain the ”cush” pack bales of straw/ hay/ cane mulch either side to maintain that position and cover with Hessian bags and/ or rugs. If wet, hair driers are an effective way of drying them and getting them warm. Check their temperature (rectally) regularly – normal core temperature is 38 degrees. In particular, alpacas can be very susceptible post shearing. DON’T leave alpacas without adequate shade and water on hot and humid days (or any time for that matter!) They can develop hyperthermia very quickly and urgent attention is required. Get them under shelter and gently hose their bellies, cover with wet towels and encourage them to drink – if necessary use a 50ml syringe to get fluids in to them. They will really appreciate soaker hoses or sprinklers in their paddocks to soak their bellies. DON’T shear off the tail or bonnet as alpacas can easily get sunburnt. Leave sufficient fleece to cover the area of bare skin either side of their bottom. DON’T put small herds in to paddocks of several acres. It is far better practice to subdivide into smaller paddocks with laneways eg quarter acre and rotate stock. This not only minimizes over grazing but also assist in parasite control. Furthermore, smaller paddocks make it far easier to handle your animals and reduces the risk of vulnerability to predators. DON’T treat your alpacas for worms on a regular basis. DO collect random faecal samples directly from the individual animal and have tested by your Vet. or a recognized laboratory and then treat accordingly. Bear in mind the more we give medication for parasite control without adequate identification the greater the risk of resistance.

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Also be mindful that: A. certain number of worms are OK; B. you are aware of the life cycle of worms; C. certain medications can be lethal to alpacas DON’T allow your alpacas to graze in your garden as the majority of garden plants/shrubs can be lethal. DO consult the AAA publication “Poisonous Plants” by Elizabeth Paul. DON’T put newly acquired alpacas in with your existing herd. DO put them in a designated (quarantine) area and drench with an appropriate product and leave for ten days; take a faecal sample and ensure it is clear before putting with the existing herd. This is a good biosecurity measure and good farm practice! DON’T rely on memory when administering medication/treatment/ matings etc. DO keep accurate records of all activities and this will prove invaluable over time. DO ENJOY THESE ANIMALS AND DON’T DESPAIR WHEN SOME THINGS MAY NOT GO RIGHT – THERE IS ALWAYS SOMEONE AVAILABLE TO HELP YOU OUT!! (Reproduced from 2009 Advocate – Thank you Rosemary – good advice for us all to revisit- Editor)

Regional Shows Members you may or may not be aware of what is involved in running a Show for the Region. It takes quite a bit of organising and many volunteer working hours from those who assist. As with many organisations it is a struggle at times to find help and for the most part always ends up with the “same people” doing all the work !

So, please think about putting your hand up and helping out..........it would be most appreciated!

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Sheryl Simper

Bob & Jackie Coxon

Lorraine Binskin

Congratulations to our WINNERS of the CVAG Christmas guessing competition to raise funds for Grafton Show Alpaca Pavilion. 1st Jill Ormston -Throw Rug 2nd Chris Bailey - Pillow 3rd Jackie Coxon Socks Drawn at Bunnings BBQ Fund Raiser December 23rd 2016

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AHA MEDIA RELEASE On-farm biosecurity – there’s an app for that It might not be as entertaining or addictive as some apps, but the new FarmBiosecurity smartphone app will help take your biosecurity planning to the next level. Available for both Apple and Android devices, the FarmBiosecurity app is a free tool that allows livestock and crop producers to create their own personalised biosecurity plan. Alison Saunders, National Manager Horticulture at Plant Health Australia (PHA), says that the app is framed around the six biosecurity essentials. “If you are wondering how to implement biosecurity measures on-farm, the six essentials are a good place to start. The app is based on the Farm Biosecurity Action Planner, so no matter how you prefer to do business, you will be able to create a plan and get started,” said Ms Saunders. Creating a biosecurity plan on the app is easy. Simply select the actions that apply to you or type in your own actions. Your selections then become a to-do list that you can share with others or email to yourself and print out. Duncan Rowland, Animal Health Australia’s (AHA) Executive Manager Biosecurity and Product Integrity Services, said that FarmBiosecurity was a great resource for producers on the go. “The app is easy to use and allows producers to take their biosecurity plan with them wherever they go, even if there is no internet access. Users can also create as many plans as they like, which is helpful for those who have multiple properties or production areas. “Photos can also be attached as reminders for later actions or to let others know what activities need to be done. And, if you happen to spot anything unusual while you’re out and about, the emergency hotline numbers for both plant and livestock producers are just a tap away,” Mr Rowland said. o download the FarmBiosecurity app, simply search for ‘FarmBiosecurity’ in the App store or Google Play. Those with a Windows-based smartphone will also be catered for, with a Windows-ready version of the app coming soon. For more information and instructions on how to use the app go to farmbiosecurity.com.au/farmbiosecurity-app. Farm Biosecurity is a national awareness program that provides information to livestock and plant producers and related service providers about on-farm biosecurity, and prevention of animal diseases and plant pests. The program is a joint initiative of AHA and PHA. It encourages producers to identify risks to their livestock and plant products and minimise these risks by incorporating on-farm biosecurity measures into their everyday operations. For more information or to arrange an interview, contact AHA’s Communications Coordinator, Harley McNamara on 02 6203 3977 or PHA’s Communications Officer Sharon Abrahams on 02 6215 7711.

