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Newsletter of the AAA South Queensland and Northern NSW Region—Region of Many Colours

2014 AUTUMN Edition ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

Alpaca Advocate ~ AUTUMN Edition

2014~


South Queensland & Northern NSW AAA Ltd Region Regional Calendar of Events 2014 16th February

REGIONAL MEETING - McLaren Vale Alpaca Stud - Contact: Leanne Tunny Ph 0755438988

22nd February

The Nutrition Workshop - Murwillumbah Showground

2nd March

The Wonderful World of Alpacas Workshop Nattermeri Alpacas Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

26th –29th March

Toowoomba Royal Show

29th March - 6th Apr

AUSTRALIAN ALPACA WEEK

10th - 23rd April

Royal Sydney Show (Judging Animal/Fleece Show & Display) Contact: Paul Haslin 02 48789429

26th - 27th April

Caves Show (Judging Animal/Fleece Show) Contact: Kelly Pfeiffer 0409129953

7th May

Maclean Agricultural Show (Regional Display) Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

9th & 10th May

Grafton Colourbration Show (Judging Animal/Fleece Show & Display) Contact: Colin Glasser (02) 66476454

11th - 19th May

AAA Ltd National Conference Adelaide Convention Centre

15th—17th May

Gympie Show

16th –18th May

Coffs Harbour Show (Regional Display) Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

16th - 18th May

Ipswich Show (Regional Display) Contact: Lynn Kincade Ph 0421093574

1st June

Contact: Convenor Marg Hassall

Fleece: Pauline Glasser (02) 66476454

Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

Contact: Robyn Harrison Ph 0418748585

REGIONAL MEETING NATTAMERI ALPACAS Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

8th –9th June

New England Show

19th—21st June

Primex Agricultural Industries Expo Casino Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

28th June

Murwillumbah Inaugural Alpaca Show Contact: Rosemary Eva 02 6677 7500

28th - 29th June

Mudgeeraba Agricultural Show (Display) Contact:Steve Rowley 07 55463971

12—13th July

Queensland Colourbration—Alpacas on Show Contact Marc Mullette 0401071574

19th – 20th July

Mid North Coast Show Contact: Lindy Brown Ph 02 65660439

20th July

The Wonderful World of Alpacas (MCLAREN VALE ALPACAS QLD) Leanne Tunny Ph 0755438988

27th July

Contact: Cathy Reid Ph 02 67787449

ANNUAL REGIONAL MEETING – Longueville Park Alpacas

3rd August

The Wonderful World of Alpacas (NATTAMERI ALPACAS) Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

8th –17th August

Royal Queensland Show ~ Ekka (Judging Animal/Fleece Show & Display) Contact: TBA Fleece: Pauline Glasser (02) 66476454

31st August

Gold Coast Show (Regional Display, Judging Animal) Contact: Leanne Tunny Ph 0755438988

18th—21st September

NATIONAL SHOW - Judging & Fleece

20th & 21st September

Nimbin Show (Regional Display) Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

16th —18th October 14th —15th October 23rd November

North Coast National LismoreShow - (Regional Display) Contact: Bob Coxon 026645 9092 Bangalow Show (Regional Display) Contact: Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092 REGIONAL MEETING - TBA - QLD ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Contents Articles

page

Presidents Report

5

ABARES Outlook Conference

6

Australian Alpaca Week

10

New Regional Trailer

14

Rickets An Overview

16

Meri Suri

23

Research—Insulation

27

Herd Sires

24

Lacy Scarf Pattern

31

Front Page: Melleah Jane Hewitt Photography

Dear Members, Welcome to the Autumn edition of Alpaca Advocate, much needed rain has fallen over our region and it looks positive headinging into Autumn. Many alpaca studs have opened their farms to the public for Australian Alpaca Week. A busy but rewarding experience for many and certainly a promotion of our thriving industry. The next open day for many across our region will be for Mothers Day weekend. In this edition: Barbara Linley shares the work which made MeriSuri products a reality. The passion of having both a Suri and Merino farm certainly was the basis for this project. Thanks to Elizabeth Paul for sending her article to the Advocate on Rickets, definitely a good read. Research projects in this edition where on “alpaca as an insulator for your home” and usage in the cold. A large number of photographs have been submitted this edition—most have been placed in articles. Photos certainly tell a story quickly.

Advertisers: Creekside Alpaca Stud Grandeverge Alpacas

Showing has started and is in full swing reports in the next edition.

Hinchcliffe Alpacas

Take care,

Kallaroo Alpaca Stud Koorana Park Alpacas

“Happy Alpacaring!”

Lakehaven Alpacas Melleah Jane Hewitt Photography McLaren Vale Alpacas ARANAR Farm Wahgungurry Alpacas Wyona Alpaca Stud

The Editor and South Queensland & Northern NSW Region Committee of the AAA accept no responsibility for the opinions expressed, information supplied or advertisements published. All submissions are subject to editing. Copyright : The material published in this magazine is subject to copyright. And may not be published in part or whole without written permission of the author.

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Your 2013 –2014 Regional Committee President:

Leanne Tunny

0407748477

Vice President:

Steve Rowley

07 5546 3971

steve@erragolia.com.au

Secretary:

Karin Bondarenko

07 55470190

karinbond@optusnet.com.au

Treasurer:

Christine Chidgey

0402234528

chidge100@hotmail.com

Past President:

Sue Challacombe

02 6642 3336

jschallacombe@tpg.com.au

Marketing: & Merchandise:

Bob Coxon

02 66459092

nattameri@bigpond.com

Newsletter Editor:

Pauline Glasser

02 66476454

cpg4764@bigpond.net.au

Webmaster:

Steve Rowley

07 5546 3971

steve@erragolia.com.au

Health & Safety Officer :

VACANCY

Education Officer:

Leanne Tunny

Fleece Liaison Officer:

VACANCY

0407748477

info@mclarenvalealpacas.com.au

info@mclarenvalealpacas.com.au

Next Regional Meeting WHEN: 1ST june 2014 TIME:

