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Annual Report 2015–16

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Message from the Queensland Governor, Patron of the Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) As Governor of Queensland and Patron of QCOSS, it has given me great pride to see the determined and sharply focused efforts of this vital peak body over the past year. Working collaboratively and creatively with its diverse members and stakeholders, the Council has continued its long-standing and active commitment to addressing disadvantage, poverty and other intractable social problems in our state. QCOSS has also continued to advocate for a series of actions and policy initiatives which seek to improve both social cohesion and the resilience of communities and individuals. Such actions are the product of a bold and determined vision and, as the case studies in this report demonstrate, the Council has made significant progress towards its goal in the 2015–16 year. Successes have included improving access to early-childhood education in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and acting as advocates for low-income households and refugees. The Council has also conducted workshops and seminars throughout the state, both online and in person, and has implemented important, place-based projects to empower communities. I congratulate QCOSS on this excellent report and on the achievements of the past year, and I wish the Council and its collaborators every success in their ongoing efforts to address poverty, homelessness, mental health, violence and the many other challenges which confront Queensland communities today.

His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC Governor of Queensland

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Contents BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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CHAIR’S REPORT

4

LIFE MEMBERS

5

WHO WE ARE

6

MESSAGE FROM THE CEO ANNUAL HIGHLIGHTS OUR WORK

7–8 9–12 14–30

Bright Actions

15

People power

17

Enabling Local Communities

19

Emerging Voices

21

EMBRACE

23

Sector support

25

Reaching the sector

26

Cost of living

27

Indigenous Professional Support Unit

28

Bringing the NDIS to life

29

Your say

30

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

32–34

THE WRITTEN WORD

36

FUNDERS AND SPONSORS

37

FINANCIAL REPORT

38-60

Directors’ Report

Information on Directors

Auditor’s independence declaration

44

Statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income

45

Statement of financial position

46

Statement of changes in equity

47

Statement of cash flows

47

Notes to the Financial Statement

Directors’ declaration

Independent Auditor’s Report

39 40-43

48–57 58 59-60 2


Board of Directors

Faiza El Higzi

Peter Emery

Richard Johnson

Mark Tucker-Evans Chair

Kate Tully

Gerry Weatherall

Sue Mason-Baker

I sincerely thank the Board for their support and guidance, particularly during my time as Chair. The Board’s members – past, present and future – have built a solid foundation and will continue to do so....

Mark Tucker-Evans, Chair

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Chair’s report The past 12 months have seen a renewed and strategic focus by the Board to ensure that QCOSS maintains its role as an enabler – for our members, Queensland’s community services sector and the people it supports. While the sector strives to support our most vulnerable, QCOSS in turn strives to support, protect and encourage the sector to survive and thrive in times of uncertainty and change. By working in partnership with our members, and the wider sector, QCOSS is committed to providing opportunities to learn and grow, to connect and share, ensuring that the focus of our work remains person-centred. There has certainly been a considered and purposeful push towards place-based solutions, where possible instigated by citizen-led responses. It is clear that when a community or an organisation is given the right resources and encouragement, great outcomes can be achieved for individuals and families experiencing poverty and disadvantage. QCOSS continues to deliver timely, considered and evidence-based submissions and publications, including the Cost of Living Report and Queensland’s wellbeing 2016 report, which are of great value to the sector, as well as the policy makers and researchers who are constantly looking at better ways of doing business. QCOSS also continues to reach out to the regions and to ensure that they are given the right opportunities and resources, with staff travelling to all corners of the state to deliver workshops and one-on-one support to provide the best possible service to their clients. Webinars are part of the professional development opportunities which is a great addition for rural and regional members and organisations.

I have been proud to be part of the QCOSS Board for more than a decade however, it is now time to step aside. I have seen many faces come and go and seen tremendous growth in the organisation over the years, but the vision and values of everyone involved has always remained steadfast – a Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage. I believe that QCOSS plays a unique and important role in Queensland’s community services sector, bringing a fresh perspective and clear focus to the end goal. I sincerely thank the Board for their support and guidance, particularly during my time as Chair. The Board’s members – past, present and future – have built a solid foundation and will continue to do so from which QCOSS can confidently and ably build upon. I thank the CEO and the staff at QCOSS for their ongoing efforts in shaping policy, providing advocacy and proudly supporting Queensland’s community services sector in an ever-changing environment. Lastly, I thank our vice-regal patron, His Excellency the Hon Paul de Jersey AC, for his ongoing support of our work. Mark Tucker-Evans Chair

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Life members In 2015, QCOSS past president and Board member Karyn Walsh was awarded life membership in recognition of her outstanding commitment and contribution to the community services sector and Queensland’s most vulnerable. With nearly 40 years’ experience in the not-for-profit sector, Karyn has significant expertise in the areas of homelessness, disability, young parents, prison ministry, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and abuse of people in church and state care. Karyn says she joined QCOSS because she “was concerned and wanted to make a contribution to influencing social and economic policy where it impacts on the most vulnerable in our communities. I was disturbed by the lack of real partnership between government and non-government services in the co-design of policy and services.” Beginning in 2000, Karyn served on the QCOSS Board for five years before taking on the role as president for a further eight years, bringing with her a wealth of knowledge, experience and energy. Considered one of the most influential voices in Queensland’s social services sector, Karyn helped ensure that the collective voice of the sector was not only heard but answered. QCOSS CEO Mark Henley said Karyn’s time on the QCOSS Board was “critically important to positioning QCOSS as a peak body and helping forge strong relationships between the sector, the government and Queensland communities. Karyn has been a tireless advocate for partnerships with government, business corporations and community organisations to create a strong and diverse community services sector to reduce the impacts of poverty and is arguably one of the most knowledgeable people about social services and the homeless sector in Queensland, including how to successfully navigate the service system.” Karyn said her time at QCOSS was sustained by “knowing that what we all do whether at QCOSS or in our organisations has value that goes beyond the funding to the heart of how we live in our communities. What contribution I have made is for others to judge. I have undertaken my role with conviction that even though we may not have got it right all the time, we have made a difference.”

Karyn Walsh, QCOSS Life Member 5

QCOSS is proud to represent the interests of our members and the broader community services sector in an effort to eliminate poverty and disadvantage from our society. With members ranging from individuals to large organisations working across the globe, QCOSS relies on and works with our membership in order to achieve our shared vision. During our history, the organisation and the QCOSS Board have welcomed many passionate, outspoken, driven and revolutionary thinkers who have no doubt helped shape the social services sector in Queensland today. As a sign of respect, and recognition for the exceptional contribution and outstanding services brought to the organisation and the broader community, the Board can nominate individuals as honourary life members. At the 2015 QCOSS AGM, the Board nominated past President Karyn Walsh for her tireless advocacy work in the social services sector to reduce the impacts of poverty and to strengthen the ties between the sector, government and business. We also recognise past life membership recipients and remain grateful for their involvement and dedication to QCOSS and vulnerable Queenslanders. QCOSS’ HONOURARY LIFE MEMBERS* Les Halliwell George Barker Cyril Gilbert OAM (Margaret) Peg Whiley Rev Colin Arkell Alma Hartshorn AM Professor Edna Chamberlain AM Vera Raymer OAM Prof Dr Margaret Steinberg AM Karyn Walsh *Due to limited historical resources this list may be incomplete and we apologise unreservedly for any errors or omissions in this information.


FACT

14.8%

OF QUEENSLANDERS are living in poverty and nearly 20,000 Queenslanders are experiencing homelessness.

Who we are The Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) is the state-wide peak body representing the interest of individuals experiencing or at risk of experiencing poverty and disadvantage, and organisations working in the social and community services sector. For nearly 60 years, QCOSS has been a leading force for social change to build social and economic wellbeing for all. With members across the state, QCOSS supports a strong community service sector. OUR VISION A Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage OUR PURPOSE To be the leading force for social change to eliminate poverty and disadvantage QCOSS, together with our members continues to play a crucial lobbying and advocacy role in a broad number of areas, including: • systems and policy change • community engagement and capacity building • sector capacity building and support • homelessness and housing issues • early intervention and prevention • cost of living pressures including low income energy concessions and improved consumer protections in the electricity, gas and water markets, and • early childhood support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse peoples.

OUR VALUES QCOSS will always act: Courageously – leading the campaign to end poverty and disadvantage Collaboratively – working together with our members and stakeholders Creatively – exploring better ways to achieve our vision Knowledgeably – using sound evidence to inform our work Inclusively – respecting the diversity of our communities and sector We underpin all this by behaving with integrity. We recognise the traditional custodians of the land, the importance of self-determination and an end to disadvantage for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. QCOSS strongly supports reconciliation. QCOSS is part of the national network of Councils of Social Service lending support and gaining essential insight to national and other state issues. QCOSS is supported by the vice-regal patronage of His Excellency the Honourable Paul de Jersey AC, Governor of Queensland.

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Message from the CEO While QCOSS’ vision – for a Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage – remains steadfast, our approach to delivering this is sharply focused on what matters most, and that is the individual. Behind every statistic is a person, with a name, a story to tell, and a perspective of what it really means to experience poverty or disadvantage that deserves to be told and to be addressed. Our work during the past 12 months has been very much about empowering, strengthening and building on the experiences, skills and capabilities of the individual, whether that be one person, one organisation or one community. We believe that a person-centred approach, one based on true respect and understanding, can deliver real results and effect real change for those who need it most. We believe that by investing in place-based initiatives, developed through citizen-led policy development, some of the greatest social issues facing our communities can be dealt with. We believe Queensland’s social services sector has the passion, know-how and capability to do great things, but that its greatest asset – the individual – must be encouraged and supported to do this work.

Sector support remains a primary focus for QCOSS and we are pleased to have broadened the scope of our engagement with and support for the sector in the last 12 months. We have delivered more than 120 workshops, webinars, and information and training sessions to nearly 4,000 people right across Queensland. Topics included outcomes measurement, human services quality framework, energy literacy and the importance of culturally safe early years’ environments for all children, as well as our pivotal work building more inclusive and thriving communities. Our annual state conference once again attracted hundreds of delegates from across the state to explore the topic of ‘individuals building thriving communities’ – and as our keynote speaker Jessica Venegas from Community Solutions in the United States told us “there is no one person that cannot be homed”, reaffirming our focus on the individual. It has been incredibly encouraging to see the momentum being gained in the area of community-led place-based initiatives and projects state wide, being driven both by government and the community sector. QCOSS has always been a vocal supporter of this concept and is proud to be 7

part of the work being done by Queensland communities to determine their own future and drive their own successes off the back of stronger and more robust models of policy development. Some of our most notable involvement includes the Enabling Local Communities (ELC) project in Ipswich and Cairns which is building on the strong networks in the homelessness area to improve client outcomes, helping to bring the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) to life in Townsville and helping to shape the Queensland Government’s child and family reform deliverables in Rockhampton. The importance of strengthening the reach of policy influence and empowering local communities far and wide to shape their own future through access to good data and pathways to implement innovative solutions cannot be overlooked. We know that communities throughout Queensland are struggling to cope due to any number of influencing factors – high unemployment rates and underemployment, increasing instances of domestic and family violence, drug and alcohol misuse, increasing cost of living pressures which are drawing more people to poverty – and these communities must be empowered to develop the right responses, involving the right people, to get the right outcomes. We are seeing more of this happening with reforms underway in the areas of housing and homelessness, families and children, and disability which are long overdue and very much welcomed by many of our members, their clients and families. Ensuring that we continue to work from a robust and sound evidence base, QCOSS released a number of important and timely publications including our Cost of Living Report – again concentrating on the cost of living and age pensioner households – and our Queensland’s wellbeing 2016 report which is designed to view, measure and track the wellbeing of individuals, in an effort to provide the evidence needed to influence our responses and improve people’s lives. The cost of living remains one of the greatest issues for low-income