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1. They're ancient Alpacas were domesticated by the Incas more than 6,000 years ago and raised for their exquisite fleece. Due to its quality and all of its superhero characteristics, alpaca fibre was reserved exclusively for the elite and nobility. 2. They grow superlative, hypoallergenic fleece Alpaca fibre is much like sheep’s wool, but warmer and not itchy. It is lacking in lanolin, which makes it hypoallergenic and also allows it to be processed without the need for high temperatures or harsh chemicals in washing. 3. They're flame-resistant! Alpaca fibre is flame-resistant. 4. They're water-resistant Like wool, alpaca fibre is water-resistant, but it can wick away moisture because of its unique ability to mimic cotton in moisture regain. These attributes are what make alpaca feel lighter than wool but warmer than cotton in cool and damp climates. 5. They come in a rainbow of hues Alpaca fibre comes in 16 colours and hundreds of shades, from white to light rose grey to dark fawn, in addition to the blends that can be made from those, thus minimizing the need for pollution-intensive dying. 6. They hum and haw Humming is the most common sound that alpacas make. Alpacas hum when they are curious, content, worried, bored, fearful, distressed or cautious.

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Birds love alpaca lining!

Murwillumbah Alpaca Show

Saturday 24TH JUNE 2017 Murwillumbah Showground Judge: Lyn Dickson Entries Close:

20 May 2014

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ALPACA WORKSHOP: JULY 22ND TO JULY 24TH 2017

When: Saturday July 22nd 2017 at 9.00am to Monday July 24th at 5.00pm Registrations are now open for the three day CAMELIDynamics Course to be held at Southern Cross Llamas, 563 Riverside Drive, Pine Mountain Qld. The Course runs from Saturday July 22, 2017 to Monday July 24, 2017 (you are welcome to come for 1 day, 2 days or the whole 3) please be aware that this is a space limited workshop, as soon as the positions are filled, the registrations will close. The link for Queensland is: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event… The link for NSW is: http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event… Marty has travelled over a million miles around the world teaching her brand of animal understanding. It isn’t enough to have a mastery of the material, a teacher must be able to excite and inspire. Marty is exceptional at both working with animals and teaching people. She uses training aids she developed herself along with a variety of role playing exercises designed to help owners really understand their woolly buddies. There is nothing like feeling what it is like to wear a halter or to be led, to give you a whole different point of view. Have fun, be inspired and leave with a higher level of skill and understanding. This three day event is designed for all skill levels and includes her very popular "Show like a Pro" day. If you have been to a clinic in the past* consider coming back for a refresher and to see for yourself how the method is constantly evolving.

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Fibre Testing Micron Man Pty Ltd Email for more information microman@iinet.net.au New England Fibre Testing Service Walcha 02 6777 2122 Australian Wool Testing Authority (AWTA) Geelong office 03 5277 9842 Melbourne office 03 9371 2100 Australian Alpaca Fleece Testing (AAFT) (AWEX accredited) Paul Vallely, PO Box 246, Crookwell, NSW 2583 Phone/Fax: 02 4834 2132 International Fibre Centre, Gordon Institute of TAFE, Geelong Geelong 03 5227 2358 Howe, Watts & Co Mudgee 02 6373 3403 Riverina Wool Testers Pty Ltd Wagga Wagga 02 6925 1407 Riverina Fleece Testing Services (RFTS) Wodonga 02 6026 0551 Southern Tablelands Fibre Testing (STFT) (AWEX Accredited) Kim Cartwright, Thalaba Downs, Laggan 2583 Phone/Fax: 02 4837 3210 Mobile: 0427 373 211

Shearers Bob Dunn

(02) 4930 3446

Chris Powers

Mob: 0438653782

Drew Shearman

(02) 49201607

Ted Winnell (Casino)

(02) 66625379 / Mob: 0427 343991

Bernie McInerney

Mob: 0429 668240

Genna Reiman (Grafton)

Mob: 0439347611

Contacting fellow breeders in your region for a recommendation is probably the best way to locate a shearer. Arrange well ahead of time (as in MAY) as the shearers are booked out quickly. The AAA Website also has a list of shearers on the home page. qldnsw.alpaca.asn.au The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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Bobble Beanie Cast on 68 stitches using 5.5mm needles.

You will need: 50g Alpaca 8ply Pair 5.5mm Needles Abreviations MB= (Kf,Kb,T,P3,T,K3,TP3tog) KF = Knit front of stitch Kb = Knit back of stitch Sl1 = slip one stitch Pssp = ppass slip stitch over Advanced: This Pattern can be used for a scarf