10.30am for 11am

WHERE: Nattameri Alpaca Stud - Goodwood Island

Contact: Jackie & Bob Coxon 02 6645 9092

Please bring Lunch to Share

More information will be emailed shortly

Advertise on the

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WINTER ADVOCATE deadline ~ JUNE 30 2014. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~ Alpaca Advocate ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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From our President’s Desk April 13th 2014 Hello Members, Many of you may be unaware that the regions committee members are quite active and meet on a monthly basis via Skype. Considering our committee members span from South East Queensland to Northern NSW - the Skype format works very well as we can all be in our own homes but in a meeting at the same time. Meeting on a regular basis gives us the opportunity to discuss forthcoming events, outcomes of past events, anticipated expenses and show programmes. If there are any topics that you would like the committee to discuss – please contact one of our committee members and ask for it to be included on the next committee meeting agenda. The ‘Inaugural’ Murwillumbah Alpaca Show will be held on Saturday June 28th at the Murwillumbah Show Grounds. Rosemary Eva and her show committee have been working tirelessly on getting this show off the ground. The show schedule will appear on the regions website shortly. We would appreciate as much support as possible by members in both show entries and volunteers (especially since this is an inaugural show). The Mudgeeraba Agricultural Show falls on the same weekend as the Murwillumbah Alpaca Show (Saturday June 28th/Sunday June 29th). Belle Byrne and Wayne Singh will be attending the Show with display animals and will be assisted by Jo Jekel. The alpacas are always a very welcome sight at the show by the 1000’s of adults and children that attend. It is usually a weekend filled with explaining the difference between a Llama and an Alpaca and explaining that not all alpacas spit! RNA Rural Discovery Day – Thursday 22 May 2014, Brisbane Showgrounds, Bowen Hills. Rural Discovery Day is a fun, educational day for primary students to learn where their food and fibre comes from. The RNA Rural Discovery Day will be attended this year by Judy Barlow, Liz Coles, Rosemary Eva, Bernadette Hunt, Lyn & Col Barron. The RNA Rural Discovery Day is all about ‘bringing the country to the city’. The crew will speak to up to 300 children on the day (in lots of 25 – 40 at a time) about everything alpaca. Every year, our region has a stand at PRIMEX Agricultural Industries Expo (June 19 – 21st), Casino Drive, Casino. This event is a wonderful public relations event for the alpaca industry. Bob & Jackie Coxon and their team of assistants ensure that there are alpacas on display each day and that there is a large amount of hand made and commercial alpaca merchandise for sale. This event is ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

where the team, (Pauline) sells an amazing amount of raffle tickets for our yearly raffle. If you would like to volunteer your services to assist in any way, please contact any committee member for more information. As you can see, there are always alpaca displays/ events and public relations opportunities available for members to become involved in. If you are a member that doesn’t necessarily want to get involved in the ‘showing of alpacas’ you still have opportunities to ‘show off’ your alpacas by participating in any number of events. A day out with your alpacas and other likeminded alpaca breeders/lovers is always a great social event. The Gold Coast Show is normally held on the Father's Day weekend but this year both the date and the venue have changed. New date: Sunday August 31st New venue: Gold Coast Turf Club, Racecourse Drive, Bundall The schedule will be available within coming weeks Having recently attended the Toowoomba Show as both a volunteer and an exhibitor, it is very pleasing to see how much of a ‘community’ we, the alpaca association members are. Although we are all competition to each other in the ring, it is lovely to see such camaraderie. A special thank you to Pauline Glasser, Di Smart and Lehanne Robinson for their huge contribution toward the fleece exhibition at the Toowoomba Show and a wonderful fleece display. The regions trailer has been completed and paid for and is now in the care of Bob Coxon. The trailer is a fabulous addition to our region and will make Bob’s trips to displays and events with alpacas and merchandise much easier. Now that we have had some rain, please don’t become complacent, don’t forget to do faecal egg tests and ensure your alpacas are strong and healthy! Leanne Tunny President South Queensland & Northern NSW Region Ltd Australian Alpaca Association Ltd

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Summary of ABARES Outlook Conference, Canberra 4-5 March 2014

Michelle Malt

The Board gave approval for the General Manager and President to attend the ABARES Outlook Conference held in Canberra on 4-5 March 2014 to develop contacts with key government and agricultural industry personnel, and to demonstrate the intent of the alpaca industry with regards to recognition as an emerging agribusiness. Craig and myself attended the conference sessions and dinner, in addition to meeting with several departments (refer General Managers report). We sat with several delegates from the Japanese Agriculture and Livestock Industries Corporation, and a number of Nuffield Scholars with background in a range of industries. There were introductions to several RIRDC staff, and I briefly met the Hon. Barnaby Joyce, who raised the subject of the ‘cria muster’ (confirming he was across this personally, not just his staff). A summary of the key points and presenters from each of the sessions attended is provided below. Conference Opening – The Hon. Barnaby Joyce MP, Minister for Agriculture (single stream) In opening the conference, the minister referred to:  the Quarantine and Biosecurity Act and its importance in maintaining the high standards of protection against disease incursions.

positive outcomes achieved from well-targeted research, which provide on average a return of $11 for every $1 spent; and contribute to Australia having a reputation as a reliable market for quality product.

noted that Australia is known for large scale agriculture that is done well.

 

Economic Overview session (single stream) Overview of the current position of the Australian economy, questioned whether better conditions would be sustainable

Indicators suggest consumers are still conservative and non-discretionary costs for health, housing and education are the cause of most concern

China is now in the first year following economic reform

If China buys a product – it becomes expensive

If China sells a product – it becomes cheap

Increase in average household income (rising “middle class”) will drive up demand for goods (and not just luxury items)

Anticipated that Chinese exports will possibly reduce due to increasing costs of labour

Chinese land reform will emphasise the asset of farmers and input of production, and is considered likely to increase the number of farmers. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

Future of Agriculture (single stream)  There is a focus on food consumption due to growing world population

Important for Australia to concentrate on areas where we can do well to ensure our competitiveness at individual, industry & National level

Government must improve market access, and provide funding to assist Research Development and Extension activities, and work with industry in these areas

Industry must invest in infrastructure, better utilise RD&E funding (ie apply outcomes/findings to improve performance & profitability), and know their market Australia has a ‘safe and clean’ reputation, but are we branding Australia well in our markets? Should there be adoption of “umbrella marketing” (unified) approach to promote Australian product in international markets; for example “100% Pure” campaign adopted by New Zealand.

Industry needs to do their homework in their desired markets – what do they want? What do they need? What does the buyer want? Need to link in with others to maintain supply. Agricultural Productivity (selected session)  Emphasised need to pool intellectual & financial resources and increase collaboration & partnership with other countries/areas conducting research (China is spending big).

Extension and advisory services are critical to rollout information to farmers

The Roi (return on investment) in agricultural research is impressive over the long term.

Consider regulations and cost of compliance (alpaca producers need to be aware of regulations governing use of agricultural chemicals, livestock transport etc)

Production cost in Australia is high (due to labour costs), so the best markets to target are in developing an expensive product for the affluent, discerning purchaser; and target the high-value, niche market.

Australia is the best source genetically for certain crops (& alpaca genetics?)

Does training affect farm performance? YES! ie attendance at field days, chemical courses, farm management courses etc. The results are statistically significant in support of training.

Where you farm, and the use of innovation – if adopted & used – will affect farm productivity and profitability.

Training affected human capital, and in turn, the ability to adopt innovation.

