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VOLUME VOLUME 12 15 •• NUMBER NUMBER 23 •• WINTER SPRING 2015 2018

QJA - ESTABLISHED IN 1918 Official Magazine of the Queensland Justices Association

INSIDE THIS ISSUE 2

COMPANY

INFORMATION 3 FROM THE PRESIDENT 4 NEWS

100TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS

This year the Queensland Justices Association celebrates it’s 100th birthday and YOU are invited to the party of the century. Celebrate with us at the Centennial Conference 3 November 2018 at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

5 JP BRANCH ARTICLE

MORE NEWS

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MEMBERS’ STORIES

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THE WAY WE WERE

8 CONFERENCE NEWS 10 WORKSHOP NEWS AND EVENTS 11 ROLL OF HONOUR 12 Q & A 14 REGIONAL ROUNDUP 16 REGIONAL CONTACTS INSERTS A PRESIDENT’S REPORT 2017-18 DIRECTORS’ REPORT AUDITOR’S REPORT & FINANCIAL STATEMENTS B CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FORM

Image provided by QJA Gladstone Branch

Don’t miss out – It is not too late to register Details inside Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918


Board of Directors

PRESIDENT & CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD The Honourable Chief Justice

Patron

Mr Ray Burrows JP (Qual) Catherine E Holmes

Board of Directors President

Vice President

Telephone (07) 3822 1366 Mobile 0409 499 016 Email ray.burrows@qja.com.au

VICE PRESIDENTS

John Carpendale JP (Qual)

M: 0419 683 325 Telephone (07) 3812 1865 Mr Bob Pilkington JP (Qual) E: john.carpendale@qja.com.au Immediate Past President Mobile 0438 121 865 Email bob.pilkington@qja.com

Marian Vierveyzer JP(Qual) M: 0415 418 320

Telephone (07) 3389 2481 Mrs Marian E: Vierveyzer JP (Qual) marian.vierveyzer@qja.com.au Mobile 0415 418 320 Email marian.vierveyzer@qja.c Directors

Glenyce Hull JP(Qual)

M: 0439 746 219 Mr Raymond Young OAM E: glenyce.hull@qja.com.au

Joan Kennedy JP(Qual) M: 0477 510 517

Telephone (07) 4927 4155 JP (Qual) E: joan.kennedy@qja.com.au Mobile 0405 624 648 Email ray.young@qja.com.au Bronwyn McEntee JP(Qual)

Chris Lancaster OAM JP(Qual) M: 0448 504 404 E: chris.lancaster@qja.com.au

M: 0424 338 381

DIRECTORS E: bronwyn.mcentee@qja.com.au

Mr David Re Mr John Gordon JP (Qual) Telephone: (0 Mobile: 0415 589 047 Graeme Moorhouse JP(Qual) Carmelo Pasquale JP(Qual) Mobile: 0405 Email: john.gordon@qja.com.au M: 0439 964 899 M: 0408 879 182 E: Graeme.moorhouse@qja.com.au E: carmelo.pasquale@qja.com.auEmail: dave.r

.au

Mr Keith Revell JP (Qual) Telephone: (07) 3803 4337 Keith Revell JP(Qual) Garth Stephens JP(Qual) Mobile: 0411 134 841 M: 0411 134 841 M: 0481 550 721 Email: keith.revell@qja.com.au E: garth.stephens@qja.com.au E: keith.revell@qja.com.au

JP (Qual) 4152 3318 (AH) 2 135 @qja.com.au

dale JP(Qual) 3353 2927 683 325 endale@qja.com.au

Mr Doug Hull JP (Qual) Queensland Justices Association State Office Telephone: (07) 4128 0294 Email: doug.hull@qja.com.au

Mr John Carp Telephone (0 Mobile 0 Email john.ca

Mr Christoph Mobile: 041 Email: chris.

Porter JP(Qual) 48 189 ter@qja.com.au

Coordinator Membership Officer Merchandise Officer QUEENSLAND JUSTICES Training ASSOCIATION - ACN Gabor 009 666 559 – ISSN 1839-2784 Cindy Revell JP(Qual) Beres JP (Qual) Aaron Dunster JP(Qual)

Business Manager and Registrar Wendy La Macchia JP(Qual) E: admin@qja.com.au

E: training@qja.com.au

E: memberships@qja.com.au

E: merchandise@qja.com.au

The Queensland Justices Association (QJA) is a not-for-profit publicACN company limited 009 666 559 – ISSNby 1839-2784 751 Stanley by Street, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102. guarantee operating under the Corporations Act 2001 and is governed a Board of Directors.

PO Box 8419, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102 Freecall 1800 061 423; Phone (07) 3392 2455 751 Stanley Street, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102. E:admin@qja.com.au www.qja.com.au PO Box 8419, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102

Registered Office: Postal Address: Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8.30am to 4.30pm 392 2955The QJA Journal is compiled by an Editorial Board on behalf of the QJA. | Editor Joan Kennedy Deputy Editor: John Carpendale. The views expressed in articles & advertisements published the QJA061 Journal are not- necessarily the views of the3392 Queensland Justices Contact: Free call: in1800 423 Telephone: (07) 2455 - Association Facsimile: (07 or the Board of Directors.© Queensland Justices Association claims copyright to all material published in this Journal. No material may be copied or Email: admin@qja.com.au reproduced without the written consent of the QJA. All enquiries should be addressed to The Editor at editor@qja.com.au Website: www.qja.com.au Printed by ZinkJPPrint. PO Box 236, Kallangur QLD 4503. Phone 0437 777 079 or visit us at www.zinkprint.net.au. AE, Cert IV Fin Serv, (Qual) Facebook: www.facebook.com/QldJusticesAssn Registrar: Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices Angela since 1918 Yin BA (Journalism), GradDipSocAdmin, MHumanServ, Cert IV 2

eensland Justices Association


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

PRESIDENT’S PAGE Fellow QJA members,

The performance of the company for the financial year ending 30 June 2018 is fully disclosed within the inserts to this Journal edition. I encourage you to familiarise yourself with the content of these reports on another successful year for QJA. My following comments focus more on the future than the past. Centennial Year events The 100th anniversary of QJA’s origin occurs on Monday 17th September (about the time you may be reading this) and although we will pause momentarily to acknowledge that day, in practice, we have regarded every QJA function in 2018 as part of our celebration of the centennial milestone. Branch events Virtually all of our 40 Branches and Contact Groups have scheduled special functions during 2018 to recognise and celebrate QJA’s centennial year. The photos and stories within the Regional Roundup pages of this issue show evidence of the diversity of these events, many of which I have been privileged to attend. Several more functions will occur in the coming months. November Conference QJA’s paramount centennial event will be the 3rd November conference featuring a unique array of contentrich business sessions and 30+ distinguished speakers / session coordinators. More information on the conference sessions and registration process is included elsewhere in this publication. There will also be a Gala Dinner, the highlights of which will be the involvement of the State Governor and the presentation of the 2018 QJA awards. Both the conference and the dinner have been planned and designed as extraordinary events, befitting QJA’s centennial. While a large number of members have already registered, we do have room for many more. To allow attendance at these historical events by as many members of the QJA family as possible, the registration fees have been deliberately set at an affordable level that represents unparalleled value for money. This is a once-in-a-lifetime professional development and networking opportunity you do not want to miss. We look forward to seeing you there. QJA history publication To mark our centennial, we have commissioned the preparation of a booklet to chronicle the first 100 years of QJA’s history. This work is nearing completion and attendees at the November conference will automatically receive a copy as part of their registration entitlements. There are some really intriguing aspects of QJA’s heritage revealed in this publication and we expect many members of the QJA family will want to acquire a copy for their library. After the conference is concluded, this publication will be available as a QJA merchandise item.

Support for Rural Queenslanders As an organisation with a corporate social conscience, QJA has genuine sympathy with and concern for the plight of those individuals and communities adversely impacted by the prolonged drought conditions in rural Queensland. To demonstrate our support, the Board considered a proposal to make a drought relief donation from QJA’s retained funds. However, when we sought and received legal advice on this proposal, we discovered the provisions of the current Constitution do not permit the application of the company’s monies in this way. This limitation imposed by the Constitution is a matter we may discuss with members at the 2018 Annual General Meeting (to be held during the lunch break at the Centennial Conference on Saturday 3 November 2018) to determine if there is an appetite to change this. In the meantime, we encourage all members of the QJA family to lend support to the drought relief cause by making a donation to one of the established funds and, to assist, the QJA website (www.qja.com.au) was recently modified to include links to some reputable drought relief funds. Relationship with the Justice Department To function effectively as your membership association, it is crucial for QJA to have a strong and respectful working relationship with the government agency responsible for managing and regulating Queensland’s justice of the peace program. This agency is the Justice of the Peace Branch of the Department of Justice and Attorney General and I am pleased to confirm that our working relationship is both positive and productive. We do have quarterly face-to-face meetings to discuss matters of mutual interest and concern and although we do not always agree, each side respects the other’s point of view. As evidence of the positive nature of this relationship, our respective September 2018 publications (the QJA Journal and the JP Branch’s JP Bulletin) each contain an article authored by the head of other organisation, to educate and inform the other publication’s readership group. The JP Branch article is on page 5 of this Journal and, for those who receive the electronic JP Bulletin from the Justice Department, keep an eye out for the reciprocal QJA article. Assisting learner drivers QJA has agreed to partner in a new program supporting learner drivers to accumulate their supervised driving hours. The program is called SuperDrive and details are explained on this website: (https://superdrive.com.au/). If you’d like to register as a trusted driving supervisor, follow the website links. Best regards

John Carpendale, QJA President Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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NEWS Director’s Cut Once again, QJA members have tried their hand at an acting career by participating as JP, patient and nurse to breathe life into some familiar scenarios so that prospective JPs can see how to operate in a given setting via role play videos. The QJA videos are designed to supplement face-toface and online training. They can be made available to Branches for professional development discussions. It should be noted that the videos are not prescriptive and not “right or wrong” and may not always align with each member’s practice, as each Justice has the discretion to provide services in their own manner. QJA would like to thank the University of the Sunshine Coast for providing the filming venues.

I have been a JP for more than 25 years, when I was appointed in Roma.” The Toowoomba branch of the association run a signing centre in Clifton Gardens. Queensland Justices Association Director, Bronwyn McEntee, said she felt proud of the organisation to have reached the milestone. “The association is still going strong with nearly 7000 members in the state,” Mrs McEntee said. “The presentations have had a positive impact on the members with their recognition of their work.

Mareeba As Mareeba branch members were recognised with the presentation of a centennial pin the Mareeba Express newspaper covered the story as follows: Local members of the Queensland Justices Association came together last Tuesday to celebrate 100 years of the organisation.

In the newspaper In recent months, a number of Branches attracted local newspaper attention as they celebrated QJA’s 100th birthday with centennial pin presentations:

Toowoomba The Chronical Newspaper which services the local Toowoomba community reported the following: Members from the Toowoomba Branch of the QJA felt proud as they were recognised for their service to the community. Toowoomba JPs attended the branch meeting held on Monday night for the Centennial Pin presentation. The centennial pin represents the organisation’s service to the community for the past 100 years.

Toowoomba Branch Queensland Justices Association chairman, Bruce Birtwell said the pin presentation was a good acknowledgement of the branch members’ work. “The association is trying to build closer links with its members by showing its appreciation with the pin” Mr Birtwell said. “It’s all about giving back to the community. 4

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

Directors of the Association, Keith Revell and Bronwyn McEntee, flew up to Mareeba for the event and highlighted how relevant Justices of the Peace are in the community. For JPs it’s an essential part of the fabric of the justice system,” said Mrs McEntee To be able to give free access to every member of the community for the essential paperwork that they give to industry and government, and the checks and balances that a JP provides to the judicial process for search warrants, arrest warrants and all those sorts of judicial aspects, it’s an essential entry point into the judicial system.” Queensland Justice Association was formed on September 17, 1918. “We’re having some special celebrations around all of the branches this year,” said Mr Revell. “Today we’re handing out centennial pins as a memento in recognition of 100 years for every current QJA member, all 6,500 of them. We’re travelling around as much as we can visiting the local branches.” Mrs McEntee said JPs are more relevant now than ever. “There’s been an increase in the services we provide over the years,” she said. “More and more people are needing our services for statutory declarations, for example with carers they have to come in and get a stat. dec. to say that they took a day off work to care for their child, instead of having to go to a doctor to get a medical certificate. “People need certified copies of all their academic records, and previous job history. The need is increasing.”


