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S H O W C A S E C I N E M A

MOTHER INDIA 100 YEARS OF INDIAN CINEMA


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THE SHELTER OF WINGS 10 MOTHER INDIA 12 THE PRISONER 14 SOUL OF SAND 16 TOURING TALKIES 18

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SCREENING PROGRAM 9

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MOTHER INDIA – CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF INDIAN CINEMA 7

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INTRODUCTION 4

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CONTENTS

INDIAN FILM POSTER COLLECTION 20 SONG OF THE ROAD 24 THE MUSIC ROOM 26 THE HOME AND THE WORLD 28 FOUR WOMEN  30 KAAL/OUT TIME  32 GANDHI MY FATHER  34 OM SHANTI OM  36 THE MUSIC OF SATYAJIT RAY  38 THE STRANGER  40

ALEXANDER PRESS BROCHURE  44

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  43

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THE TIES THAT BIND US / SYMPOSIUM  42


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INTRODUCTION

[It’s] v er y, v er y difficult to condense one hundred y ears of cinema in fif teen-plus languages, with a production of now close to a thousand films a y ear, into tw o or three pages. It is of necessity super ficial but I hope it giv es an idea of the scope and reach of India’s many cinemas. —Aruna Vasudev (President, Netpac Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema) The quote above is from an e-mail sent to me by Aruna Vasudev on completion of her short historical essay that is featured in this catalogue to accompany the celebration of one hundred years of Indian cinema. When you read Vasudev’s essay, you will certainly understand and concur with her statement. Indeed, “India’s many cinemas” is one of the main reasons why we at the Griffith Film School (GFS) have titled our second cinema showcase Mother India, and this mother did bear not one but many children. The opening film Mother India (1957) is, in itself, a phenomenon. Overall, many consider that this particular film gave birth to the Bollywood blockbuster; some critics have even called it India’s Gone with the Wind. Mother India tells the story of a poverty-stricken village woman named Radha—played by Nargis Dutt—who, amid many other trials and tribulations, struggles to raise

her sons and survive against an evil money-lender. Despite her hardship, she sets a goddess-like, moral example of what it means to be an Indian woman, yet kills her own criminal son at the end for the greater moral good. She metaphorically represents India as a nation in the aftermath of independence. Beyond Bollywood is the Indian New Wave Cinema, commonly known in India as ‘Parallel Cinema’. An alternative to the mainstream commercial cinema, it is best described as the Indian version of neo-realism, as it deals with much more serious content, depicted in a naturalistic manner. These documentary-like portrayals of poor Indian families have a keen eye for the social political climate. It began as ‘Bengali Cinema’, around the same time as the French New Wave and the Japanese New Wave, but faced long-running difficulties and confrontation with the censorship

laws in India. It was only through Nehru’s personal intervention that Pather Panchali, though produced by the government of West Bengal, reached the Cannes Film Festival in 1956, where it won the Grand Prix, and made the film into a landmark of world cinema. It also launched the cinematic career of India’s greatestever director, considered by many as being among the top five directors of all time (globally), Satyajit Ray. Made on a meagre budget, this film is accompanied by the mesmerising music of Ravi Shankar. Strangely enough, it was about twenty-five years later that Nargis Dutt, the attractive heroine of Mother India (which was Bombay’s answer to Pather Panchali) and one of the biggest box-office stars of her time, raised the same and ever-returning objections to this film in the Indian Parliament. Dutt accused Ray of distorting India’s image abroad: it did not represent India’s poverty in its true form. Soon after this intervention, the central government informed Ray that it could not grant him permission to make a film about child labour since it did not constitutionally exist in India. As an homage to Ray, our closing weekend features a selection from the fine streaming collection of AsiaPacificFilm.com, starting with the already mentioned, glorious, first


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A third interest of this collection of films celebrating one hundred years of Indian cinema is dedicated to ‘independent Indian filmmakers’, as the organisers wish to expose viewers to the rich diversity of independent cinema emerging across the Indian subcontinent today. Most of these films have been nominated for the highest accolades in film in an Asian-Pacific regional context, via the official submission channel of the Asia Pacific Screen Awards, or even beyond that, in the world stage at Cannes, Berlin, or Venice. Obvious gems, these films have had little or no screening distribution in the commercial circuits in Brisbane, or even Australia. These criteria made us decide to screen them, as they reflect what the GFS terms as being ‘Essential Cinema’. On the occasion of this Mother India celebration, we have been fortunate enough to invite and

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We end our homage to this legend of Indian cinema with his last film, Agantuk. Ray had always avoided repeating himself and, happily, Agantuk ranks among his finest work, and was better received than previous ones. A modest picture, with a script written in only a fortnight, and influenced by Ray’s recent reading of two books by Claude Lévi-Strauss (Tristes Tropiques and The Savage Mind), it was far more ambitious than the original, which was Ray’s own short story written years earlier for the children’s magazine Sandesh. In the story, a comfortable middle-class Bengali family is surprised to receive an unexpected letter from the wife’s youngest uncle, who has not been heard from for decades and is assumed dead. According to the film, the man originally left Calcutta in 1955, the same year Ray completed Pather Panchali. This seems to be more than a coincidence. The character surely resembles his creator more than any other character in Ray’s films.

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Jalsaghar is a film that has excited passions abroad for years and enjoys a real cult status because of its chief indigenous element: Indian music. This film was largely responsible for opening French eyes to Ray’s films after years of indifference, and was described by some critics as his “most perfect film”. Ghare Baire, based on a novel by Rabindranath Tagore, is Ray’s most demanding work for non-Bengali viewers. As in other works by Ray, it shows the interaction of India with the West in microcosm, but, as Pauline Kael comments, it is presented in a formal style that owes almost nothing to the conventions of American or West European cinema. The years following this film were difficult for Ray; he had his first heart attack and there were times when he despaired of being permitted to ever direct again. When he finally received doctors’ permission to direct in late 1988, they told him he had to restrict himself to studio shooting (and, furthermore, hand over his usual operation of the camera to someone else). This constraint in turn meant

The organisers of the film program also wished to highlight the affinity of this great man to music, by screening a documentary that provides a better understanding of the music Ray chose for his films in the beginning of his career, and the great Indian musicians who scored with and for him, such as Ravi Shankar. (In his later years, Ray began composing the music for his films himself.)