Rows 1-10 K2,P2 Rib Rows 11-12 (P2,K2)Rep to end of row Rows 13-14 (K2,P2)Rep to end of row Row 15 (K1,MB,K2)Rep to end of row Row 16-18 Knit Row 19 (K2,yo,sl1,K1,psso) rep to end of row Row 20 Purl Row 21(K1,yo,sl1,K1,psso,K1) Rep to end of row Row 22 Purl Row 23(K2,yo,sl1,K1,psso) rep to end of row Row 24 Purl Rows 25 – 26 (K2,P2)Rep to end of row Rows 27-28 (P2,K2)Rep to end of row Row 29 (K1,MB,K2)Rep to end of row Row 30 Purl Row 31 (K1,yo,sl1,K1,psso,K1) Rep to end of row Row 32 Purl Row 33(K2,yo,sl1,K1,psso) rep to end of row Row 34 Purl Row 35 (K1,yo,sl1,K1,psso,K1) Rep to end of row Row 36 Purl Rows 37(K1,P1)Rep to end of row Rows 38 (P1,K1)Rep to end of row Rows 39(K1,P1)Rep to end of row Rows 40 (P1,K1)Rep to end of row Row 41 (K1,MB,K2)Rep to end of row Row 42 Purl Rows 43(K1,P1)Rep to end of row Rows 44 (P1,K1)Rep to end of row Rows 45(K1,P1)Rep to end of row Rows 46 (P1,K1)Rep to end of row Row 47-48 ( K2,P2) Rep to end of row Row 49 (K2tog) Rep to end of row Row 50 Purl Row 51 (K2tog) Rep to end of row Row 52 Purl Row 53(K2tog) Rep to end of row until last 3st K3tog Row 54 Purl Sew up side seams and sew in all loose ends The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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Sire Name

Colour

IAR

Stud

Stud Fee

Grand Flowerdale TRAVIATOR

Huacaya Solid Medium Fawn

130107 Creekside Alpacas Craig and Chris Chidgey 07 32976857 North Maclean QLD

$500

Ambersun MOTLEY Huacaya CRUZ Leopard Appaloosa

182550 Creekside Alpacas Craig and Chris Chidgey 07 32976857 North Maclean QLD

$400

Elsendale MISTER BEAU

Huacaya Solid White

192438 Creekside Alpacas Craig and Chris Chidgey 07 32976857 North Maclean QLD

$250 per mating drive-by until May 2017

Erragolia COLLAROY

Huacaya Dark Fawn

114843 Erragolia Alpacas Steve Rowley 07 55463971 Chambers Flat QLD

$300

Erragolia DOUBLE ICE

Huacaya Solid White

129715 Erragolia Alpacas Steve Rowley 07 55463971 Chambers Flat QLD

$400

Wyona CENOTAPH Huacaya Solid 115482 Longueville Park Black Rosemary Eva & Elizabeth Coles 02 66777500 Palmvale via Murwillumbah NSW

$330

Longueville Park RHYLEY

$550

Huacaya Solid Black

86100 Longueville Park Rosemary Eva & Elizabeth Coles 02 66777500 Palmvale via Murwillumbah NSW

Photo

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Sire Name

Colour

IAR

Stud

Longueville Park PEGASUS

Huacaya Solid Black

140623 Longueville Park Rosemary Eva & Elizabeth Coles 02 66777500 Palmvale via Murwillumbah NSW

$880

Longueville Park MADIBA

Huacaya Solid Black

149919 Longueville Park Rosemary Eva & Elizabeth Coles 02 66777500 Palmvale via Murwillumbah NSW

$990 discount multiple matings

Longueville Park BRIGANTINE

Huacaya Solid Black

159784 Longueville Park Rosemary Eva & Elizabeth Coles 02 66777500 Palmvale via Murwillumbah NSW

$660

Longueville Park MERCURY

Huacaya Solid Black

174958 McLaren Vale Alpacas Leanne Tunny 0407 748 477 Tamborine QLD

$500

Silcron MARS

Huacaya 74257 Medium Fawn

Wahgungurry MR MARTIN

Huacaya Medium Brown

177746 Wahgungurry Alpacas Colin & Pauline Glasser 0419 986554 Lower Southgate NSW

$400 discount multiple matings

Penny-Lane LICORICE

Huacaya Solid Black

149827 Wahgungurry Alpacas Colin & Pauline Glasser 0419 986554 Lower Southgate NSW

$400 discount multiple matings

McLaren Vale Alpacas Leanne Tunny 0407 748 477 Tamborine QLD

Stud Fee

Photo

$300

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Alpacas have become the latest weapon in the battle against foxes as Christmas turkey suppliers use them to protect their posse. After a fox attack last year which killed 150 birds, a family-owned business in Berkshire has recruited ten guard alpacas to protect their prized birds. Blitzen, Comet, Cupid, Prancer, Dasher, Dancer, Sage, Onion, Donner and Vixen are now keeping watch over the Copas’ 24,000

turkeys. The herd of 10 alpacas are in charge of protecting a gang of 24,000 free-range turkeys. Owner Tom Copas said their farm manager first became interested in the idea when he heard about alpacas’ strong guard qualities. After the fox attack, which cost the Copas Turkeys around £27,000 in retail value, the business owners tried more powerful electric fences and a range of other tactics but the problem did not go away. “We thought we would try and alpacas and I spent a couple of days calling around the alpaca world trying to find out more about what I needed and where I would find them,” said Tom. “Eventually I found a lovely lady in Gloucester who had some alpacas she couldn’t keep any more so we offered them a good home.” Tom described the moment the alpacas were introduced to the birds as “like a mexican stand-off”. “We backed the trailer into the turkey range and let the tailgate down and the alpacas came galloping out and then they stood still, frozen staring at the turkeys while the turkeys just stared back. “But then they sort of acknowledged each other and now they co-exist pretty happily with the turkeys.” The grass-eating animals react aggressively to foxes because in their native South America, wild foxes will try to kill unguarded cria. Tom said he has also noticed there have been less damaged birds - sold as ‘downgrades’ - since the alpacas arrived.