Skill affects farm performance

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Summary of ABARES Outlook Conference, Canberra 4-5 March 2014 (Cont)

Fibre (selected session)  Outlook for 2018-19 indicated demand will be strengthening for wool & cotton, due to lower production & supply resulting from adverse weather conditions

China is stockpiling cotton, global consumption of cotton is trending upwards

Necessary to have a stable supply for processors – processing countries include China, Turkey, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Vietnam

By end 2014 forecast Australian sheep herd will be 71.8million,

Shorn wool production is forecast to decline in the short -term with fewer sheep shorn & lower fleece weight due to conditions.

When you have history – Mine it. When you have no history – Collect it, & build a community of practice.

You can’t find what you don’t look for, so start with the data you have, on a small level (case studies) and keep your eye on operations.

Tasmanian fruit grower presentation – how they used their situation to build & promote their brand by telling a story about their philosophy of growing/farming product.

Responding to Society (selected stream)  Important to research consumer & market, community, producer, animal behaviour.

Consider what ‘term’ or descriptions are accepted (think ‘Free Range Eggs’)

Producer – stockmanship issues, animal welfare – wellbeing, psychology etc

Wool exports to China, Taiwan, India, Czech Republic, Italy, with a growing capacity for processing wool in Vietnam.

Research is used to inform marketing and communication strategies, and inform development of standards and Code of Practice.

Cotton has made a conscious decision to be at the premium end of production, this reduces cost of production for processors & increases demand for product.

Benchmarks for educating the public – change the work practice OR change the perception of the practice.

 

Level of responsiveness to community expectations Innovative – future driven

Proactive – low risk

 

Reactive – high risk (crisis mode) Failure to identify changing expectation can lead to fallout.

The Australian economic model is not conducive to mass production/lower quality There is international market demand for ‘best management practice’, sustainable farming that is environmentally responsible. An ageing population has a different perception of “quality goods”, there is aspiration to consume from a rapidly growing market of middle income producers.

Global focus (single stream)

There will need to be increased intensity of production, as more food will be needed with less resources to support them.

Australia is well-postitioned to be environmentally sustainable.

Industry to consider – What are your constraints?

Scanning Long Term Horizons (conference close, panel session) Important to produce an industry ‘snapshot’. Attendance at the ABARES Outlook Conference highlighted several things AAA could do to improve our knowledge, communicate our position and demonstrate the strength of the alpaca industry and its potential to be a positive contributor to the agricultural sector in Australia. These suggestions have been made to the Board and are under consideration. Michelle Malt.

The Value of Biosecurity (selected stream)  Insurance to protect/minimise the impact of an incursion on farm profitability.

FMD incursion – the impact is mainly from lost access to export markets while the incursion is being managed.

To estimate the $cost, assess what the reduced risk becomes as a result (benefit) of biosecurity measures implemented.

Various livestock industries have determined the base value (per farm) of preventing FMD by the implementation of biosecurity measures. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

OMG!! One head is better than two!! from Longueville Park

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POSITIONS VACANT

Fleece Liaison Officer & Health & Welfare Officer SOUTH QUEENSLAND & NORTHERN NSW AAA LTD

Fleece Liaison Officer The Fleece Liaison Officer (FLO) is responsible for co-ordinating the collection and forwarding of fleeces from the region to AAFL or other outlets, as well as ensuring information on fleece is distributed effectively to regional members. Duties Determine, and advise members of, those fleece collection points to be used within the region. Set up and co-ordinate collection points within region. The number of which depends on geographic/grower spread Determine which collection point best suits each grower; produce and distribute a “Grower List” for each collection point. Ascertain the best method of transporting fleece from the collection points to the AAFL Fleece Handling Centre (FHC). (Note that national wool transport companies are usually the cheapest). Prepare articles for Newsletter on fleece matters. Ensure that all regional members are kept informed of the current regional fleece collection arrangements, using regional meetings, newsletters, emails and circulars. Advise on and organise pre-classing tuition for members. Maintain a supply of approved fleece bags for sale to members through the regional merchandising officer. Organise at least one fleece collection day annually at which fleece is collected and pressed, ready for dispatch.

Animal Health & Welfare Regional Animal Health Representative – Roles and Responsibilities Provide the Regional Newsletter Editor with articles on care and husbandry. Role One: To act as a conduit between the Region and the AAA Ltd AHH&W Committee on regional animal health issues and working with AHH&W in meeting the needs of Region members in relation to animal health. Responsibilities: The Representative is the initial point of contact for a member who has a health concern in relation to an alpaca. So far as is practicable, the representative may resolve the concern or refer it to the AHH&W Committee. Role Two: To provide a report three times per year (December, April, August) to the AHH&W Committee via AAA Ltd office on animal health activities and areas of concern within the Region. Responsibilities: The Representative is to consolidate enquiries from regional members, on the form provided, stating action taken where appropriate and submit this form through their Regional Committee to the AHH&W Committee Role Three: To liaise with local animal welfare agencies in relation to cases of alpaca neglect or abandonment. Responsibilities: The Representative is to make themselves known and hold the contact details of local animal welfare agencies (RSPCA, Rangers etc,) Also, the Representative may provide advice or assistance to the agency on an ‘as required’ basis. Role Four: Should a significant disease/condition occur within the Region, the Representative is to advise the Regional President, AAA Ltd office and AHH&W Committee as a matter of priority. Role Five: The Representative must be familiar with the statutory requirements for reporting of Emergency Animal Disease (EAD). Information may be found at the following website of Department of Agriculture, Fisheries & Forestry.

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The Toowoomba Show Fleece Team A busy time again this year organising the fleece competition. The team arrived in Toowoomba on the Tuesday to weigh and set up on the Wednesday. Ron Reid our Judge started examining fleeces on the Thursday at 8.30am and finished judging at 4pm. Much effort is taken in setting up the Fleece competition display after judging. This year red satins were suggested by Lehanne to brighten up the Fleece corner of the pavilion. We think they did that well! Thank you to Lehanne & Bruce Robinson, Di Smart and Colin Glasser for their expertise and energy in setting up the fleece display and most importantly taking it apart and making sure all exhibitors received their fleeces back.