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that the stories he now chose to film would need to be set indoors, with a focus on the conversation between actors. Thus, there is a greater emphasis on dialogue in Ray’s final films; one sees the ‘inner eye’ of Satyajit Ray.

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film of the famous Apu trilogy, Pather Panchali (Song of the Little Road), 1955. It is followed by Jalsaghar (The Music Room),1958, Ghare Baire (The Home and the World),1984, and closes with Ray’s last film Agantuk (The Stranger), 1991.


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welcome Meenakshi Shedde, an expert scholar in independent Indian cinema, a journalist, film curator, and Indian consultant for the Berlin and Dubai film festivals. Shedde will introduce some of the films in the collection and participate in the ENCOUNTERS: India Symposium, and The Ties That Bind Us, organised at the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA) in collaboration with the Griffith Asia Institute. The film panel Beyond Bollywood—Indian Identity through Film and Television also welcomes Maxine Williamson, Artistic Director of the Asia Pacific Screen Awards, and Indian-born Australian director and actor Anupam Sharma, and will be moderated by Pat Laughren from the GFS. Finally, the GFS will hold a research seminar on independent Indian cinema, in which Shedde will highlight the current struggles of the independent producers. To illustrate this, she has chosen to screen (for the first time outside of India) Touring Talkies, directed by Gajendra Ahire and produced by actress Trupti Bhoir. This film depicts the era when sound first came to the movies, and—amazingly—the practice continues in rural India, where the exhibitor travels with the film prints from village to village, organising screenings in tents, with the projection machine permanently afixed to the back of an old truck.

The seminar is followed by the opening of an exhibition of Indian movie posters (some of which highlight the particular art of handpainted movie posters, including one for Mother India), held in the GFS foyer. Our academic exchange partner in India, Whistling Woods International (WWI), Mumbai, was kind enough to lend some of the posters and film-stills of their vast collection, which spans over one hundred years of Indian cinema. I want to take the opportunity to thank Ravi Gupta, CEO of WWI, as well as all the other contributors to this endeavour, without whom this rich Indian showcase would not have been possible: Maxine Williamson, Anne Demy-Geroe, Sheree Kumar, Jeanette Hereniko, Philip Cheah, Aruna Vasudev, Meenakshi Shedde, Anupam Sharma, Margaret McVeigh, Ross Woodrow, Jacqui Hancox, Pat Laughren, and Donna Hamilton. One of the Delicatessen directors, Jean Pierre Jeunet compared the art of filmmaking to the art of cooking… We believe we have a great selection of Indian curries for you in store here! Welcome to Mother India, celebrating one hundred years of Indian cinema. Enjoy!

Herman Van Eyken Curator, Head of School Griffith Film School


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This was the beginning of what is today the biggest film industry in the world. Following the arrival of sound in Indian films in 1931—with Alam Ara (Light of the World), spoken in Hindi, by Ardeshir M. Irani—twenty-

With sound films, another kind of Indian viewer—educated and aware—started to consider cinema as a medium of conveying a message, not just a provider of mindless entertainment. From the very beginning, Indian filmmakers had drawn on popular forms of folk culture, and incorporated dance and songs into the films they made, to which the audiences responded with zest. But, as the educated elite became drawn to cinema—even in small numbers—as a means of expressing ideas within the songand-dance formula, cinema took on another shape. The studio system was born, and legendary studios were established, such as New Theatres in Calcutta, Prabhat Film Company in Pune, Bombay Talkies, Wadia Movietone, and several more in Bombay, and many others in the four south Indian states. These studios continued to emerge for another thirty years or so. A handful of memorable films managed to bypass the British censors by subtly communicating the rising demand for independence as well as the call for social reform that Mahatma Gandhi had launched.

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six more films were soon released in Tamil, Bengali, and Hindi, and shown in port cities across the country.

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In fact, Indians started making short films the year after the Lumiere brothers’ films were presented in India in July 1896, just six months after the first showing in Paris. By 1897, H. S. Bhatvadekar in Bombay (now Mumbai) imported a camera from London and filmed a wrestling match. In 1901 he filmed what was to be termed the first “newsreel event” in Indian film history— celebrating the triumphant return of an Indian student, R. P. Paranjpye, from Cambridge, where he had won special distinction. Meanwhile, in Calcutta (now Kolkata), Hiralal Sen had filmed scenes from plays presented in the city, and in 1909 R. G. Torney in Bombay filmed an entire play, Pundalik. The finished film was 8000 feet long and earned Torney the distinction of being the first feature filmmaker in India. But after this initial achievement, he faded into obscurity, and it is Phalke who is celebrated as the first real filmmaker in India.

Phalke’s first film (of which some parts still remain), Raja Harishchandra not only introduced India to the cinema but asserted its own ethos and culture by filming a story from the epic narrative, the Mahabharata. This film created a genre—the mythological—that was to thrive over the next thirty years or so. While others imitated the films being made in the West, Phalke chose to express an Indian identity through this new medium. The reason perhaps was that cinema was seen from the start as something for the masses, not for the educated urban elite. At that time, Britain ruled India and continued to do so until 1947 when independence was wrested from them. Until then, the Indian elite itself tended to emulate the British in every way; in the cities, they even shunned their native languages in favour of British English. As a story from the Mahabharata,1 the content of Phalke’s film was well known to all Indians, and the inter-titles, which the illiterate audience could not read, became redundant.

S H O W C A S E

This year the film world celebrates one hundred years of Indian cinema, recognising Raja Harishchandra (King Harishchandra), the film made by Dadasaheb Phalke in 1913, as the beginning of Indian cinema.

