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LEARNING PORTFOLIO Landscape Ecology & Horticulture


CONTENT NATURE HABITAT 1 Introduction to Habitat Features 2 Principles of Ecology 3 Vegetation Types DESIGN VALUE 4 Landscape Values 5 Green Roof 6 Vertical Garden 7 Bioswales 8 Constructed Wetland 9 Urban Food 10 Gardens for Community 11 GEL Project 12 Regional Planning

SOIL 13 Introduction to soil PLANT IDENTIFICATION 14 Plant Identification PLANTING DESIGN 15 Planting design Techniques 16 Design Brief 17 Plants


1 INTRODUCTION TO HABITAT FEATURES

NATIVE VEGETATION.

BIG OLD TREES Tree hollows are vital for nesting for many species, eg. owls.

LOGS fallen branches, leaf litter.

UNDERSTOREY Bushes, grasses, small trees, sedges,herbs.

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2 Principles of Ecology PLANTS: sun, water, air, soil, nutrients, wind, climate, waterlogging.

ANIMALS: habitat trees, food, shelter, water, drought.

REPRODUCTION COMPETITION PREDATION

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3 VEGETATION TYPES RAINFOREST & RELATED SHRUB

WETLANDS & SALT SMARSH

minimum 8000mm rainfall Lack of fire Shady Fern masses

Water regime Salinity Grazing uses

NATIVE GRASSLAND WET EUCALYPT & WOODLAND Fire regime Wet Dense understorey Forestry Needs fire for reproduction of eucalypts.

Most cleared Fire occurs Grazing uses Dry and rich sites.

SCRUB, HEATHLAND, COASTAL COMPLEX

DRY EUCALYPT & WOODLAND Grassy, healthy Fire adapted patchy (lots of diversity) Have to maintain big old tress for regeneration.

Sandy with poor soils Phytopthra threat

MOORLAND, SEDGELAND, PEATLAND, RUSHLAND

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4 Landscape values Landscape has different values to different people, I think it depends to individual and environment situations. However, these two types of values should exist together to have the balance between reserves and development of country.

INSTRUMENTAL

INTRINSIC

food. resources. society.

habitat. serenity.

urban prairies HIGH LINE PARK, NEW YORK. A kind of eco system that recycling the used railway to an aerial greenway for the society to use the line safely from the busy roads There are 210 species of plants, including American natives plants. It will be better if urban farming cooperate with the line, it can be approached by society easily and supply to the big city immediately.

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5 green roof

Green roof or living roof is a roof that have living vegetation cover with the growing medium. It is quite popular in Europe. I think it is a really good solution for urban landscape, especi ally metropolis, which don’t have any extra space. We can utilize the roof part to add green to the city and also create a relax space for the busy city.

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6 vertical garden Vertical garden is different from others mostly because it is planted vertically but not horizontally. A better way for high rise building, the vertical space could be much more than the roof space.

SIMPLE 5 STEPS 1 Find a north facing wall (southern hemisphere), north east or north west is acceptable, as well as they recieved minimum of 4 hours sunlight. 2 Find a nearby water source 3 Choose your growing containers 4 Select and plant your vegetables 5 Maintain

MUSEUM of OLD & NEW ART, HOBART,TASMANIA. 8


7 bioswales

Bioswales are landscape elements that remove silt and pollution from runoff surface water. This is good to the little green space between building, carpark. According to the contour of the space to create porous space that water permeable.

Trees with porous loose aggregates covering around reduce the impact of soil compaction by pedestrians and promotes good water and oxygen exchange for the roots. 9


8 CONstructed wetland

Constructed wetland is a place that provide final resting placefor runoff water but also a pollutant removal.

CASE STUDY SUTCLIFFE PARK, LONDON, UK. This redeveloped park significantly increase the biodiversity value of an urban park by linking creation and management of habitat and wildlife areas. The land has been redesigned to accommodate different degrees of flooding. There’s also an increase of people using the site, particularly families that coming for the water. In fact, Children’s enjoyment become a by-product of the habitat creation.