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Controlling weeds on your property Some introduced weeds from other countries have become serious pests in Queensland. Weeds threaten Queensland's primary industries, natural environment, livestock, human health and people's livelihoods. Under Queensland law, landowners, including state and local government, are responsible for controlling declared weeds on their property. Queensland's farmers spend more than $600 million each year on weed-related control activities. However, the total cost of weeds to Queensland's economy and your business can be much higher, including: direct control and management costs competition with pasture species to reduce available grazing toxicity to stock competition with crops for space, water and nutrients increased stock mustering costs loss of ecotourism values impact of aquatic weeds on water quality and irrigation.

Deadline for next advocate – May 30th 2017 Advertise in our regional magazine Our reasonable rates: Full Page $ 85.00 Half Page $ 40.00 Quarter Page $ 25.00 Classified—Business Card size $ 10.00 (4 for $36) Special Offer: 10% discount for 4 Adverts - discount applied on the 4th Advert. Consider advertising in our Newsletter - contact LeanneTunny info@mclarenvalealpacas.com.au

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Your AAA National office is staffed by three people one full time and two part time members. See below who we are and what we do in providing assistance to all AAA members Joanne Rothque Registrar IAR, Membership Services and allocation of Show Judges (Ext 5) Email: jo@alpaca.asn.au (Work Days: Mon Tue, Thu Fri) 1. Registrar IAR 2. Membership Services including new members 3. Registration and transfers 4. Allocation of judges 5. Online Registration Passwords 6. Show system set up Janette Law Accounts Management, Online Registration Passwords (Ext 1) Email: janette@alpaca.asn.au (Work days: Mon Thu) 1. National finance administration 2. Regional finance administration assistance 3. Insurance (in conjunction with EA / OffIce Manager) 4. Merchandise Kris Brown Executive Assistant / Office Manager (Ext 3) Email: kris@alpaca.asn.au and alpaca@alpaca.asn.au (Work Days: Monday Friday) 1. Assistance in providing overall administrative management of the organisation 2. Provide support to AAA Board, Regional Committees and AAA Committees 3. Travel, accommodation co-ordination and teleconferences 4. National event co-ordination 5. Q-Alpaca Administration 6. Australian Alpaca Week 7. Marketing (in conjunction with AAA Director responsible for Marketing and Communications)

The 'spa' is in high demand at this time of year, particularly for our very pregnant Honey Joy. She takes priority as the others look on longingly. One way to keep cool on those steamy, nearly summer days!

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By Lehanne Robinson

WETHERS WORMS

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Rickets: An Overview Elizabeth Paul - Erehwon Alpacas

Rickets is usually seen as a bone condition, often caused by a deficiency in vitamin D, which fails to maintain bone integrity. This is essentially correct, but it is not the whole story. The mammalian body has a complex biological system in place to ensure that it has sufficient circulating calcium, or serum calcium, to maintain the contraction of the heart muscle, among other functions. The store of calcium is in the skeleton, and the body will attempt to maintain its serum calcium level at all costs.

Calcium and PTH If there is not sufficient calcium in the blood for this purpose, the body will take immediate steps to improve the supply. The lowered calcium levels trigger the parathyroid gland, situated in the neck, to start producing parathyroid hormone, or PTH. This hormone activates stored vitamin D to become active, as vitamin D has the role of increasing absorption of calcium across the gut wall. PTH also starts stripping calcium from the bones, essentially weakening them. Once the calcium level has been raised, the PTH production is shut off, and bone starts to renew by being laid down again. This process is perfectly normal and is carried on by the homeostatic systems of the body, on a diurnal or daily basis. However, if there is little calcium in the diet, or if the animal has little stored vitamin D ready to go, the PTH will keep on stripping calcium from the bones, and this creates the condition called rickets. It would seem therefore, that we only need to provide extra calcium and/or extra vitamin D, and the rickets problem is solved. Not quite.

The Role of Phosphate When bone breaks down, it releases not only calcium but also phosphate, as the other major component of bone. Phosphate is vital for many cellular activities within the body, but the two main functions are as cellular energy, in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and as phospholipids, which are the major component of cell membranes. While PTH is actively supplying the body with calcium, it is also altering the calcium to phosphate ratio by blocking the re-absorption of phosphate through the kidney. This creates a massive outpouring of phosphate through the urine.

Without enough phosphate, not only do the bones become weak, but the cells lose an energy source and cell production slows down. One of the main effects of rickets on the body, besides weakening the bones, is that it causes a severe anaemia. Calcium is always present in plant material, because plant cell walls contain calcium, even if they are dead, so dry hay will still be a source of calcium. High phosphate levels in grazing situations are only available in spring, because high levels of ATP are required for the spring growth of the plants. Spring or early cut hay is much higher in phosphate levels than autumn cut hay. In a drought situation, when the plants are either dead or not growing, there will still be some calcium in the little available plant matter, but virtually no phosphate. Apart from plant material, the main source of phosphate for grazing animals is animal material. This is the reason why free range cattle and other large herbivores may eat bones, dung or even urine soaked soil, during a drought. They are most likely to be looking for phosphate, rather than calcium. In summary, rickets can be caused by deficiencies in calcium, phosphate or vitamin D, or by an overactive parathyroid gland.