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MOTHER INDIA – C E L E B R AT I N G 1 0 0 Y E A R S OF INDIAN CINEMA


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Following independence in 1947, India experienced a ‘golden era’ during the 1950s and early 1960s. From Bombay, currently the undisputed centre of the Indian film industry—with films made in Hindi that have continuously drawn an all-Indian audience—came the now legendary filmmakers, Mehboob Khan (with his most celebrated film Mother India), Bimal Roy (with Do Bigha Zamin), Raj Kapoor (whose Awara won audiences for decades even beyond the shores of India, particularly Russia), and Guru Dutt (with his unforgettable Pyaasa among others), while Bengal witnessed the arrival of Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Mrinal Sen, and many more. In the south, less known nationally because of the language issue (India has no tradition of inserting subtitles into films made in the major Indian languages, such as Tamil, Bengali, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, among the fifteen-plus languages in which films are made), some great names have emerged, including S. S. Vasan, C. N. Annadurai, M. G. Ramachandran and N. S. Krishnan in Madras (now Chennai). These directors’ political and social leanings led to the formation of a major political party, the D. M. K., which was made up of writers, actors, and directors, with Ramachandran (widely known as M. G. R.) eventually becoming the Chief Minister of the state. This situation was repeated in other south Indian states; for

example, the hugely popular star of Telugu cinema in Andhra Pradesh, N. T. Rama Rao, became Chief Minister. Jayalalitha, who became a major star when she first started acting opposite M. G. R., remains Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu today. In the 1970s, with television and then video increasing in popularity, cinema went into a brief decline, only to emerge resplendent once again in the 1990s. Ironically, as popular cinema started losing its popularity, the New Indian Cinema came into being. Many of these young filmmakers were trained at the newly created Film Institute of India in Pune, where they drew inspiration from the French New Wave, Italian neo-realism, and New German Cinema, and became disdainful of Hollywood. Financial support came from the National Film Development Corporation that had been set up in Bombay at approximately the same time as the Film Institute and the National Film Archive, which was also in nearby Pune. While they began to win some international recognition for India’s many films, unfortunately no distribution outlets arose in India—no chain of art theatres in which to show their films. Nor were the thousand-seat theatres interested in anything that did not bring in the huge audiences that distributors and exhibitors were concerned with. Over the years, the distinction between ‘art’ cinema and

‘popular’ cinema became erased as the film world became more professional, with considerably better production values and a higher quality of direction, acting, and script-writing. Today, the divide is more between urban and rural, with films being made specifically for distribution in the multiplexes and malls across the urban landscape. Rural audiences are not considered, and the cinema that was once aimed for audiences across the board and became a unifying factor for this widely disparate country is becoming more an urban phenomenon aimed at the highly educated, widely travelled, elite, urban audience. Television has taken its place and offers the best access audiences across the country have to the cinema. With the still huge popularity of its own films with Indian audiences, Hollywood has never really made inroads into India. It is Bollywood that holds sway, and today, over a century later, Indians still prefer to watch their own films. Aruna Vasudev President, Netpac Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema

1 M  any decades later, Peter Brook (with Jean-Claude Carrière and Marie-Hélène Estienne as scriptwriters) produced a nine-hour-long play and then a film of the Mahabarata.


THURSDAY 16 MAY 6PM THE PRISONER 8PM SOUL OF SAND FRIDAY 17 MAY 3PM TOURING TALKIES

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8PM M OTHER INDIA FOLLOWED BY OPENING DRINKS

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6PM THE SHELTER OF WINGS

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WEDNESDAY 15 MAY

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PROGRAM

7PM INDIAN POSTER EXHIBITION OPENING

8.30PM S ONG OF THE ROAD SATURDAY 18 MAY 2PM THE MUSIC ROOM 4PM T HE HOME AND THE WORLD 6PM FOUR WOMEN 8PM OUR TIME

2.30PM OM SHANTI OM 5.30PM THE MUSIC OF SATYAJIT RAY 8.30PM  T HE STRANGER FOLLOWED BY CLOSING DRINKS

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12NOON GANDHI MY FATHER

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SUNDAY 19 MAY


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CH AR ACHAR / T H E S H E LTER OF WI N G S (19 93 ) D I R E CTO R : B U D D H A D E V D A S G U P TA

1993

Writers: Buddhadev Dasgupta, Prafulla Roy

Editor: Ujal Nundy

97 min Bengali, with English subtitles

Producers: Gita Gope, Shankar Gope

Production Design: Shatadal Mitra

Original Music: Biswadep Dasgupta

Cast: Indrani Haldar, Rajit Kapoor, Sadhu Meher, Laboni Sarkar

Cinematographer: Soumendu Roy

Sound: Jyoti Chatterjee

SYNOPSIS Based on the novel by Prafulla Roy, Charachar (The Shelter of the Wings) revolves around the film’s protagonist Lakha, who comes from a family of bird catchers. Each day Lakha traps birds and sells them to Shashmal, the local dealer who in turn sells them to wealthy people who live in the city. Unfortunately, before they are sold, many of the birds die. Despite being in desperate need of the money he makes from the birds, Lakha’s deep love for them inspires him to let many go free. Frustrated by her husband’s lack of ambition and his obsession with the birds, Lakha’s wife Sari has an affair with another bird catcher. This beautifully told narrative reveals the connection between humans and the natural world.  — AsianPacificFilms.com


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ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

SCREENING INFORMATION

Buddhadeb Dasgupta (1944–) is a poet and prominent contemporary Indian filmmaker. Five of his films have won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film, Bagh Bahadur (1989), Charachar (1993), Lal Darja (1997), Mondo Meyer Upakhyan (2002) and Kaalpurush (2008)—while Dooratwa (1978) and Tahader Katha (1993) have won the National Film Award for Best Feature Film in Bengali. As a director, he has won National Film Award for Best Direction twice, for Uttara (2000) and Swapner Din (2005). Over the years, he has published several works of poetry including Govir Araley, Coffin Kimba Suitcase, Himjog, Chhaata Kahini, Roboter Gaan, Sreshtha Kabita, and Bhomboler Ascharya Kahini O Ananya Kabita.

Nominated Golden Berlin Bear, Berlin International Film Festival 1994

6pm Wednesday 15 May

Won Audience Award and Special Jury Award Fribourg International Film Festival 1995 Film courtesy of Asian Pacific Films.com

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Images courtesy of cineplex.com

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 — IMDb

Won Golden Lotus Award, India National Film Awards 1994


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MOT HER INDI A (19 57 ) D I R E CTO R : M E H B OO B K H A N

1957

Writers: Mehboob Khan, Wajahat Mirza, S. Ali Raza

Editor: Shamsudin Kadri

172 min Hindi, with English subtitles

Producer: Mehboob Khan

Cast: Nargis, Sunil Dutt, Rajendra Kumar, Raaj Kumar

Original Music: Naushad

Sound: Kaushik

Cinematographer: Faredoon A. Irani

SYNOPSIS The story of a poverty-stricken village woman named Radha who, in the absence of her husband, struggles to raise her sons and survive against a money-lender amid many troubles. Despite her hardship, she sets a goddess-like moral example of an ideal Indian woman. In the end, she kills her son Birju, a criminal, for the greater good.


