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ISSUE 5

JAN 2015

Qatar Leadership Academy

PBIS In the Classroom Mrs. Zarmina Hotaki A key component in guiding classroom success can be marked by the positive interaction between teacher and student. Studies show that the “quality of the teacher/student relationship is the single most important factor to consider when thinking classroom management� (Patricia Sequeira Belvel & Maya Marcia Jordon, 2010). There are situations where we find ourselves struggling to understand why the effort we put in as educators does not balance the results of our students. It is relevant to share our techniques and formulas with parents so we can all have an understanding of what is beneficial for our cadets. PBIS encourages the use of data (its collection, monitoring, and application) as a useful tool towards the troubleshooting of classroom management. For example, the next time the intended outcome of the class falls below expectation it is important to take note of any contributing factors. Maintaining a record of data will help all teachers throughout the year as it segregates days/weeks into months and quarters tracking outbursts or successes. Everybody wins when student behavior improves. As parents it is important to understand that when classroom routines or procedures changes the purpose is to help facilitate a system that works best for our cadets. PBIS clearly notes that Academic success or failure is another contributing factor to classroom management. Academic failure will lead to or exacerbate problematic behavior. It’s recommended to match curriculum to skills. Maintain instructional objectives while being flexible to adjust your instruction to assist in their success. As parents and teachers are we asking those important questions of why your son might be misbehaving in the class. Sometimes it is because he does not understand. Perhaps the most overlooked management tool is the room itself and its engagement. The location or position of desks for example is important, proximity does make a difference. Posting of classroom expectations also matter. Student engagement within the classroom is another important factor. Interacting with the cadets prior to the bell. It is vital get a feel of what you will be getting into that day. Parents inquire about the classroom and where you child sits; something as small as seating arrangements can make all the difference. Proper behavior management helps us as educators and parents gain intended results. Although every class and home has its own uniqueness, our approach to order and instruction remains universal.

Qla newsletter issue no5  

QLA

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