Pauline Glasser ~ Fleece Convenor

Interesting Websites: The listing of these websites is simply for interest and the information is not a recommendation. e.g. on health matters, please consult with your Veterinarian. www.owning-alpaca.com (Excellent site, has instructions for washing fleece, craft projects, felting etc, packed with information.) www.alpaca-uk.co.uk (Articles) www.camelidsupplies.com.au (Supplier) www.alpaca.org.nz (Info & Articles) www.thinklivestock.com (Suppliers of Vaccination Equipment)

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-25/qch-alpacas/5343330 http://www.ruralweekly.com.au/news/western-australian-alpaca-fleece-judge-rod-reidsa/2212214/ http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-03-25/qch-alpacas/5343330

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Thank you to all studs who opened to the Public Australian Alpaca Week

You will recall that AAA changed the timing of Australian Alpaca Week (previously known as National Alpaca Week) this year from May to March/April to, in the main, cater for the 2014 National Conference in Adelaide, 9 – 11 May. The change severely affected involvement by our members with only seven studs participating compared to seventeen last year. Nonetheless, as open day reports filter in some members had great events with excellent numbers attending whilst others were not so good with the poor weather conditions on some days obviously a contributing factor. A considerable amount of free advertising via ABC Radio and local newspapers was forthcoming due mainly to the efforts of some participants who took the initiative and used their creative skills to promote their events. Also, your committee spent over $1000.00 for a full page advertising feature in the APN publication - The Rural Weekly. Stephen Rowley our Webmaster, as always, did a great job setting up our dedicated AAW website. Once again, many thanks to all members who participated in AAW 2014 and I look forward to you and many more of our members joining in next year. Bob Coxon

Sphinx Rock Alpacas... Open Day Sunday March 30th Our first tilt at Alpaca Week in our first year of owning alpacas. Not really knowing what to expect we approached the day with much anticipation. Rainy weather on the day impacted on our numbers but those people who did brave the weather had a great opportunity to enjoy our herd at close range. They were particularly taken with Ulysses who is a real personality and who featured at Alpaca Week at his last home. A big thank you to Bob and Jackie Coxon for their advice and support and help. We enjoyed the experience and the opportunity to introduce alpacas to other people and we will be involved again next year. Margo & David Vincent

Deadlines for advocate Winter June 30 - Spring Sept 30 ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Roland Schwertner, was interviewed by ABC Radio during Australian Alpaca Week. The segment went to air on Wednesday morning in the Rural Report and went over very well. Top effort Roland. Roland had a successful open day at Erwin Alpacas with plenty of visitors enjoying the alpaca information and as a special treat Roland had his families train set on exhibition as well. Roland has been promoting the Australian Alpaca Industry on a regular basis at various organisations around the Alstonville district. His Alpaca Bella Rose is well known to many. Quite a celebrity!

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The next promotion is at Eltham Valley Pantry.

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What is this storm going to do? ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Regional trailer ~ first trip The scones (Plain & Pumpkin) were made at 6am ready to go. Di had the kitchen under control jam and cream ready. Jackie and Bob arrived early with the new trailer to use as display and it was full of all the merchandise. Our display looked good even with the poo vac on display. As the photos show we were all ready to go not knowing how many people would turn up. Then as you can see in the photos the biggest thunderstorm arrived—so unusual a morning storm in April! Not to dampen our spirits Di made us all a cuppa and scones—Yum! we were all a little peckish. A local arrived in the storm, so we shut the roller doors (as the rain was coming in) and talked paca and sold some raffle tickets. By 11am the sun started to come out and the phone was ringing and the visitors started to arrived. We all had a busy afternoon with 70 visitors, the sun was beautiful and the alpacas dried off. Nattameri and Wahgungurry Alpaca Studs shared the work with setting up on Sunday the 6th of April. We decided to advertise our event via the use of postcards. Pauline organised the designing, Bob edited and the order for 2000 was organised. Jackie distributed postcards on the lower Clarence through all her weekly events! ie Line Dancing, Zumba and Bob went for a drive to deliver to roadside post boxes. Pauline distributed in the Grafton area using the local school teachers’ pigeonholes! and general distribution centres around town. (local stores, produce stores, Coles and Woolies notice Boards). The local media produced some great info and our publicity plan was complete. Col organised the fencing and set up of the area for our guests to experience a cuppa and Devonshire tea whilst our 17 weanlings and cria wondered amongst our guests.

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We all sat for an evaluation at the end of the day— “not a bad day considering the weather”, “Gee we sold a lot of raffle tickets” “Everybody wanted to pay for Devonshire tea instead I told them buy some raffle tickets” , “if we had 70 in a few hours imagine how many we could have had!” We are all set now for our traditional Mothers Day opening—lets hope the weather is kind! Jackie, Pauline, Bob and Col.

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Regional Shows and Regional Displays Members you may or may not be aware of what is involved in running a Show for the Region. It takes quite a bit of organising and many volunteer working hours from those who assist. As with many organisations it is a struggle at times to find help and for the most part always ends up with the “same people” doing all the work ! So, please think about putting your hand up and helping out..........it would be most appreciated!

Check out the merchandise stand at the next regional meeting.

PROMOTIONAL TRAILER Well the trailer has finally arrived and the end result is very pleasing. It can be used for transporting animals and merchandise or just animals as the internal gates are removable. Measurements are, 2400mm long x 1525mm wide and 1500mm high or in the old terminology an 8 x 5. With signwriting now complete it is a great traveling advertisement for AAA and our region. Whilst the trailer will be garaged at Nattameri Alpacas, Goodwood Island NSW it is available to all members to use for regional/alpaca business. Therefore, don’t hesitate to contact me if the need arises for you to use the trailer. The earlier the notice the better so that pick up/delivery can be arranged. Manufacturers, Triple TTT Trailers at Lismore NSW are keen to help out AAA members so if you would like to discuss your custom trailer requirements please call Marty on 02 66218916. Also, Triple TTT recently agreed to sponsor Grafton Show, alpaca judging events on 10th May 2014. Bob Coxon Regional Marketing Representative ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Send in your favourite Alpaca photos

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Rickets: An Overview. Elizabeth Paul Erehwon Alpacas 3/01/14

Rickets is usually seen as a bone condition, often caused by a deficiency in vitamin D, which fails to maintain bone integrity. This is essentially correct, but it is not the whole story. The mammalian body has a complex biological system in place to ensure that it has sufficient circulating calcium, or serum calcium, to maintain the contraction of the heart muscle, among other functions. The store of calcium is in the skeleton, and the body will attempt to maintain its serum calcium level at all costs. Calcium and PTH If there is not sufficient calcium in the blood for this purpose, the body will take immediate steps to improve the supply. The lowered calcium levels trigger the parathyroid gland, situated in the neck, to start producing parathyroid hormone, or PTH. This hormone activates stored vitamin D to become active, as vitamin D has the role of increasing absorption of calcium across the gut wall. PTH also starts stripping calcium from the bones, essentially weakening them. Once the calcium level has been raised, the PTH production is shut off, and bone starts to renew by being laid down again. This process is perfectly normal and is carried on by the homeostatic systems of the body, on a diurnal or daily basis. However, if there is little calcium in the diet, or if the animal has little stored vitamin D ready to go, the PTH will keep on stripping calcium from the bones, and this creates the condition called rickets. It would seem therefore, that we only need to provide extra calcium and/or extra vitamin D, and the rickets problem is solved. Not quite. The Role of Phosphate When bone breaks down, it releases not only calcium but also phosphate, as the other major component of bone. Phosphate is vital for many cellular activities within the body, but the two main functions are as cellular energy, in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and as phospholipids, which are the major component of cell membranes. While PTH is actively supplying the body with calcium, it is also altering the calcium to phosphate ratio by blocking the re-absorption of phosphate through the kidney. This creates a massive outpouring of phosphate through the urine. Without enough phosphate, not only do the bones become weak, but the cells lose an energy source and cell production slows down. One of the main effects of rickets on the body, besides weakening the bones, is that it causes a severe anaemia. Calcium is always present in plant material, because plant cell walls contain calcium, even if they are dead, so dry hay will still be a source of calcium. High phosphate levels in grazing situations are only available in spring, because high levels of ATP are required for the spring growth of the plants. Spring or early cut hay is much higher in phosphate ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