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ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

SCREENING INFORMATION

Mehboob Khan (1907–1964) was a pioneer, producer-director of Hindi cinema, best known for directing Mother India, which won the Filmfare Awards for Best Film and Best Director and was a nominee for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. He set up his production company, Mehboob Productions, and later a film studio, the Mehboob Studios in Bandra, Mumbai, in 1954.

Won All India Certificate of Merit for Best Feature Film and Certificate of Merit for Best Feature Film in Hindi at the 5th National Film Awards 1957

8pm Wednesday 15 May

Won Filmfare Best Actress Award, Best Director Award, Best Cinematography Award, Best Sound Award and Best Film Award 1958 Won Best Actress Award Karlivy Vary International Film Festival 1958 Nominated Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film 1958 Film courtesy of Aman Raniga

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Images courtesy of Whistling Woods International


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S ID DHAR TH / T H E P RIS ON ER (2009) D I R E CTO R : P R YA S G U P TA

2009 110 min

Writers: Anadi, Pryas Gupta, Hitesh Kewalya

Hindi and English

Original Music: Sagar Desai

Sound: Amala Popuri Cast: Rajat Kapoor, Sachin Nayak, Pradip Sagar, Pradeep Kabra

Cinematographer: Mrinal Desai Editor: Arindam Ghatak, Pryas Gupta

SYNOPSIS Just released from prison, Siddharth Roy, a once-famous writer, completes a new manuscript. He re-engages with the outside world, hoping that the new book will restore his reputation and also reconcile him with his estranged wife, Maya. However, fate has other plans for Roy, when his briefcase gets exchanged at a cyber cafĂŠ with a similar briefcase containing a large sum of money. Roy loses the only copy of his new manuscript, while Mohan, the cyber cafĂŠ manager, comes under pressure from mob bosses to recover the lost money. In the midst of growing despair about the lost manuscript, Roy is reconciled with his three-year-old son through a scheming housemaid. Unable to find happiness in the money he


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Pryas Gupta, originally from New Delhi, is a trained architect and graphic designer. In 2002, he decided to pursue his interest in filmmaking by joining the film program at the National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad. During this time, he made several short films and videos. He completed Siddharth, his first feature film, in 2008, which he wrote directed and edited and directed. The film was awarded the Jury Grand Prize in the 2008 Asia Pacific Screen Awards.

Won Jury Grand Prize Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2008

He currently has two projects in development, one of which is a biopic about the early life of Mahatma Gandhi. He presently resides in Mumbai. In addition to filmmaking, Pryas also works as a visual designer and television commercial director.  — APSA.

Won Indian Competition Award, Cinefan: Festival of Asian and Arab Cinema 2008 Film courtesy of Pryas Gupta Images courtesy of APSA and buzzintown.com

SCREENING INFORMATION 6pm Thursday 16 May

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 — APSA.

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

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has found, Roy begins to desire the custody of his son. Meanwhile, the pressure mounts on Mohan as he loses his job and is forced to go into hiding from the mob. He must find Roy and the money at any cost. Based on the ancient text of the Rig Veda, the film explores the theme of the renunciation of desire as the true path to enlightenment and freedom.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR


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PA IR ON TALL E / S O UL OF SAN D (20 10 ) D I R E CTO R : S I D H A RT H S R I N I VA S A N 2010

Writers: Sidharth Srinivasan

Sound Designer: Nihar Ranjan Samal

98 min

Producers: Divya Bhardwaj, Sidharth Srinivasan

Production Design: B. Nagar

Hindi, with English subtitles

Executive Producer: Aruna Vasudev Original Music: Jona Kompa Cinematographer: Nalla Muthu

Production Manager: Narendra Nagar Cast: Dibyendu Bhattacharya, Saba Joshi, Avtar Sahani, Geeta Bisht

Editor: Sameera Jain

SYNOPSIS Amid the timeless landscape of the Indian epic—the Mahabharata—the stage is set for an intimate yet eternal tussle between custom and commerce, tradition, and modernity. Bhanu Kumar, a lower-caste watchman, stands fierce guard over his feudal master’s disused, barren silica mine. A creature of habit, Bhanu reflects powerlessness so complete, it can only make the world stand still. Bhanu’s wife, Saroj, watches in silent disgust as her innocent husband stands sentinel over the empty property. Saroj conceals a dark secret, for her husband’s unwavering loyalty to his master implicates Saroj in ways Bhuna cannot imagine.


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FESTIVALS & AWARDS

Sidharth Srinivasan was born in New Delhi, India in 1975. He graduated with a degree in Economics from St. Stephen’s College at Delhi University. His debut short film, Swamohita premiered in competition at the Venice Film Festival in 2000, and his first feature, The Divine Vision, won Best Film, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Supporting Actor at the Karachi International Film Festival in 2001. Soul of Sand is his second feature film.

Toronto International Film Festival 2010

 — Global Film Initiative

Museum Of Modern Art New York 2010

Hubert Bals Fund Award, International Film Festival Rotterdam 2010 Official Selection, Gasparilla International Film Festival 2010 Scottsdale International Film Festival 2010 Minneapolis-St. Paul International Film Festival 2010 Santa Barbara International Film Festival 2010 World Cinema Festival Amsterdam 2010 Film courtesy of Sidharth Srinivasan

SCREENING INFORMATION 8pm Thursday 16 May

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Images courtesy of Global Film Initiative

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One night, all hell breaks loose when a runaway couple in desperate search of refuge come to Bhuna seeking shelter. Terrified of becoming victims to an honour killing, they inform him that a contract killer is following them. But Bhuna has never granted entry to anyone at the mine without his master’s permission. Suddenly forced to choose between duty and compassion, the initially reluctant Bhuna relents. The rusted gate of the Royal Silica Mine opens, exposing a bloody world of lust, fear, and violence in the name of caste, ownership, and honour.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR


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TO U R ING TAL K I ES (20 12 ) D I R E CTO R : G A J E N D R A A H I R E