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

NEWS JPs in the Community Program Governance Greetings all QJA members. I have been given the opportunity to write to you in the QJA journal by the President, Mr John Carpendale. I wanted to provide some important information about the governance of the JPs in the Community Program. For those of you who currently volunteer or have previously volunteered in the program I want to thank you for choosing to take part in the Program. I am sure you recognise the value of providing accessibly, credible and reliable witnessing services to the Queensland community. Your voluntary participation makes a valuable contribution and should be commended. As some of you might know, this year Justices of the Peace Branch has been conducting a State-wide audit of its volunteer database. This database is where we record information pertaining to the highly successful JPs in the Community Program. As the manager of the Program, I am responsible for the Program’s governance, an integral part of which is ensuring accurate records which reflect who is volunteering and where. This is an essential component of good governance. This is also important from the perspective of workplace safety, insurance and knowing who is representing the Department of Justice and Attorney General in the public sphere. I hope that all of you are aware of the distinction between the roles of the Justices of the Peace Branch and your supportive Association. It is important to understand that the Justices of the Peace Branch, Department of Justice and AttorneyGeneral is the custodian of the JPs in the Community Program and is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the Program. To this end, the Justices of the Peace Branch is also the point of contact for complaints and parliamentary enquiries, and is directly accountable to the Queensland community. Officers from the Branch have been in contact with site coordinators across the State asking for registration forms from all volunteers. I apologise for any inconvenience but must stress that this is a necessary requirement to participate in the Program. If there is anyone reading this who volunteers in the Program and has not filled out a registration please contact us on 1300 301 147. Any persons wishing to participate in the Program are always welcome and should also contact us. I would like to acknowledge the significant support that your Association has provided to the Queensland Government in ensuring support to the Program and members is of a high standard. During May and June 2018, all registered volunteers have received a letter from the Attorney-General and a personalised certificate that celebrated the 15th anniversary of the JPs in the Community Program.

Finally, staff and myself from the Justices of the Peace Branch are very much looking forward to joining you for the conference celebrating the centenary of QJA and wish you and the Association every success in the future. Warm regards Damien Mealey Registrar and Manager Justices of the Peace Branch

Message of Support QJA is a strong supporter of the JPs in the Community program (which is managed by the Justice of the Peace Branch of the Justice Department). Many QJA Branches have embraced the responsibility of coordinating community signing sites within this program and a significant number of QJA members are committed program volunteers. Based on own experience as a member association, we know how much the success of our business is reliant on us having accurate and up-to-date member records. The same principles apply to managing a volunteer program like JPs in the Community. Accordingly, we fully support the request from the Registrar and Manager of the Justice of the Peace Branch for all program volunteers to complete and return their registration documentation. John Carpendale, QJA President

Community Engagement in Action Two years ago, Lyn Brown JP (Qual) was invited to be a founding member of a new and exciting community venture in Labrador on the Gold Coast. The local council, spearheaded by Councillor Kristyn Boulton allocated funding as well as an unused caretaker’s house in the grounds of the community centre, to set up The Women’s Space at Labrador. Cr Boulton (pictured (L) with the community program leader and Lyn) said “I asked Lyn to join 10 other women to form a steering committee charged with starting our City’s first women’s space. They were to come up with an operating model and invite the community to partake in the activities and timetable on offer through this space. The Committee was to foster a space which was an inclusive, comfortable space for women of all backgrounds to come together under the one roof and undertake classes and activities offered by local community groups. In only 12 months, the women’s space is now operating above capacity, with a rich and diverse timetable that is meeting community demand and has exceeded all our expectations so far as a pilot model and a first of its kind for our City. I believe this model can now be rolled out across our City”. Cr Boulton went on to say “Thanks to Lyn and other steering committee members, this space is working well and is changing the lives of many women in our community. Without Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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NEWS Lyn’s volunteer support, I couldn’t deliver the programme and services. Her role as a conduit between my office and the space has ensured all needs are being met and daily operations and management is in good hands.” Lyn said she jumped at the offer to join the steering committee and undertook volunteer training with the Benevolent Society to expand her horizons. With Lyn’s experience and dedication to the local community, and long-time provider of JPs in the Community Services at Runaway Bay, Lyn was an obvious choice to undertake this task. The space started out and an empty shell, but now offers an array of free services from English language talking circles, classes in foreign languages such as French and Spanish, hand craft, sewing, yoga, migration services and as well as a JPs in the Community service once a month which Lyn provides. It is clear that Lyn is more than the JP who turns up once a month, she is involved in supporting the women by providing brochures on Enduring Power of Attorney and other estate documents. Lyn was a JP for 30 years in New South Wales before she and her husband of 44 years, Don, retired from the paid workforce and moved to the Gold Coast. Lyn is definitely not the retiring type and immediately signed up to undertake the Queensland JP training to be able to continue her commitment as an honorary justice. With the experience of a long career in accounting and office and financial management, Lyn became a major asset to the Gold Coast branch of QJA when she joined in 2007. Since then she has held the positions of Treasurer and Chair of the branch. Lyn also went on to undertake the training to become one of the JPs in the Queensland Civil and Administrative Tribunal (QCAT) pilot where JPs perform minor bench duties. Despite such a busy life style, Lyn also finds time to participate in art classes at the University of the 3rd Age.

Memories One of QJA’s oldest members, William Keith Shang of Maryborough, was very excited to see the Journal’s retro cover on the Autumn edition as it reminded him of when he first became a JP back in 1959. Back then, Keith worked for Queensland Rail at the station in Mackay. His local MP Fred Graham, who himself had worked for Queensland Rail as an engine driver, recognised Keith’s potential as a Justice of the Peace and recommended him for appointment. Soon after he was appointed word got around and Keith’s JP services were in great demand. Keith joined the QJA in February 1960 and is pictured proudly displaying his original membership certificate. The membership certificate reflects the picture of the front cover of the Journal at 6

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

the time. The inscription on the lower section of the plinth reads ‘this certificate is dependent upon the above named remaining a financial member of this association and the retention of the appointment of the commission of the peace.’ Keith went on to provide JP services across the State as he was transferred around from Mt Isa to Barcaldine, Ingham, Tully and finally arriving in Maryborough where he became the Queensland Rail pay clerk until he retired in 1994. Despite a serious illness last year, which required emergency surgery in Brisbane, at 91 years of age, Keith is still a very active member of his local community. He lives at home with Juanita, his wife of 55 years. He was a founding member of the local Older Men Unlimited (OMU) group and each week, with his OMU colleagues, he visits men in nursing homes. QJA President John Carpendale was pleased to present Keith with a centennial pin during his travels around the State visiting regional branches in July.

QJA members will receive a 25% discount when shopping at Joe Black Menswear. Joe Black is one of the sponsors for the QJA Centennial Conference to be held on Saturday 3rd November at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. Make sure you are there to be in the draw to win a fabulous prize valued at $1000

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VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

THE WAY WE WERE The Justice of the Peace Branch, Department of Justice and Attorney General, has come into the possession of some historic memorabilia donated by relatives of former JPs. Members can view the display, which includes a JP handbook which dates back to 1927, when visiting the office in South Brisbane. At the time of its publication, Queensland JPs were appointed under the Justices Act 1886 (Qld) and had similar powers to their counterparts in the UK. They were able to perform a wide range of the duties, whether they had legal qualifications or training or not. Leafing through the JP handbook titled An Outline of the Powers and Duties of Justices of the Peace in Queensland, 2nd edition, published in 1927, we see that heavy judicial responsibilities were placed on Justices. The following introductory paragraph of the handbook outlines the powers and duties of the Justice of the Peace thus: “The office of the Queensland Justice of the Peace, as set down in the commission by which he is appointed, is “to keep and cause to be kept all laws, for the preservation of the Peace and for the quiet rule and good government of our People,” in this State and it’s dependencies, “and to punish all persons offending against them, or any of them”; and also “to inquire the truth concerning all manner of treasons, felonies, misdemeanours and offences, by whomsoever and in what manner soever done, attempted, or perpetrated.” within the said State. He is therefore commanded, by the same commission, to “diligently apply himself to keep and cause to be kept the Peace and all laws of the Realm and of the said State,” and “at certain days and places duly appointed for these purposes,” to “make inquiries into the premises, and hear and determine all and singular of the matters aforesaid, and perform and fulfil the duties aforesaid, doing therein what is just according to the laws of the Realm and of the said State.” This early handbook is an interesting read and illustrates the extensive powers both legally qualified justices and lay justices were empowered to undertake. The handbook goes on to outline the responsibilities of JPs in relation to investigating suspicious deaths. Could you imagine an honorary justice of today presiding over a court and using their discretion as described here?

Clearly not a job for the fainthearted. The Branch also has a copy of the fourth Edition of the handbook published in 1958, the contents of which do not differ a great deal from that of the second edition. Skip ahead to 1991 when we see the introduction of the tiered justice of the peace system which we know today. The Justices of the Peace and Commissioners for Declarations Act 1991 made provisions for two new types of Justices, the Justice of the Peace (Qualified) and the Commissioner for Declarations. Adrian Philpott’s text recognises that “With the increasing complexity of law, and legal practices, it was felt that one class of JP was no longer appropriate to meet the needs of a modern, and growing, Queensland” He goes on to say “Many Justices had only ever undertaken witnessing functions; some had no desire to retain the very wide powers which are part of the a one class system” The JP Hand book of 1992 covers the roles and responsibilities of the newly minted Justice of the Peace (Qualified) and Commissioner for Declarations. Much of the information in this book focuses on the procedural aspect of an honorary justice. Moving into the 21st century the Department of Justice and Attorney General has taken on the responsibility for producing the hand book. Many of you will recognise the 2013 version pictured here.

Of course the latest version, published in 2017, is available in both loose-leaf and electronic formats and allows us to update chapters as change is introduced.

“A justice may hold a magisterial enquiry into the death of a person who has died by violence or in suspicious circumstances and may also, at his discretion, direct by his order in writing or by his summons, any such medical practitioner to perform a post-mortem examination of the body of the deceased person, either with or without an analysis of the contents of the stomach or intestines”

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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CENTENNIAL CONFERENCE NEWS The QJA has reached an historic milestone birthday celebrating 100 years and when you attend this conference, YOU will get the presents. Come along and get to know your Board members, network with colleagues and celebrate this wonderful milestone.

Centennial Conference Welcome Reception - 7pm Friday 2nd November

Every delegate will receive a limited edition presentation booklet in their conference satchel: The History of the Queensland Justices Association We have had a chequered history, and some of you may well remember the turbulent period that almost brought the QJA to its knees.

Exceptional value! The Conference Program (see page 9 for more details), lets you choose from not one, not two but, from three options for breakout sessions 2, 3 and 5. What will you choose?

Centennial Conference App To help you navigate the conference venue and decide which sessions you would like to attend there is an App available for downloading free of charge from Google Play or Apple App Store. You will be able to access directions to the venue, see the venue floorplans and view the program and information about the speakers. Start your Conference weekend on Friday 2nd November 2018 with a trip on the:

Wheel of Brisbane Register now at www.qja.com.au. Don’t miss out. Members’ Price $25.

Jump on a Citycat at Southbank and head for Public Quarters Bar and Eatery at No 1 William Street. The Restaurant is a generous sponsor and invites conference delegates and partners from 7pm to partake in nibbles while viewing Brisbane’s skyline from one of the newest restaurants in town. Drinks can be purchased at bar prices.

Gala Dinner Following the Conference, a Gala Dinner will be held in the Boulevard Ballroom at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. Commencing at 7:30pm members and guests will be welcomed to the sounds of the Queensland Police Pipe Band. A sumptuous 3 course meal will be enjoyed with one of Brisbane’s best Jazz Bands ‘Midnight Grove’ providing the music, with wines by conference sponsor Sirromet Wines. If you have Branch colleagues who are also attending, you may wish to book a Branch table for the evening. To do so, phone the QJA office (07)3392 2955. Alternatively, you may enjoy the fellowship of other members of the QJA family you have not previously met. His Excellency, Paul de Jersey AC, Governor of Queensland, who has a very long and enduring association with the QJA, will address delegates and present the centennial awards for:

Arrive at 5:55 pm and receive a glass of ‘bubbly’ as you step into the carriage. Enjoy Brisbane as it lights up for the night and then move on to the Welcome function:

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Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

• Member of the Year • Community Engagement of the Year • Branch of the Year


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

CENTENNIAL CONFERENCE Conference Program On Saturday 3rd November conference registrations will open at 7.30am in the Plaza level Foyer at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre. At 9.00am the Conference will start with a Welcome to Country and Official Opening. This will be followed by the first of three Keynote Speakers, The Hon. Catherine Holmes, Chief Justice and QJA Patron, as she takes us on a journey through the evolutionary history of the role of justice of the peace. Cr Graham Quirk, Brisbane Lord Mayor, will welcome delegates to the City of Brisbane. We will then move into the concurrent sessions where delegates will be able to choose from topics grouped into the three streams - (a) Technical Issues (b) Meet the Leaders and (c) Emerging Issues. Technical Issues Within this stream, during the morning we will hear from Ian Kelly, Solicitor, Hall Payne Lawyers and others about Wills and Enduring documents followed by Barrister, Michael Amerena; A/Registrar, Coolangatta Courthouse, Katrina O’Connor; and QJA Trainer, Sharon Munro; speaking about Police and Court Documents. In the afternoon, this stream will focus on Family Law Matters as Judge Leanne Turner, Federal Circuit Court of Australia; and, Solicitor and Principal, Oner Family Law, Katrina Owner; familiarise us with how the JP role impacts the outcomes of family court matters. Meet the Leaders Damien Mealey, Registrar and Manager, JP Branch, DJAG will start off this stream with a session on the Queensland JP Program. After a mouth-watering morning tea sponsored by White Lady Funerals, this stream will continue with an information-packed session about QJA’s Professional Development Program presented by members of QJA’s Training and Professional Development Group - Brooke Batley, Keith Revell and Chris Lancaster OAM - all leaders in this field. Later in the day, Rachael O’Grady, President, RFNZJA and Keith Revell will enlighten delegates about initiatives being introduced by other JP Membership Associations. Emerging Issues Dr Michael Rees, former Adjunct Professor in computer science at Bond University, will be joined by Lisa Shaw, Team Leader, JP Branch, DJAG to bring us up to date and show us the way forward with Technology and the JP. A customer service focus, or more colloquially described as “Go ahead and make my day’ will be the topic covered in this after-lunch session presented by Melissa Johnson HR Consultant, exceler8, Chris Lancaster OAM, QJA Director/Trainer and Gary Fagg, HR expert. Reflecting on the Conference theme of justice across the generations, QJA Registrar Wendy La Macchia, will be “Talking about your generation”.