levels than autumn cut hay. In a drought situation, when the plants are either dead or not growing, there will still be some calcium in the little available plant matter, but virtually no phosphate. Apart from plant material, the main source of phosphate for grazing animals is animal material. This is the reason why free range cattle and other large herbivores may eat bones, dung or even urine soaked soil, during a drought. They are most likely to be looking for phosphate, rather than calcium. In summary, rickets can be caused by deficiencies in calcium, phosphate or vitamin D, or by an overactive parathyroid gland. Lifestages: Juveniles It is frequently assumed that rickets only affects young animals. This is presumably because the effects on the bones are more visible in younger than older animals. Rickets in younger crias will cause crooked legs see Plate 1; or humped back See Plate 2. It may also cause the cria to stop growing altogether, as the body sometimes decides to “make do” with what it’s got. If left unattended, the cria will Plate 1: 10 month stay stunted., and may even be old suri with severe leg deviation. described as a miniature. Stunted male crias under 2 years old can be got going again. Female crias mature sexually much earlier than males, so there is a smaller window of opportunity to fix the problem. For crias, generally extra vitamin D will do the job. Adults Adult alpacas rarely show the severely crooked legs of crias, but in their case the condition has a far more devastating effect, particularly for breeding females. In late pregnancy the mother is pumping lots of minerals into the fetus. If she can’t keep up the supply for herself as well, Plate 2: 12 month old suri and goes into a rickets with humped back. situation, she may abort, and may even die afterwards. The heavily nursing mother is also at high risk of rickets, especially if she is stressed by something else eg transport. Moving late pregnant or just birthed females is never a good idea, although the threat of bushfires/floods could be good enough reasons.

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Adults may appear lame, called shifting lame, when the lameness appears to be in one leg today and a different one tomorrow. They may show a mild humped back, but the two main signs in mothers are falling body condition and severe anaemia. The breeding female herd needs a vitamin D program, and also needs regular checking on these two points. Alpacas can go skeletal and chalkwhite, virtually overnight. Moving an alpaca in this situation is very likely to kill it. My recommendation is to give emergency supplies of phosphate on the spot, which can be either by oral drench or injectables, and waiting about half an hour BEFORE moving the alpaca to yards or shelter for further treatment. The phosphate will help reduce the stress involved in transport.

Colour Matters

The phosphate source must be a veterinary/medicinal product by the way, not eg a phosphate fertilizer, which could kill the animal.

Other Causes of Lameness in Crias

Vitamin D Animals make their own vitamin D as long as they have access to sufficient UV light in the form of sunlight. Once the light hits the skin, it takes 6-8 weeks, to produce the active form of vitamin D in the body. A vitamin D deficiency problem now, means that access to sunlight was interrupted between 6 - 8 weeks ago. Plate 3: 4 year old black wether with The hours of sun start increasing in chronic rickets. spring, hit their peak over Christmas and then start reducing again. The vitamin D levels in the animal follow behind, in the same curve. Of course there will be cloud on some days, spring or summer storms or the severe smoke haze problem of bushfires. This will cut the season short and cause problems in late Feb/early March if not before. Worms There are two important points to remember about worms in a farming situation. Firstly, they are always present, and in fact they should be present, so that the animals can build up a natural defence against them. (It is worth noting that a “zero” worm count does not mean there are no worms. It means the worm level is below the limit at which they would be considered as a significant cause of illness.) Secondly, worms such as stomach worms are what biologists call secondary opportunistic pathogens, meaning they are rarely the actual cause of illness, but merely taking advantage of a situation where the animal’s immune defences are dropping. Thus the wormy cria is flagging an immune problem, which in turn could be due to a nutritional or other stress problem. Any alpaca which constantly seems to display ‘worminess” ie anaemia, lameness, pot belly, ill thrift, poor appetite or even increased appetite but with no resulting weight gain, should be considered as having another problem. The worms do still need to be treated for, but treating only for worms, will not improve the situation much unless the underlying problem is addressed. In alpacas this problem is very likely to be rickets.

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Dark and black animals simply do not make as much vitamin D in their skins as lighter skinned animals. In a mixed coloured herd, black and light alpacas cannot be treated the same in a vitamin D program, as the blacks at any lifestage will always need more. See Plate 3. This 4 year old black wether was returned to a breeder from a pet situation. Despite initial appearances, he is not trying to go to the toilet, but is locked up in this stance with chronic rickets, being at this stage almost unable to walk. Emergency treatment was started but it was really too late, and eventually he had to be put down.

White Muscle Disease: Selenium deficiency causes white muscle disease, a condition of lameness usually seen in very young stock. Selenium is also required for proper fertility, but as a trace mineral, it is only required in small amounts. In other livestock industries, the most usual times of supplementing are just before mating, for improved fertility, and just before birthing, to ensure supply in the colostrum. If not done then, it would be important to look at supplementing very young animals with appropriate selenium doses, because this is the time when they really need to be protected. White muscle disease crias tend to spread their hind legs out before they go down, and then lay on their sides, unlike rickets crias which can still cush. They remain bright and alert, but cannot get up. If bottle fed they may survive for some time, but eventually the heart muscle is affected and then they will die. Joint Ill: The bleeding of the umbilical cord straight after birth is nature’s way of flushing out any contamination that may have been acquired during the birthing process. For this reason, it is not a great idea to immediately clamp an umbilical cord, (if at all) but to let it pulse Plate 4: Joint Ill cria. for a few minutes. Joint ill involves a newborn getting a severe bacterial blood infection at or before birth. The infection travels up the umbilical cord, hence the other term, navel ill, and localises in the leg joints, causing swelling, and lameness. In other livestock, it is probably more often seen in newborn foals than in calves. Crias with joint ill are either born lame or become lame, very soon after birth, with at least one leg joint becoming noticeably swollen. See Plate 4. The cria looked very sick at birth, and took a long time to get up. One front joint can be seen to be very swollen. His mother was a ten year old female, who had previously had trouble free births. This cria was born at the end of the prolonged drought, and the mother had been in labour for some time, possibly overnight. Almost

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Rickets (Cont) certainly the cria got infected in utero. He developed a temperature, became more lame, his fleece began to drop out and he died of pneumonia on Day 4. There is virtually nothing that can be done for joint ill crias, as without a functioning immune system, even strong antibiotics will have little effect. If by chance a cria with joint ill does survive, to eg weaning, then it will almost certainly die at the first major stress event. Summary There are many causes of lameness, but over the years that I have been collecting material, rickets stands out as being the major cause of lameness in alpacas. I believe it is also responsible for most deaths within the female breeding herd. For further information see Rickets: The Silent Killer and Handbook of Alpaca Health By Elizabeth Paul, Cost $ 55 per set plus $14 AUD P&P Australia wide. New purchasers please note these books are now only sold as a set.