2012

Writer: Gajendra Ahire

Art Direction: Vasu Patil

107 mins

Producer: Trupti Bhoir – Trupti Bhoir Films

Cast: Subodh Bhave, Trupti Bhoir, Milind Shinde, Kishore Kadam, Suhas Palshikar, Chinmay Sant, Vaibhav Mangle

Marathi, with English subtitles

Original Music: Ilayaraja Cinematographer: Amol Gole Editor: Ballu Saluja

SYNOPSIS Chandi is a feisty young woman, who keeps the family’s Chandi Touring Talkies going in rural Maharashtra, the state of which Mumbai is the capital. She dresses as a man to hold her own in a risky business— that includes bawdy films—which is not particularly suitable for women. The touring talkies is a unique, Indian travelling cinema popular in a movie-addicted nation, where the exhibitor travels with the film prints from village to village, organising screenings in tents, with the projection machine permanently affixed to the back of a truck! This was how it was when sound first came to the movies, and the practice continues in rural India, including Maharashtra, where the film is set.


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SCREENING INFORMATION

Shown at the Kerala International Film Festival and Pune International Film Festival 2013

3pm Friday 17 May

Film courtesy of Trupti Bhoir

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Images courtesy of Trupti Bhoir

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When Chandi’s alcoholic father, encouraged by her rival Subhnya of Shahenshah Talkies, loses a gamble in which he pledges the touring talkies to the local moneylender, it takes all of Chandi’s gumption and wiles to get the touring talkies back. Meanwhile, she teams up with a city art film director who is also duped by Subhnya—and teaches him a lesson or two about life, art, and what movie addiction really means. A passionate love letter to cinema, with the smell of the earth, farmers’ hands, and the dust of trucks, that celebrates the centenary year of Indian cinema.

FESTIVALS & AWARDS


INDIAN FILM POSTER COLLECTION “Long before graphic design changed the movie industry, the heaving bosoms and rippling muscles of Bollywood’s heroes and heroines drew viewers to the box-office from hand-painted, larger -than-life posters” (Reuters Life!) To highlight the Indian tradition of hand-painted film posters, by talented artists of yesteryear, the Griffith Film School presents an exhibition of Indian Movie Posters and Film Stills. View a small selection from the Whistling Woods International Collection Griffith Film School Foyer South Bank Campus


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PATHER PANCHALI / SONG OF THE ROAD (1955) D I R E CTO R : S AT YA J I T R AY

1955 115 min Bengali, with English subtitles

Writers: Satyajit Ray, based on novel by Bibhutibhushan Banerjee Producer: Government of West Bengal Original Music: Ravi Shankar

Sound: Bhupen Ghosh Production Design: Bansi Chandragupta Cast: Kanu Bannerjee, Karuna Bannerjee, Subir Bannerjee

Cinematographer: Subrata Mitra Editor: Dulal Dutta

SYNOPSIS The story revolves around a poor Brahmin family in Bengal during the early years of the twentieth century. The father, Harihara, is a priest who is unable to make ends meet to keep his family together. The mother, Sarbajaya, has the chief responsibility for raising her mischievous daughter Durga and caring for her elderly aunt Indir, who is a distant relative and whose independent spirit sometimes irritates her. With the arrival of Apu in the family, scenes of happiness and play enrich their daily life.


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In spite of poverty and death the film leaves one not depressed but moved, filled with the beauty and subtle radiance of life. The film suggests an intimate relationship between loss and growth or destruction and creation.  — UCSC

“It is true. For one year I was trying to sell the scenario, to peddle it... since nobody would buy it, I decided to start anyway, because we wanted some footage to prove that we were not incapable of making films. So I got some money against my insurance policies. We started shooting, and the fund ran out very soon. Then I sold some art books, some records and some of my wife’s jewelry. Little trickles of money came, and part of the salary I was earning as art director. All we had to spend on was raw stock, hire of a camera and our conveniences, transport and so on... I had nothing more to pawn.”  — UCSC

Golden Lotus Award and Silver Lotus Award, 3rd National Film Awards 1955 In Competition Palme D’Or, 9th Cannes Film Festival 1956 Diploma of Merit, Edinburgh International Film Festival 1956 Selznick Golden Laurel for Best Film, Berlin International Film Festival 1957 Golden Gate for Best Director and Golden Gate for Best Picture, San Francisco International Film Festival 1957 Best Film, Vancouver International Film Festival 1958 Critics’ Award for Best Film, Stratford Film Festival 1958 Best Foreign Film, New York Film Festival 1959 Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press Images courtesy of Whistling Woods International

SCREENING INFORMATION 8.30pm Friday 17 May

C I N E M A

Life, however, is a struggle, so Harihara has to find a new job and departs, leaving Sarbajaya alone to deal with the stress of the family’s survival, Durga’s illness, and the turbulence of the monsoon. The final disaster, Durga’s death, causes the family to leave their village in search of a new life in Benares.

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

S H O W C A S E

COMMENT FROM THE DIRECTOR


26

JAL SAGHAR / T H E MUSIC R OO M ( 1958) D I R E CTO R : S AT YA J I T R AY

1958 100 min Bengali, with English subtitles

Writers: Satyajit Ray. Based on the story “Jalsagher’ by Tarasankar Banerjee Producer: Satyajit Ray Productions Original Music: Vilayat Khan

Sound: Durgadas Mitra Production Design: Bansi Chandragupta Cast: Chhabi Biswas, Padma Devi, Pinaki Sen Gupta

Cinematographer: Subrata Mitra Editor: Dulal Dutta

SYNOPSIS The action occurs in a palace in Nimitia, Bengal, at the beginning of the twentieth century. On his terrace, smoking a hookah, the zamindar has his memory stirred by the sound of some music from the coming of age ceremony of his neighbour’s son. He recalls his own son’s initiation and the recitals in his salon to which he invited the finest musicians, the most beautiful singers, and the greatest dancers. Now his wife and his son are dead and his status as an important landowner has declined. Goaded by his neighbour, an arrogant pretender who boasts of his taste in music, the zamindar opens his salon once again and ruins himself with a final recital. He savours the music. He savours his victory and toasts his ancestors. At dawn, he departs on his horse and leaves this elegant world behind.  — satyajitray.ucsc.edu


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

“Critics have often accused me of a grasshopperish tendency to jump from theme to theme, from genre to genre... rather than pursue one dominant subject in an easily recognisable style that would help them to pigeonhole me, affix me with a label. [Having made such films as] a whodunit, a children’s fantasy, a tale of adventure, problems of contemporary urban youth, the famine of ‘43, all made over a ten year stretch, it is inevitable that a feeling of restlessness, perhaps even of indecision, will emerge from this jumble. All I can say in self-defence, if one is needed, is that this diversity faithfully reflects my own personality and that behind every film lies a cool decision.”