Mark Henley, QCOSS CEO

individuals and families who continue to struggle to afford a basic standard of living, due in part to skyrocketing electricity prices, high housing and transport costs and minimum incomes. We know that assistance in the form of concessions can have a big impact on a household which is why we were so pleased to see the Queensland Government finally release its public transport review and announce its recommendations to reduce fares across the board, but more importantly to extend concessions to job seekers and refugees in South East Queensland. It is also why we will continue to advocate for energy concessions to be extended to all individuals on a health care card. We eagerly await the government’s response to the Queensland Productivity Commission’s recommendations regarding the state’s energy market in the hope it will deliver strong reforms and actions which will provide relief to individuals and families struggling with high energy bills. The complexities and inter-related nature of poverty shows that by providing assistance in one area – making public transport more affordable – you can effect real change in a person’s life – a job seeker can now afford to attend more interviews, secure employment sooner and start to build their own financial and social security. QCOSS’ 2016/17 Pre-budget submission to the Queensland Government provided a clear plan for social and economic wellbeing for all and drew attention to five key areas of concern – community resilience; regional Queensland; cost of living; housing and homelessness; and financial resilience – followed by 10 clear actions that could improve the lives of our most vulnerable. Queensland Treasurer, the Hon Curtis Pitt MP provided a more in-depth look at the 2016 Budget at our annual Budget Breakfast and in a detailed written response to QCOSS, demonstrating that the government is willing to listen to the sector’s concerns and to respond appropriately, including additional community recovery and resilience funding, a strong focus

on supporting regional Queensland with infrastructure projects and employment packages, and funding for its Financial Resilience program which aims to “support Queenslanders to respond better to financial stresses, personal issues and cost of living pressures”. It remains to be seen how the government implements these plans and whether the initiatives are broad enough to truly make a difference in the lives of vulnerable Queenslanders. There will always remain a level of uncertainty in Queensland’s social service sector, particularly now with political unease in both the state and federal governments, ongoing funding uncertainty and cuts and empty promises with regards to many national partnerships in critical areas such as housing, homelessness, education and health. QCOSS is not immune and we have had to farewell a number of staff in recent times as projects and funding cycles come to an end. This includes our Indigenous Professional Support Unit (IPSU) team, our EMBRACE program which was focused on increasing the participation rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and culturally and linguistically diverse children in kindergarten, and those working on our Low Income Energy Efficiency Program. You can read more about this valuable work later in this report. I thank all the staff who have been part of these projects, and indeed all our staff, for helping to effect so much positive change for individuals, families and communities, throughout all of Queensland. I also thank the QCOSS Board, and our membership for their engagement and support of the work being carried out by QCOSS in the pursuit of our shared vision to improve the lives of each and every individual experiencing poverty and disadvantage. Mark Henley Chief Executive Officer

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Annual highlights

JULY 2015

AUGUST 2015

SEPTEMBER 2015

Home for Good initiative wrapped up with 17 registry weeks run throughout Queensland, including 2,502 surveys completed and 4,152 people surveyed.

Community Door celebrated a milestone with more than one million people visiting the site to find information, news and resources since the site began in 2008.

Fifteen face-to-face information sessions delivered to service providers around the state, focusing on the rollout of the Human Services Quality Framework (HSQF).

More than 90 people attended a workshop about marginalised Queenslanders influencing public policy, featuring key note speaker Professor Gerard Quinn.

QCOSS’ energy team hosted the Australian Energy Market Commission providing community groups with the opportunity to directly influence and advocate with the agency that makes the energy rules.

More than 300 attended the QCOSS State Budget Breakfast with the Hon Curtis Pitt MP outlining funding for a range of initiatives such as domestic and family violence, Skilling Queenslanders for Work, financial counselling and the Triple P Positive Parenting Program.

The Queensland Government announced it will implement 140 recommendations from the Not Now, Not Ever report. Good news for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers using electricity pre-payment meters in Queensland with the government and Ergon implementing a number of process improvements following strong advocacy from QCOSS. QCOSS joined the national Councils of Social Service (COSS) in urging the Australian Senate to vote down the harsh federal government proposal to withhold income support from young people and some single parents.

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Welcomed new Board member Debra Malthouse from Wuchopperen Health Service Limited.

IPSU’s focus continued with support for Budget Based Funded services to submit their Quality Improvement Plans (QIP). Feedback received has praised the level of support provided by the IPSU team and the high quality of QIPs submitted.


OCTOBER 2015

NOVEMBER 2015

DECEMBER 2015

Third pensioner-specific Cost of Living Report released focusing on age pensioner households and highlighting that couples relying on the pension and renting privately are at greatest risk of living in poverty.

Embracing Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood Conference brought together more than 120 delegates to celebrate achievements, identify gaps and create a shared understanding and vision for the sector’s future.

2015 QCOSS State Conference attracted nearly 300 sector representatives with highlights including Jessica Venegas from Community Solutions USA, a panel session hosted by SBS’ Jenny Brockie and a storytelling workshop by Full & Frank’s Juanita Wheeler.

Professor Anne Tiernan from Griffith University was guest speaker at the QCOSS AGM, where she shared her insights on how the sector can and should engage with the community and government at all levels to ensure better outcomes.

Outcomes paper: Co-design 2015 released documenting the 10 Outcomes Working Group workshops held around the state, providing a useful tool and reference point for organisations. Free eTraining course on outcomes co-design processes also launched on Community Door.

Communities Minister Shannon Fentiman announced the roll-out of five-year agreements for nongovernment organisations and services at the 2015 QCOSS State Conference, to cut red tape and provide better service delivery and support for vulnerable Queenslanders.

Past QCOSS President Karyn Walsh awarded lifetime membership recognising her years of service to the community sector. Senior management together with Queensland Government and sector representatives visited New Zealand to look at work done on data collection, analytics and policy development and the NZ government’s approach to addressing disadvantage.

A strong focus on the impact of electricity prices on low-income earners resulted in QCOSS hosting 14 energy literacy workshops, two webinars, and 154 surveys completed exploring the issue, all designed to help guide our advocacy work in this space. QCOSS connected with more than 4,500 people from communitybased organisations across the state, including many of our members, through workshops, conferences, network meetings, webinars and more, including topics such as HSQF, outcomes, sector capacity and capability.

Enabling Local Communities (ELC) project launched in Ipswich and Cairns to build upon existing service integration knowledge and practices to get better housing outcomes for people. 10


JANUARY 2016

FEBRUARY 2016

MARCH 2016

Released 2016/17 Pre-budget submission to the Queensland Government outlining 10 clear actions within five key areas: community resilience, regional Queensland, cost of living, housing and homelessness, and financial resilience. Also provided Lend your voice advocacy kit for members.

First Love Your Tender webinar, a COSS collaboration and part of a series of four, attracts a fantastic sign-up.

First stage of the ELC project completed – including online surveys and interviews in both Ipswich and Cairns – with the second stage now underway.

Continued advocacy for vulnerable energy and water consumers with a submission to the Department of Energy and Water Supply supporting changes to ensure vulnerable on-supply customers can access their energy rebate entitlements and improved access to justice through the Energy and Water Ombudsman Queensland. Reduce Your Juice – an Australianfirst program helping low-income households save money on their energy bills – won Best Residential Energy Efficiency Project at the National Energy Efficiency Awards. 11

QCOSS and Q Shelter jointly welcomed the federal government’s announcement to spend $250 million to provide energy efficient community housing. Welcomed new Board member Sue Mason-Baker, from IFYS Limited, in the capacity of regional member. Two additional HSQF workshops held this month due to demand from the sector. The interactive workshops have been extremely well received, assisting any organisations to implement a quality system.

QCOSS hosted a Multicultural Forum with the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse led by Commissioner Robert Fitzgerald AM. QCOSS Chair and CEO met with several ministers and senior staff to discuss the Pre-budget Submission and to advocate for improved services and supports for vulnerable people living throughout Queensland.


Bringing the NDIS to life

APRIL 2016

MAY 2016

JUNE 2016

Queensland’s wellbeing 2016 report released revealing the interrelated nature of poverty and disadvantage.

ELC workshop in Cairns held to develop a vision for how the housing and homelessness service system can best be delivered to ensure improved outcomes for homeless or at risk individuals and families.

The Hon Curtis Pitt MP outlined the impact of the state budget on the community sector at the QCOSS State Budget Breakfast. QCOSS released its budget commentary at the breakfast.

Connecting Communities forum held in Cairns focusing on energy and housing affordability issues. A number of workshops were held this month including: an ELC workshop in Ipswich looking at initiatives to get better outcomes for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness; a privacy management forum for community services in Brisbane and an energy literacy workshop in Warwick. More webinars were also delivered including how to answer the tender documents under the Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative, and how to support clients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Facilitated the Financial Resilience Workshop in Brisbane to discuss investment in building financial resilience for all Queenslanders, particularly those who are vulnerable or disadvantaged. Hosted a free Energy Literacy Workshop in Mackay for frontline workers who assist clients struggling with their energy bills, ensuring community organisations can get the best outcomes for their clients.

More than 100 people attended the ‘Bringing the NDIS to life’ event in Townsville to share information and generate ideas for action to ensure the city is ready for the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme. Launched the QCOSS Community Insurance Cover package for members in partnership with AON. Welcomed new Board member Faiza El Higzi who has more than 20 years’ experience in the community sector.

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For a little over 50 years, QCOSS has been the most significant voice for social change in this state. I believe that the collective of what happens with QCOSS is something very powerful, and I look around the room and see a lot of people from various community organisations, non government service providers, people who are advocates and I know that the work that QCOSS does really is representative of the collective work that is trying to be undertaken. So thank you for the crucial role that QCOSS, its Board and all of the people involved make in the community sector here in Queensland. The Hon Curtis Pitt MP Queensland Treasurer

The Hon Curtis Pitt MP, Queensland Treasurer, at the QCOSS State Conference 2015 13


Our work

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FACT

3,000

PEOPLE from a refugee background attended Bright Action workshops.

Bright Actions More than 10,000 people from a refugee background in Queensland received practical, real-life knowledge and advice to help them reduce their electricity bills and save hundreds of dollars now and into the future, thanks to the Bright Actions program. QCOSS, in partnership with MDA Ltd and the Moreland Energy Foundation, has delivered the Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (LIEEP) during the past three years, helping to improve the energy efficiency of thousands of low income households from a refugee background in Queensland.

Engaging with people from more than 20 countries, speaking nearly 40 languages, the success of Bright Actions was in delivering energy-efficiency information through face-to-face service delivery in peoples’ first language and appropriate cultural context. Bright Actions offered four different services across multiple locations in Queensland, including: a personalised home visit; energy-efficiency workshops; providing energy efficiency information into the Life Skills Orientation Program undertaken by all new arrivals to Australia; and facilitating access to the No Interest Loan Scheme (NILS) and a bulk buy scheme for energy-efficient appliances. The home-visit approach was the most effective mechanism for building knowledge and achieving real reductions in energy bills for refugee households. It meant team members could provide information in a safe, comfortable environment, observe current practices and conduct actual demonstrations of energy-efficient behaviours in the home, ensuring greater understanding and the chance for longterm changes. It is estimated that during the 1,700 home visits by Bright Actions team members, average savings of $363 per household over five years will be achieved. Importantly, 74 per cent of home visit participants surveyed six months after one of the four interventions, 15

reported that they had shared their knowledge with others in their community, thereby extending the reach of this program and its benefits to a much wider audience. More than 3,000 people from a refugee background also attended a Bright Actions energy-efficiency workshop, and nearly 500 people received energy efficiency information as part of their Life Skills Orientation Program. Bright Actions also assisted 70 people from a refugee background to purchase energy-efficient appliances through NILS. While Bright Actions has come to an end, it has no doubt made a lasting impression on all involved and will continue to achieve ongoing savings for many households for many years to come. Data collected regarding the experiences of refugee households in Queensland will also be valuable, helping to inform future advocacy. It will also assist in building a case for a dedicated program to increase both energy literacy and energy-efficiency knowledge in low-income households, with specific support for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The energy sector is often seen as a highly complex area and this project has highlighted the need for future programs to have the flexibility to assist people with a range of energy needs. These include identifying faults or poor quality appliances, connecting people with concessions and NILS, and advocating on behalf of people to address issues with their retailer, such as negotiating payment plans or securing a better energy deal. QCOSS will continue to work with MDA to advocate on behalf of this project and secure better outcomes for people from a refugee background.