Fibre Testing Micron Man Pty Ltd Email for more information microman@iinet.net.au New England Fibre Testing Service Walcha 02 6777 2122 Australian Wool Testing Authority (AWTA) Geelong office 03 5277 9842 Melbourne office 03 9371 2100 Australian Alpaca Fleece Testing (AAFT) (AWEX accredited) Paul Vallely, PO Box 246, Crookwell, NSW 2583 Phone/Fax: 02 4834 2132 International Fibre Centre, Gordon Institute of TAFE, Geelong Geelong 03 5227 2358 Howe, Watts & Co Mudgee 02 6373 3403 Riverina Wool Testers Pty Ltd Wagga Wagga 02 6925 1407 Riverina Fleece Testing Services (RFTS) Wodonga 02 6026 0551 Southern Tablelands Fibre Testing (STFT) (AWEX Accredited) Kim Cartwright, Thalaba Downs, Laggan 2583 Phone/Fax: 02 4837 3210 Mobile: 0427 373 211

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Shearers Bob Dunn

(02) 4930 3446

Chris Powers

0438653782

Drew Shearman

(02) 49201507

Ted Winnell (Casino)

(02) 66625379

Mob: 0427 343991

Bernie McInerney

Mob: 0429 668240

Dusty the Aussie Shearer

0422 946697

Mike Snow via Kelli Pfeiffer pfeiffer@austarnet.com.au Contacting fellow breeders in your Region for a recommendation is probably the best way to locate a shearer. Arrange well ahead of time as the shearers are booked out quickly. The AAA Website also has a list of shearers on the home page. qldnsw.alpaca.asn.au

Controlling weeds on your property Some introduced weeds from other countries have become serious pests in Queensland. Weeds threaten Queensland's primary industries, natural environment, livestock, human health and people's livelihoods. Under Queensland law, landowners, including state and local government, are responsible for controlling declared weeds on their property. Queensland's farmers spend more than $600 million each year on weed-related control activities. However, the total cost of weeds to Queensland's economy and your business can be much higher, including:

      

direct control and management costs competition with pasture species to reduce available grazing toxicity to stock competition with crops for space, water and nutrients increased stock mustering costs loss of ecotourism values impact of aquatic weeds on water quality and irrigation. This guide explains various methods to control weeds on your property and how this can benefit your business.

Now that’s a neat cria vest! ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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PRIMEX 19 20 21 June 2014 This year Primex will celebrate its 30th anniversary and the organising committee have lots planned for the event. One of the main attractions will be the Premier Feature – The future Of Farming which is a joint venture with NSW Farmers Association and the Future Farmers Network. Please refer to advertisement for further information. Our region will once again be represented at Primex with our usual display of alpacas, fleeces, products for sale as well as raffle tickets for sale and plenty of information. To support the abovementioned concept we have adopted the theme “Look To The Future - Farm Alpacas” We have requested fifty VIP passes for use by our members over the three days. So if you would like to attend this wonderful industry exhibition please let me know as soon as you can and I’ll send you tickets when they come to hand. As always we are looking for volunteers to assist with our display over the three days. So if you would like to help out please let me know, email: nattameri@bigpond.com Many hands make light work. Bob Coxon Regional Marketing Representative

Murwillumbah Alpaca Show Saturday 28TH JUNE 2014 Murwillumbah Showground Judge: Lyn Dickson Entries Close:

20th May 2014

Declaring 2015 the Australian Year of the Alpaca. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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AN ALPACA and a Merino touching nose-to-nose isn't something you see every day. And combining their fibres is even less common. But at a property in the Western District it is the meeting of these two animals that is behind the development of the unique MeriSuri yarn. MORE: MeriSuri yarn can be bought from merisuri.com.au or

“It was a trial for the processors too as they had never blended the fibres, so they have had to change around machinery,’’ Barbara says. “When you put so much effort into producing the fibre it is great to see what happens to it.” For the MeriSuri blend 18.5-micron Merino wool was used and the Suri fleece, in fawn and white, was 20-22 microns. Barbara admits the yarn “isn’t totally perfect” due to the blend, but that was part of the appeal. “Suri has a beautiful lustre, a silky handle and drapes well, so combined with the qualities of wool it is beautiful.” Barbara says the blend retained the silky sheen of the Suri and the quality crimp and comfort factor of the Merino, and concedes “blood, sweat and tears’’ went into producing quality wool and alpaca fleece and getting the yarn to a point she was happy with. “Farming isn’t easy, but I get a real thrill when I see the final product.” Once the yarn was sorted, Barbara contacted Melbourne-based contemporary knitwear designer Wendy Voon to see if she could help in designing garments.

emailinfo@wendyvoon.com MeriSuri co-developer Barbara Linley’s passion for natural fibre and sheer determination to “make it work” played a huge role in the development of the yarn. A long-time dream of Barbara’s to produce a soft, silky, durable yarn, MeriSuri is made up of 50 per cent superfine Merino wool and 50 per cent Suri alpaca fleece.

Wendy, who only works with natural fibres, has since made a sample collection out of the MeriSuri yarn. “It is beautiful to knit with and is so soft,’’ Wendy says.

While it may seem logical to combine two natural woollen fibres, it is the first time superfine Merino and Suri alpaca have been blended in Australia. Part-owner of Ambleside alpacas and Merinos at Berrybank, Barbara joined up with friend and fellow alpaca breeder, Robyn Betts from Jaegar alpacas at Kithbrook to develop MeriSuri.

Having officially launched the MeriSuri yarn and Wendy Voon garments at the recent Australian National Alpaca Show and Sale in Bendigo, Barbara says the aim now is to sell the yarn and Wendy’s garments commercially.

Barbara admits she may not know a lot about the fashion side of things, but she says she wants to get the message out there about wearing natural fibres because she “loves fibre”.

“It has to be commercially viable as that is the point of valueadding,” she says.

Barbara says it was an unusual but important step to process the fibre locally to ensure it was Australian grown and made. There are minimal processing plants left in Australia after many have closed their doors in recent years because processing is cheaper overseas.