The eclectic Ray was not, as he points out, erratic or idiosyncratic in the choices of his themes. What he does not spell out is how the themes overlapped with and related to the changing social and political mores in postcolonial India and probably his personal life as well.

President’s Silver Medal, New Delhi 1959

 — satyajitray.ucsc.edu

2pm Saturday 18 May

Silver Medal for Music, Moscow 1959 Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press Images courtesy of dvdbeaver.com

SCREENING INFORMATION

C I N E M A

In 1975, Satyajit Ray had this to say on the bewildering array of films he had made to date:

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

S H O W C A S E

COMMENT FROM THE DIRECTOR


28

G H AR E BAIR E / T H E H O ME AND T H E WO RLD ( 1 984) D I R E CTO R : S AT YA J I T R AY

1984 140 min Bengali, with English subtitles

Writers: Satyajit Ray. Based on the story by Rabindranath Tagore Producer: National Film Development Corporation of India Original Music: Satyajit Ray Cinematographer: Soumendu Roy Editor: Dulal Dutta

Sound: Robin Sen Gupta, Jyoti Chatterjee, Anup Mukherjee Production Design: Ashoke Bose Cast: Victor Bannerjee, Soumitra Chatterjee, Swatilekha Chatterjee


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

The action occurs in 1905, in the “I don’t think of Western audiences period in which Great Britain, when I make my films. I am thinking represented by Lord Curzon, decided of my own audience in Bengal. I am to partition Bengal in order to trying to take them along with me, separate the Hindus and Muslims. and this I have succeeded in doing. The populace mobilised against this At the beginning, this audience was project in the nationalist movement extremely unsophisticated. They known as swadeshi, which called were used to trash or the naive for a boycott of foreign-made Bengali film. You had to take them goods, and in an insurrection that along slowly. Sometimes you took a was subsequently suppressed. In leap as in Kanchenjungha or in Days this turbulent context, a bourgeois and Nights in the Forest, and lost couple, Nikhil and Bimala, who have them.” remained faithful to the ideals of the  — satyajitray.org Bengal Renaissance, receive in their home a friend, Sandip, a vehement anti-English nationalist. Encouraged by her husband to be a “modern” woman, Bimala is seduced by Sandip, before gradually recognising the duplicity of his motives and behaviour.  — satyajitray.ucsc.edu

FESTIVALS & AWARDS Best Bengali Film, New Delhi, 1984 Best Costume design, New Delhi, 1984 Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press Images courtesy of dvdbeaver.com

SCREENING INFORMATION 4pm Saturday 18 May

C I N E M A

COMMENT FROM THE DIRECTOR

S H O W C A S E

SYNOPSIS


30

NAALU PENNUNGOL / FOUR WOMEN (2007) D I R E CTO R : A D OO R G O PA L A K R I S H N A N

2007 105 minutes Malayalam, with English subtitles

Writers: Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai, Adoor Gopalakrishnan

Sound: N. Harikumar Editor: Ajithkumar

Producers: Adoor Gopalakrishnan, Benzy Martin

Production Design: Adoor Gopalakrishnan

Original Music: Issac Thomas Kottukapally

Cast: Geethu Mohandas, Nandita Das, Padmapriya, Manju Pillai

Cinematographer: M.J. Radhakrishnan

SYNOPSIS Based on the short story by Thakazhi Sivasankara Pillai, acclaimed director Adoor Gopalakrishnan’s film version focuses on the lives of four women, each of whom is faced with a marital issue. The first story, “The Prostitute”, features a young prostitute who has decided to give up her life on the streets to be with the love of her life. However, the couple’s happiness is disrupted when they are caught sleeping on the pavement by the police who assume they have been engaging in illegal sexual activity. Unable to prove they are married, the couple is threatened with imprisonment. The second story, The “Virgin”, focuses on a woman whose parents marry her off to a shopkeeper. However, unable to bring himself to be intimate with his new wife, the husband sends the young woman back to her mother

and father. The third story, “The Housewife”, features a married middle-aged woman who is unable to have children of her own. A visiting classmate offers an idea to help solve her problem, but his solution implies dire consequences. The final story involves a woman for whom her parents cannot find a husband. When her younger sister is offered a marriage proposal, the parents are faced with having to break tradition by marrying their youngest daughter off before their eldest.  — AsianPacificFilms.com


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

valuable contributions to Indian cinema by awarding him the highest cinema award of India, the Dadasaheb Phalke Award for the year 2004  — IMDb

Golden Lotus Award, Best Director National Film Awards, India 2009; Seattle International Film Festival 2008 Film courtesy of Asian Pacific Films.com Images courtesy of adoorgopalakrishnan. com

SCREENING INFORMATION 6pm Saturday 18 May

C I N E M A

Moutatthu “Adoor” Gopalakrishnan Unnithan (1941–) is an Indian film director, script writer, and producer. Gopalakrishnan had a major role in revolutionising Malayalam cinema and is regarded as one of the finest filmmakers of India. Adoor’s first film, Swayamvaram (1972), pioneered the new wave cinema movement in Kerala. Most of his films appear in festivals around the world, and are released in Kerala. He has won several national and international awards including the National Film Award sixteen times, the Kerala State Film Awards seventeen times, and also won several international film awards. He won the prestigious British Film Institute award for Elippathayam (1981). Adoor received the Padma Shri in 1984 and the Padma Vibhushan in 2006. The Nation honoured Adoor for his