Lifestages:

Juveniles It is frequently assumed that rickets only affects young animals. This is presumably because the effects on the bones are more visible in younger than older animals. Rickets in younger crias will cause crooked legs see Plate 1; or humped back See Plate 2. It may also cause the cria to stop growing altogether, as the body sometimes decides to Plate 1: 10 month old “make do” with what it’s got. If left suri with severe leg unattended, the cria will stay deviation. stunted., and may even be described as a miniature. Stunted male crias under 2 years old can be got going again. Female crias mature sexually much earlier than males, so there is a smaller window of opportunity to fix the problem. For crias, generally extra vitamin D will do the job.

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Adults Adult alpacas rarely show the severely crooked legs of crias, but in their case the condition has a far more devastating effect, particularly for breeding females. In late pregnancy the mother is pumping lots of minerals into the fetus. If she can’t keep up the supply for herself as well, and goes into a rickets situation, she may abort, and may even die afterwards. The heavily nursing mother is also at high risk of rickets, especially if she is stressed by something else eg transport. Moving late pregnant or just birthed females is never a good idea, although the threat of bushfires/floods could be good enough reasons. Adults may appear lame, called shifting lame, when the lameness appears to be in one leg today and a different one tomorrow. They may show a mild humped back, but the two main signs in mothers are falling body condition and severe anaemia. The breeding female herd needs a vitamin D program, and also needs regular checking on these two points. Alpacas can go skeletal and chalkwhite, virtually overnight. Moving an alpaca in this situation is very likely to kill it. My recommendation is to give emergency supplies of phosphate on the spot, which can be either by oral drench or injectables, and waiting about half an hour BEFORE moving the alpaca to yards or shelter for further treatment. The phosphate will help reduce the stress involved in transport. The phosphate source must be a veterinary/medicinal product by the way, not eg a phosphate fertilizer, which could kill the animal.

Vitamin D

Plate 3: 4 year old black wether with chronic rickets.

Animals make their own vitamin D as long as they have access to sufficient UV light in the form of sunlight. Once the light hits the skin, it takes 6-8 weeks, to produce the active form of vitamin D in the body. A vitamin D deficiency problem now, means that access to sunlight was interrupted between 6 - 8 weeks ago.The hours of sun start increasing in spring, hit their peak over Christmas and then start reducing again. The vitamin D levels in the animal follow behind, in the same curve. Of course there will be cloud on some days, spring or summer storms or the severe smoke haze problem of bushfires. This will cut the season short and cause problems in late Feb/early March if not before.

Worms There are two important points to remember about worms in a farming situation. Firstly, they are always present, and in fact they should be present, so that the animals can build up a natural defence against them. (It is worth noting that a “zero” worm count does not mean there are no worms. It means the worm level is below the limit at which they would be considered as a significant cause of illness.) Secondly, worms such as stomach worms are what biologists call secondary opportunistic pathogens, meaning they are rarely the actual cause of illness, but merely taking advantage of a situation where the animal’s immune defences are dropping. Thus the wormy cria is flagging an immune problem, which in turn could be due to a nutritional or other stress problem. Any alpaca which constantly seems to display ‘worminess” ie anaemia, lameness, pot belly, ill thrift, poor appetite or even increased appetite but with no resulting weight gain, should be considered as having another problem. The worms do still need to be treated for, but treating only for worms, will not improve the situation much unless the underlying problem is addressed. In alpacas this problem is very likely to be rickets.

Plate 2: 12 month old suri with humped back.

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Colour Matters

Joint Ill:

Dark and black animals simply do not make as much vitamin D in their skins as lighter skinned animals. In a mixed coloured herd, black and light alpacas cannot be treated the same in a vitamin D program, as the blacks at any lifestage will always need more. See Plate 3. This 4 year old black wether was returned to a breeder from a pet situation. Despite initial appearances, he is not trying to go to the toilet, but is locked up in this stance with chronic rickets, being at this stage almost unable to walk. Emergency treatment was started but it was really too late, and eventually he had to be put down.

The bleeding of the umbilical cord straight after birth is nature’s way of flushing out any contamination that may have been acquired during the birthing process. For this reason, it is not a great idea to immediately clamp an umbilical cord, (if at all) but to let it pulse for a few minutes. Joint ill involves a newborn getting a severe bacterial blood infection at or before birth. The infection travels up the umbilical cord, hence the other term, navel ill, and localises in the leg joints, causing swelling, and lameness. In other livestock, it is probably more often seen in newborn foals than in calves. Crias with joint ill are either born lame or become lame, very soon after birth, with at least one leg joint becoming noticeably swollen. See Plate 4. The cria looked very sick at birth, and took a long time to get up. One front joint can be seen to be very swollen. His mother was a ten year old female, who had previously had trouble free births. This cria was born at the end of the prolonged drought, and the mother had been in labour for some time, possibly overnight. Almost certainly the cria got infected in utero. He developed a temperature, became more lame, his fleece began to drop out and he died of pneumonia on Day 4. There is virtually nothing that can be done for joint ill crias, as without a functioning immune system, even strong antibiotics will have little effect. If by chance a cria with joint ill does survive, to eg weaning, then it will almost certainly die at the first major stress event. Summary There are many causes of lameness, but over the years that I have been collecting material, rickets stands out as being the major cause of lameness in alpacas. I believe it is also responsible for most deaths within the female breeding herd. For further information see

Other Causes of Lameness in Crias White Muscle Disease: Selenium deficiency causes white muscle disease, a condition of lameness usually seen in very young stock. Selenium is also required for proper fertility, but as a trace mineral, it is only required in small amounts. In other livestock industries, the most usual times of supplementing are just before mating, for improved fertility, and just before birthing, to ensure supply in the colostrum. If not done then, it would be important to look at supplementing very young animals with appropriate selenium doses, because this is the time when they really need to be protected. White muscle disease crias tend to spread their hind legs out before they go down, and then lay on their sides, unlike rickets crias which can still cush. They remain bright and alert, but cannot get up. If bottle fed they may survive for some time, but eventually the heart muscle is affected and then they will die.