“Initially I knew nothing, but I grew to love wool and Suri. “When selecting stock I think about the fibre they are going to produce at the end.” Article from Barbara Linley Ambleside Alpacas

“All of the animals are born and bred in Victoria and the yarn is then processed here, too. “It is taking the fibre from farm to fashion.” While they initially found many barriers to processing locally, after a lot of hard work and research the yarn is now scoured, made into tops, blended and processed into the final yarn by three different processing companies in Victoria. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Sire Name

Colour

IAR

Alpha Centauri Tahvo

Huacaya,

134917

Cobaki Creek Alpacas

$450.00

118157

Cobaki Creek Alpacas

$500.00

Encantador Alonzo (ET)

Stud

Stud Fee

Photo

Solid White

Huacaya, Light Fawn

Grand Flowerdale Traviator

Huacaya Medium Fawn

130107

Creekside Alpacas

$600.00

Erragolia Double Ice

Huacaya,

129715

Erragolia Alpacas

$ 400

72710

Erragolia Alpacas

$ 200.00

114843

Erragolia Alpacas

$ 300 .00

Wilari Park Ballantyne

Solid White

Huacaya, Solid White

Erragolia Collaroy

Huacaya, Dark Fawn

Longueville Park Black Opal

Huacaya Black

50527

Erragolia Alpacas Co Owned with Misty Mountain

$ 300 .00

Hinchcliffe Alfonso

Huacaya,

149935

Hinchcliffe Alpacas

$600.00

149931

Hinchcliffe Alpacas

$600.00

10515

Hinchcliffe Alpacas

$600.00

Hinchcliffe Olympus

Rathdowney Giacomo Casanova

Solid White

Huacaya, Medium Fawn

Solid White

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146614

Humminghills Alpacas

$660.00

114709

Humminghills Alpacas

$770.00

71817

Humminghills Alpacas

$440.00

118489

Humminghills Alpacas

$660.00

:97011

Humminghills Alpacas

$440.00

96951

Humminghills Alpacas

$550.00

158796

Humminghills Alpacas

$660.00

72948

Jacaranda Alpacas

$300.00

Huacaya Solid 115482 Black

Longueville Park

$660.00

Huacaya Solid Black

86100

Longueville Park

$770.00

Huacaya Solid 140623 Black

Longueville Park

$880.00

Huacaya Solid Black

149919

Longueville Park

$880.00

Huacaya Solid Black

159784

Longueville Park

$770.00

Suri Solid Dark Fawn

125158

Mangowood

$880.00

Rosemont CASTAWAY

HUACAYA Solid Black

Humminghills OLIVER TWIST

SURI Solid White

Bonny Belle DAN THE MAN

HUACAYA Rose Grey

Timbertop CT

HUACAYA

WARLORD

Solid White

Greenvale GABBANA

HUACAYA Solid White

Coricancha BOLDAMERO

HUACAYA Solid White

Rosemount

HUACAYA

LEWIS

Solid Medium Fawn

Janda

HUACAYA

MONTE CARLO Solid White

Wyona CENOTAPH Longueville Park RHYLEY Longueville Park PEGASUS Longueville Park PHOENIX Longueville Park BRIGANTINE

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Alpacas

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Lakehaven Optimo

Stud fee: $500 on farm, negotiable for multiple matings.

132003

Maple Park Alpacas

Huacaya Black

61055

MiaJai Alpacas

Huacaya Dark Fawn

125054

Misty Mountain Stud

$500

Karawill Atom

Huacaya Black

104635

Kestral Place Alpacas

$400.00

Arcady Auberon Kallarro

Huacaya Grey

Kallaroo Alpacas

POA

Barkala Garcia

Solid White

91399

Nattameri Alpacas

$400.00

Arcady Hoax

Huacaya Rose Grey

15538

Stanmore Park Alpacas

$500.00

Criadero Fidel

Huacaya Solid Black

95506

Wahgungurry Alpacas

$400.00

Ninbella Matt

Huacaya Medium Fawn

74124

Wahgungurry Alpacas

$400.00

Ninbella Galaxy

Huacaya Medium Fawn

87337

Wahgungurry Alpacas

$400.00

Shogun Lord Toranaga

Balfour Haven Noble Monarch

Huacaya, Solid White

Stud fee: $300 on farm, negotiable for multiple matings

Value add to your business by advertising in The Alpaca Advocate The Advocate is sent to all Regional Members, All AAA Directors, AAA Regional Presidents and Regional Newsletter Editors. We often have subscriptions from people interested in our industry from Intro to alpaca workshops.

Our reasonable rates: Full Page Half Page Quarter Page Classified—Business Card size

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Special Offer: 10% discount for 4 Adverts - discount applied on the 4th Advert. Subscription— 4 copies $22.00

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Information found from researching topic Using alpaca for house insulation I've seen a couple things about alpaca and wool used as insulation. At the bottom of this page is a brief discussion: http://www.greenhomebuilding.com/QandA/ materials/insulation.htm and here: http://madmikestips.com/2010/04/23/i-wantto-know-how-to-get-started-in-processingalpaca-fiber-into-home-insulation/ Q: I am an alpaca farmer looking for alternative uses for fibre that is not suitable for garments. I'd like to insulate my new fibre arts studio with alpaca and have read Janine Bjornson's advice on treating wool fibre for insulation. Since alpaca contains no lanolin or oil of any sort do I really need to wash the fibre before insulating? Would using the Borax dry (i.e. just sprinkling it on the fibre as we insulate) be as effective as applying it wet? A: I do not think it would be necessary to wash your alpaca wool unless there is some kind of dirt or debris in the wool that would render it desirable to insects or the like. In regard to adding the borax dry, I think that it would not be as effective. Dissolving it in water and spraying it on would ensure better coverage. All the recipes I have looked at (like this one below) recommend dissolving the Borax first. Making children's clothing flame retardant: Mix together 9 ounces 20 Mule Team Borax and 4 ounces boric acid in one gallon water. If the article is washable, soak in the solution after final rinsing, then dry. If the garment is not washable, spray with the solution. This solution, recommended by fire departments, may wash out of clothing and should be used after each washing or dry cleaning. Hi, We are currently having 5500lb of polyester, wool and alpaca being needle felted into thick batts for the insulation of our new house. The alpaca and wool is scoured and moth proofed. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

We are assuming that the alpaca, wool, polyester insulation will have better insulation properties than a wool, polyester mix. Moisture absorption is similar to wool insulation and provided there is not a problem with excess moisture (ie the house not being water proof) the batts act basically as a garment does. Adobe alpacas NZ FREE ALPACA SOLUTIONS

Australian Alpaca fleece comes in from the cold … really cold! This article first appeared in Alpacas Australia Magazine Issue 44 (Winter 2004) and with the permission of the AAA please read this sensational story: by Michael van den Bos McGregors International, NSW With the cold tentacles of winter taking a firm grasp of the seasonal merry-go-round, it is time once again to pull out the jumpers from the bottom draw. To make sure you stay extra warm this winter, Australian Alpaca could be just the ticket, as new ways of exploiting the qualities inherent in the fleece are continually being developed – including ensuring survival in one of the world’s coldest climates. Initially considered impossible, an Australian drilling company faced the challenge of insulating emergency communication equipment that would continue to work in temperatures that drop to minus 60°C; the solution was alpaca fleece. Major Drilling, a diamond core drilling company, needed a reliable means of providing emergency communication to employees that would withstand the harsh conditions of the Mongolian winter. Tony Brennan, Logistics Manager, Major Drilling, outlines just what they are up against. “We operate drill rigs in harsh and isolated environments where emergency navigational and communication equipment is priceless,” he said. “Our first reaction was that someone would have already developed a solution that would meet our needs. However, there was nothing remotely suitable on the market so sourcing components and materials was a very demanding process, especially when the