Fiona Hawthorne, Tenant Liaison Officer

The results Besides helping thousands of people from a refugee background save money and improve their energy literacy, Fiona Hawthorne says the Bright Actions program also gave them a sense of control and confidence over their bills. Conducting home visits for the Bright Actions program, Fiona says she was always welcomed into people’s households as they were eager to learn more about their new environment, including how to navigate the energy market, make better energy choices and ultimately reduce their energy bills. “We often take for granted the knowledge we have about our energy use or even how to read a bill and contact an energy provider if we have a problem,” Fiona says. “Sometimes it was the simplest of information that made the biggest difference, like having the washing machine set to cold wash, or paying an energy bill on time to avoid paying late fees. Even sometimes going through the bill to explain that their account was in credit so there was nothing to be paid! All this information helped individuals and families regain a sense of control in one area of their lives and confidence that they could cope better within a new and often overwhelming environment.” Fiona says the program also helped energy companies in Queensland to better understand the complex backgrounds of their customers, and how they could better support vulnerable consumers and provide more targeted information and advice. “It can be difficult for people from a refugee background to access information in their own language. Most of the energy companies we came into

contact with were willing to make changes and appreciated the insight into some of the issues faced by vulnerable customers,” she says. “Bright Actions also highlighted the need for government departments to better understand the energy needs of clients before placing them in housing as it can cause more financial or social problems in the long run if energy bills are left to spiral out of control.

The people we visited during the home visits were often just so pleased that someone was taking the time to listen to them and trying to better understand their cultural practices in a new context and how to make the two work together, giving them a better quality of life and extra money in their pockets.

Fiona Hawthorne, Bright Actions

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People power Queensland’s energy market remains a complex environment ahead of deregulation on 1 July 2016 and energy bills are still one of the biggest cost of living pressures for households despite efforts to stop the big price hikes of recent years. Energy advocacy therefore remains a priority area for QCOSS with activities being undertaken across the state to empower consumers, protect vulnerable customers and enable the sector to better support at-risk clients. In 2015-16 QCOSS held 11 energy literacy workshops across the state providing information to community organisations to assist people struggling with their electricity bills. Our goal – to build confident and informed community organisations able to assist people to better manage their electricity bills – was achieved, with the vast majority of all participants confirming that their knowledge and confidence had improved as a result of attending a QCOSS energy event. More than 75 per cent of attendees also reported that their clients experienced better outcomes as a direct result. Ensuring that industry and government remain aware and informed of the difficulties being faced by vulnerable consumers and the organisations doing their best to support them is also critical and part of QCOSS’ advocacy role. Representatives from Smart Services Queensland, Department of Energy and Water Supply, Australian Energy Regulator, Energy and Water Ombudsman Queensland, Ergon Energy, Origin Energy and AGL were invited to participate in the workshops and webinars to hear first-hand valuable insights into the current and emerging issues households experience day-to-day. The engagement of such a wide range of stakeholders hearing about the experiences of people struggling to cope with high electricity costs provided invaluable opportunities for discussions on how all parties can work together to better support those in need. 17

QCOSS has also played an active role in the Queensland Government’s investigation into electricity prices following the establishment of the Queensland Productivity Commission (QPC), with multiple submissions into the inquiry providing a strong voice for vulnerable consumers and the community organisations who support them. QCOSS also collaborated with the Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland to make a joint submission to the QPC, in recognition that small businesses and community organisations themselves are struggling with high electricity prices, which is impacting employment and economic growth, particularly in regional areas. The QPC’s Final Report has not yet been published, however the Draft Report included some promising recommendations as a result of QCOSS’ advocacy. This included: providing community organisations with resources to support people who are struggling with energy bills; improving the Home Energy Emergency Assistance Scheme (HEEAS) application process; and extending eligibility for the Queensland Government’s Electricity Rebate to Commonwealth Health Care Card holders. These recommendations, if accepted, would make a significant difference to the lives of many Queenslanders who are at risk of debt and disconnection from their energy supply. QCOSS is working closely with the Queensland Government on these matters and will continue to push for these recommendation to be accepted as the government considers its response. Watch this space!


QCOSS Energy Literacy workshops

The results UnitingCare Community’s Financial Counsellor Jan Gregson believes information is power, especially when it comes to educating her clients about their energy usage and how to access assistance in times of need. “The energy literacy workshop run by QCOSS which I attended was invaluable,” Jan says. “It gave me practical, up-to-date information and advice which I could immediately use to help my clients with their energy issues and ensure they weren’t cut off and left in the dark. “The information provided definitely gave me a deeper understanding of the complexities of the energy market and power bills! I understand so much more now and am able to pass that information on to my clients giving them the confidence to cope better with their situation. “By giving the right advice and information to our clients we are empowering them and giving them the confidence to cope better and hopefully make better choices in the future which will help them to avoid further financial problems.”

Jan participated in the Financially Fair Masterclass at the 2015 QCOSS Annual Conference and a financial resilience workshop hosted by QCOSS in early 2016, enabling her to provide direct input into the Queensland Government’s Financial Resilience and Inclusion Action Plan and says she found this to be a great opportunity to share experiences and knowledge and help shape future responses. “All these opportunities provided a real eye-opener for the government as it gave them a deeper understanding of the work we as financial counsellors do in this space and how important it is for vulnerable consumers to be supported,” she says.

“I’m certainly seeing an increase in the number of clients because there is more information available to the sector and to individuals, thanks to the work of QCOSS and the financial counselling sector, so people know there is someone there to help, and that there are options for financial support or payment plans.

It’s important that our clients know they have an advocate, someone who will speak up on their behalf and be there to support them, encourage them and give them the confidence to take back control of their future.

Jan Gregson, UnitingCare Community

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Enabling Local Communities This year QCOSS began working in partnership with community organisations and stakeholders in Cairns and Ipswich to better support people experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The Enabling Local Communities (ELC) project aims to address local needs with local solutions that are community-owned and delivered. It does this by using local data and stories of personal experiences gathered in 2015 the Home for Good registry weeks, and existing service integration knowledge and practices. This place-based project provides the opportunity to work with stakeholders in two different locations, asking them to reflect on their individual purpose, practice and priorities for their future. QCOSS’ role is to work alongside them to build or strengthen processes and relationships; identify and address service gaps; enhance practice within the housing and homelessness service system; and ultimately to create more positive and sustainable outcomes for people experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Since commencing the consultation process in late 2015, there has been strong participation and interaction from services in both the Ipswich and Cairns communities. Local reference groups were formed in both locations with a mix of key local staff from the Department of Housing and Public Works, community stakeholders and QCOSS staff. These groups have been instrumental in guiding the project and testing themes and initiatives that have come from broader consultation.

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Data gathered through literature research, local workshops and network meetings, face-to-face interviews, focus groups and an online survey have been presented back to the sector and broader communities in Cairns and Ipswich, giving everyone the opportunity to review local findings and key issues. Participatory process activities were then used to assist the communities to determine the vision, direction and approaches to projects they want to pursue.

As QCOSS works toward the end of the project we will continue to support the target communities to develop their own vision for how a housing and homelessness service system would best be delivered in their community, within existing resources, through improved system integration. Project outcomes, learnings, tools and mechanisms that assist sustainable integrated service delivery and sector integration will be available for use by other communities to help them break the cycle of homelessness for individuals and families throughout the state.


Nancye McDonald, U1Ri case coordination facilitator

The results The timing of the ELC project couldn’t have been better, says Under 1 Roof Ipswich’s (U1Ri) case coordination facilitator Nancye McDonald, bringing a new intensity and energy to the good work already under way in the region. “It has been fantastic to have an organisation like QCOSS take that over-arching view of the work being done here and highlight some of the resources or opportunities we were missing, or encouraging a new way of approaching an interested stakeholder – there has certainly been a number of practical, solution-focused outcomes already which is not always the case with these types of projects,” Nancye said. “Anything that can help us all to increase our sustainability and the return of investment is good for the sector and good for the individuals and families we support.” U1Ri is a collaborative community and human service sector-driven case coordination initiative. It harnesses the experience, knowledge and resources of multiple agencies, disciplines and workers to address

the needs of at risk community members. It does not receive government funding and operates on the goodwill of participating services and offers of volunteer, in-kind and financial supports.

“The ELC project has certainly helped us all to see things in a new way, providing a fresh perspective of what is really working, what could be done better and what we can do with the resources and materials we have.”

Now in its third year, U1Ri has secured broad support and involvement from the region and continues to achieve positive outcomes for clients through its collaborative approach.

Nancye said she hopes the ELC project can truly deliver on its namesake – enabling local communities – to produce positive, long-lasting outcomes for the region’s residents.

“There has been fantastic community spirit and buy-in for U1Ri and at the same time there is a feeling that we are all overstretched and finding it hard to maintain that energy and real investment of time and resources to maintain the momentum,” said Nancye.

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Emerging Voices QCOSS’ Emerging Voices project engages passionate individuals and facilitates opportunities for them to influence and change Queensland’s social and economic policy agenda. The Emerging Voices team play an important role in government, sector and community engagement, helping to bring new and diverse perspectives, experiences and ideas to the table. With one in eight Queenslanders experiencing poverty, policy decisions that support vulnerable people to participate and contribute to the social and economic life of the community are critical. To be relevant, these decisions need to reflect an understanding of the day-to-day life of people who experience poverty and disadvantage, in the context of the communities in which they live. The Emerging Voices project is in direct response to this need. Established in early 2015, the Emerging Voices team has grown from 12 to 19 members, representing a wide range of backgrounds and interest areas, who have come together to learn effective strategies to engage with communities and effect real change in the policy making process. Additional capability training has included topics such as systems thinking, system navigation, social entrepreneurship, and tools and process for engagement. Putting their expertise and skills into practice has seen the team participate in range of workshops and host meaningful conversations in key areas, including young people in the criminal justice system; reforms in Queensland’s Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services; criminalisation of poverty; population health; family violence; housing and homelessness; and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. Team members have brought unique and valuable insights into many of the discussions and helped to ensure that the opinions and concerns of community service users are heard by the providers and policy makers. 21

The Emerging Voices project continues to provide a targeted response to the increasing expectation in our communities that citizens will have greater influence on decision-making that affects their health and well-being. Emerging Voices is a long-term program that empowers people who are current and potential consumers of the community services system to be collectively involved in interpreting data and generating creative solutions to long standing social issues. Emerging Voices team member Bryony Walters: “Emerging Voices excites me because of the scope the project has to contribute toward development of innovative ways to include citizens in development of policy that touches their lives - even when those citizens are hard to reach or engage. What I’m talking about here is people who live on the fringes of our communities, geographically and/or sociologically speaking or who, as a matter of necessity have to be more concerned with their survival than with their political engagement. These are the sorts of people whose interests have tended to not be represented adequately in the past because of the way we have all agreed that politics will be done in our community. Working for five years as a solicitor at a community legal centre assisting people with social security matters I was confronted time and again with law and policy that did not represent the interests of the people it affected, or the broader community and was not evidence based. Our democracy requires that all voices are heard and it is an honour to be a part of a movement to find better ways to make that happen.”


Tasman Bain

The results The QCOSS Emerging Voices program is both a brilliant opportunity and a humbling privilege to partake in. Since joining the program in April 2015, I have attended numerous advanced workshops from policy design to community empowerment, participated in a social innovation learning village, and even conducted consultancy work. More importantly though, I have connected and collaborated with amazing and inspirational people from diverse backgrounds united in the pursuit of a fairer society and supported by QCOSS. I endeavour to live a life in the pursuit of justice and in service to the community – particularly in the realms of gender equality, human rights, community development, and youth empowerment. In 2013 alongside the brilliant Ayesha Lutschini and Courtney Price, I co-founded Meri Toksave which is a youth-led non-government organisation that designs and delivers programs and partnerships for the empowerment of women and girls and the prevention and elimination of gender-based violence in Papua New Guinea.