Rickets: The Silent Killer and Handbook of Alpaca Health By Elizabeth Paul, Cost $ 55 per set plus $14 AUD P&P Australia wide. New purchasers please note these books are now only sold as a set.

Our Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/qldnsw.alpaca add your Studs photos to advertise FREE

Our website www.qldnsw.alpaca.asn.au President SQNNSW: Pauline Glasser

AAA website www.alpaca.asn.au

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When I first started breeding I wanted to show every cria that was born on the farm. I thought they were all magnificent… I was sure of it. So I bought leads and halters and went to every show that I could. But, in that first year, the results were not what I had hoped. I was pretty disappointed and, because the first few animals I brought to the shows were coloured, and I realised the whites were the ones winning the big prizes, I began to wonder if all the effort was worth it. I figured I had a few choices. 1) I could quit showing or 2) I could continue to show and just be satisfied with the results as they were (and I could make excuses about why they weren’t better) or 3) I could take a hard look at my breeding and make the changes necessary to get better results. I have been told I have a slight competitive streak so, of course, I chose option three. It was then that I made a couple of very important decisions that would shape Shahrizai’s showing future. First, I decided to make a very concerted effort to look at every animal that won a championship ribbon. I spent more time in other people’s pens than I did in my own. It was only then that I could really look at mine honestly. Next, I decided that I would not just listen, but hang on every word from every judge about every animal that came through the marshalling area and got a ribbon. Absorbing all they had to say gave me the opportunity to look more critically at my stock and it also allowed me to decide if my animals had what they were looking for. And lastly, I decided that I was going to seek out the very best animals I could, especially the best males. I was not going to use males because they were “conveniently located” and I was going to be very, very critical of the boys I produced. With my suris, I made an instant decision to never use a heterozygous male again - they are just not up to the task, no matter the colour. Immediately, the quality of our stock began a steep ascent, and those who used to place in front of us were now very much caught. It was during this initial improvement in our stock that I made some other changes to my showing philosophy. I changed my breeding calendar to make sure my suris were born in late winter and early spring so that they were six months old before the Toowoomba Show. This gave them the opportunity to be in full fleece for their junior season. I found that without a mammoth effort, animals born in March or April could not make it through the summer to be shown in their first fleece. In conjunction, I began to put my show suris in a very clean paddock – one without weeds and as few rolls-holes as possible. I also started to put my hands on them very regularly. The huacayas began to get a second shear at the new year to avoid that end-of-the-season cotting. These changes proved to be very beneficial. In fact, the modifications to the philosophy and practice have produced wonderful show results for Shahrizai. Between the start of the 2013 show season and the upcoming 2016 Colour Show, we have won 86 Championship ribbons and another 31 Reserve Champions ribbons. We have also won a number of Supreme Champion awards in both suri and huacaya and we have either owned or helped breed three consecutive Suri of the Year winners. During this period we were also battling the elements as many QLD breeders were. We may not have had floods, fires or cyclones, but we experienced a tremendous drought that had a mighty impact on our show team. But the plan, coupled with our top-of-the-tree genetics, allowed us to still achieve wonderful show results.

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However, we are most proud of the success of our partners and clients during that time. In the last decade in Queensland, no other stud has sold a female that produced even one Supreme Champion ribbon for the purchasing breeder. In stark contrast, we have sold females who have produced TEN Supreme Champions for their new owners. We have helped our clients and partners to beat us in the shows, and no other breeder can make that claim. I still look at winning animals closely and I absolutely listen to every word uttered by our well-trained judges. I have changed how and when we mate and I have made very tough calls on wonderful and successful males. It has been a lot of hard work to achieve the results we have, especially from where we started. I know there are breeders out there who love showing and who would love to improve their results the way we have. There are a variety of reasons, however, that many breeders have failed to make that jump. Let me briefly discuss a couple. The first reason is that people do not go to look at winning alpacas. Usually, when the Supreme has been awarded, I find I am often the only one looking at the animal with the striped ribbon. I have spoken to breeders who win all the time and who have been winning for years, and they agree - almost nobody comes for a look. Whether they are too shy or they don’t feel like they are allowed to, they just don’t, and that’s a real pity. And as a result, not many truly know the difference between their animals and the ones that are winning consistently. I also watch closely as breeders wander around the show ring with their ribbons, far more focused on everything other than what the judge has to say. They are gazing at the sky, they are watching their alpacas walk, or they are recording results for their advertising. Sometimes, they are just smiling for their friends. Our judges have seen thousands of alpacas, AND they have very interesting things to say about the animals they are critiquing. It behoves us to listen with care, even if we do not agree with the placings. Even when breeders do not place in a class, it is of benefit to stay ringside and listen. Most breeders just drag their alpaca straight back to the pen without pausing. Last, it is also clear that breeders are still using the same males each year, hoping for better results. But those males just aren’t up to being sires of show-winning stock. The rationale that they’re good enough because their progeny are winning 2nd place ribbons is the same thinking that keeps those 2nds from becoming 1sts. What they mightn’t realise is that the gap between 1st and 2nd is sometimes colossal. Breeders who win regularly are very critical of their males. At Sharazai, we have wethered males who have won Supreme Champion awards. Realistically, far fewer than 5% of your males will make the grade. But all over Queensland, there are inferior males working each season. The breeders using those males are being left behind, and the gap is getting bigger and bigger each year. In the end, this much is true – showing isn't all about winning, but when you meet or exceed your expectations, it is a lot more fun. So, if you like to show, and if you want to show, and if you want to do better, then you need to change the way you approach showing. Winning broad ribbons in the ring is not an un-reachable goal. The “big” breeders are beatable, and to be honest, they will be happy when it happens. Whether you come to Shahrizai for guidance or seek advice and help elsewhere is immaterial to us. Our goal is to see a more competitive and lively show circuit, where more breeders have a chance to win. We would love to see people reaching their goals and making progress, even if it is at the expense of our results. A healthy, vibrant show circuit is good news for all of us. We are all too happy to help you get there. Ring or email today, and let’s talk about your results, your plan, and your goals. – Mark Mullette