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

S H O W C A S E

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR


32

KAAL / OUR T I M E (20 07 ) D I R E CTO R : B A P PA D I T YA B A N D O PA D H YAY

2007

Writers: Shakti Barthwal

Production Design: Gautam Bose

118 min

Producers: Bhaidani Films Abdulla Valdani, Manik Valdani

Cast: Chandrayee Ghosh, Rudranil Ghosh

Bengali, with English subtitles

Original Music: Abhijit Bose Cinematographer: Rana Dasgupta

SYNOPSIS Threatened with censor cuts before its release in 2007, Bappaditya Bandopadhyay’s controversial feature film Kaal (Our Time) explores the disturbing world of human trafficking in India. The film focuses on four women, Itu, Fatima, Soma, and a young widow, each of whom falls prey to Ratan (Rudranil Ghosh), a sweettalking agent whose prime motive is to smuggle them out of the village in which they live and sell them to sex traders in the city. Although initially terrified by the life of prostitution they have been forced into, each woman begins to accept her fate as the allure of money and city life take hold. In the wider context of Indian politics, Kaal is a critical

commentary on human displacement and the effects of globalisation. In an interview, the director declared: “I do want my films to look like news footage at times and try sincerely to shoot a fiction in the way one would shoot a documentary. Most of the characters and incidents in my films are from real life. I deliberately use the music and the backdrop to refer to a certain culture which is becoming marginal day by day.”  — AsiaPacificFilms.com


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

Bappaditya Bandopadhyay or Bappaditya Banerjee (1970–) is an Indian director and poet.He is the recipient of the Most Promising Director award for the year 2003, by the BFJA (Bengal Film Journalists’ Association).

Cairo International Film Festival 2007 Sao Paulo International Film Festival 2007 Stockholm International Film Festival 2007 Osian’s Cinefan Festival of Asian and Arab Cinema 2007 Singapore International Film Festival 2008. Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press Images courtesy of kaalthefilm.tripod.com

SCREENING INFORMATION

S H O W C A S E

C I N E M A

8pm Saturday 18 May


34

GA N D H I MY FAT H ER (20 07 ) D I R E CTO R : F E ROZ A B B A S K H A N

2007

Writers: Feroz Abbas Khan

Sound: Resul Pookutty

136 min

Producer: Anil Kapoor

Hindi, Gujarati, English, with English subtitles

Original Music: Piyush Kanojia

Production Design: Nitin Chandrakant Desai

Cinematographer: David McDonald Editor: A. Sreekar Prasad

Cast: Darshan Jariwala, Akshaye Khanna, Bhumika Chawla, Shefali Shah

SYNOPSIS Gandhi My Father paints the picture of Gandhi’s intricate, complex, and strained relationship with son Harilal Gandhi. From the onset, the two had dreams in opposite directions. Harilal wanted to study abroad and become a barrister like his father, while Gandhi hoped that his son would join him and fight for his ideals and causes. When Gandhi doesn’t give Harilal the opportunity to study abroad, it is a huge and almost unforgivable blow to Hari. He decides to abandon his father’s vision and leaves South Africa for India where he joins his wife Gulab (Bhoomika Chawla) and children. He returns to school to earn his diploma but fails three times in a row. Each of his schemes to make money falls through and he ends up building a bad reputation for himself, all the while tarnishing his father’s

name. Sick of his failure, Gulab returns to her parent’s house with the children and Hari stumbles and eventually falls. He turns to alcohol for solace and shuffles back and forth between Hinduism and Islam, in a never ending search for peace. With political tension escalating, the rift between Gandhi and his eldest son grows until it is beyond repair. This is the story of a man who lived in the enormous shadow of his father, striving to discover his identity.


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

He was the first artistic director of the Prithvi Theatre in Mumbai, and in 1983 was head of the Prithvi Theatre Festival with Jennifer Kapoor and Akash Khurana. He started with productions such as comedy All the Best and Saalgirah (1993), written by playwright Javed Siddiqui with Anupam Kher and Kirron Kher, which incidentally became her first acting performance during her comeback after a sabbatical.

In 2007, he made his film debut with Gandhi, My Father, based on his own previous play, Mahatma vs Gandhi, and opened to critical acclaim by falsely portraying the father of nation in a bad taste. At the National Film Award, actor Darshan Zariwala won the Best Supporting Actor Award, for his role of Gandhi, while the film itself won the Special Jury Award and Best Screenplay and the Best Screenplay Award at the Asia Pacific Screen Awards and was nominated for Grand Prix at Tokyo Film Festival.

Special Jury Award, Best Supporting Actor, Best Screenplay, National Film Awards 2008 Critics Award (Best Film), (Best Actress), Zee Cine Awards 2008 Best Art Direction, IIFA Awards 2008 Best Screenplay, Asia Pacific Screen Awards 2008 Film courtesy of Feroz Abbas Khan Images courtesy of gandimyfather. erosentertainment.com

SCREENING INFORMATION 12noon Sunday 19 May C I N E M A

Feroz Abbas Khan is an Indian theatre and film director, playwright and screenwriter, who is most known for directing plays, including, Saalgirah, Tumhari Amrita, Salesman Ramlal and Gandhi Viruddh Gandhi.

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

S H O W C A S E

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR


36

O M SH AN TI O M (20 07 ) D I R E CTO R : FA R A H K H A N

2007 169 min Hindi, with English subtitles

Writers: Farah Khan, Mayur Puri, Mushtaq Sheikh Producer: Gauri Khan Original Music: Vishal-Shekhar

Sound: Nakul Kamte Production Design: Sabu Cyrill Cast: Shahrukh Khan, Deepika Padukone, Kirron Kher

Cinematographer: V. Manikandan Editor: Shirish Kunder

SYNOPSIS Om was a junior artist in the 1970’s. Shanti was a superstar of the 1970’s. He was her biggest fan. She was his biggest inspiration. He was madly in love. She was ready to give up everything she had for love. He felt betrayed in life. She felt betrayed in love ... And then ... started the saga of ‘Om Shanti Om’. For some love stories, one lifetime is not enough...