In April 2016 I was a National Youth Week Champion with the duty of travelling around Queensland to celebrate the contributions and vibrancy of young people in Mt Gravatt, Redlands, Bundaberg and Yeppoon. From February to April 2016 I was a research and advocacy assistant with the Human Rights Act for Queensland Campaign. As a member of the Emerging Voices program, QCOSS has helped contribute to my professional development particularly in social innovation, community empowerment, and my understanding of poverty and marginalisation and the structural barriers that underpin it in Queensland. Tasman Bain Emerging Voices participant

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Dr Miriam Giugni, EMBRACE conference keynote speaker

EMBRACE The importance of a quality, early childhood education for children is indisputable. And with Queensland being home to people from more than 220 countries, speaking as many different languages and holding more than 100 different religious beliefs, it is easy to see how some children may feel isolated and excluded from a mainstream early education environment. This is why QCOSS’ EMBRACE-Culture in Kindy Program (EMBRACE) was so widely welcomed and supported by early years’ educators and professionals as well as parents and families who come from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. There is no doubt the reach of the EMBRACE program in Queensland was significant with the team providing more than 2,875 occasions of service to more than 4,424 individuals from more than 913 services. The program has made a real difference in helping more children get the best possible start in their education journey, to achieve better learning outcomes at school, and ultimately better education, employment and health once they finish school. The three-year program began in 2013 with funding from the Queensland Department of Education and Training (DET) with the aim to: • raise community awareness of the importance, availability, affordability and the nature of kindergarten programs in Queensland • address key challenges to the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and CALD children in kindergarten programs • establish partnerships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and CALD communities, families and kindergarten providers and • enhance the capacity of early year’s services and kindergarten program providers to effectively engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and CALD families and deliver inclusive early childhood education programs that meet the diverse needs of children. 23

With the end of the program on 30 June 2016, QCOSS can now reflect on the enormous influence and positive outcomes which have been delivered in the 14 priority areas, but also more widely throughout many Queensland communities and into the homes of many children. As a result of a multi-pronged and collaborative approach, early childhood educators involved in the program say they are now better resourced, more confident and capable of working with children from diverse cultural backgrounds, and feel better connected to the families and communities in which they work. The EMBRACE program employed several strategies to build community capacity and increase attachment and belonging to kindy for children from diverse cultural backgrounds. These strategies included: professional development for early childhood educators and family support workers including conferences and workshops; development of cultural competence e-training modules; a website rich in resources and information; tip sheets for educators; the creation of audio-visual vignettes showing educators reflecting on culturally competent practice; and a multilingual radio campaign promoting the importance of kindergarten. A series of e-training modules are now available on Community Door to meet the continued demand for professional development in this area and to provide a useful platform upon which educators can continue their journey towards cultural proficiency, and a more culturally inclusive and appropriate education for all children. While the program provided many benefits across Queensland, disappointingly it is clear that there is a lot more to be done and achieved before many more children and families will be confident that the early childhood services are culturally safe and engaging.


Jackie Bennett, C & K Community Links Advisor

The results For Jackie Bennett, one of the greatest outcomes of the EMBRACE program has been to see so many childcare and daycare centres proudly display their cultural diversity from the flags flying at the front gate to the bush tucker garden out the back. The C&K Community Links Advisor encouraged more than 40 educators from the north side of Brisbane to attend the EMBRACE Culture in Kindy training to increase their cultural understanding and create more 'culturally safe' environments for children from all backgrounds. “I love that you can drive past a centre now or walk in the door and immediately see vivid murals, totem poles, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags, or bush tucker gardens – all demonstrating that this centre is proud to support and encourage the many cultures present in Australia today,” Jackie says. “It is also a beautiful sign for parents and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds that this centre appreciates culture and that their child will be welcomed and encouraged to be proud of their culture.”

Jackie says the EMBRACE program has taken many educators on not only a professional journey but also a personal one as they each explored different ways of bringing culture into their centre and into their interactions with the children and families in attendance. "It has been wonderful to see so many educators growing in their understanding of cultural differences and how to embed these into a child's early years so that they are not seen as something that makes them different, but something that makes them special," she says.

I’m sad to see the EMBRACE program ending but am optimistic that cultural diversity and acceptance will become more embedded in the early years framework and education of our children in future.

Jackie Bennett, C & K

“Seeing the children start their day with an acknowledgement of country has also been lovely, and knowing that they are learning about reconciliation and understanding of the culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is just beautiful.”

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FACT

4,500

RECIPIENTS receive information on policy and reforms, grants, training, resources and sector news through our fortnightly e-newsletters.

Sector support QCOSS’ commitment to supporting a vibrant and viable community services sector remains steadfast, with an ongoing focus on regional engagement and place-based support. We are pleased to have broadened our scope and opportunities to network, engage and learn about current government policy and reforms, how to write a winning tender and community-led solutions to homelessness, just to name a few of the more than 100 workshops, information sessions and webinars which took place in 2015-16. Staff travelled throughout Queensland, hosting one-on-one information sessions and workshops on topics such as outcomes measurement, the human services quality framework, organisational health check-ups, quality pathway training, privacy management for community services, and Partnerships for Change Outcome Management System training. Feedback from participants and stakeholders has been positive with great satisfaction results and increased knowledge due to attendance or involvement in QCOSS-led events or training. Our annual State Conference and Budget Breakfast events were also well attended and well received. 25

As the Minister for Communities, Women and Youth, Minister for Child Safety and Minister for the Prevention of Domestic and Family Violence, the Hon Shannon Fentiman said in her opening address at the 2015 QCOSS State Conference, Queensland’s community services sector “is on a significant and transformational journey. We need a clear vision for the community services of tomorrow. I want to see a community services sector that has a forward-looking focus, builds on the great work you and the government have already commenced and works in partnership with clients and other government agencies”.

Supporting our members and the sector has also been achieved through a number of other avenues. Up-to-date information on government policy and reforms, grants, training, resources and sector news was delivered every week to more than 4,500 mailboxes through our fortnightly e-newsletters Focal point and CommunityNews. Forty new multimedia resources were posted on StudioQ, covering topics such as the HSQF, domestic and family violence, customer experience, embracing diversity in early childhood services, essential services, child protection reforms, storytelling, the NDIS and applying for funding.

It is for this reason that QCOSS remains committed to supporting the community service sector to build on its existing skills and knowledge base and capacity to directly engage with the government and policy makers to bring about real and sustainable changes. A stronger community service sector, built on quality programs and outcomes, means better services and results for clients and the broader community.

The usability and accessibility upgrades to the Community Door website were completed, with further updates and expansions still to come making it a valuable resource tool for many sector organisations.


Reaching the sector The often prohibitive cost of attending training and events for regional and rural members and organisations has always been of concern to QCOSS.

In 2015-16 QCOSS extended its reach to our members and the wider sector by offering a range of webinars for the first time, with more than 650 people registering to participate. We hosted 10 webinars throughout the 12 months including a series on energy literacy, HSQF and the popular Love Your Tender (LYT) series held in conjunction with the COSS network. We also partnered with the Department of Education and Training to deliver two webinars to help community based organisations respond effectively to funding applications for the Skilling Queenslanders for Work initiative (SQW). Both the first Love Your Tender series and the Skilling Queenslanders for Work webinars were so popular we had to run a second one to meet the demand. Other topics included organisational health check-ups and supporting clients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Based on feedback after the webinars we recorded a 100 per cent satisfaction rating, with respondents satisfied or highly satisfied with the content and agreeing that their knowledge and understanding on the topic had improved. We look forward to expanding our topics in the future and bringing more opportunities to the sector to learn and network more cost-effectively and with greater ease.

The webinar gave me a better understanding of the processes that are up and coming and what is involved.

Great and well focused presentation.

SQW

HSQF

Webinars are perfect for our organisation as the financial and time / travel costs of face-toface training is often prohibitive for us.

The webinar was well-planned. The information was relevant and useful, clear, concise and easy to understand.

Org Health Check-up

LYT

I feel more confident in writing tender applications and believe the applications will be of a higher standard which will hopefully convert to a better success rate.

We will be more confident to share the early prevention tips around contacting retailers as soon as payment issues arise.

Energy Literacy

LYT

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FACT

5,000 QUEENSLANDERS over the age of 55 are on the waiting list for long-term social housing.

Cost of living The rising cost of living has become a common topic for all Australian households, however much of the debate fails to acknowledge that it is low-income households – many of those pensioners – who are at most risk of falling into poverty and disadvantage. QCOSS' Cost of Living Report – Special Edition: The cost of living and age pensioner households Issue 3, 2015 clearly shows that housing costs continue to have one of the most significant impacts on the ability of age pensioners to meet a basic standard of living.

which means paying more than 30 per cent of their gross income on housing costs. This in turn impacts all aspects of their lives, forcing pensioners to make compromises about their quality of housing, food and medical treatment which could undermine their quality of life.

The report examined the capacity of four example age pensioner households to make ends meet based on basic income and expenditure. The age pension is the primary source of income for more than 50 per cent of the people of eligible age. It comprises between 80 and 90 per cent of their income, making it vital that the age pension remains adequate and keeps pace with the rising cost of living.

There continues to be a significant lack of available and appropriate social housing in Queensland, with an estimated 19,000 households on the waiting list for long-term social housing and nearly 5,000 of them over the age of 55.

Research showed that the requirement to meet ongoing rental costs is the single biggest financial burden for age pensioners who do not own their own home. Single and couple households renting in the private market are likely to be experiencing housing stress,

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The financial stresses experienced by our example households would be considerably worse if they did not benefit from several Queensland Government concessions, including electricity, car registration, public transport fares, council rates, water charges and the emergency management levy. This report shows that adjusting and better targeting concessions must be considered with

regard to changes to commonwealth government pensions and other supplementary payments, especially rent assistance. It is always important to understand that the findings in QCOSS' Cost of Living Reports are based on very austere living standards, allowing little room for improvement or buffers from unexpected costs or crises. So while our example single and couple pensioner home owners receive slightly more than is needed to afford a basic standard of living, they are still considered at high risk of experiencing disadvantage.

Based on the findings in this latest report, QCOSS called for urgent targeted action to address the significant costs associated with the provision of housing for Queenslanders who are dependent on the age pension for survival.


Directors Network Gathering

IPSU Following a change in the Australian Government’s approach to funding early childhood education and support, QCOSS’ Indigenous Professional Support Unit (IPSU) ended in June 2016 after 10 years. The IPSU team spent much of the past year preparing the 57 childcare services it supported to transition as smoothly as possible to the new model of childcare assistance following the government’s decision. The focus no doubt shifted from a training and workforce development approach to one of supporting management and boards to gain the knowledge and understanding they would need to move into the new funding model based more on a user pays system. As we reflect on the outcomes and achievements of QCOSS IPSU in this area during the past decade, it is also timely to focus on the future for these services and their children and how to best support them in the long-term. A real strength of the QCOSS IPSU program was bringing early years educators and staff together to share their wisdom, and learn from each other as well as undertake professional development and mentoring opportunities throughout Queensland. The final Men’s Yarning Circle met in Cairns to recap their experiences and learnings from the past three years. Once the Men of Steel, they are now the Men Who Care and are committed to continuing their work in the early years space and support work in the child protection area by facilitating further yarns in their communities about protecting children.

Another key event held recently was the Directors Network gathering, initiated at the request of directors, who were keen to reconnect with and continue the learning process with their colleagues they had connected with thanks to the QCOSS IPSU team. The critical need for strong leadership continued to be a key theme identified by all stakeholders.

experiences “to be a leader and share as much knowledge that we can with the educators so that everyone learns off each other as everyone learns and teaches in different ways...also to teach and learn as much knowledge about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture as we can to make sure it is embedded in our everyday learning for our children”.

Through the establishment of the Directors Network, participants undertook a range of professional development opportunities and yarns increasing the knowledge and skills to ensure their services met the required guidelines and provided quality care to the children. The directors felt a greater sense of respect for themselves and their staff following the training, giving them more confidence and capability to undertake their work in the new early years environment. The experience also highlighted for many the significant gap between school and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander early years’ services and the need to work more collaboratively to facilitate effective transitions for students.

Another service acknowledged the confidence IPSU had given them saying “IPSU has shown us that just because we are in a very remote location, we still deliver quality services for our clients and children as we are so connected to the community and we work in with so many different services to deliver outcomes to our children that we should be proud of the work we do and the outcomes we achieve.” QCOSS will continue to advocate for continued funding and assistance for the unique needs of early childhood education and educators outside of the mainstream education system.