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Alpacas Love Water Starwood Alpacas enjoying a swim!

Alpacas love water and I was not surprised to read Charles Ledger’s observations of his alpaca herd during their marathon exodus from Peru and Bolivia. (The life of Charles Ledger: G Gramiccia) Ledger reported that after arriving at water, having crossed the Atacama Desert with only minimal water for 22 days, the animals “showed a greater inclination to bathe in it rather than drink it. There is a wonderful legend linking alpacas and their fascination with water. This version was published in ‘Gold of the Andes” Volume 11. According to both the Aymara and Quechua speaking people of Peru and Bolivia, long ago the world was actually made up of two, superimposed worlds, the upper and the lower. The lower world was populated with enormous flocks of plump, sleek alpacas that belonged to the apu, or mountain god, and were tended to by his daughter. The alpacas of the upper world were far fewer in number and were inferior in quality with only a short fleece. Because the apu’s daughter had difficulty in protecting her alpacas from the region’s numerous predators, her father arranged for her to marry a young herdsman from the upper world who could help her tend the flocks. For a while, the apu’s daughter and her husband lived contentedly in the inner world. Later, however, the young herdsman grew homesick and told his wife that he wished to return to his own world, and to enrich it with the inner world's flocks. The mountain god’s daughter agreed and collecting her alpacas began travelling via the springs and lakes to live with her husband in the upper world. Her father’s only condition to the marriage was that his daughter’s husband took good care of the flocks and especially a tiny alpaca that always had to be carried. The daughter’s husband proved to be lazy, however, and one day dropped the tiny alpaca on the ground, leaving it to fend for itself. When his wife saw this she took fright and immediately ran to the nearest spring, where she dived in and began swimming towards the inner world. The alpacas followed her, although a few

were prevented from doing so by the herdsman. Ever since then, the alpacas of the upper world have remained near springs and lakes where they continue to yearn after their mistress, who has yet to return. As well as the obvious enjoyment of the alpacas, water access is an excellent prevention of heat stress. At Starwood Alpaca Farm the alpacas are permitted water access as part of our management program, the benefits outweighing the loss of leg and belly fleece. (unfortunately the consequence does restrict our choice of show exhibits) When providing alpacas with water access consider the following safety aspectsDrowning: Alpacas should be shorn prior to their initial introduction to water sites. Shearing in spring ensures minimal fleece length during swimming season as wet fleece is heavy. Be warned that the swimming season may extend to a year long habit. Access to water site: Access to dams/river banks must not be steep, slippery or boggy and there should be plenty of room for multiple entry-exit sites to prevent a dominant animal standing guard over his/her private pool. Don’t forget drinking water: Swimming is not the only thing done in the water, so an alternative supply of clean drinking water will be necessary. Wendy Summerell (a very active member of our Region who has now retired)

This article was kindly supplied by Wendy from Starwood Alpacas reproduced from previous Alpaca Advocate Editions—the editor requested a re-run considering our changed weather conditions besides, a lovely article. THANK YOU, Wendy.

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Pleased to announce Karen Caldwell will be the Judge at Grafton Colourbration this Year!

SCHEDULE AVAILABLE ON OUR REGIONAL WEBSITE: qldnsw.alpaca.asn.au

Emailed Entries and EFT payments this Year!!