The AGM will be held during the lunch break and you will have opportunities to visit the merchandising and sponsors tables as well as hear from other branches about their exciting activities. After Lunch we will hear from our second Keynote Speaker John Carpendale, QJA President about QJA’s history. As our centennial conference draws to a close we will hear from Keynote Speaker number three, Sallyanne Atkinson AO, former Lord Mayor of Brisbane, who will shine a light on what the future of organisations such as the QJA may look like.

Saturday 3 November 2018 QJA Centennial Conference & Gala Dinner

JUSTICE ACROSS THE GENERATIONS Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre Registrations now open: Conference: Members $70 Non-Members $80 Gala Dinner: Members $95 Non-Members $105 Brisbane Wheel: Members $25 Non-Members $30 For more information and to register, visit the QJA website: www.qja.com.au Dress standards apply: Conference: Smart casual or QJA branded apparel Gala Dinner: Ladies: evening or cocktail wear Gentlemen: black tie or lounge suit

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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WORKSHOP REPORTS & EVENTS Cybercrime proved to be a hot topic this quarter as workshops and forums were held on the Sunshine Coast and the Gold Coast. Branches recognised a growing need for education and community awareness about cybercrime and identity fraud. The Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission (ACIC) states that cybercrime is costing the Australian economy up to $1 billion annually in direct costs alone. Fifty-one percent (51%) of crimes reported to ACIC are related to scams and fraud so it is timely to inform our citizenry about how to protect themselves. Maroochydore Branch hosted a refresher Forum for Justices of the Peace and Commissioners for Declarations at the University of the Sunshine Coast on Saturday 16th June. A diverse range of topics were covered on the program and feedback from all who attended was very positive. More than seventy people attended the day which commenced with a “Welcome to Country” from Lyndon Davis of the Gubbi Gubbi traditional owners. His explanation of the history of how his people had lived on the land from across the coastal regions to the hinterland of the Sunshine Coast was most interesting and his talented playing of the traditional didgeridoo very enjoyable giving a great start to the day. Damien Mealey, Registrar of the JP Branch of the Dept. Of Justice and Attorney General, officially opened the Forum after speaking on how JP’s play such a vital role for the legal system and for the community and how the future will only see this role increase. Acting Superintendent, Peter Brewer, from Brisbane gave an excellent talk on cybercrime and how this is growing across Australia and the world. His comment that ‘no longer do people rob a bank as it is much easier to simply scam people on the internet’ brought home the seriousness of the growing situation. QJA President, John Carpendale, spoke about our history over the last 100 years from its conception and humble beginnings, and how it has grown and survived through some tough times. Detective Sargent Glenn Elliott from Maroochydore CIB spoke about search warrants and made the process very clear to JP’s who are often asked to witness them. Caron Menashe, Senior Community Relations Officer, from the Anti- Discrimination Commission talked about unconscious bias and how to be aware of it when dealing with members of the public. Also on hand were speakers from the Land Titles Office, Dept. Land and Mineral Resources, speaking about the correct witnessing of land title documents. A representative from The Public Trustee’s Office explained the correct process for witnessing a will and the consequences of poorly prepared wills, as well as witnessing Enduring Powers of Attorney and determining capacity. The day finished with a dinner at the Headland Golf Club where members were presented with their QJA Centennial Pins. 10

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

Gold Coast Branch held a Forum on Cybercrime, Identity Fraud and Estate Documents and Fraud on Saturday 25 August at the Burleigh Waters Community Centre. The Forum was attended by 33 participants which included 8 members of the general public. The aim of the forum was to inform, educate, and increase awareness about cybercrime and identity fraud, as well as providing advice about prevention, protection, and reporting. In addition, the audience heard from Mr Nash Te Ua (pictured) Regional Manager of the Southport Public Trustee Office on estate documents. Nash engaged the audience with information about the importance of making wills and, appointing an appropriate executor who is capable of carrying out the wishes of the deceased in accordance with the will. He went on to explain the process for contesting wills which can only be done through the Supreme Court, as well as outlining the purpose of probate. It was reported that more than 400,000 Australians are living with dementia so the audience was made aware of the importance of completing and maintaining enduring documents. Nash also spoke about elder abuse, saying that 80% of abuse is perpetrated via EPAs and of that 90% is perpetrated by the principal’s children. One take home message for JPs is to be vigilant about ensuring clients are not coerced into signing EPAs. Senior Constable Melanie Gent, assisted by Volunteer in Policing Kate Truelove, and accompanied by Karin Cooper of the Department of Fair Trading gave an engrossing presentation about the pitfalls of living with technology. Attendees were informed that the term cybercrime describes crimes that are directed at computers or other information communications technologies. It includes crimes such as hacking, scamming, unauthorised access to data, and identity fraud. Victims, many of whom loose large sums of money, may also suffer from damage to personal identity and reputation, loss of business or employment opportunities, as well as negative impacts on their emotional and psychological wellbeing. We are exposed to this type of crime though social media, emails, and telephones from anywhere in the world, which makes catching the criminals so difficult. Participants were encouraged “to not listen to, and hang up on, unsolicited phone calls and refrain from giving out credit card details”. The key take home message from this presentation was “If it is too good to be true; then it probably is too good to be true” The Branch would like to acknowledge and thank Gold Coast City Council for providing grant funding to assist with meeting the costs of this activity. In between sessions, members enjoyed a well-earned cup of tea.


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

ROLL OF HONOUR Members should note that the Roll of Honour recognises the length of Membership of the QJA. Members wishing to receive the official distinguished service certificate as a Justice of the Peace for the State of Queensland should contact their local State Member of Parliament. The Board wishes to acknowledge the long service given by the following Members.

50 Years QJA Membership

Peter Bills

William Davies

John English

40 Years QJA Membership

Philip Berting PSM Robert Brice

Warwick Carter Elsie Clark

Ronald Coffison Cecil Dinsdale

Rodney Perry

Norman Hansen Howard Littleton

Michael Manley Tom Tassell

Joseph Kostowski Gregory Veivers

Valerie Vitale

Lynette Wachter

25 Years QJA Membership June Bell George Boldireff

David Cawley Grace Corica

Barbara Eggers Phyllis Glenister

Welcome to New Members The following have joined the QJA since the last Journal: Kaytlin Aburn Savahna Adams Brittany Alder Jacquelyn Aldridge Deborah Aldridge Graham Alexander Yvonne Allison Danielle Altamura Jade Anderson Gary Atkin Hulwina Azmi Gayle Bailey Vicki Baker Joanne Baker Ramez Barsoum Marnie Basham Linda Battersby Friday Benbow Alison Bennett Alan Bennett Grahame Benson Crystal Bignall Brandon Black Neville Blomeley Ashleigh Boardman Richard Boddington Angela Bone Dianne Bonell Angeles Borey Cassandra Bott Faye Bourke Kevin Boylan Margaret Boyle Tania Brady Melanie Brehaut Steven Bremner Joan Bremner Simon Bright Kim Brown Timothy Brown Catherine Buckley Rebecca Burke Kevin Bycroft Deanna Carroll Rebecca Carton Melissa Castles Matthew Castles

Jodie Chalker Annabelle Chapman Ginene Charrington Cecilia Cheung Jessica Christensen Tanya Clancy Mark Clapper Brooke Clarke Selena Cleveland Erin Clifford Valerie Cooper Jane Corran Peter Cottell Jennifer Cronin Leanne Cunningham Philip Curbishley Lee Curtis Susanne Dale Rodney Daniel Richard Davies Elizabeth Davies Warwick Davies DEBORAH DAVIS Jane Dean William Deeb Jeanette Denmead Alena Desbrow Leith Dobbie Candice Dover Jamie Dow Rhian Doyle Claire Dusman Eileen Dycher Catherine Dykstra Jessie Edge-Williams Pieter Eksteen Stuart Engel Zachary Favell Mandy Mun Wai Fok Elizabeth Fountain Justin French Peter Gabriel Kayeleen Garner Margaret Garner Anthony Gates Joanne Gibson Jessica Gillespie

Nicole Goodwyn Scott Goudy Andrew Graham Kaela Grauf Luke Gray Courtney-Ann Griffiths Kate Grindrod Shane Ham Elaine Hans Karen Hardgrave Rogier Heijens Romi Hellingrath Rodger Henry Svetlana Herman Benjamin Hilsdon Andrea Ho Thomas Hobday Trina Hockley Jodie Hogg Jeremy Holland Wendy Howitt Shiela Hunter Nicola Hussein David Hyde Brett Irvine Jane Jackson Kylie Jacques Peter Jaggard Anne James Kirsty James Callum Jarvis Hayley Jenkins Trent Jepsen Andrew Jesberg Merrilyn Jones Juliet Jones Katie Kahler Amanda Karran Timothy Kealley Jack Keegan Lisa Maree Kelly Peter Kent William Knowles Helen Koloc Eric Krepp Leon Lamprecht Jade Lamson-Sheridan

Shauna Lanagan Brett Langley Sally-Ann Lawrence Rebecca Lawson Russell Lebsanft Kin Sun Raymond Lee Megan Lees Lynn Leeson Philip Lilliebridge John Lindsay Helen Lloyd Janay Loureiro Katie Lush Nayson Machin Darren MacLeod Rosemay Mahoney Ivan Maric Heather Martin Laurel Mason Leah McClymont Melinda McCormack Joshua McDonnell Catherine McHugh Kim McInnes Ewan McLeod Taahlia McNamara Amelia Medina Eshani Mendis Emma Merritt Anthony Miller Felicity Miller Caitlin Millward Denise Mobbs Margaret Moorhouse Leah Morgan Angela Morris Rosemary Mountford Karan Mullins John Mullins Lacinda Mundy Ariel Muntelwit Amanda Murfett Brett Neeson Paul Newton Kevin Obermuller Louise O’Brien Emma OConnor

Christopher OReilly Ann Osborne Divina Padayachee Marnie Parker Ellyse Pashley Anjana Patel Felicia Payne William Peacock Tegan Pearson Daniel Petravicius Karen Phillips Brittany Piper Robert Plummer Rebecca Pope Michael Portley Michael Quinn Paul Reitano Craig Rickards Karen Riddell Margaret Rieck Stacey Robinson Rodney Robinson Frances Rofe Gail Rogers Clancie Rogers Valerie Rooney Petrina Rumpf Vicki Ryan Robert Sable Nicole Sassine Zachary Schutt Nicole Schwartz Peter Selleck Shelly Shaw Lee Shimbel Darryl Shipp Leisa Shuttleworth Maureen Siolo Amanda Smallhorne Timothy Smeeton Michael Smith George Somasundaram Gina Somers Constantine Splawa-Neyman Lena Steinhardt Amanda Stephens

Victoria Stevens Jessica Stibbard Lauren Stone Sherry Stone Randolph Story Liz Swanson Edward Taylor Sharyn Tengbom Peter Terrill Erin Thiele Melina Thompson Leanne Thompson Roslyn Thompson Trevor Tillack Alexander Toh Robert Toh Rozanne Trenerry Leanne Turnor Paula Valmadre Paul van Pinxteren Anna-Louise Vautin John Vierkant Christopher Vlahos Danika Wadey Shona Walen Simon Walker Fusen Wang Colin Watson Colin Waugh Scott Wetzels Duncan Whitchurch Alan White Clive Wiggins Samuel Willebrands Debbie Wilson Tobias Wilson Margaret Wine Jade Winterhoff Tania Woo Christina Wood Christina Wood Maryjane Wruck Robert Young