Feedback from some of the services supported during the term of IPSU revealed a sense of positivity and gratitude for the facilitation of professional development and networking opportunities. One service summed up what they had learnt through their association with IPSU and how they would use the 28


Bringing the NDIS to life The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is about giving Queenslanders with disability greater choice and control over their own lives, and ensuring the disability sector, mainstream businesses and communities can deliver the right supports in a new, consumer-driven market, one that is truly person-centred. In June 2016, QCOSS partnered with the Townsville community, Queenslanders with Disability Network, Townsville City Council and Community Connections to host the two-day ‘Bringing the NDIS to life’ event. Nearly 100 people attended, including people with disability, their families, carers and friends, and interested members of the community, together representing a broad range of life experiences and expertise. The event was designed to not only inform the community about the NDIS but also to actively explore how to break down barriers and create new pathways for people with disabilities to have access to jobs, homes and a brighter future in a truly inclusive and thriving Townsville community. The event was free and accessible and attracted passionate and likeminded people, who want to be part of a journey that many Queensland communities have begun, as the NDIS is being rolled out throughout the state. The scheme is expected to provide opportunities for extraordinary economic benefits to towns and businesses, and social benefits to individuals and their families. 29

Day one of the two-day event was about sharing what we know about the NDIS from a panel of speakers, followed by a question and answer session. There was also an opportunity to hear from local people to share their own personal stories about pathways to employment, finding and keeping a home, and reimaging the future. The day ended with an opportunity to network and to hear from some entrepreneurs with disabilities who shared their stories and their wares. Day two concentrated on generating fresh ideas and how to put them into action which generated plenty of robust conversations among groups of participants and showed the depth of passion and knowledge within the local community. An opportunity for the groups to present their idea to a judging panel resulted in the best initiative receiving $3,000 to put their concept into action. The judging panel included local councillor Colleen Doyle, Lea Spavan from the National Disability Insurance Agency, Terry O’Connor from the Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services,

and Anne Franzmann from the Anti-Discrimination Council of Queensland. The winning idea was pitched by the Pathways to Employment group, with their idea to develop a CEO Challenge to ensure businesses in and around Townsville understood the positives of employing people with a disability. Work is currently underway on developing this idea further. This event was an incredible showcase of a citizen-led response to a place-based initiative which will ultimately see many Queensland communities begin to determine their own future and successes. QCOSS looks forward to hosting follow-up events in the near future.


Conference Scholarship Winners

Your say As a member-based organisation QCOSS relies on feedback received throughout the year, but particularly as part of the annual membership survey, and for the first time a stakeholder survey, to help guide and strengthen our focus. Whether as a valued member or sponsor; participant in a reference group; government, business or sector representative who engaged with QCOSS as part of our work, all opinions are considered as part of the organisation’s ongoing commitment to a Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage. A total of 59 member surveys were completed with most from non-government organisations with fewer than 20 full-time employees, and a further 26 stakeholder surveys mostly representing large Brisbane-based government departments. The mix of member and stakeholder opinions has provided QCOSS with a more holistic reflection of our position in the sector, what is most valued and areas for improvement. The majority of respondents also indicated they preferred to stay in contact via email communication with very few interested in using social media as a means of communicating with QCOSS. Suggestions for future topics included government reforms; organisational resources; funding opportunities and cost of living issues. When asked what QCOSS could do to support organisations to thrive in the current environment, responses included more information, support and advocacy, and a greater focus on smaller and regional organisations.

The top three most valued aspects of QCOSS were the provision of information, acting as the peak body and coordinator for connections within the sector, and representing and advocating on behalf of members and the sector.

In terms of providing better support to members, many respondents asked for more opportunities to partner with other organisations or to be consulted with, and ensure advocacy activities represent the needs of all organisations and are independent of the government’s agenda. The inaugural stakeholder survey was well-received and provided a positive insight into how well we engage with others, what value QCOSS provides, and what could be done differently to strengthen relationships. Most respondents indicated they were either familiar or very familiar with QCOSS and its activities, and that our role in supporting the collective voice was critical. Responses also commended QCOSS as a “valuable source of insight into the perspective of vulnerable households and cost of living issues”, “a connection to social services” and a “respected, reputable, qualified voice for vulnerable communities in Queensland”. The survey also asked for suggestions on how QCOSS could improve itself and responses included a broader level of advocacy and greater understanding of grass roots issues, a stronger approach to energy policy matters and more options for virtual training or meetings for those in regional areas. QCOSS values the honesty and opinion of our members and stakeholders and the results of both surveys will be considered and used as part of future strategic planning activities for the organisation. 30


Calendar of events JULY 2015 13

Communities of Reflective Practice, Bundaberg

14

HSQF information session, Rockhampton

14

Organisational Health Check-up session, Rockhampton

14

Embedding Cultural Diversity professional development session, Bundaberg

16

HSQF information session, Emerald

17

QCOSS State Budget Breakfast, Brisbane

30- 1

Directors Network Gathering, Brisbane

31

Energy Literacy Workshop, Gold Coast

31

QCOSS Outcomes Working Group, Brisbane

AUGUST 2015

SEPTEMBER 2015 1

Emerging Voices – Community Services 2025 forum, Brisbane

1

HSQF webinar

3

Customer Experience – Night Café Anecdote circle, Brisbane

10

EMBRACE Stakeholder Working Group ‘The nexus between early childhood diversity and the NDIS’, Brisbane

21

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Brisbane

23

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Mt Isa

25

Outcomes Working Group, Brisbane

28

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Gatton

3

Energy Literacy Workshop, Brisbane

29

5

ImproveIT workshop: Develop an IT Improvement Plan, Brisbane

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Rockhampton

30

6

Energy Literacy Workshop, Sunshine Coast

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Upper Coomera

7

Breakfast with Angela Blanchard, Brisbane

7-9

North/Far North Queensland Coordinators and Educators Training and Networking Event, Cairns

11

Organisational health check-up webinar

12-13 Embracing diversity in kindergarten, Gladstone

OCTOBER 2015 1

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Townsville

2

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Cairns

6

Energy literacy webinar

13

Energy Literacy Workshop, Redlands

17

Energy Literacy Workshop, Brisbane

9

17

Marginalised Queenslanders influencing public policy workshop, Brisbane

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Mackay

12

Customer Experience – Southside Blind and Low Vision Group Session, Mt Gravatt

Torres Strait and Northern Peninsula Area 17-26 Workshop Series and Tour (IPSU), Torres Strait Islands

13-14 2015 QCOSS State Conference, Brisbane 15

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Maroochydore

16

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Caboolture

20

Communities of Reflective Practice, Kedron Community Door presentation and consultation, Atherton and Innisfail

19

Energy Literacy Workshop, Caboolture

24

Embracing cultural diversity in kindergarten workshop series, Murrumba Downs

26

Energy Literacy Workshop, Ipswich

28

Outcomes Working Group, Sunshine Coast

20-21

29

Walk on Country at Balaangala, Brisbane

31

QCOSS Outcomes Working Group, Sunshine Coast

National Inclusion Professional Support 27-30 Program Alliance Gathering, facilitated by IPSU, Melbourne 28

Community Door presentation, Brisbane

28

Emerging Voices and DCCDS – Anticipating and planning for the future, Brisbane

32


QCOSS AGM 2015

NOVEMBER 2015

JANUARY 2016

1

Outcomes Workshop, Bundaberg

14

4

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Roma

4

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Cooktown

4

Outcomes Workshop, Cooktown

4

Energy literacy webinar: Home Energy Emergency Assistance Scheme

9

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Longreach

10

Outcomes Workshop, Longreach

12

Outcomes Workshop, Townsville

17

Connecting disability sector workers and their clients to Legal Aid services, Brisbane

17-18

Embracing Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood Conference, Brisbane

18

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Kingaroy

MARCH 2016

19

Customer Experience Domestic and Family Violence small group forum, Brisbane

1

19

Outcomes Workshop, Kingaroy

Royal Commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse Multicultural Forum, facilitated by QCOSS, Brisbane

24

Community Door information session, Toowoomba

1

Community Door presentation, Ipswich

1

NDIS/CALD joint forum, Brisbane

25

Outcomes Workshop, Mount Isa

25

Outcomes Workshop, Roma

2

25

QCOSS AGM, Brisbane

Royal Commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse – Emerging Voices breakfast feedback session, Brisbane

2

Love your tender webinar series

26

Emerging Voices as Critical Friends – Senior Leaders Forum DCCDS, Brisbane

3

27

Outcomes Working Group, Rockhampton

EMBRACE Stakeholder Working Group, Brisbane

9

Love your tender webinar series

16

Love your tender webinar series

DECEMBER 2015

33

Outcomes Workshop, Brisbane

FEBRUARY 2016 2-3

Power of Story – The use of storytelling to effect change, Brisbane

22

Emerging Voices – engagement and feedback sessions – Job, Skills and Industry DCCDS (five sessions), Brisbane and Cairns

22

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Brisbane

24

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Hervey Bay

24

Energy Literacy Workshop, Hervey Bay

24

Love your tender webinar series

2

Emerging Voices Planning Sessions, Brisbane

16-18

4

HSQF Quality Pathway Training Program, Brisbane

Emerging Voices – Capability and Capacity building sessions, Brisbane

21

4

Outcomes Workshop, Mackay

Emerging Voices – A day with Toke Moeller – Flow game, Brisbane

8

Energy literacy webinar: the competitive market in South East Queensland

21

Outcomes Workshop, Brisbane


APRIL 2016 1

Skilling Queenslanders for Work webinar: Tips and tricks to make your funding application stand out

4

Energy Literacy Workshop, Warwick

15

Privacy Management for Community Services Workshop, Brisbane

19

Engaging and Working With Interpreters webinar

21

ELC workshop, Ipswich

27

Connecting Communities forum, Cairns

30

Make Queensland home – local and migrant perspectives on welcoming people into the community, Ashmore

MAY 2016 9

Financial Resilience Working Group, Brisbane

9

Emerging Voices – engagement sessions – Housing Strategy Discussion paper submission – DCCDS (four sessions), Brisbane, Darling Downs South West and Cairns

12

ELC workshop, Cairns

12

Love your tender webinar series

19

Love your tender webinar series

19

Emerging Voices presentation and panel at QDN Leading Change Forum, Brisbane

20

Energy Literacy Workshop, Mackay

25

Emerging Voices – Datacomp 2016 Idea Generation session, Brisbane

26

Love your tender webinar series

28

Make Queensland home – local and migrant perspectives on welcoming people into the community, Toowoomba

JUNE 2016 1-2

Co-hosted Bringing the NDIS to life in Townsville – a community event, Townsville

2

Love your tender webinar series

6

HSQF group session, Ipswich

7-8

Final Men’s Yarning Circle, Cairns

8

HSQF group session, Toowoomba

9

HSQF group session, Sunshine Coast

10

Kurbingui Strengthening Health and Allied Health session, Brisbane

17

QCOSS State Budget Breakfast 2016, Brisbane

17

HSQF group session, Brisbane

20-21 PCOMS training, Brisbane 23

HSQF group session, Gold Coast

23-24 PCOMS training, Sunshine Coast 27-1

PCOMS training, Brisbane

34


35


The written word Below is a list of publications and submissions from QCOSS to help provide research and information on effective policy advice, strengthen responsive community services and productive partnerships with the community sector, government, private sector, academia, media and the broader community. JULY 2015

FEBRUARY 2016

A road is not just a road: linking social outcomes to infrastructure spending: QCOSS Submission to the Queensland Infrastructure Plan

Homelessness in the Ipswich region: Analysis of the Home for Good data, Registry Week (November 2014)

QCOSS Commentary State Budget 2015-16

Homelessness in the Cairns region: Analysis of the Home for Good data, Registry Week (October 2014)

Response to Australian Energy Regulator Preliminary Decision for Queensland distributors 2015-2020

Early Childhood Education and Care: Access and equity for children and their families

A road is not just a road: linking social outcomes to infrastructure spending – Discussion Paper

MARCH 2016

SEPTEMBER 2015 Submission to Ergon Energy on its future network tariffs OCTOBER 2015 Cost of Living Report – Special Edition: The cost of living and age pensioner households Second Submission to Energex on Network Tariff Reform NOVEMBER 2015 Emerging Voices: the journey so far Submission to Issues Paper for Electricity Pricing Inquiry Outcomes paper: Co-design process 2015 JANUARY 2016

Embracing Cultural Diversity in Early Childhood Conference: Executive Summary Submission to Draft Report – Queensland Productivity Commission Inquiry on Electricity Pricing Joint Submission on behalf of QCOSS and CCIQ to the Queensland Productivity Commission Draft Report on Electricity Pricing Housing and homelessness service integration: Literature review Enabling Local Communities: Homelessness in Ipswich – Preliminary site analysis Enabling Local Communities: Homelessness in Cairns – Preliminary site analysis

2016/17 Pre-budget submission to the Queensland Government: A plan for social and economic wellbeing

Indefinite temporaries: Scoping the impact of Trans-Tasman travel arrangements on Queensland communities

Lend your voice: QCOSS' 2016/17 Pre-Budget Submission Advocacy Kit

APRIL 2016

Submission to QCA Interim Consultation Paper on Regulated Retail Electricity Prices 2016-17

JUNE 2016

Submission to Regulatory Impact Statement: On-supply customer access to energy rebates and the Energy and Water Ombudsman Queensland

Queensland’s wellbeing 2016: A QCOSS report

QCOSS Commentary State Budget 2016-17 EMBRACE e-learning module ‘Welcome to Country and Acknowledgement of Country’ NEWSLETTERS Focal point – fortnightly CommunityNews – fortnightly IPSU News – quarterly

36


Funders and sponsors QCOSS acknowledges and thanks the funders and sponsors who have supported us this financial year.