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required products were non-existent and had to be developed from scratch,” he said. An Emergency Equipment Electronic Support System (EEESS) was conceived and developed by George Meyer of RJM AutoElectrics in Mount Isa, ironically one of the hottest places in Australia. The EEESS is a sealed and controlled environment containing a satellite telephone, Global Positioning System (GPS) and an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB). The use of alpaca fleece as insulation made the system unique and able to operate in conditions where other equipment had failed. Meyer, who has extensive experience and knowledge of arctic conditions and materials suitable for use in extreme environments, explained that the thermal qualities of the insulation material were the biggest concern. It also needed to be transportable and be able to take punishment that modern insulating foams would not be able to handle. “Our solution was to use alpaca fleece to insulate the emergency communication equipment as the fibre is lightweight, robust and has tremendous thermal qualities. There is only one other natural material that rivals alpaca fleece for its warmth, but it is very hard to get hold of, polar bear fur,” said Mr Meyer.

“Alpaca fleece is great to work with, from developing highly thermal material to creating luxury suits and garments,” said Ms Pantelic. “The fleece has partially hollow fibres, providing excellent insulating properties whilst remaining lightweight, making it perfect for the job”. As pure alpaca fleece was required for the insulation of the EEESS, the fibre was hand spun. A lofty yarn was produced to maximize the entrapment of air and it was woven in a way so that it packed in very closely to create a very thick blanket. “The last thing we did was wash the blanket so it filled out, and as it doesn’t have scales like wool, it didn’t shrink. After a quick moth proofing, the end result was an amazing fabric and a much needed product,” she said. From the Gobi Desert to premier catwalks, Australian Alpaca fleece is enjoying increasing demand and acceptance both in Australia and overseas. In Australia, large department stores such as David Jones have increased their orders from last season and Australian Alpaca products will also be exported to China, South Korea and the UK. So next time you feel as if you are being shrouded by the cold cloak of winter, or if you happen to be on top of a drill mast during a Mongolian winter, reach for the alpaca jumper or attempt to shear a polar bear – the choice is yours.

The self-contained unit, which houses a small heater but has no power supply, was tested at minus 60°C. The system maintained a temperature of plus 16°C, a remarkable 76°C difference. “There is nothing like this product in the world and we now have both Australian and New Zealand arctic teams looking at using the system. Previously, arctic teams’ navigational and communication systems would stop operating when temperatures hit minus 20° C,” said Mr Brennan. Queensland based textile designer, Ana Pantelic LDAD, was responsible for producing the alpaca fleece blankets that were used to insulate the EEESS. ~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

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Casino High School Alpaca Program Last year Casino High School received a generous donation of an alpaca called Ajax to add to our flock of sheep from Bob and Jackie Coxon of Nattameri Alpacas. He arrived at the school very shy of the kids and also the other sheep and spent a few weeks by himself. We fed him by hand and walked him around with the halter and gradually he has become part of the Casino High sheep family. He loves his friends and is very protective of the 2 little lambs that have been born recently. He still loves being fed by hand although he is a lot bigger now. We are about to start the new high school program which has kindly been offered to us through the Australian Alpaca Association and when we finish this program we should know a lot more about alpacas. We are really interested in learning what we can do with his fleece and also the Alpaca meat industry.

Chelsea Wenham Teacher Agriculture/VET/Science Casino High School

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Method 1.

Preheat oven 220 C

2.

Prepare scone tray either grease well or use baking paper.

3.

With a mixer Cream Butter and Sugar

Ingredients

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2. Add Egg

1C mashed Pumpkin

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3.Add mashed pumpkin

1 T Butter

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4. Fold in S.R. Flour

1 Egg

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Knead lightly

1/2C sugar

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Pat out to 4cm thick, cut out with scone cutter.

9.

Place on tray touching each other.

10.

Cook 10-15 mins in HOT oven.

11.

Turn onto tea towel and wrap to steam. Serve with butter

Pumpkin Scones This is a quick and easy Pumpkin Scone Recipe Great for the friends who visit the farm for a morning cuppa.

2 C S. R. Flour

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AUSTRALIAN ALPACA

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S

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R

I

H

S

H

E

F

R

H

J

A

F

G

J

E

A

S

W

D

M

Y

S

C

L

P

P

F

E

Y

ET

N

A

2

S

B

S

U

R

I

C

G

C

S

D

FELTED SOAP

A

G

0

A

R

H

W

I

H

H

F

S

R

Y

HEMBRA

L

J

B

G

A

J

Y

A

N

I

M

A

L

S

P

J

3

K

U

J

I

S

A

G

A

H

K

L

A

L

2

H

J

K

K

Z

V

B

R

S

E

L

HISTORY

C

8

D

6

L

L

P

N

R

E

C

A

S

D

MARCHO

A

O

P

E

N

D

A

Y

S

A

H

G

W

F

4

5

Y

U

J

L

W

Q

E

R

O

H

E

R

R

F

E

L

T

E

D

S

O

A

P

J

R

G

E

G

J

I

E

E

E

H

J

A

D

L

E

H

VET

S

C

N

G

H

U

I

O

O

L

D

L

T

S

WET PACAS

~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

20 YEARS AUTUMN

BABY CRIAS

HUACAYA

OPEN DAYS SURI

Alpaca Advocate ~ AUTUMN Edition

2014~

30


Tex~Paca ~ all to do with the use of Alpaca fibre. New Scarf Pattern for Winter

Easy Lacy Scarf Lace stitch called Faggot Stitch Materials Size 11US or 8mm Needles (variation of needles will produce different effects) 2 50g balls alpaca wool

Instructions Cast on 20 stitches Row 1: Slip 1 *K1, YO, K2 tog, K1; rep from * to end of row Repeat Row 1 until finished 2 balls or required length

Felted Soap‌. In France and England in the olden days! Soap was made on the Estates. To distinguish the difference between soap for the manor and laundry soap.

See the felted Soap at our next meeting.

The manor soap was covered in a decorative felt. A washer and soap in one, plus a nice exfoliation or just to decorate the bathroom!

~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

Alpaca Advocate ~ AUTUMN Edition

2014~

31


~ AUTUMN Edition 2014~

Alpaca Advocate ~ AUTUMN Edition

2014~

32


Alpaca Advocate 2014 Autumn  

The Newsletter of the South Queensland & Northern NSW Region on the Australian Alpaca Association Ltd.

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