ENTRIES CLOSING DATE: APRIL 21 2017

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Purchasing a new Stud Male Is it time to purchase a new Stud Male? We have recently been looking into purchasing a new Stud Male in order to continue forward in our breeding programme and I thought I would give you some ideas on what process we have gone through to do this. The first time we bought a male we were very new to alpaca breeding and in the end we bought based on Show results of the male in question as well as his father’s results. We also trusted the person we were buying from and felt we could safely purchase the male based on their “say so”. Not very thorough I know, but when you are just starting out there are a lot of things that you just don’t know enough about in order to make great decisions. As it turns out, the boy we bought has been great so our trust was well placed. I would not recommend that you spend big dollars on your first male purchase unless you have someone with you, that you trust, who knows what is needed in a good Alpaca Stud Male. This time around we have approached it quite differently. Following, are some pointers for you to consider if you are looking at buying a Stud Male for the first time: 1. Do your homework on the animal first before you go and look at him. (Don’t fall in love with him until you know he is up to the task you are purchasing him for). 2. Get several options to choose from, these options need to preferably come from several different Studs. 3. Decide what qualities you may be missing in your alpaca herd and then find a male that has those qualities in abundance. 4. Ask about his Show results but don’t trust all your decisions to these. 5. Make sure that he is a Certified Male. (You cannot register progeny from a mating that took place between any unregistered female or uncertified Male.) 6. Ask about any Warrantees and Guarantees that the Stud you are considering purchasing from offer, on the Stud Males they sell. 7. Check to see if the males you are considering have had a healthy birth/life to this date. (You may not wish to consider a male that was born prematurely with complications, or has suffered from some serious illness like Rye Grass Staggers or Facial Eczema in case this may make him a high risk animal, or, he may pass his vulnerability to these problems on to his offspring giving you a whole herd of sickly animals.) 8. Ask for photos of the animal so you can get a look at his face structure, body conformation, and fleece characteristics. (Do you want a herd of animals that look like him?) Now it’s time to make an appointment to view the one or two animals you have narrowed your search down to. If the males are already certified and have a current Vet Health Certificate then you shouldn’t be finding any major flaws in the Male, however, it is good to check on a few things for yourself so you can make informed decisions. There is a great document available called the Australian Alpaca Breed Standard to help you with knowing what a true Suri or Huacaya should look like. Available in the AAA Ltd Showing Rules Manual available on AAA Ltd website.  Check ears, eyes, nose. (Are they healthy, normal in size etc)  Check teeth. (Does the alpaca have a good fitting ‘bite’ or is it under/over shot?)  Look through the fleece thoroughly. (Is it what you are wanting to add to your breeding programme, e.g. fineness/handle, density, lustre, length, lock structure, colour)  Check the Testicle size. (The vet will have already measured them when he certified the Male but in the case of Testis in alpaca, size does matter. The bigger the better. The Testis size in the male has direct correlation to any of his female progeny’s sexual organs and on her fertility etc.)  Pick up each of his feet to check for any possible foot problems.  Check on the upper/inside of his legs for any skin problems resulting from eczema or mites. The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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 If possible, view a recent poo sample. Is he soft, or does he produce little pellets. (Things like this can be passed on genetically, and little pellets are definitely less messy to a full fleeced alpaca. We don’t want to have to start “dagging” our alpacas just because we were breeding from males with stools that were too soft.)  Put on his halter, take him for a walk, then, take off the halter. (Is he going to be easy to work with?)  Stand back and look at him as a whole. Does he stand with good posture, tall and strong? Think about all you’ve seen. Does he have enough of what you are wanting to add to your herd at this time? (Although the ‘Perfect’ male does not yet exist, you want to make sure that your new male will definitely be able to add something extra to your breeding programme.) Well, I hope this is of some use to you and that you have great success in your future breeding programmes. Richard & Rosemary Newson, Sonric Suri Alpacas, New Zealand Disclaimer: The information presented here is from our own experiences, or adapted from others to suit our situation, property and our animals. We don’t claim to be experts and you are welcome to disagree. If you find something useful—great. This article is a reprint from the Vertigo Vic Eastern Region Newsletter Issue 59, Autumn 2010 and by permission from Sonric Suri Alpacas website: www.soncric.co.nz

Autumn is gardening time! Now that the weather is getting cooler it is time to follow up on the fertilizing regime and preparation of in the garden. The Spring annuals are soon to be planted and don't they love that boost of “Alpaca-poo” around them, automatic bright green leaves from the urea

present. Some local gardeners have been using “Alpaca-poo” as a deterrent for cats in the garden! Not sure of the outcome? “Alpaca-poo” is great in the no dig garden concept—layers of cane mulch and layers of “Alpaca-poo” the worms love it and so will you with the results. Good mulching for the garden ready for Winter frosts. “Alpaca-poo” used as liquid manure is an excellent fertilizer on tomatoes.

More gardening tips next edition….

The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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Ingredients: 250g pkt pink and white marshmallows, halved 100g pkt dried cranberries 110g pkt macadamia nuts, roughly chopped or pistachios (I use pistachios) 1/3 cup desiccated coconut 2 x 180g blocks good-quality white chocolate, chopped Slivered almonds to top 1: Grease a 20cm square cake pan, line with baking paper 2: Combine marshmallows, cranberries, nuts and coconut in a bowl. Place chocolate in bowl and microwave for a few minutes stirring with a metal spoon every few seconds or until smooth 3: Pour chocolate over mixture. Mix well, then spoon into pan, top with some slivered almonds & let set in fridge. When set cut with a warm knife into squares. Serve Enjoy!! (Jackie Coxon)

EXTRA ORDINARY REGIONAL MEETING LONGUEVILLE PARK ALPACA STUD 3 CHRISTIES RD PALMVALE 23RD APRIL 2013 - 10AM Please bring a plate of food to share for lunch The Advocate – Autumn Edition 2017

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Alpaca Advocate 2017 Autumn  

The Newsletter of the South Queensland & Northern NSW Region on the Australian Alpaca Association Ltd.

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