QCOSS FUNDING BREAKDOWN 2015-16 51%

State

Federal

34%

Other

MAJOR SPONSORS (CONFERENCE AND EVENTS)

OTHER DONATIONS

Queensland Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services

Churches of Christ

Energy Networks Association

Connecting Up Corporate Traveller Energex

Queensland Department of Housing and Public Works

HealthCareLine

Queensland Department of Education and Training

Infoxchange

Australian Government Department of Education and Training

Life Without Barriers

Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation and Science Energy Consumers Australia

4%

Membership

MAJOR FUNDERS

Queensland Department of Energy and Water Supply

HESTA

Legal Aid Queensland

Origin Energy Queensland Family and Child Commission Queensland Mental Health Commission Queensland Treasury – Social Benefit Bonds Program

37

11%

Sincere thanks to our generous sponsors and supporters. We appreciate your energy and commitment. We thank you on behalf of the community services sector and vulnerable individuals and families throughout Queensland who have benefited from our shared vision.

The QCOSS team


Financial report

38


Directors’ Report The directors present their report, together with the financial statements, on the company for the year ended 30 June 2016. DIRECTORS

OBJECTIVE

OPERATING RESULT

The following persons were directors of the company during the whole of the financial year and up to the date of this report, unless otherwise stated:

A Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage.

The surplus/(deficit) after providing for income tax amounted to $273,092 (2015 surplus: $346,867).

-- Faiza El-Higzi (appointed 30 June 2016) -- Peter Emery -- Matt Gardiner (appointed 17 August 2016) -- Richard Johnson -- Kevin Keeffe (resigned 26 May 2016) -- Peter Last (resigned 15 March 2016) -- Debra Malthouse (resigned 1 June 2016) -- Sue Mason-Baker (appointed 28 January 2016) -- Mark Tucker-Evans -- Kate Tully -- Geoff Walters (retired 25 November 2015) -- Gerry Weatherall

39

PRINCIPAL ACTIVITIES QCOSS is the state-wide organisation for individuals and organisations working in the social and community service sector. Key activities during the financial year focussed on providing effective policy advice, working to strengthen responsive community services and having productive partnerships with communities, the community services sector and government. This work is done with a Queensland free of poverty and disadvantage front of mind. STRATEGY FOR ACHIEVING THE OBJECTIVES -- A policy agenda to eliminate poverty and disadvantage through informed advocacy -- Innovative, effective, valued community services -- Mutually beneficial relationships with our stakeholders -- A strong, sustainable and effective organisation

PERFORMANCE MEASURES -- A membership that sees value in QCOSS membership -- QCOSS seen by key stakeholders as the leading authority on issues relating to poverty and disadvantage -- Advice and research to inform policy, program and service design for improved social and economic outcomes is sought and acknowledged -- Advocacy outcomes for access to a basic standard of living and essential services for all Queenslanders -- Collaboration is facilitated between service providers, government and communities to improve outcomes for service users -- Community sector organisations are prepared for key reforms impacting the sector -- Appropriate organisational resources and structures in place to support delivery of key initiatives


Information on Directors FAIZA EL HIGZI

MATT GARDINER

DIRECTOR (APPOINTED 30 JUNE 2016)

DIRECTOR (APPOINTED 17 AUGUST 2016)

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

BSc (Hons), Grad Dip Pjt Mgt, MAppSc, Med. Also JP(Qual)

BSocSc (Couns), M.Clin.Couns

Faiza has over 20 years experience in the community sector as a board member, manager and volunteer focusing on emerging African, Arab and Islamic communities and also has extensive experience working with youth and refugees. Faiza has 10 years experience in government policy at both state and federal levels and significant experience in the NGO sector. Currently Faiza is a member of the Queensland Domestic and Family Violence Implementation Council and Metro South Health Consumer Advisory Committee. She was the Human Rights Advisor for the National Council for Women and a member of the Queensland Ministerial Multicultural Committee. She is currently a PHD scholar at the University for Queensland focusing on gender studies.

Matt is Executive Director, Child & Family Services at the Benevolent Society leading a broad portfolio of counselling, early childhood education, mental health, violence prevention, child protection and community development services. Passionate about social justice, improving systems and therapeutic practice, Matt is an experienced practitioner and has held several senior executive roles at some of Australia’s leading not-forprofits, in a career spanning two decades.

PETER EMERY DIRECTOR QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: BA; LLB; Grad Dip Mgt; FAICD; FFin; FAIM; FGIA; FCIS Peter chairs the Board’s Governance Committee. He has over 38 years experience in management as a lawyer, investment banker, general manager, company director and consultant. Peter is currently Chair of TransitCare and a board member of Artius Group. He is a facilitator for various Australian Institute of Company Directors education programs including the Company Directors Course and The Not for Profit Board.

RICHARD JOHNSON DIRECTOR QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: BSocSci, BCouns, MCouns. Richard trained as a Registered Nurse, and has over 30 years experience working for a number of community services, non-government organisations including senior executive positions in UnitingCare Community and more recently Suncare Community Services. Having spent most of his career working in regional Queensland, along with his role in providing senior leadership in community recovery activities, Richard is acutely aware of many of the issues facing individuals, families and communities throughout regional areas of Queensland.

40


KEVIN KEEFFE

DEBRA MALTHOUSE

RESIGNED 26 MAY 2016

RESIGNED 1 JUNE 2016

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

Dip T, BA (Hons), ANU

Bachelor of Community Welfare and Advanced Diploma in Community Sector Management.

Kevin has a long background and experience in Indigenous communities in NQ and Central Australia, including publishing many articles and two books on indigenous issues, especially education and curriculum development. Kevin has worked in senior Australian Government roles in the Native Title, Reconciliation, Environment and Heritage areas, including several roles in International Environmental Policy organisations including the OECD. Kevin returned to Queensland in 2010 to become the State Manager of the Australian Government Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and was Executive Director of the Red Cross until June 2016.

PETER LAST RESIGNED 15 MARCH 2016 QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: B.Bus (HRM), M. Health Services Management, RN, CCRN. Peter currently works for Blue Care as an Integrated Service Manager for Redlands which includes two residential aged care facilities, community aged care, respite and hospital in the home. Peter is also a board director of Spina Bifida Hydrocephalus Queensland and has been a past board director of the Allora District Cooperative Hospital in Toowoomba. Peter has more than 30 years health industry experience including public policy, statewide and local health service planning and clinical governance.

41

Debra has spent over thirty-four years working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs at a local, regional and state level in both the community and government sectors. As a community welfare practitioner working in the community sector, Debra has been responsible for the delivery of direct client services to individuals, families and groups in a number of areas, including domestic/family violence, child protection, and housing. Debra has worked in community engagement and development roles in government including in the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing and Queensland Department of Communities. Debra is currently the Chief Executive Officer of the Wuchopperen Health Service Limited.

SUE MASON-BAKER DIRECTOR (APPOINTED 28 JANUARY 2016) QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: Bachelor of Business(Accounting), FCPA, GAICD Sue is an experienced Board Director and is Treasurer of the Sunshine Hospice Ltd, a charity providing end of life care. Sue has held senior Finance, executive and CEO positions, in diverse industries including manufacturing, property, private hospitals, primary health care and community services. Sue’s previous role was as CEO with a Not-forProfit provider specialising in aged, disability and mental health services. Currently Sue holds a senior Executive position with IFYS Limited, an organisation that provides opportunities for children, young people, adults and families. Her experience in community services has given Sue much insight into the issues facing our most vulnerable.


MARK TUCKER-EVANS

GEOFFREY WALTERS

DIRECTOR (CHAIR)

RETIRED 25 NOVEMBER 2015

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

Mark is QCOSS Chair. Mark is Chief Executive of Council on the Ageing (COTA) Queensland, Chair of Health Consumers Queensland and the Queensland Health Consumer Collaborative, Director of ACOSS, The Institute of Healthy Communities Australia, Healthy Communities Australia Certification, CheckUp Australia and an Executive Member of the Queensland Clinical Senate. Previously Mark has held CEO roles within research, media, industry and professional associations in NSW and Queensland and developed significant expertise in issues related to Consumer and Community Engagement and Age-Friendly Cities and Communities.

MBA, B.Bus (Finance), FCPA Geoff has had a distinguished business career in Australia and overseas focusing on finance, strategy development, new business acquisition, corporate governance and general management. More recently he has worked as CEO and Chair of United Synergies Ltd; a Sunshine Coast based service supporting young people, families and communities.

GERRY WEATHERALL DIRECTOR QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE:

KATE TULLY DIRECTOR QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERIENCE: M Bus, Grad Cert Bus (Philanthropy & Nonprofit Studies), Cert Gov Prac, BA (Comm). Kate is the Chair of the Finance & Audit Committee and is an experienced nonprofit governance professional. Kate’s particular areas of interest include governance, strategy and change management. Kate has been an active member of governing and advisory bodies for more than 20 years, including the Australian Young Business and Professional Women’s Committee, Ethics Review Committee of Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Premiers Council for Women (NSW), and Management Committee of YWCA Downs and South West Queensland and has managed businesses in the private and not for profit sectors. Kate is currently CEO of YWCA Queensland.

Dip Electronics & Communications, MAICD Gerry is a member of the Senior Executive of Churches of Christ in Queensland and holds the position of Chief Mission Development Officer. Gerry is responsible for driving the development of the mission across all areas of the organisation including through acquisitions and business growth. Churches of Christ provides services to over 45,000 people across seniors living, homelessness and housing, child, youth and family services and chaplaincy and through a number of local Christian churches. Prior to joining the Executive Team in 2010, Gerry was the Deputy Chair of the Board of Churches of Christ Care in 2009 and of the combined board of Churches of Christ Queensland in 2010. Gerry has had significant experience in corporate leadership having served on the board of EDMI Ltd an international company listed in Singapore

42


COMPANY SECRETARY Julie Couper holds the role of Company Secretary. Julie is a graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors, holds a Graduate Certificate Management and has more than 20 years of experience in strategy and operations development; service management and governance gained in the not for profit and financial services sectors. MEETINGS OF DIRECTORS The number of meetings of the company’s Board of Directors (‘the Board’) and of each Board committee held during the year ended 30 June 2016, and the number of meetings attended by each director were:

FULL BOARD

FINANCE & AUDIT COMMITTEE

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

ATTENDED

HELD

ATTENDED

HELD

ATTENDED

HELD

Peter Emery

8

10

4

4

Faiza El Higzi

1

1

Richard Johnson

8

10

2

2

3

4

Kevin Keeffe

9

9

4

4

Peter Last

3

7

1

2

Debra Malthouse

3

9

1

1

Sue Mason-Baker

5

5

2

3

Mark Tucker-Evans 9

10

3

4

Kate Tully

3

7

5

5

Geoff Walters

4

4

2

2

Gerry Weatherall

10

10

3

3

0

1

Held: represents the number of meetings held during the time the director held office or was a member of the relevant committee. CONTRIBUTIONS ON WINDING UP

AUDITOR’S INDEPENDENCE DECLARATION

In the event of the company being wound up, ordinary members are required to contribute a maximum of $10 each. The total amount that members of the company are liable to contribute if the company is wound up is $5,540 based on 554 current ordinary members.

A copy of the auditor’s independence declaration as required under Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001 is set out page 44.

SUBSEQUENT EVENTS TO REPORTING PERIOD There are no subsequent events to be noted.