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

11


Q&A Q1 I was asked to witness a will at my local signing site where I volunteer in the Justice of the Peace in the Community Program and, although I was quite happy to witness the document along with my colleague, I could not help but notice that the testator’s instructions were not very clear. Without giving legal advice, what sort of advice could I have given this client that may have helped him clarify his instructions? A1 As Justices we are often asked to witness wills. Some people hold the view that wills witnessed by JPs have a greater legal standing and authority. While others think a JP’s seal of office is necessary to validate the will. Of course, neither of which is true. Therefore, it is important to clarify your role as well as ensuring that you are satisfied that the client understands that you are not acting in your capacity as a JP. To establish this position, you may wish to discuss, in general terms, whether the client has considered taking any legal advice for the preparation of the document, or accessing resources about making wills. Depending on the client’s response, it may be useful to direct them to the Queensland Government site at: https://www. qld.gov.au/law/births-deaths-marriages-and-divorces/ deaths-wills-and-probate/wills/making-a-will. This site contains a lot of useful information about making wills and the consequences of poorly crafted documents. Referring clients to a government website or other publically available resources would not be considered as giving legal advice. Q2. Does a JP (Qual) have the power to issue a night search warrant that is to be executed after nine (9) pm and before six (6) am? A2 A search warrant is a document authorising police officers to enter and search a place for evidence relating to an offence that has been committed. Justices of the Peace are empowered to issue search warrants that are executed after nine (9) pm and before six (6) am. Accordingly, if the police are seeking approval to execute a search warrant between the hours of 9:00pm and 6:00am (night), then this must be specified in the application and supported by an explanation, in the application, to the satisfaction of the JP (or magistrate/ judge) to whom the application is made. This is a mandatory requirement under the Section 3(3) of the Police Powers and Responsibilities Regulation 2012 which states: (3) If the application includes the authority to execute the warrant at night, the application must state why it is necessary to execute the warrant at night. Example for subsection (3)— It may be necessary to execute the warrant at night for an early morning search to prevent the loss or destruction of evidence, or because the occupier is only at the place at night. As per the general procedure for issuing warrants (see Chapter 5.4 of the The duties of the Justices of the Peace and Commissioner for Declarations handbooks), the JP might consider it necessary/prudent to ask the applicant officer questions to clarify the information provided in the application regarding the need for a night search and to record the responses (on the application or in 12

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

their logbook). Q3 Who is responsible for signing an oath of service? A3 The oath of service is the third part of the documentation for issuing and serving summonses and warrants. It is completed after the person that is named in the summons or warrant has been issued with the summons or warrant. The person who serves the summons or warrant must swear or affirm under oath that the said document has been served. This may be a police officer, the complainant, or any other person engaged to serve the summons or warrants. Once the oath of service has been sworn or affirmed it must be lodged with the court to prove that the service has been carried out. Q4 Is it correct that an enduring power of attorney (EPA) only ends when the principal dies? A4 The EPA ends when the principal dies, however, there are a number of life events and circumstances that will cause the EPA to end, which are listed on page 6 of the EPA form. These include: • Getting married — unless your enduring power of attorney states otherwise, it is revoked if you get married. However, if your husband or wife is already your attorney, your power of attorney is only revoked to the extent that it gives power to someone other than your husband or wife. • Getting divorced — if you divorce, the power of attorney is revoked to the extent that it gives power to your former spouse. • Entering into a civil partnership — unless your enduring power of attorney states otherwise, it is revoked if you enter into a civil partnership. However, if your civil partner is already your attorney, your power of attorney is only revoked to the extent that it gives power to someone other than your civil partner. • Terminating your civil partnership — if you terminate your civil partnership, your enduring power of attorney is revoked to the extent that it gives power to your former civil partner. • Making an inconsistent document — Your enduring power of attorney is revoked to the extent of any inconsistency with any later documents you complete, such as an advance health directive or another enduring power of attorney. Further it will also end if your attorney dies or: • Withdraws — Your attorney may withdraw by giving you a signed notice or by getting the court’s leave to withdraw. • Becomes your paid carer or health-care provider — If your attorney becomes your paid carer or health-care provider, your enduring power of attorney is revoked to the extent that it gives that attorney power for a personal matter. • Becomes incapable — Your attorney’s power is revoked if he or she is no longer capable to make a decision about a matter. • Becomes bankrupt or insolvent — if your attorney becomes bankrupt or insolvent, your enduring power of attorney is revoked to the extent that it gives that attorney power for a financial matters.


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018 Q5 I was asked by a friend of the family to witness a traffic offence statutory declaration. I refused and directed the lady to our local shopping centre where there are JPs three time a week. I was concerned that this may be a conflict of interest. Was this the right thing to do?

need to seek guidance from the client about whether you are permitted to touch their religious text. When administering oaths other than Christian you may need to refer to page 4.6/4 Duties of the Justice of the Peace (Qualified) Handbook, to ensure you carry out the procedure in accordance with the relevant religion.

A5 Legally, there is nothing preventing you from witnessing this document. However, it is wise to err on the side of caution and refuse to witness documents which may lead to allegations of bias or legal challenges in the future. Each JP and C.Dec must use their discretion to determine whether a conflict of interest exists. You may wish to refer to the Code of Conduct issued by the Department of Justice and Attorney General. The Code states that:

Q8 Statutory Declaration forms purchased at the Post Office include a Queensland Stat. Dec. and a Commonwealth Stat. Dec. Can these forms be interchangeable?

JPs and C.Decs shall not show favour to friends, relations and associates nor adopt procedures other than outlined in both ‘The duties of the Justices of the Peace and Commissioner for Declarations’ handbooks and technical bulletins published by the Department of Justice and Attorney General. They shall disqualify themselves from acting if they are faced with a conflict of interest.

Q6 Am I required to certify both the front and back sides of a drivers licence or pension card? Will the certified copy be invalid if only the front side has been certified? A6 No. The client can request that only one side of a double sided document be certified. Whether both sides need to be certified depends on the requirements of the organisation or agency requesting the copy/copies. If the client is unsure what is required, he or she should be encouraged to review the paperwork requesting the certified copies or seek clarification directly from the receiver. It is not the responsibility of the JP or C.Dec to decide whether both sides are required. Q7 I have relocated from a regional to a metropolitan area where there is a large multicultural presence. While I have always provided a Christian Bible for swearing oaths, am I expected to provide religious texts, such as the Koran, in order to witness affidavits of people of the Muslim faith? A7 Oaths are administered pursuant to the Oaths Act 1867 which makes reference to the Bible and New and Old Testaments. It is silent on the use of other religious texts to accommodate different beliefs. However, in keeping with the religious freedoms of our society, it is accepted practice to permit people to swear on the holy text and or paraphernalia relevant to their religion. Given the variety of religions practiced in Queensland today, it would be unreasonable to expect that JPs could or should provide all religious equipment to facilitate swearing an oath. The Department of Justice and Attorney General takes the view that it is the responsibility of the client to provide the equipment required to swear an oath. It is important to note that religious beliefs and practices vary, therefore you may

A8 It is the client’s responsibility to understand why and for whom they are making a statutory declaration. There are differences between the forms. A Queensland Statutory Declaration is made under the Oaths Act 1867 and applies to a declaration taken for Queensland law. However, the declaration can be made at any location, including interstate and overseas, in the presence of an appropriately qualified person. The Commonwealth statutory declaration is made for the purposes of a law of the Commonwealth, and may be taken in any State of Territory by the persons prescribed in the Statutory Declarations Act 1959. There are also differences in the penalties for making false statements. Section 194 (1) The Criminal Code 1899 states the maximum penalty for making a false statement is 3 years imprisonment while, under Commonwealth law Section 11Statutory Declarations Act 1959 states the penalty is 4 years imprisonment. Q9 What is involved if I am issued with a summons to appear in court to give evidence about a statutory declaration I witnessed two years ago. A9 Going to court can be a daunting proposition if you are not familiar with the process. However, if you have exercised your powers in accordance with your standard process and taken due care in doing so, you should be confident that you can answer questions posed to you. You may be called as a witness by either the prosecution or defence and you may be asked to clarify or remove doubt about such things as: •

Whether the correct person signed the document

Whether the document was sworn correctly

Whether the deponent was capable of making the declaration at the time

As it is unlikely that you will remember the details of something you did 2 years ago, you may wish to refer to the records you made at the time. However, in order to do so, you will need to seek permission from the court. It is best to discuss this will the solicitor for the prosecution or defence (which ever you have been subpoenaed to appear for). You will be placed under oath, or asked to affirm that your testimony is true and honest. Be respectful and always refer to the presiding Judge or Magistrate as “Your Honour” when requesting permission to refer to your log book. Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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REGIONAL ROUNDUP Esk Contact Group

Mackay QJA Director Bronwyn McEntee recently caught up with Joe Brischetto, coordinator of the Esk Contact Group, to present him with his centennial pin.

Hornibrook Officers from the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries came to the Hornibrook Branch and addressed branch members at the May 2018 meeting. Fisheries Queensland supports the profitability and sustainability of the state’s fisheries through a variety of services. The Fisheries Act 1994 empowers Fisheries Inspectors to execute warrants (authorised by a Magistrate) or a summons (authorised by a justice of the peace). Attendees enjoyed an interesting insight into the important role they have, ensuring fisheries remain sustainable and productive.

Bridget Morton; Bob Arnold; Lesley Taylor; Lisa Chapman; Fran Killian; Laura Jorgensen

Mackay QJA members participated in a Volunteers Expo proudly displaying their branch banner.

Brisbane North

Branch Chairman Bev Nicholls with the Fisheries presenters.

Gladstone On 26th June, the Gladstone Branch enjoyed an informal evening with special guests John Carpendale (QJA President), Raymond Young OAM (former QJA director), Lance Watson (Rockhampton branch) and Glenn Butcher (Local MP).

On Saturday, 16 June 2018, the QJA Brisbane North Branch conducted its annual half-day Refresher Workshop which attracted 56 participants. The topics addressed were (a) Affidavits & Annexures and (b) Police documents. For each topic, the workshop format involved a presentation (outlining the process theory) followed by a hands-on activity session (which explored the practice). At the conclusion of the workshop, QJA President John Carpendale presented QJA Centenary badges to all QJA members present.

Lockyer The executive spent time informally meeting with John to share branch news and ideas. Fred Golder (Branch Chairman), shared some reflection on the Branch’s more recent history, followed by a speech from Glenn Butcher recognising the service of the local JPs. Treasurer Megan Lutton assisted John and Glenn in presenting 15 members with their centenary pins. The evening concluded with cutting of a celebration cake. Editor’s note: The image of this magnificent cake was so appropriate, we’ve also used it on the front cover of this Journal. Thank you Gladstone Branch!

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Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

QJA President John Carpendale attended the Lockyer Branch meeting on Wednesday 13 June at Annie’s Room at the Royal Hotel in Gatton. The Chairman of the Toowoomba Branch, Bruce Birtwell, was also in attendance and took the photo below. At the conclusion of the meeting, John presented attendees with their centennial badges.


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018 South Pine Greg Thompson, C o m m u n i t y Engagement Officer, Justice of the Peace Branch, Department of Justice and Attorney-General was guest speaker of the QJA South Pine Branch meeting Wednesday 20 June. Greg spoke in some detail about witnessing enduring documents and answered attendees’ questions. There was a really good turn-out for the South Pine Branch Centennial badge presentation function held at the South Pine Community Church hall on Saturday 25 August. Function guests included MBRC councillors Matt Constance and Mike Charlton as well as QJA President John Carpendale and QJA Registrar Wendy La Macchia (the photographer).

Bundaberg Bundaberg Branch has been out and abut recently. Members had stalls at A Cure for Cancer Car Show & Charity Auction Day and also at the Seniors Expo (pictured). The work of JPs was promoted, as well as the QJA, plus the two signing centres run by the branch. In addition, the JP training course scheduled for next month was promoted and four definite candidates were recruited, while two others showed an interest.

Caloundra Members of Caloundra branch celebrate QJA’s 100th birthday at their AGM on 14 August and can be seen here proudly displaying their centennial pins. Special guests for the evening included Mark McArdle MP, Member for Caloundra and QJA Director Chris Lancaster OAM and patron for Sunshine Coast branches.