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10 urban food WHY?

WHY?

HOW?

We can see clearly from the food life cycle, we can get inputs easily, but the intermediate before output is complex, time consuming, increasing the output emmision as well. It will be better if we can utilize our green space for urban food production. Although we only spend around 3% of our income on fruits and vegetables, but we can save that.

HOW? Resurgence in Urban Food. Community garden Educational and school garden Roof top garden City farm Guerilla garden Transient or Pop up garden

VILLANDRY KITCHEN GARDEN, FRANCE. 11


11 gardens for community FOOD LIFE CYCLE INPUT: water, energy, toxic. Produced; transported; Purchased&Processed; transported; Wasted OUTPUT: emmision.

Sensory garden can also be educational that connects to the community.

Community garden which harvest can be shared. More than a intrinsic garden, it is an instrumental that provides urban food.

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12 gel project

GrowEatLearn.

UTAS. NORTHERNWASTEMANAGEMENT. NRMNORTH. GLEBEGARDENS. TASMANIANINSTITUTEOFAGRICULTURE. UTASSCHOOLOFARCHITECTURE. CRESSY� DISTRISCHOOL. EASTLAUNCESTONPRIMARYSCHOOL. LILYDALEDISTRICTSCHOOL.

GEL Project is one of the best example for resurgence urban food. The box was configured by Landscape students. We found a best location that draws pedestrian attention and also received maximum sunlight. Each square bed was filled with 350mm depth soil and 10 litre of water. Peas, radishes, carrots, chards, and chives will be planted in each GEL bed.

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13 REGIONAL PLANNING For me, regional planning is a larger scale of landscape management and it is important for a country’s development. Regional landscape planning: • Feed us and keep us warm - Food & Fibre • House us and provide resources that drive our economy - Minerals & Energy • Supply us with clean air and water - Ecosystem Services • Process our waste - Ecosystem Services • Reflect who we are as a culture - Cultural Landscape • Provide us space for recreation - Social Services • “The economy is a wholly owned subsidiary of the environment”

WESTERN AUSTRALIA LANDSCAPE

QUEENSLAND LANDSCAPE

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9 introduction to soil SOIL TEXTURE CLASSES

SOIL is..... mineral, organic, air , water.

IDEAL

TOO DRY

TOO WET

mineral organic water air

SOIL STRUCTURE

SOIL SENSATION Soil structure is easier to change than soil texture. Higher of soil Cation Exchange Capacity(CEC), the higher capable absorb nutrients of soil.

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14 PLANT IDENTIFICATION

FAMILY ASTERACEAE

FAMILY EPACRIDACEAE

FAMILY FABACEAE

daisy family

heath family

pea family

FAMILY MIMOSACEAE

FAMILY MYRTACEAE

FAMILY PROTEACEAE

wattle family

eucalypt & tea tree family

waratah & banksia

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15 PLANTING DESIGN TECHNIQUES PLANNING knowing the site features and design approach.

TECHNIQUES

Red, Bright Orange catches the eye

Planting Triangle

Clear Visual Connection CPTED

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16 PLANTING DESIGN BRIEFUTAS LIBRARY, NEWNHAM.

Reading

A quiet atmsophere is needed in this space, screening plants and barriers could be used.

Entrances

Solar access and visual connection have to be provided by designing open spaces with helping of bright colour flora.

Cafe

A relax space for people to hangout and have a nice landscape view.

SITE PLAN 20


PLANTING PLAN

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17 PLANTSUSED IN PLATING PLAN

Callistemon Viridiflorus prickly bottle brush

Pultenaea Juniperina prickly beauty

Lomandra Longifolia sag

Cyathodes Straminea small leaved cheeseberry

Ulmus Procera elm trees

Coprosma Kirkii

Athrotaxis Laxifolia intermediate pine

Hedera Ivy

ivy

Betula Pendula silver birch

Lupinus Perennis

Agapanthus Africanus

african lily

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Landscape Ecology & Horticulture  

Learning portfolio [Landscape Ecology & Horticulture Course, UTAS]

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