This report is made in accordance with a resolution of directors, pursuant to section 298(2)(a) of the Corporations Act 2001. On behalf of the directors Mark Tucker-Evans and Gerry Weatherall

43


QUEENSLAND COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SERVICE LTD AUDITOR’S INDPENDENCE DECLARATION

Auditor’s independence declaration Tel: +61 7 3237 5999 Fax: +61 7 3221 9227 www.bdo.com.au

Level 10, 12 Creek St Brisbane QLD 4000 GPO Box 457 Brisbane QLD 4001 Australia

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE BY D P WRIGHT TO THE DIRECTORS OF QUEENSLAND COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SERVICE LTD QUEENSLAND COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SERVICE LTD

As lead auditor of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd for the year ended 30 June 2016, I declare AUDITOR’S INDPENDENCE DECLARATION that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: 1.

No contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and

2.

Brisbane No contraventions of any applicable code of conduct in relation toQLD the4000 audit. Fax:professional +61 7 3221 9227

Tel: +61 7 3237 5999

Level 10, 12 Creek St

GPO Box 457 Brisbane QLD 4001

www.bdo.com.au This declaration is in respect of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd. Australia

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE BY D P WRIGHT TO THE DIRECTORS OF QUEENSLAND COUNCIL OF SOCIAL SERVICE LTD As lead auditor of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd for the year ended 30 June 2016, I declare D P Wright that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: Director 1. No contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Australian Charities and Notfor-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to the audit; and 2. No contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit. BDO Audit Pty Ltd This declaration is in respect of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd. Brisbane, 22 September 2016

D P Wright Director

BDO Audit Pty Ltd

Brisbane, 22 September 2016 -7

-

BDO Audit Pty Ltd ABN 33 134 022 870 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO Audit Pty Ltd and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.

44


FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

Statement of profit or loss & other comprehensive income Revenue

NOTES

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

2

5,811,267

6,995,926

(3,472,211)

(3,918,455)

Employee benefits expense Contracted Program Delivery

3

(772,391)

(838,863)

Depreciation expense

4

(8,494)

(13,960)

(77,311)

(82,704)

Conference/seminar costs

(326,380)

(310,066)

Consultancy fees

(283,716)

(450,240)

Travel and accommodation

(193,900)

(403,114)

Printing and stationery

(28,229)

(58,704)

(254,174)

(232,243)

(6,877)

(6,991)

(40,845)

(42,277)

-

-

Other expenses

(73,647)

(291,442)

Surplus before income tax expense

273,092

346,867

-

-

273,092

346,867

-

-

273,092

346,867

Computer costs

Rent

4

Postage Telephone Write off of property, plant and equipment

Income tax expense

1

Surplus after income tax expense for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of tax Total comprehensive income for the year The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

45


AS AT 30 JUNE 2016

Statement of financial position NOTES

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

Cash and cash equivalents

5

3,150,957

3,437,371

Trade and other receivables

6

206,563

114,015

Other current assets

7

39,862

55,566

3,397,382

3,606,952

11,582

20,275

11,582

20,275

3,408,964

3,627,227

1,217,600

1,732,678

1,217,600

1,732,678

77,896

54,173

77,896

54,173

TOTAL LIABILITIES

1,295,496

1,786,851

NET ASSETS

2,113,468

1,840,376

Retained surpluses

2,113,468

1,840,376

TOTAL EQUITY

2,113,468

1,840,376

CURRENT ASSETS

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS NONCURRENT ASSETS Property, plant and equipment

8

TOTAL NONCURRENT ASSETS TOTAL ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES Trade and other payables

9

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES NONCURRENT LIABILITIES Long-term provisions

10

TOTAL NONCURRENT LIABILITIES

EQUITY

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements.

46


FOR YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016

Statement of changes in equity RETAINED SURPLUSES ($)

TOTAL ($)

1,493,509

1,493,509

346,867

346,867

-

-

Total Comprehensive Income

346,867

346,867

Balance as at 30 June 2015

1,840,376

1,840,376

Balance as at 1 July 2015

1,840,376

1,840,376

273,092

273,092

-

-

Total Comprehensive Income

273,092

273,092

Balance as at 30 June 2016

2,113,468

2,113,468

Balance as at 1 July 2014 Surplus after income tax expense for the year Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax

Surplus after income tax expense for the year Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax

Statement of cash flows NOTES

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

5,255,091

6,837,511

(5,631,462)

(6,524,318)

89,758

95,022

(286,613)

408,215

Payment for property, plant and equipment

199

8,442

Net cash used in investing activities

199

8,442

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

(286,414)

399,773

Cash at beginning of financial year

3,437,371

3,037,598

3,150,957

3,437,371

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from government grants, members and clients Payments to suppliers and employees Interest received Net cash provided by operating activities

14(b)

CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Cash at end of financial year The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements. 47

14(a)


Notes to the Financial Statement NOTE 1: STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES GENERAL INFORMATION The financial statements cover Queensland Council of Social Service Company Ltd by guarantee as an individual entity. The financial statements are presented in Australian dollars, which is the company’s functional and presentation currency. Queensland Council of Social Service Company Ltd is a not-for-profit unlisted public company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. Its registered office and principal place of business are: Ground Floor, 20 Pidgeon Close, West End Qld 4101 A description of the nature of the company’s operations and its principal activities are included in the directors’ report, which is not part of the financial statements. The financial statements were authorised for issue, in accordance with a resolution of directors, on 22 September 2016. The directors have the power to amend and reissue the financial statements.

Donations Donations are recognised at the time the pledge is made. Grants Grants are recognised at their fair value where there is a reasonable assurance that the grant will be received and all attached conditions will be complied with. Deferred Income Deferred income represents grants received in advance for next financial year or unexpended grants of current year, which under the terms of agreement with the grantors, are refundable. Interest Interest revenue is recognised as interest when it is earned. Other revenue Other revenue is recognised when it is received or when the right to receive payment is established. (B) INCOME TAX

BASIS OF PREPARATION These general purpose financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’), the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Act 2012 (ACNC 2012), as appropriate for not-for-profit oriented entities. These financial statements also comply with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (‘IASB’) HISTORICAL COST CONVENTION The financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention. (A) REVENUE Revenue is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefit will flow to the company and the revenue can be reliably measured. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Sales revenue Events, fundraising and membership are recognised when received or receivable.

As the company is a charitable institution in terms of subsection 50-5 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997, as amended, it is exempt from paying income tax. (C) C  URRENT AND NON-CURRENT CLASSIFICATION Assets and liabilities are presented in the statement of financial position based on current and non-current classification. An asset is current when: it is expected to be realised or intended to be sold or consumed in normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is expected to be realised within twelve months after the reporting period; or the asset is cash or cash equivalent unless restricted from being exchanged or used to settle a liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period. All other assets are classified as non-current. A liability is current when: it is expected to be settled in normal operating cycle; it is held primarily for the purpose of trading; it is due to be settled within twelve months after the reporting period; or there is no unconditional right to defer the settlement of the liability for at least twelve months after the reporting period. All other liabilities are classified as non-current. 48


(D) CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

(H) TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES

Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the company prior to the end of the financial year and which are unpaid. Due to their short-term nature they are measured at amortised cost and are not discounted. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of recognition.

(E) TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

(I) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Trade and other receivables are recognised at amortised cost, less any provision for impairment.

Short-term employee benefits Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and long service leave expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are recognised in current liabilities in respect of employees’ services up to the reporting date and are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled.

(F) PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Plant and equipment is stated at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment. Historical cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the items. Depreciation is calculated on a straight-line basis to write off the net cost of each item of property, plant and equipment over their expected useful lives as follows: CLASS OF FIXED ASSET

USEFUL LIVES

DEPRECIATION BASIS

Motor Vehicles

4 years

Straight Line

Office Equipment 4 to 5 years

Straight Line

Furniture, Fixtures and Fittings

10 years

Straight Line

Library

10 years

Straight Line

The residual values, useful lives and depreciation methods are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each reporting date.

Other long-term employee benefits The liability for annual leave and long service leave not expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are recognised in non-current liabilities, provided there is an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability. The liability is measured as the present value of expected future payments to be made in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date using the projected unit credit method. Consideration is given to expected future wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of service. Expected future payments are discounted using market yields at the reporting date on national government bonds with terms to maturity and currency that match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash outflows. (J) FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENT

When an asset or liability, financial or non-financial, is measured at fair value for recognition or disclosure An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised purposes, the fair value is based on the price that would upon disposal or when there is no future economic benefit be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in to the Company. Gains and losses between the carrying amount and the disposal proceeds are taken to profit or loss.  an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date; and assumes that the transaction will take place either: in the principle market; or in the absence (G) IMPAIRMENT OF NON-FINANCIAL ASSETS of a principle market, in the most advantageous market. Non-financial assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate Fair value is measured using the assumptions that market that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the assuming they act in their economic best interest. For asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. non-financial assets, the fair value measurement is based on its highest and best use. Valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data are available to measure fair value, are used, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs.

49


(K) GOODS AND SERVICES TAX (GST) AND OTHER SIMILAR TAXES Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the tax authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of the acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense. Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority is included in other receivables or other payables in the statement of financial position. Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the tax authority, are presented as operating cash flows. Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the tax authority. (L) LEASES Leases of fixed assets, where substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to the ownership of the asset, but not the legal ownership, are transferred to the Company are classified as finance leases. Finance leases are capitalised, recording an asset and a liability equal to the present value of the minimum lease payments, including any guaranteed residual values. Leased assets are depreciated on a straightline basis over their estimated useful lives where it is likely that the Company will obtain ownership of the asset, or over the term of the lease. Lease payments are allocated between the reduction of the lease liability and the lease interest expense for the period. Lease payments for operating leases, where substantially all the risks and benefits remain with the lessor, are charged as expenses in the periods in which they are incurred.

(M) N  EW, REVISED OR AMENDING ACCOUNTING STANDARDS AND INTERPRETATIONS ADOPTED The company has adopted all of the new, revised or amending Accounting Standards and Interpretations issued by the Australian Accounting Standards Board (‘AASB’) that are mandatory for the current reporting period. Any new, revised or amending Accounting Standards or Interpretations that are not yet mandatory have not been early adopted. Any significant impact on the accounting policies of the company from the adoption of these Accounting Standards and Interpretations are disclosed below. The adoption of these Accounting Standards and Interpretations did not have any significant impact on the financial performance or position of the company. The following Accounting Standards and Interpretations are most relevant to the company: AASB 2012-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards - Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities. The company has applied AASB 2012-3 from 1 July 2014. The amendments add application guidance to address inconsistencies in the application of the offsetting criteria in AASB 132 ‘Financial Instruments: Presentation’, by clarifying the meaning of ‘currently has a legally enforceable right of set-off’; and clarifies that some gross settlement systems may be considered to be equivalent to net settlement. The standard also changed the definition of short-term employee benefits, from ‘due to’ to ‘expected to’ be settled within 12 months. Annual leave that is not expected to be wholly settled within 12 months is now discounted allowing for expected salary levels in the future period when the leave is expected to be taken.

Lease incentives received under operating leases are recognised as a liability. Lease payments received reduced the liability.

50


(N) N  EW ACCOUNTING STANDARDS AND INTERPRETATIONS NOT YET MANDATORY OR EARLY ADOPTED NEW/REVISED NATURE OF CHANGE PRONOUNCEMENTS

APPLICATION DATE TO THE IMPACT TO THE COMPANY COMPANY

AASB 9 Financial The AASB has issued the complete 30 June 2019 Instruments (December AASB 9. The new standard includes 2014) revised guidance on the classification and measurement of financial assets, including a new expected credit loss model for calculating impairment, and supplements the new general hedge accounting requirements previously published. This supersedes AASB 9 (issued in December 2009-as amended) and AASB 9 (issued in December 2010).

AASB 9 may have a potential increase in the Company’s loans and advances provisioning. However, the company has not yet fully assessed the impact of AASB 9 as this standard does not apply mandatorily before 1 January 2018.

AASB 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers

The Company has not yet assessed the full impact of this Standard.

The standard contains a single model that applies to contracts with customers and two approaches to recognising revenue: at a point in time or over time. The model features a contract-based five-step analysis of transactions to determine whether, how much and when revenue is recognised.

30 June 2018

(O) CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES AND JUDGMENTS The preparation of the financial statements requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the company’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements. Estimation of useful lives of assets The company determines the estimated useful lives and related depreciation and amortisation charges for its property, plant and equipment and finite life intangible assets. The useful lives could change significantly as a result of technical innovations or some other event. The depreciation and amortisation charge will increase where the useful lives are less than previously estimated lives, or technically obsolete or non-strategic assets that have been abandoned or sold will be written off or written down.