Let us know what you’re doing If you’d like the QJA membership to be informed about the activities of your group via exposure on these pages, send the relevant information to: editor@qja.com.au. Advertisement

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15 10


REGIONAL CONTACT INFORMATION BEAUDESERT CONTACT GROUP Bernice Lippiatt beaudesert@qja.com.au Telephone: 0481 554 805

GLADSTONE BRANCH Ruth Waite gladstone@qja.com.au Telephone: 0438 741 318

LOGAN BRANCH Brooke Batley logan@qja.com.au Telephone: 0411 727 792

BOWEN CONTACT GROUP Anne Maree Bligh bowen@qja.com.au Telephone: 0417 735 990

GOLD COAST BRANCH Joan Kennedy goldcoast@qja.com.au Telephone: 0477 510 517

LOGANHOLME CONTACT GROUP Pauline Harris loganholme@qja.com.au Telephone: 0428 916 557

GREATER SPRINGFIELD BRANCH Paul Howard greaterspringfield@qja.com.au Telephone: 0473 221 078

MACKAY BRANCH Maria Valena mackay@qja.com.au Telephone: 0422 636 374

GYMPIE BRANCH Tom Bushell gympie@qja.com.au Telephone: 0402 132 679

MAREEBA BRANCH Ann Vains mareeba@qja.com.au Telephone: 0419 719 616

HERVEY BAY BRANCH Loretta Lashmore herveybay@qja.com.au Telephone: 0448 784 854

MAROOCHYDORE BRANCH Eva Marie Seeto maroochydore@qja.com.au Telephone: 0417 635 0788

HORNIBROOK BRANCH Robyn Francis hornibrook@qja.com.au Telephone: 0439 327 242

MARYBOROUGH BRANCH Andrew Baker maryborough@qja.com.au Telephone: 0422 730 890

HOWARD CONTACT GROUP Carrol Bond howard@qja.com.au Telephone: 0411 743 585

NOOSA BRANCH Margaret Lewins noosa@qja.com.au Telephone: (07) 3150 0195

BRISBANE NORTH BRANCH Peter Twine brisbanenorth@qja.com.au Telephone: 0488 233 870 BRISBANE SOUTH BRANCH Diane Rippon brisbanesouth@qja.com.au Telephone: 0418 233 141 BUNDABERG BRANCH Dave Read bundaberg@qja.com.au Telephone: 0405 252 135 CABOOLTURE BRANCH Sara Gault caboolture@qja.com.au Telephone: 0439 866 682 CAIRNS SOUTH CONTACT GROUP Ralph Powell cairnssouth@qja.com.au Telephone: 0434 510 333 CALOUNDRA BRANCH Anne Poole caloundra@qja.com.au Telephone: 0407 157 460 CENTRAL HIGHLANDS BRANCH Karen Bray centralhighlands@qja.com.au Telephone: 0438 824 361 ESK CONTACT GROUP Joesph Brischetto esk@qja.com.au Telephone: 0417 198 053 FOREST LAKE CONTACT GROUP Reg Connelly forestlake@qja.com.au Telephone: 0403 167 121

IPSWICH BRANCH Deanna McDonald ipswich@qja.com.au Telephone: 0408 195 277

REDLAND CITY BRANCH Ray Burrows redlandcity@qja.com.au Telephone: 0409 499 016

KILCOY CONTACT GROUP Kay Jackson kilcoy@qja.com.au Telephone: 07 5424 2461

ROCKHAMPTON BRANCH Lawrence Fox rockhampton@qja.com.au Telephone: 0448 439 999

LOCKYER BRANCH Kerrie Price lockyer@qja.com.au Telephone: 0401 796 857

ROMA BRANCH Brian O’Rourke roma@qja.com.au Telephone: 0437 557 768

ROSEDALE CONTACT GROUP Jonathan Brown rosedale@qja.com.auTelephone: 0408 068 169 ROSEWOOD CONTACT GROUP Alan Broughton rosewood@qja.com.au Telephone: 0468 802 689 SOUTH BURNETT BRANCH Ruth Rimes southburnett@qja.com.au Telephone: 0457 681 159 SOUTH PINE BRANCH Michelle Goswell southpine@qja.com.au Telephone: 0438 084 889 TIN CAN BAY CONTACT GROUP Rod Ehrke tincanbay@qja.com.au Telephone: 0448 943 336 TOOWOOMBA BRANCH Jeni Rengers toowoomba@qja.com.au Telephone: 0408 771 786 TOWNSVILLE BRANCH Tracey Cooper townsville@qja.com.au Telephone: 0423 695 855 WESTERN SUBURBS BRANCH Paul Humphreys westernsubs@qja.com.au Telephone: 0409 877 613 WYNNUM MANLY BRANCH Amanda Hilhorst wynnummanly@qja.com.au Telephone:0423 028 160

Branches conduct regular meetings (at least five per year), conduct training, operate signing facilities, have defined revenue streams and a formalised structure. Contact groups meet on an “as required basis” and generally exist to operate signing facilities and to deal with other local issues. For details of what is happening in your local area, including professional development opportunities, please feel free to phone any of the numbers above and your local contact will be happy to assist.

INTERSTATE CONTACT INFORMATION NSW

Southern Riverina Elizabeth Adam south.riverina@qja.com.au 0427 617 589 Lismore Paul Beckey lismore@qja.com.au 0428 560 467 Sydney (Inner West) Jim Elmore sydney.1@qja.com.au 0408 870 721 Sydney (North West) Sharon Atkins sydney.2@qja.com.au 0417 479 412

Sydney (Western Subs) Marie McCabe sydney.3@qja.com.au 0434 992 107

Adelaide Hills Fred Braun adelaide.hls@qja.com.au (08) 8389 9462

Hobart Barrie Bell hobart@qja.com.au 0419 395 796

Wollongong Peter Pioro wollongong@qja.com.au 0419 638 121

Victor Harbor Timothy Barclay victor.harbor@qja.com.au 0403 134 290

Launceston Vanda Stevenson launceston@qja.com.au 0417 707 330

TAS

VIC

Devonport Dennis Wheelton devonport@qja.com.au 0418 334 431

Melbourne (Langwarrin) Robert Bolch melbourne.1@qja.com.au 0412 155 634

NT

Jabiru Karen Beare nt@qja.com.au 0417 891 226

SA

Adelaide Noel J. Lindsay adelaide@qja.com.au 0407 507 773

Deloraine Annette Powell deloraine@qja.com.au 0427 158 648

Melbourne (Glen Waverley) Simon Bullimore melbourne.2@qja.com.au 0419 756 780

Bendigo Richard Lancaster bendigo@qja.com.au 0407 345 472

INTERNATIONAL CONTACT INFORMATION Hong Kong Luca Ferrerio hong.kong@qja.com.au 16

New Zealand Brandan Hooper nz@qja.com.au

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

UK (Norfolk) Derek Hill uk@qja.com.au

USA (Texas) Tanya Conole usa@qja.com.au


QJA CENTENNIAL CONFERENCE – 2/3 NOVEMBER 2018 REGISTRATION FORM Surname:

Given Names:

Accompanying Person’s name (if applicable): QJA member number:

Non - member Email:

Contact details

Mobile:

Special Dietary Needs? (please explain) Please indicate the involvement of yourself and any accompanying persons: Day Time Item Cost p.p. Number 6pm-7pm Wheel of Brisbane ride Member $25 Friday nd Non-member $30 2 Nov 7pm-8pm Saturday 8am-5pm 3rd Nov 7pm-10pm

Welcome Reception

Total

N/A

Centennial Conference

Member $70 Non-member $85

Gala Conference Dinner

Member $95 Non-member $110 Total

$

Payment Options (please indicate your selection): Cheque Make payable to Queensland Justices Association and attach to this form Funds Transfer Credit Card

Return:

Transfer funds to: Queensland Justices Association BSB: 064 184 (Commonwealth Bank) Account Number: 10889197 Insert your Member number (or name if a non-member) in the reference field Card Type Visa MasterCard Cardholder Name Card Number Expiry Date / Signature CCV Number

Please complete and return this document to:

The Registrar Queensland Justices Association PO Box 8419 Woolloongabba, Q4102

Or scan and email to: admin@qja.com.au Instead, if you’d like to register and pay online, visit:

www.qja.com.au


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT For the annual General Meeting to be held on 3rd November 2018

Fellow QJA members, The formal Directors’ Report and Financial Statements, contained within the Spring 2018 (September) edition of the QJA Journal (and published on the QJA website), summarise the achievements of the last financial year and address those matters we are required to disclose as a company governed by the Corporations Act 2001. This report contains some additional information about the operation of the business in 2017-18. Corporate Strategy QJA is a membership association for Queensland Justices of the Peace (JPs) and Commissioners for Declarations (Cdecs). Of approximately 85,000 registered JPs and Cdecs in Queensland, about 6,300 (7.4%) are current QJA members. The essential and exclusive value of QJA membership, which separates you, as a QJA member, from other Queensland JP and Cdec practitioners, is: As a member of QJA you are connected to and supported by, a network of people like you, dedicated to providing best practice service to the community as Justices of the Peace or Commissioners for Declarations. This is the QJA promise. To successfully deliver this promise to our members, QJA pursues five strategic business programs: •

Membership – optimise member recruitment, retention, services and satisfaction

Marketing and Communication – create and improve brand awareness penetration

Community Engagement – facilitate QJA integration with communities throughout the State

Training and Professional Development – enable QJA members to be best-practice JP practitioners

Branch Leadership and Development – enhance the success of Branches and their leaders

Each program has a working group of directors with an assigned leader who regularly reports to the Board on initiatives and progress achieved. Twice a year (March and November), the company’s Board and executive undertake intensive strategic planning workshops to review the progress of the business in delivering on its promise and to consider new and innovative strategies to improve business operations going forward. Financial management The annual budget process is a core function of the Board and we have a responsibility to ensure that we deliver a financial result which makes us sustainable in the long term and enables us to improve and expand our services to you, our Members, to the community, and to our Students. We must achieve this outcome by delivering financial results that acknowledge the challenges, provide for the needs and expectations of our Membership and plan for the future. Our budget for the 2017-2018 financial year forecast a moderate surplus at year-end and your Board is very pleased to report that as a result of careful financial management through cost containment, delivering savings, and increasing sales, a surplus has been achieved which has exceeded our original budget estimates. The Board wishes to disclose to members that the budget forecast for the 2018-19 financial year is a moderate deficit. While we anticipate revenue to be similar to the year just finished, we believe there will be some extraordinary and unique current-year expense items (explained below) which are unlikely to be repeated in subsequent years. The 2018 Centennial Conference & Dinner - to be held in early November – represent a once-in-a-lifetime celebration of one hundred years of QJA’s existence. The intended quality of these centenary events has been set to a standard befitting this auspicious occasion. To allow as many as possible QJA members to attend, the Board made the strategic decision to establish modest attendance fees and to use a fraction of the company’s retained funds to meet the shortfall in cost not recovered via attendance fees. We did ask the Queensland Government, the Brisbane City Council and a multitude of Queensland businesses to partner with us in delivering this very special celebratory event but, aside from a handful of community-minded

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT organisations whose involvement has been gratefully acknowledged in the event publications, our requests were denied. Fortunately, as a result of prudent financial management over the last decade, QJA has accumulated a healthy financial reserve and the Board has determined that a portion of this should be used to subsidise the attendance at the Centennial events of QJA members whose past membership, merchandise, event and training fees have contributed to the building of these reserves. While the negative impact on the reserves will be minimal, the positive impact on the affordability for QJA members to participate in these significant events is considerable. Corporate Governance To complement the monthly meetings of the QJA Board of directors, several governance sub-committees have been established to give more detailed consideration and attention to crucial corporate governance aspects of the business. Each of these committees is chaired by a different director, assigned with the responsibility for facilitating the committee business: •

Board Governance

Business Risk Management

Finance and Audit

RTO Compliance

These committees meet at least quarterly and regularly report progress to the monthly Board meetings. Project groups Other working groups of directors have also been put in place to oversight various single-purpose or ongoing business projects. These project groups also meet at least quarterly and some meet monthly. The committees meet at least quarterly and regularly report progress to the monthly Board meetings: •

Centennial Year Conference planning

Centennial Year Events

Information Technology

QJA Journal

HR / OHS

Succession Planning The functions of the Board’s various business program work-groups, compliance committees and project workgroups allow all directors to have some detailed involvement across a broad cross-section of the company’s operations and to acquire experience in the responsibilities of group chairmanship. This is a crucial component of succession planning for the Board. Training business In addition to being a membership association business, QJA is also a Registered Training Organisation (RTO). As such, QJA is authorised to offer pre-appointment training courses for JPs and Cdecs throughout Queensland and is the largest provider of these courses. Details of the courses conducted in 2017-18 are contained in the Directors’ Report. Surplus funds generated by the training business are added to overall financial reserves for the company. For the first time in 2018-19, the revenue generated by pre-appointment training courses exceeded membership fee revenue for QJA. Because the training business is now such a significant component of the whole company’s operations, there is now a separate Board sub-committee (RTO Compliance Committee) dedicated to ensuring its probity and sustainability. In the early part of 2019, QJA’s current licence as an RTO will expire and we will need to apply to the training industry regulator (ASQA) for re-registration. The primary focus of the RTO Compliance Committee is to ensure a smooth and successful re-registration process. The success of QJA’s training business is due in no small part to the high quality and committed involvement of our

2

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018 PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT contracted trainers and assessors. QJA trainers and assessors are not only QJA members, they are experienced and well-informed JP practitioners. Students within the QJA training program are privileged to be tutored and advised by best-practice proven specialists in this calling. QJA’s trainers and assessors have also been involved in developing the unique training resources used within the company’s pre-appointment training program. The extent and quality of these resources is another point of differentiation that sets the QJA training course apart from its competitors. Annually, the QJA trainers and assessors are gathered together for a day dedicated to maintaining the currency and quality of the trainers’ competence / qualifications and the course resource materials. Professional Development To complement QJA’s pre-appointment training program resources, the organisation has developed and maintained an extensive range of Branch and Members resources designed specifically to facilitate the continuous professional development of members. These resources were further enhanced in 2017-18. For members, the now-available professional development resources (contained within a secure Member-only portal within the QJA website) include: •

Quizzes

Professional development courses (known as the “Essentials” suite)

Professional development role-play videos

For Branches, the resources (contained within a secure Branch-only portal within the QJA website) include: •