51


NOTE 2: REVENUE 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

QCOSS project funding

5,135,112

6,514,778

- Other income

586,397

386,126

5,721,509

6,900,904

Interest

89,758

95,022

TOTAL

5,811,267

6,995,926

Operating activities

Non operating activities

NOTE 3: CONTRACTED PROGRAM DELIVERY Disbursement to grant partners

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

772,391

838,863

During the year the company entered into formal arrangements with other organisations to deliver grant outcomes.

NOTE 4: EXPENSES SURPLUS BEFORE INCOME TAX INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING SPECIFIC EXPENSES: Depreciation of noncurrent assets Rental expense on operating leases • Minimum lease payments – property

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

8,494

13,960

254,174

232,243

NOTE 5: CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

Cash on hand

38

1,565

Cash at bank

750,480

787,518

2,400,439

2,648,288

3,150,957

3,437,371

Deposits at call

Cash and Cash Equivalents include $474,188 deferred grant monies and not yet expended (2015: $826,355).

NOTE 6: TRADE AND OTHER RECEIVABLES Trade receivables

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

206,563

114,015

52


NOTE 7: OTHER CURRENT ASSET 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

Accrued Interest

12,610

12,481

Prepayments and other receivable

6,958

14,794

Deferred income

20,294

28,291

TOTAL

39,862

55,566

NOTE 8: PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

(a) Office equipment

82,800

108,176

At cost

(72,991)

(90,813)

Less accumulated depreciation

9,809

17,363

(b) Office furniture and fittings

14,229

14,228

(12,456)

(11,316)

Less accumulated depreciation

1,773

2,912

Total property, plant and equipment

11,582

20,275

At cost

RECONCILIATION Movement in the carrying amounts for each class of property, plant and equipment between the beginning and the end of the current financial year. FURNITURE AND FITTINGS ($)

OFFICE EQUIPMENT ($)

MOTOR VEHICLES ($)

TOTAL ($)

2,912

17,363

-

20,275

Additions

-

-

-

-

Disposals

-

(199)

-

(199)

(1,139)

(7,355)

-

(8,494)

1,773

9,809

-

11,582

4,190

29,585

-

33,775

Additions

-

8,442

-

8,442

Disposals

-

(7,982)

-

(7,982)

(1,278)

(12,682)

-

(13,960)

2,912

17,363

-

20,275

2016 Balance at the beginning of the year

Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year 2015 Balance at the beginning of the year

Depreciation expense Carrying amount at end of year

53


NOTE 9: TRADE AND OTHER PAYABLES 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

Trade payables

208,971

158,668

GST Payable

45,962

150,000

Annual leave

154,161

224,953

Accrued expenses

178,261

143,765

Long service and other leave

13,838

87,517

Deferred income

616,407

967,775

1,217,600

1,732,678

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

77,896

54,173

NOTE 10: PROVISIONS NONCURRENT Employee entitlements – Long service leave

NOTE 11: CAPITAL AND LEASING COMMITMENTS 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

Operating Lease Commitments Non-cancellable operating leases contracted for but not capitalised in the financial statements Payable — minimum lease payments — not later than 12 months

-

145,809

— between 12 months and 5 years

-

150,000

The property lease has expired at 30 June 2016, there is no rental agreement in place currently. Rent is paid on a monthly basis.

NOTE 12: CONTINGENT LIABILITY Bendigo Bank has provided a rental guarantee on behalf of the Company of $nil (2015: $13,750).

NOTE 13: RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS There were no related party transactions during 2016 financial year or in the prior year. Key management personnel – disclosures relating to key management personnel are set out in note 16.

54


NOTE 14: CASH FLOW INFORMATION 2016 ($)

2015 ($)

(A) RECONCILIATION OF CASH Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the cash flow statement is reconciled to the related items in the balance sheet as follows: Cash on hand

38

1,565

Cash at bank

750,480

787,518

2,400,439

2,648,288

3,150,957

3,437,371

At call deposits with financial institutions

(B) RECONCILIATION OF CASH FLOW FROM OPERATIONS WITH PROFIT AFTER INCOME TAX Surplus before income tax expense

273,092

346,867

8,494

13,960

-

7,892

(92,549)

18,985

15,705

(14,864)

Decrease in payables

(50,303)

(7,514)

Increase/(decrease) in accruals and provisions

(89,684)

125,178

Increase/ (decrease) in deferred income

(351,368)

(82,379)

Cash flows from operations

(286,613)

408,215

Noncash flows in profit: Depreciation Write off of Property, plant and equipment Changes in assets and liabilities: Decrease/(increase) in receivables Decrease in other current assets

NOTE 15: FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS (A) RISK MANAGEMENT The Company is exposed to the following risks from their use of financial instruments: -- Market Risk -- Credit Risk -- Liquidity Risk The Directors of the Company have overall responsibility for risk management. The Directors have established risk management policies designed to identify and monitor risks from financial instruments and ensure any adverse effects from these risks are minimized. The Directors meet on a regular basis to review compliance with risk management policy and to analyse financial risk exposure in the context of the current economic environment.

55


(B) INTEREST RATE RISK Interest rate risk is the risk that a financial instrument’s value will fluctuate as a result of changes in market interest rates. Interest rate risk arises on balances of cash and cash equivalents. The entity minimises this risk by using a term deposit facility. The Company is exposed to interest rate risk and the effective weighted average interest rates on classes of financial assets and financial liabilities, is as follows: WEIGHTED AVERAGE EFFECTIVE INTEREST RATE Financial Assets:

FIXED INTEREST RATE MATURING

FLOATING INTEREST RATE

WITHIN 1 YEAR

1 TO 5 YEARS

2016 (%)

2015 (%)

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

2016 ($)

2015 ($)

2.74

2.79

691,305

639,083

2,459,659

2,798,287

-

-

691,305

639,083

2,459,659

2,798,287

-

-

Cash Total Financial Assets (C) CREDIT RISK

Credit is the risk that one party to a financial instrument will cause a financial loss for the other party by failing to discharge an obligation. Credit risk arises on trade and other receivables. The objective of the entity is to minimise exposure to credit risk. The maximum exposure to credit risk, excluding the value of any collateral or other security, at balance date to recognised financial assets is the carrying amount of those assets, net of any provisions for doubtful debts, as disclosed in the statement of financial position and notes the financial statements. The Company does not have any material credit risk exposure to any single debtor or group of debtors under financial instruments entered into by the Company. (D) LIQUIDITY RISK Liquidity risk is the risk that an entity will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities. The Company is largely dependent on government funding for grants to continue its operations during the year. It has always been the Company’s priority to maintain a good relationship with all government departments and ensure all contractual obligations have been met each year. Remaining contractual maturities The following tables detail the Company’s remaining contractual maturity for its financial instrument liabilities. The tables have been drawn up based on the undiscounted cash flows of financial liabilities based on the earliest date on which the financial liabilities are required to be paid. Trade and Other Payables are expected to be paid as follows: 30 JUNE 2016 ($)

30 JUNE 2015 ($)

Less than 6 months

832,316

1,136,314

6 months to 1 year (50% of annual leave & deferred income not expensed)

385,284

596,364

1,217,600

1,732,678

Total (E) NET FAIR VALUES

The net fair values of listed investments have been valued at the quoted market bid price at balance date adjusted for transaction costs expected to be incurred. For other assets and other liabilities the net fair value approximates their carrying value. Financial assets where the carrying amount exceeds net fair values have not been written down as the Company intends to hold these assets to maturity. The aggregate net fair values and carrying amounts of financial assets and financial liabilities are disclosed in the statement of financial position and in the notes to the financial statements.

56


(F) SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS The Company has performed a sensitivity analysis relating to its exposure to interest rate risk at balance date. This sensitivity analysis demonstrates the effect on the current year results and accumulated funds which could result from a change in this risk. Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis: At 30 June 2015, the effect on profit and equity as a result of changes in the interest rate, with all other variables remaining constant, would be as follows: YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2016 ($)

YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 2015 ($)

Change in profit attributable to members -Increase in interest rate by 1%

27,309

34,373

-Decrease in interest rate by 1%

(27,309)

(34,373)

NOTE 16. KEY MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL DISCLOSURES COMPENSATION The aggregate compensation made to the members of key management personnel of the Company is set out below: Short-term employee benefits

543,092

642,254

Long-term benefits

8,127

11,587

Post employment benefits

57,025

64,632

608,244

718,473

Related party transactions Related party transactions are set out in note 14.

NOTE 17. REMUNERATION OF AUDITORS During the financial year the following fees were paid or payable for services provided by BDO Audit Pty Ltd: Audit of the financial statements

30,500

30,000

NOTE 18: CAPITAL RISK MANAGEMENT The entity’s objectives when managing capital are to safeguard their ability to continue as a going concern, so that they can continue to provide benefits for stakeholders and maintain an optimal capital structure to reduce the cost of capital. In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the entity may sell assets to reduce its debts. Consistent with others in the industry, the entity monitors capital on the basis of the net gearing ratio. Net debt is calculated as total borrowings less cash and cash equivalents.

NOTE 19: ECONOMIC DEPENDENCE The Company is dependent on receiving government grants for the majority of its revenue used to operate the business. At the date of this report the directors have no reason to believe the Company will not continue to receive grants from the government.

NOTE 20: EVENTS SUBSEQUENT TO BALANCE DATE The organisation has signed a Heads of Agreement to enter into a two year lease for rental of office premises for $111,000 per annum commencing 1 October and will be required to provide a bank guarantee equivalent to $27,759. 57


Directors’ declaration IN THE DIRECTORS’ OPINION: -- the attached financial statements comprising the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of financial position, statement of changes in equity and statement of cashflows and accompany notes, are in accordance with the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Act 2012; -- comply with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board as described in note 1 to the financial statements and Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Regulation 2013(ACNC Regulation 2013); -- the attached financial statements and notes thereto give a true and fair view of the company’s financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of its performance for the financial year ended on that date; and -- there are reasonable grounds to believe that the company will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. Signed in accordance with a resolution of directors made pursuant to subsection 60.15(2) of the ACNC Regulation 2013.

On behalf of the directors Mark Tucker-Evans Chair 22 September 2016, Brisbane.

58


Tel: +61 7 3237 5999 Fax: +61 7 3221 9227 www.bdo.com.au

Level 10, 12 Creek St Brisbane QLD 4000 GPO Box 457 Brisbane QLD 4001 Australia

INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT

To the members of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd

Report on the Financial Report We have audited the accompanying financial report of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd, which comprises the statement of financial position as at 30 June 2016, the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, notes comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information, and the responsible entities declaration. Responsible Entities’ Responsibility for the Financial Report The responsible entities of the registered entity are responsible for the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 (ACNC Act) and for such internal control as the responsible entities determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial report based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Those standards require that we comply with relevant ethical requirements relating to audit engagements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report is free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial report. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the responsible entities’ preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the registered entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the responsible entities, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

- 26

59

-

BDO Audit Pty Ltd ABN 33 134 022 870 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO Audit Pty Ltd and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.


Opinion In our opinion the financial report of Queensland Council of Social Service Ltd has been prepared in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including: a) giving a true and fair view of the registered entity’s financial position as at 30 June 2016 and of its financial performance and cash flows for the year ended on that date; and b) complying with Australian Accounting Standards and Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulation 2013.

BDO Audit Pty Ltd

D P Wright Director Brisbane, 22 September 2016

- 27

-

BDO Audit Pty Ltd ABN 33 134 022 870 is a member of a national association of independent entities which are all members of BDO Australia Ltd ABN 77 050 110 275, an Australian company limited by guarantee. BDO Audit Pty Ltd and BDO Australia Ltd are members of BDO International Ltd, a UK company limited by guarantee, and form part of the international BDO network of independent member firms. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation, other than for the acts or omissions of financial services licensees.

60


NOTES                                           61


Danny Doyle performs a traditional smoking ceremony at the 2015 QCOSS State Conference.

62


P (07) 3004 6900 E qcoss@qcoss.org.au

www.qcoss.org.au ABN 11 781 477 447 ACN 169 502 032

63

QCOSS Annual Report 2015-2016  

The Queensland Council of Social Service is pleased to present this year's Annual Report for 2015-2016.

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