Frequently asked questions

Forms and Guides

PowerPoint presentations

Activity samples and quizzes

Workshop templates

Videos

Discussion forum

Member communication During 2017-18, the quarterly QJA Journal continued as the dominant vehicle for member communications. More than 75% of QJA members now receive their journal in an electronic format which allows recipients to access (via hyperlinks) enhanced features like video files and external webpage documents. Periodic electronic newsletters and email campaigns to members were also used to supplement the journal content. Annual Conferences Since the turn of the century, the package of services QJA has offered to its members has included an annual professional development conference at different centres throughout the State. The 2017 State Conference was held in Toowoomba in November and it proved to be very successful, attracting more than 130 attendees. With 2018 representing QJA’s centennial year, detailed planning for the 2018 Centennial Conference in Brisbane in November has been in place for several years and this intensified during the 2017-18 financial year. At 30 June 2018, the conference program content and speaker details had virtually been finalised. Branch Network Arguably the company’s most valuable business asset, the network of 30 Branches and 10 Contact Groups (at centres dotted throughout the length and breadth of the State) provide almost every QJA member, no matter where they reside, with access to a team of knowledgeable local practitioners – each an integral part of the QJA family – to guide, sustain and strengthen the network of honorary justices in regional communities. Because of other competing priorities, the program of regional Branch Leadership Forums – inaugurated in the 2016-17 financial year, were put on hold in 2017-18. However, the Board remains convinced about the intrinsic

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

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PRESIDENT’S ANNUAL REPORT value of this program which it has committed to recommence in 2018-19. During 2017-18, the focus for many QJA Branches was the holding of functions within their communities to present the specially minted Centennial badge to local QJA members. Awards To recognise and reward significant achievements, QJA has established a range of awards as detailed hereunder: •

Honorary Life Membership (to recognise exemplary service to the company)

QJA Member of the Year

QJA Branch of the Year

QJA Community Engagement initiative of the Year

QJA membership milestone awards (to recognise the attainment of significant membership periods)

Award recipients for 2017-18 in each of the first four categories will be announced and presented at the Gala Dinner QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION following the Centennial Year Conference on 3 November 2018. Membership milestone awards are distributed ABN: 41 009 666 559 periodically throughout the year. External Relationships

DIRECTORSʼ DECLARATION

To effectively operate both the membership association and the training components of the business, it is crucial for QJA to have positive and constructive working relationships with relevant external agencies. In 2017-18, Inconstructive accordanceinteractions with a resolution of the directors of Queensland Justices Association, the directors declare were conducted with the following agencies / individuals: • •

1.• •

that:

The Chief Justice of Queensland (also QJA patron) The State Attorney-General and Shadow Attorney-General

Thefinancial Registrarstatements and Manager of notes, the Justice of out the Peace Branch, Department of Justice with the The and as set on pages 7 to 28, are in accordance Corporations Act Council 2001 and: The Australasian of Justices’ Associations (QJA director Keith Revell is the ACJA Vice-president)

State Office a.

Have determined that the company is not a reporting entity and that this special

The company’s purpose head office remains located at 751 Stanley Street, Woolloongabba. Allaccounting the office work for the financial report should be prepared in accordance with the policies business (both the memberinassociation parts) is undertaken by the four full-time employees outlined Note 1 to and the training financialorganisation statements. led by Business Manager and Registrar, Wendy La Macchia. Work continues to improve the office systems and b. (so as give true and view of the financial position of the company as atOther 30th June 2018 and procedures to a enhance thefair services provided to members, Branches and students). than this ongoing development, there no significant 2017-18. of itswere performance forchanges the yearinended on that date. Summary

2.

In the directors’ opinion there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to

By most 2017-18 was they a good year for financial surplus for this period exceeded budget paymeasures, its debts as and when become dueQJA. and The payable. projections and financial reserves are now at an all-time record high (approaching $400,000). We estimate than a further $92,000 is held within the retained funds of the 30 QJA Branches across the State. Consistent with the experience of the last decade, membership numbers remain in the 6,000 to 6,500 range.

Dated this 30th August, 2018to be to support and facilitate the aspirations of these members to be the most The objective of QJA continues accomplished Justice of the Peace or Commissioner for Declarations they can be. During the year, the organisation’s products and services continued to be enhanced in line with this goal. For what has been achieved in 2017-18, thanks and credit goes to the hardworking State Office staff and the QJA

John Carpendale McEntee directors (who have given so generously of their time and energy, Bronwyn without remuneration, for the privilege of being President Director & Chair of Finance and Audit Committee involved in the governance of this historic association).

John Carpendale President and Chairman of the Board Queensland Justices Association 4

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

DIRECTORS’ REPORT for the Year Ended 30 June 2018 Your directors present this report together with the financial statements of the company for the financial year ended 30 June 2018.

Directors The names of the directors in office at any time during or since the end of the year are: Keith Revell JP(Qual) John Carpendale JP(Qual)

President and Chairman of the Board Board Member

Until 4th November 2017 From 4th November 2017

Board Member President and Chairman of the Board

Until 4th November 2017 From 4th November 2017

Marian Vierveyzer JP(Qual)

Vice President

Raymond Young OAM JP(Qual)

Vice President

Until 4th November 2017

David Read JP(Qual)

Board Member

Until 4th November 2017

Bruce Birtwell JP(Qual)

Board Member

Until 4th November 2017

Mike Tidbold JP(Qual)

Board Member

Until 4th November 2017

Carmelo Pasquale JP(Qual)

Board Member

Garth Stephens JP(Qual)

Board Member

Graeme Moorhouse JP(Qual)

Board Member

Bronwyn McEntee JP(Qual)

Board Member

From 4th November 2017

Chris Lancaster JP(Qual)

Board Member

From 4th November 2017

Glenyce Hull JP(Qual)

Board Member

From 4th November 2017

Joan Kennedy JP(Qual)

Board Member

From 4th November 2017

Directors have been in office since the start of the financial year to the date of this report unless otherwise stated.

Company Secretary The following person held the position of company secretary at the end of the financial year: Wendy La Macchia Wendy La Macchia has worked for Queensland Justices Association performing the functions of Registrar and Company Secretary since 28th July 2014.

Principal Activities Queensland Justices Association (QJA) is the peak industry body that represents Justices of the Peace and Commissioners for Declarations throughout Queensland, Australia. It is the largest organisation supporting Honorary Justices in Australia, a major representative body in its field and a Queensland representative on the Australasian Council of Justices’ Associations. Principal activities include providing Members with a resource-rich member-only website, regular electronic newsletters, priority bulletins, a quarterly QJA Journal and professional development workshops to enhance the skills and professionalism of our members. In addition, as a Registered Training Organisation (RTO), QJA is licenced to deliver the accredited course required for appointment as a Justice of the Peace (Qualified) or Commissioner for Declarations. With a membership base of over 6,000, QJA also provides training, information and resources to its members through a network of 30 Branches and 10 Contact Groups.

Operating Results The surplus of the company for the financial year amounted to $38,217. This year’s surplus will be used to strengthen working capital and position the company for future stability and growth.

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

5


DIRECTORS’ REPORT

Review of Operations Review of Operations In theInopinion of directors, the company’s operations during the year performed as expected. A review of the company’s the opinion of directors, the company's operations during the year performed as expected. A review of the operations during the financial year, and the results of those operations, is as follows: companyʼs operations during the financial year, and the results of those operations, is as follows: Membership Membership QJA oversees the operation of a network of 30 branches and 10and contact groupsgroups as at 30 TheseThese branches and QJA oversees the operation of a network of 30 branches 10 contact as June at 30 2018. June 2018. contact groups provide ongoing support for JPs to manage their needs on a local basis. branches and contact groups provide ongoing support for JPs to manage their needs on a local basis. Total Total membership numbers as at 30 composition being: being: membership numbers asJune at 302018 Junewere 20186,323, were the 6,323, the composition

BY MEMBER TYPE 5000 4000 3000 2000 1000 0

4039

JP (Qual)

1173

131

7

1

958

14

C.dec

JP C.dec)

JP (Mag Ct)

JP Solicitor

Student

Unknown

BY MEMBER TYPE 6000 4000

4094

2000 0

939 Regular

Concessional

11

185

90

3

Corporate

Joint

Life Subs

Hon Life

1001 Associate

30 June themembership total membership number was 6,433. At 30At June 2017,2017, the total number was 6,433. QJA supports the “JPs in the Community” program managed by the Department of Justice and AttorneyQJA supports the “JPs in the Community” program managed by the Department of Justice and Attorney-General, JP Branch. General, JP Branch. QJA Branches have been involved in establishing and coordinating a number of QJA Branches have been involved in establishing and coordinating a number of signing facilities in local shopping centres, signing facilities in local shopping centres, libraries, community organisations, and courthouses throughout libraries, community organisations, and courthouses throughout the State. The public signing facility at QJA State Office the State. The public signing facility at QJA State Office continues to be well attended with a regular 5 day continues to be well attended with a regular 5 day volunteer roster in place. volunteer roster in place. The provision of QJA-branded Merchandise continues to be an part of part the business as newas Members and Students The provision of QJA-branded Merchandise continues to integral be an integral of the business new acquire the essential tools of trade and new products are added to the range. On-site sale of merchandise at regional Members and Students acquire the essential tools of trade and new products are added to the range. On-workshops and Branch meetings is well received. site sale of merchandise at regional workshops and Branch meetings is well received. Professional Development Professional Development During the year, regular updates and improvements were were mademade to thetomain publicpublic QJA website. Updates have also been During the year, regular updates and improvements the main QJA website. Updates applied to the Members’ site with the release of the revised Essentials Professional Development online courses for Members have also been applied to the Membersʼ site with the release of the revised Essentials Professional – nowDevelopment available at no charge for QJA members. online courses for Members – now available at no charge for QJA members. To supplement the existing (and extensive) portfolioportfolio of QJA training and professional development resources, a range of roleTo supplement the existing (and extensive) of QJA training and professional development play videos was produced 2018. videos was produced in 2018. resources, a range ofinrole-play

The quarterly Journal (issued all members in either hard-copy or electronic format) continues to The quarterly QJA QJA Journal (issued to alltomembers in either hard-copy or electronic format) continues to include content include content to satisfy the professional development needselectronic of members. Periodic electronic designed to satisfy thedesigned professional development needs of members. Periodic newsletters are used to supplement newsletters are used to supplement the Journal. the Journal. and wasaagain a very The 2017 Annual QJA State Conference wasinheld in Toowoomba on 4th November The 2017 Annual QJA State Conference was held Toowoomba on 4th November and was again very successful event, successful event, attracting over 130 delegates. attracting over 130 delegates. During the year, Professional Development workshops were organised by seven Branches and eight workshops delivered to over 380 members. It is pleasing to note that several Branches are now delivering activity-based workshops which provide a more hands-on experience for attendees. 6

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018 DIRECTORS’ REPORT During the year, Professional Development workshops were organised by seven Branches and eight workshops delivered to over 380 members. It is pleasing to note that several Branches are now delivering activity-based workshops which provide a more hands-on experience for attendees. Training Training In addition to being a membership association, QJA is a Registered Training Organisation (RTO). The In addition to being a membership association, QJASkills is a Quality Registered Training Organisation (RTO). The national regulator of national regulator of RTOs is the Australian Authority (ASQA). RTOs is the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA). Under the provisions of the Justices of the Peace and Commissioners for Declarations Act 1991, persons aspiring to hold as a Justice the Peace Commissionerfor forDeclarations DeclarationsAct are 1991, required to Under the provisions ofoffice the Justices of theofPeace and or Commissioners persons aspiring to hold satisfactorily complete a course of study (if such a course is approved by the Minister for Justice). office as a Justice of the Peace or Commissioner for Declarations are required to satisfactorily completeAt a the course of study the approved is 10276NAT in Community Services (if such present a coursetime, is approved by thecourse Minister for Justice).–AtCourse the present time, theJustice approved course(Commissioner is 10276NAT –for Course in Declarations) (Justice(Commissioner of the Peace [Qualified]). Community Justice Services for Declarations) (Justice of the Peace [Qualified]). QJA is accredited to deliver 10276NAT. As of 30th June 2018, six other RTOs were licenced to deliver this QJA is accredited to deliver 10276NAT. As of 30th June 2018, six other RTOs were licenced to deliver this course. course. In 2017-2018, pre-appointment training for new JPs and JPs Cdecs to be a core component of QJA business In 2017-2018, pre-appointment training for new andcontinued Cdecs continued to be a core component of QJA with 1,237 studentsbusiness enrolled.with The1,237 categories were: students enrolled. The categories were:

STUDENTS - PRE-APPOINTMENT TRAINING 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

586

296

232 JP (Qual) classroom

90 JP (Qual) online

C.dec classroom

33 C.dec online

JP upgrade

Twenty-three of the students attended courses at their workplace. Twenty-three of the students attended courses at their workplace. Surplus Surplus funds generated by the training businessbusiness are added overall reservesreserves for the company. funds generated by the training aretoadded tofinancial overall financial for the company. The Director with responsibility for Training together with thewith Immediate Past President (who continued in the in role The Director with responsibility for Training together the Immediate Past President (who continued theof Chief roleofofthe Chief Executive of the RTO) are RTO supported by the RTO Compliance Committee, theand QJAthe Registrar Executive RTO) are supported by the Compliance Committee, the QJA Registrar Training Program and the Trainingthe Program Coordinator to oversee the RTO aspects of company operations. Coordinator to oversee RTO aspects of company operations.

Significant Changes in State Affairs Significant Changes in of State of Affairs No significant in the companyʼs affairs occurred during the financial No significant changeschanges in the company’s state of state affairsofoccurred during the financial year. year.

Post Balance Date Events Post Balance Date Events No matters or circumstances haveinarisen in the between interval between thethe end of the financial and of thethis date of which No matters or circumstances have arisen the interval the end of financial year andyear the date report this reportaffected, which has significantly affected, or may significantly the operations of theofcompany, the has significantly or may significantly affect, the operations ofaffect, the company, the results those operations, or the of the those operations, or the state of affairs of the company in subsequent financial years. state of results affairs of company in subsequent financial years.

Likely Likely Developments and Future Results Developments and Future Results The estimated QJAheld funds QJA Branches has disclosed been disclosed note to 1(m) the The estimated value ofvalue QJA of funds in held trustinbytrust QJAbyBranches has been in notein 1(m) theto2017-18 financial 2017-18 financial statements. Directors consider that this disclosure is warranted on the basis of the statements. Directors consider that this disclosure is warranted on the basis of the materiality of its value. For future years, materiality of its value.ofFor years, consistent with the provisions we consistent with the provisions the future company’s Constitution, we anticipate that it of willthe be companyʼs our fiduciaryConstitution, responsibility to incorporate anticipate that it will be our fiduciary responsibility to incorporate more elements of the Branchesʼ finances more elements of the Branches’ finances within the overall company’s financial statements reported to members. within the overall companyʼs financial statements reported to members.

Environmental Issues Environmental Issues

The company’s operations are not regulated by any significant environmental regulation under a law of the Commonwealth or The of a state or companyʼs territory. operations are not regulated by any significant environmental regulation under a law of the Commonwealth or of a state or territory.

Share Options No options over issued shares or interests in the company were granted during or since the end of the financial year and there were no options outstanding at the date of this report. Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

7


Share Options No options over issued shares or interests in the company were granted during or since the end of the financial year and there were no options outstanding at the date of this report.

Meetings of Directors During the financial year, 11 meetings of directors were held. Attendances by each director were: Directors

Number eligible to attend

Keith Revell JP(Qual)

11

Number attended 10

11ASSOCIATION 11 QUEENSLAND JUSTICES QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION Marian Vierveyzer JP(Qual) 11 11 ABN: 41ABN: 009 666 559666 559 41 009 Raymond Young OAM JP(Qual) 4 3 DIRECTORSʼ DECLARATION DIRECTORSʼ DECLARATION David Read JP(Qual) 4 2 John Carpendale JP(Qual)

Bruce Birtwell JP(Qual)

4

4

Mike Tidbold JP(Qual)

4

0*

Graeme Moorhouse JP(Qual)

11

11

Bronwyn McEntee JP(Qual)

7

7

accordance with aCarmelo resolution of the directors Queensland the9directors Pasquale JP(Qual) 11Justices Association, In accordance with a resolution of theofdirectors of Queensland Justices Association, thedeclare directors declare that: Garth Stephens JP(Qual) 11 11 that: 6 The1.financial statements and notes,and as set out on pages 7on to pages 28, are7 in accordance with the with the The financial statements notes, as set out to 28, are in accordance Glenyce Hull JP(Qual) 7 5 Corporations Act 2001 and: Corporations Act 2001 and: Chris Lancaster JP(Qual)

7

Joan Kennedy JP(Qual)

7

7

a. of illness, Have determined that the company iscompany not reporting and entity that this Because Tidbold granted special leavethe for these fourameetings a.Director Havewas determined that is not aentity reporting andspecial that this special purpose financial report should be prepared in accordance with the accounting policies policies purpose financial report should be prepared in accordance with the accounting Indemnification and Insurance of Directors and Officers outlined inoutlined Note 1 to financial inthe Note 1 to thestatements. financial statements.

To safeguard its office bearers, QJA provides Directors and Officers insurance. In addition, QJA has made available a Deed give truegive and view theview financial of the company at 30th and b.aAccess afair true fair ofthe theposition financial position ofindemnities theas company as at 2018 30th 2018 and of b. Indemnity and for each of and theof Directors and Company Secretary. No haveJune been given June nor insurance itsduring performance for the year ended on that date. premiums of paid or since the end of the financial year for any person who is or has been a Director or Officer of the of its performance for the year ended on that date. company, that are prohibited by the Corporations Act 2001.

In the there are reasonable grounds togrounds believe that the company be ablewill to be able to 2. directors’ In theopinion directors’ opinion there are reasonable to believe that thewill company

Proceedings Behalf thebecome Company pay its debts ason and whenof they due and payable.

pay its debts as and when they become due and payable.

No application has been made and no proceedings have been brought or intervened in, on behalf of the company under section 237 of the Corporations Act 2001.

ated Auditor’s thisDated 30th August, Independence Declaration this 30th2018 August, 2018 The Directors received the independence declaration from QJA’s auditor. The independence declaration forms part of the Directors’ Report for the year ended 30 June 2018 and is located on the page following the Directors’ Report. Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Directors.

hn Carpendale John Carpendale Dated this 30th August, 2018 esident President

Bronwyn McEntee Bronwyn McEntee Director & Chair of Finance Audit Committee Director & Chairand of Finance and Audit Committee

_____________________________ _____________________________ John Carpendale President and Chairman of the Board

8

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

Bronwyn McEntee Director and Chairman of the Finance and Audit Committee


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION UNDER S 307C OF THE CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 TO THE DIRECTORS OF QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION ABN 41 009 666 559 I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, during the year ended 30 June 2018 there have been no contraventions of: (i)

the auditor independence requirements as set out in the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and

(ii)

any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

AH Jackson & Co

Elias Manicaros Fortitude Valley, QLD 31/08/2018 Document Ref: 434974_1

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

9


INCOME STATEMENT for the year ended 30th June 2018 Note 2018 2 665,899

2017 631,594

17,106 174,412 87,028 278,546 387,353

10,465 178,817 78,085 267,367 364,227

109,495 129,696 109,945 349,136 38,217

109,538 120,911 94,714 325,163 39,064

Revenue less Cost of Revenue Events Training Merchandise Total Gross Profit less Expenses Overhead Expenses Employment Expenses Operang Expenses Total Profit Aributed to Members of the Enty

3

CASH FLOW STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018 Note 2018 CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from Customers 638,326 Payments to suppliers and employees 606,229 Net cash used in/generated from operang acvies

-

Net increase (decrease) in cash held Cash at the beginning of the year Cash at the end of the year

10

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918

11A

-

32,097

11B

CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Payment for property, plant & equipment Proceeds of disposal of plant & equipment Net cash used in invesng acvies

2017

3,688 3,688

654,516 618,183 36,333

-

8,260 8,260

28,409 491,506

28,073 463,433

519,915

491,506

Page 6 of 19


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 30 JUNE 2018 Note

2018

2017

11A 4 5

519,915 20,339 4,330 35,707 580,291

491,506 3,808 5,642 15,500 516,456

6

14,014 0 14,014

18,178 0 18,178

594,305

534,634

177,535 19,304 196,839 397,466

161,636 13,749 175,385 359,249

EQUITY Retained Earnings

397,466

359,249

TOTAL EQUITY

397,466

359,249

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and Other Equivalents Trade and Other Receivables Prepayments Inventories TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

NON CURRENT ASSETS Property, Plant & Equipment Intangible Assets TOTAL NON CURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and Other Payables Employee Entitlements TOTAL LIABILTIES NET ASSETS

7

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2018 2018 Retained Profits $

2017

Retained Profits $

2016 Retained Profits $

Balance at 1 July Profit attributable to the entity

359,249

320,185

257,925

38,217

39,064

62,260

Balance at 30 June

397,466

359,249

320,185

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NOTE 1: STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES The directors have prepared the financial statements on the basis that the company is a non-reporting entity because there are no users dependent on general purpose financial reports. This financial report is therefore a special purpose financial report that has been prepared in order to meet the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001. The financial report covers the economic entity of Queensland Justices Association. Queensland Justices Association is a company limited by guarantee. The Constitution of the company provides for the formation of branches that operate autonomously but do not constitute separate legal entities. The financial performance and position of these branches have not been incorporated into this financial report, except to the extent they engage in transactions with the company. The financial report has been prepared in accordance with the significant accounting policies disclosed below, which the directors have determined are appropriate to meet the needs of members. Such accounting policies are consistent with the previous period unless stated otherwise. The financial statements have been prepared on an accruals basis and are based on historical costs unless otherwise stated in the notes. The accounting policies that have been adopted in the preparation of this report are as follows: Accounting Policies a) Revenue Revenue from the sale of goods is recognised upon the delivery of goods to customers. Grant revenue is recognised in the income statement when the entity obtains control of the grant and it is probable that the economic benefits gained from the grant will flow to the entity and the amount of the grant can be measured reliably. If conditions are attached to the grant which must be satisfied before it is eligible to receive the contribution, the recognition of the grant as revenue will be deferred until those conditions are satisfied. When grant revenue is received whereby the entity incurs an obligation to deliver economic value directly back to the contributor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction and the grant revenue is recognised in the balance sheet as a liability until the service has been delivered to the contributor, otherwise the grant is recognised as income on receipt. Donations and bequests are recognised as revenue when received. Interest revenue is recognised using the effective interest rate method, which for floating rate financial assets is the rate inherent in the instrument. Revenue from the rendering of a service is recognised upon the delivery of the service to the customers. Members of the Association are Justices of Peace and Commissioners for Declarations who pay an annual subscription fee. Subscription fees paid in advance at year end are treated as current liabilities. All revenue is stated net of the amount of goods and services tax (GST). b) Inventories Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value.

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Inventories acquired at no cost, or for nominal considera on are valued at the current replacement cost as at the date of acquisi on. c) Plant and Equipment Plant and equipment are measured on the cost basis less deprecia on and impairment losses. The carrying amount of plant and equipment is reviewed annually by directors to ensure it is not more than the recoverable amount from these assets. The recoverable amount is assessed based on the expected net cash flows that will be received from the assets employment and subsequent disposal. The expected net cash flows have been discounted to their present values in determining recoverable amounts. Plant and equipment that have been contributed at no cost or for nominal cost are valued and recognised at the fair value of the asset at the date it is acquired. d) Deprecia on The depreciable amounts of all fixed assets are depreciated on a diminishing balance basis over the asset’s useful life to the en ty. It is es mated that the useful life of all assets is five years. The assets’ residual values and useful live s are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each balance sheet date. An asset’s carrying amount is wrien down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its es mated recoverable amount. Assets are not depreciated un l they are ready for use. Assets with a cost or wrien down value below $300 are fully depreciated. e) Leases Lease payments for opera ng leases, where substan ally all the risks and benefits remain with the lessor, are charged as expenses on a straight-line basis over the lease term. f)

Financial assets and financial liabili es

Inial recognion and measurement Financial assets and financial liabili es are recognised when the en ty becomes a party to the contract. Classificaon and subsequent measurement Financial assets and financial liabili es are measured at amor sed cost (using the effec ve interest rate method). Amorsed cost is calculated as: i. ii. iii. iv.

the amount at which the financial asset or financial liability is measured at ini al recogni on; less principal repayments; plus, or minus the cumula ve amor sa on of the difference, if any, between the amount ini ally recognised and the maturity amount calculated using the effec ve interest method; and less any reduc on for impairment.

The effecve interest method is used to allocate interest income or interest expense over the relevant period and is equivalent to the rate that exactly discounts es mated future cash payments or receipts (including fees, transac on costs and other premiums or discounts) through the expected life (or when this cannot be reliably predicted, the contractual term) of the financial asset or financial liability to their net carrying amounts. Revisions to expected future net cash flows will necessitate an adjustment to the carrying value with a consequen al recogni on of an income or expense in profit or loss. Loans and receivables Receivables are recognised at amor sed cost, less any provision for impairment.

Serving Queensland’s Honorary Justices since 1918 13


Financial liabilities Financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost. All current financial assets and financial liabilities, except for employee benefits (see note i), are measured at cost. Impairment At each reporting date, the entity assesses whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or financial liability has been impaired. Impairment losses are recognised in the Income Statement. g) Derecognition Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with the carrying amount. These gains or losses are included in the income statement. Financial assets are derecognised where the contractual rights to receipt of cash flows expires or the asset is transferred to another party whereby the entity no longer has any significant continuing involvement in the risks and benefits associated with the asset. Financial liabilities are derecognised where the related obligations are discharged, cancelled or expired. The difference between the carrying value of the financial liability, which is extinguished or transferred to another party and the fair value of consideration paid, including the transfer of non-cash assets or liabilities assumed, is recognised in profit or loss. h) Impairment of Assets At each reporting date, the entity reviews the carrying values of its tangible and intangible assets to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have been impaired. If such an indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset, being the higher of the asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use, is compared to the asset’s carrying value. Any excess of the asset’s carrying value over its recoverable amount is expensed to the Income Statement. i)

Employee Benefits

Provision is made for the entity’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to Balance Sheet date. Employee benefits expected to be settled within one year together with benefits arising from wages, salaries and annual leave which may be settled after one year, have been measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled plus related on costs. Other employee benefits payable later than one year have been measured at the net present value. Contributions are made by the entity to an employee superannuation fund and are charged as expenses when incurred. j)

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, deposits held at-call with banks, other short-term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, and bank overdrafts. k) Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office. In these circumstances, the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of expense. Receivables and payables in the Balance Sheet are shown inclusive of GST. The company follows the cash system of accounting for lodgement of BAS since GST receivable on Future subscriptions should be paid when collected and not when due. Page 10 of 19

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Cash flows are presented in the Cash Flow Statement on a gross basis, except for the GST component of investing and financing activities, which are disclosed as operating cash flows. l)

Income Tax

No provision for income tax has been raised, as the entity is exempt from income tax under Div. 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997. m) Branches of QJA The Constitution of the entity provides for the existence of branches, which have been established throughout Queensland and operate in accordance with By-Laws established by the entity. These branches are not separate legal entities and are considered to be part of the Queensland Justices Association. Branches exist to provide representation to members within a specified area. Branches appoint their own office bearers, conduct their own limited operations with relative autonomy and hold no assets except to maintain any surplus funds in a specified bank account, which is not currently under the control of the entity. Branches are required to report their activities to the entity annually in accordance with the By-Laws. Historically, the reporting of branches has not been included in the income statement of the entity nor has their combined cash balances at year end been included in the balance sheet. Due to their increased operations and accumulation of cash held, the entity has resolved to consolidate the operations of branches into financial report of the entity. Until such time as systems and processes are implemented for this to occur for disclosure purposes, the total value of cash at bank held by the 30 branches as at 30 June 2018 that has not been included in the entity’s balance sheet is approximately $92,264. n) Comparatives The entity has reclassified the reporting of employment expenses in the income statement to distinguish between direct and indirect employment expenses. In prior years, all employment expenses were reported as one amount in the income statement. Direct employment expenses comprise employment expenses directly attributed to the assembly of inventory items and are reported as part of the cost of events, training and merchandise, respectively. Indirect employment expenses relate to all other employment expenses. The reclassification is intended to provide members with more reliable and relevant information concerning the employment costs and cost of goods sold. In order to maintain comparability with the prior year operating results, affected items in the income statement have been reclassified and restated. This reclassification does not result from a change in an accounting policy or a correction of an error.

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NOTE 2: REVENUE

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Members’ Subscriptions Sales of Merchandise Training Fees Received Event Revenue Sundry Income Fundraising Interest Income Grant Income

2018 $

2017 $

266,391 82,952 289,521 16,977 317 0 9,741 0 665,899

307,729 66,425 236,826 10,231 384 250 9,549 200 631,594

NOTE 3: PROFIT FOR THE YEAR 2018 $ 38,217

2017 $ 39,064

this is after provision for the following: Depreciation 7,852

10,292

Profit Before Income Tax

NOTE 4: TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES 2018 $

2017 $

CURRENT Accounts Receivables Deposits Paid

1,253 19,086

1,496 2,312

Total Current trade and other receivables

20,339

3,808

Miscellaneous Prepayments

2018 $ 4,330

2017 $ 5,642

4,330

5,642

NOTE 5: PREPAYMENTS

Total Prepayments

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NOTE 6: PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 2018 $

PLANT & EQUIPMENT Office Equipment at cost less Accumulated Depreciation

2017 $ 10,172 -6,276

8,790 -4,788

Computer Equipment at cost less Accumulated Depreciation

22,990 -20,697

22,990 -17,812

Coresoft Software less Accumulated Depreciation

23,322 -17,323

23,322 -14,324

Training Library less Accumulated Depreciation Total Property Plant & Equipment

2,305 -479 14,014

0 0 18,178

(a) Movements in carrying amounts: Movements in carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and end of the current financial year. Opening Carrying Amount Office Equipment Computer Equipment Coresoft Software Training Library Total

4,002 5,178 8,998 0 18,178

Depreciation Expense & Disposal

Additions 1,383 0 0 2305 3,688

Carrying Amount at 30 June 2018

1,489 2,885 2999 479 7,852

3,896 2,293 5,999 1,826 14,014

Disposal relates to assets from earlier years no longer in existence based on physical existence testing of all assets held by the Association as at 30 June 2018 NOTE 7: TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

Accounts Payable Subscriptions in Advance GST Payable PAYG Withholding Accrued Expenses Superannuation Payable Sundry Creditors and Accruals

2018 $

22,231 120,567 6,590 3,192 15,631 5,469 3,855 177,535

2017 $

23,354 102,549 8,280 3,524 14,708 5,640 3,581 161,636

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NOTE 8: EVENTS AFTER THE BALANCE SHEET DATE NOTE 8: EVENTS AFTER THE BALANCE SHEET DATE There were no significant events which occurred after the balance sheet date. There were no significant events which occurred after the balance sheet date. NOTE 9: COMPANY STATUS NOTE 9: COMPANY STATUS The Company does not have a share capital as it is a company limited by guarantee. The liability of the members is The Company not have a share capitalbeing as it wound is a company byJune guarantee. Thenumber liabilityofofmembers the members limited to $1 indoes the event of the Company up. At limited the 30th 2018, the wereis limited to $1 in the event of the Company being wound up. At the 30th June 2018, the number of members were 6,323 (2017 = 6,433 members) 6,323 (2017 = 6,433 members) NOTE 10: RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURE NOTE 10: RELATED PARTY DISCLOSURE The Directors of the Company during the year and payments made were: The Directors of the Company during the year and payments made were:

President: Keith Revell President: Keith Revell Director: Keith Revell

Director: Keith Revell Vice President: Marian Vierveyzer Vice President: Marian Vierveyzer Raymond Young Vice President: Raymond Young Director: John Carpendale Director: John Carpendale President: John Carpendale President: JohnStephens Carpendale Director: Garth Director: Garth Bruce Stephens Birtwell

MV & Travel Trainer MV & Travel1311 Trainer 1311 800 800 102 102 1210 1210

Director: Graeme Bruce Birtwell Moorhouse Graeme Moorhouse Director: Carmelo Pasquale Director: Carmelo Pasquale David Read DavidTidbold Read Director: Mike Director: Mike Tidbold Bronwyn McEntee Bronwyn McEntee Director: Joan Kennedy

1309 1309

Director: Chris Lancaster

486 486 4732 4732

Director: Joan Kennedy Glenyce Hull Glenyce Hull Director: Chris Lancaster

NOTE 11: CASH FLOW INFORMATION NOTE 11: CASH FLOW INFORMATION

4755 47550 0

Other total Other 607 total 1918 6073 1918 803 803 1283 230 128 230 201 201 201 2010 12100 12100 0 0 0 0 0 13090 13090 0 52410 5241 939 5671 939 5671

A A

Reconciliation of Cash Cash at Bank of Cash Reconciliation Pettyat Cash Cash Bank Petty Cash

B B

Profit\Loss before income tax Non-cash flows in profit Profit\Loss before income tax Depreciation Non-cash flows in profit of Fixed Assets Amortisation of Fixed Intangibles Depreciation Assets Amortisation of Intangibles Decrease (increase) in Trade and Other Debtors Prepayments Decrease (increase) in Trade and Other Debtors Decrease (increase) in Inventory Prepayments (Decrease)/Increase in Inventory Future Yr Subscriptions Decrease (increase) in Trade Creditors and Accruals (Decrease)/Increase in Future Yr Subscriptions Employee Entitlements (Decrease)/Increase in Trade Creditors and Accruals (Decrease)/Increase in Employee Entitlements Net cash used/generated in operating activities Net cash used/generated in operating activities

2018 $ 2018 519,716 $ 199 519,716 199 519,915 519,915 38,217 38,217 7,852 7,8520 46,0690 46,069 (16,531) 1,312 (16,531) (20,207) 1,312 18,018 (20,207) (2,182) 18,018 5,555 (2,182) 5,555 (14,035) (14,035) 32,034 32,034

2017 $ 2017 490,753 $ 753 490,753 753 491,506 491,506 39,064 39,064 10,292 10,2920 49,3560 49,356 (609) 1,854 (609) 9,848 1,854 (29,677) 9,848 10,633 (29,677) (5,072) 10,633 (5,072) (13,023) (13,023) 36,333 36,333 Page 14 of 19 Page 14 of 19

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NOTE 12: ENTITY DETAILS The registered office of the company is: Queensland Justices Association 751 Stanley Street WOOLLOONGABBA QLD 4102 The principal place of business is: Queensland Justices Association 751 Stanley Street WOOLLOONGABBA QLD 4102

NOTE 13: AUDITOR’S REMUNERATION

Remuneration of the auditor of the entity for auditing and reviewing the financial report

2018

2017

$

$

4,300

3,900

NOTE 14: FINANCIAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES RISK EXPOSURE (a) Interest rate risk The company is not exposed to any significant credit risk. (b) Credit Risk The company is not exposed to any significant credit risk. (c) Liquidity Risk The company manages liquidity risk by maintaining adequate cash reserves by continuously monitoring actual and forecast cash flows.

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QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION ABN: 41 009 666 559 DIRECTORSʼ DECLARATION

QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION In accordance with a resolution of the directors of Queensland Justices Association, the directors declare that: ABN: 41 009 666 559 DIRECTORSʼ DECLARATION

1. The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 7 to 28, are in accordance with the Corporations Act 2001 In accordance ofand: the directors of Queensland Justices Association, the directors declare In accordance with a resolution that: that: a. Have determined that the company is not a reporting entity and that this special

purpose financial report should be prepared in accordance with the accounting policies outlined in Note 1 to the financial statements. 1. The financial statements and notes, as set out on pages 7 to 28, are in accordance with the 1. b. give a trueand: and fair view of the financial position of the company as at 30th June 2018 and Corporations Act 2001 of its performance for the year ended on that date. a. Have determined that the company is not a reporting entity and that this special 2. In thepurpose directors’ opinion thereshould are reasonable grounds to believewith that the the accounting company will be able to financial report be prepared in accordance policies pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. outlined in Note 1 to the financial statements.

b.

give a true and fair view of the financial position of the company as at 30th June 2018 and of its performance Dated this 30th August, 2018for the year ended on that date. 2. 2.

In the directors’ opinion there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. John Carpendale President

Dated this 30th August, 2018

John Carpendale Carpendale John President President

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Bronwyn McEntee Director & Chair of Finance and Audit Committee

Bronwyn McEntee Director & Chair of Finance and Audit Committee


VOLUME 15 • NUMBER 3 • SPRING 2018

QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION ABN: 41 009 666 559 INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS OF QUEENSLAND JUSTICES ASSOCIATION Report on the Financial Report Opinion We have audited the financial report of Queensland Justices Association (the company), which comprises the balance sheet as at 30 June 2018, the income statement, the statement of changes in equity and the cash flow statement for the year then ended, and notes to the financial statements, including a summary of significant accounting policies, and the directors’ declaration. In our opinion the accompanying financial report of Queensland Justices Association presents fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the company as at 30 June 2018 and its financial performance for the year then ended in accordance with the accounting policies described in Note 1 to the financial statements. Basis for Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the company in accordance with the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 and the ethical requirements of the Accounting Professional and Ethical Standards Board’s APES 110: Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the directors of the company, would be in the same terms if given to the directors as at the time of this auditor’s report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. Other Information The directors are responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the information included in the company’s annual report for the year ended 30 June 2018, but does not include the financial report and our auditor’s report thereon. Our opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial report, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard. Responsibilities of the Directors for the Financial Report The directors of the company are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and have determined that the basis of preparation described in Note 1 to the financial report is appropriate to meet the requirements of the constitution and the needs of members. The director’s responsibility also includes such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Page 17 of 19

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In preparing the financial report, the directors are responsible for assessing the ability of the company to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the directors either intend to liquidate the company or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternative but to do so. Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report. As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: y Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. y Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control. y Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the directors. y Conclude on the appropriateness of the directors’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the Company to cease to continue as a going concern. y Evaluate the overall presentation, structure and content of the financial report, including the disclosures, and whether the financial report represents the underlying transactions and events in a manner that achieves fair presentation. We communicate with the directors regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit. We also provide the directors with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements regarding independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence, and where applicable, related safeguards. From the matters communicated with the directors, we determine those matters that were of most significance in the audit of the financial report of the current period and are therefore the key audit matters. We describe these matters in our auditor’s report unless law or regulation precludes public disclosure about the matter or when, in extremely rare circumstances, we determine that a matter should not be communicated in our report because the adverse Page 18 of 19

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QJA Journal Spring 2018  
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