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR Asian Film Awards Won

Best Choreographer – Farah Khan

Best Composer – Vishal Dadlani, Shekhar Ravjiani

Jodi No. 1 – Shahrukh Khan and Deepika Padukone Best Special Effects – Red Chillies VFX

Nominated Best Actress – Deepika Padukone Asia Pacific Screen Awards

Stardust Awards

Nominated

Won

Best Feature Film

Dream Director Award - Farah Khan Zee Cine Awards

Annual Central European Bollywood Award

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

Won

Won

National Film Awards

Best Actor in a Negative Role – Arjun Rampal

Best Film

Best Costumes – Manish Malhotra,

Film courtesy of Aman Raniga Eros International

Won 2008 – National Film Award for Best Art Direction – Sabu Cyril Filmfare Awards Nominated Best Director – Farah Khan Best Film – Red Chillies

IIFA Awards Won

Best Director – Farah Khan

Images courtesy of omshantiom. erosentertainment.com

Best Art Direction – Sabu Cyril Best Special Effects – Red Chillies VFX

SCREENING INFORMATION 2.30pm Sunday 19 May

C I N E M A

Star Screen Awards Won

S H O W C A S E

Farah Khan (1965–) is an Indian film director, actress, and choreographer. She is best known for her choreographic work in numerous Bollywood films. Khan has choreographed dance routines for more than one hundred songs in over eighty Hindi films. Khan has worked on international projects, such as Marigold: An Adventure in India, Monsoon Wedding, and the Chinese film Perhaps Love.


38

T HE MUSIC O F S AT YA JIT R AY ( 1984) D I R E CTO R : U T PA L E N D U C H A K R A B A RT Y D O C U M E N TA R Y 1984

Writers: Utpalendu Chakrabarty

169 min

Cinematographer: Pantu Nag, Soumendu Roy

English

Editor: Bulu Ghosh Cast: Satyajit Ray

SYNOPSIS In the beginning of his career, Ray worked with some of the greatest musical maestros of Indian classical music; Pandit Ravi Shankar for the Apu Trilogy and Parash Pathar (The Philosopher’s Stone, 1958, Ustad Vilayat Khan for Jalsaghar (The Music Room, 1958) and Ali Akbar Khan for Devi (The Goddess, 1960). With Teen Kanya (1961), he began composing the music for his films. “The reason why I do not work with professional composers any more is that I get too many musical ideas of my own, and composers, understandably enough, resent being guided too much”, he said. He would start working on music in very early stages of a production— sometimes as early as in the scriptwriting stage. He would keep notes of the music ideas as they evolved.


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

SCREENING INFORMATION

To him, the role of music was to make things simpler for the audience. “If I were the only audience, I wouldn’t be using music! ... I have always felt that music is really an extraneous element, that one should be able to do without it, express oneself without it”.

5.30pm Sunday 19 May

 — satyajitray.org Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press

C I N E M A

“... the pleasure of finding out that the music sounds as you imagined it would more than compensates for the hard work that goes into it. The final pleasure, of course, is in finding out that it not only sounds right but is also right for the scene for which it was meant”. Ray wrote.

He experimented with mixing Western and Indian elements in his scores. He composed background music that belonged to a particular film rather than to any recognisable tradition. In Ghare Baire, he adapted Western music elements along with Indian ones to complement the two influences on the film’s characters.

S H O W C A S E

After completing the final edit, he would usually escape to his study for several days to compose the music. He meticulously wrote the scores in either Indian or Western notation depending on musicians.


40

AGANTUK / T H E S T RAN GER ( 1992) D I R E CTO R : S AT YA J I T R AY

1992

Writer: Satyajit Ray

Editor: Dulal Dutta

120 min

Produced by: National Film Development Corporation of India

Cast: Utpal Dutt, Biramjit, Mamata Shankar

Bengali, with English subtitles

Composer: Satyajit Ray Cinematographer: Barun Raha

SYNOPSIS When Anila receives a letter from a man who claims to be her long-lost uncle, her husband Sudhindra is suspicious. The man claiming to be Manomohan Mitra appears and stays with the family, stating that he is an anthropologist who has travelled all over the world.

lawyer’s anger builds up until finally he orders the guest to “either come clean or just clear out”. The next morning, the visitor is nowhere to be found. Desperate to find him, the family finally learns that he is in fact Manmohan Mitra and locates him in a remote tribal village.

Anila, who initially believes the visitor, is slowly led to believe that he has come to claim his share of property by pretending to be her uncle. Only her son, who has befriended the man claiming to be Manomohan, believes that the visitor is truly Anila’s uncle.

The couple apologises to Manmohan, and persuades him to come back with them to Calcutta. In the end, Manmohan hands his niece a piece of paper, which turns out to be the claim to his share of property.

The central conflict of the film rests upon the identity of this man and the family’s struggle to accept or reject it. Sudhindra subjects the visitor to various tests in an effort to resolve this conflict. In a final attempt to unravel the truth, he invites a lawyer friend of his to gently question the guest. But, matters turn ugly as the


C I N E M A I N D I A N O F Y E A R S 1 0 0 I N D I A M O T H E R

Ray directed thirty-six films, including feature films, documentaries, and shorts. He was also a fiction writer, publisher, illustrator, calligrapher, graphic designer and film critic. He authored several short stories and novels, primarily aimed at children and adolescents. Feluda, the sleuth, and Professor Shonku, the scientist in his science fictions, are popular fictional characters created by him.

Ray’s first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including Best Human Documentary at the Cannes Film Festival. Agantuk, Aparajito (1956) and Apur Sansar (1959) form the Apu Trilogy. Ray did the scripting, casting, scoring, and editing, and designed his own credit titles and publicity material. Ray received many major awards in his career, including thirty-two Indian National Film Awards, a number of awards at international film festivals and award ceremonies, and an Academy Award in 1992. The Government of India honoured him with the Bharat Ratna in 1992.

FIPRESCI Award, Venice Film Festival 1991 Best Feature Film, Best Direction and Special Jury Award, National Film Awards 1992 Film courtesy of Alexander Street Press Images courtesy of mostlycinema.com

SCREENING INFORMATION 8.30pm Sunday 19 May

C I N E M A

Satyajit Ray (1921–92) was an Indian filmmaker, regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of world cinema. Ray was born in the city of Calcutta into a Bengali family prominent in the world of arts and literature. Starting his career as a commercial artist, Ray was drawn into independent filmmaking after meeting French filmmaker Jean Renoir and viewing Vittorio De Sica’s Italian neorealist 1948 film Bicycle Thieves during a visit to London.

FESTIVALS & AWARDS

S H O W C A S E

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR


42

T H E T I E S T H AT B I N D U S / S Y M P O S I U M

The Ties That Bind Us is a series of panels, in-conversations and keynotes reflecting on the many dimensions of the relationship between Australia and India, yesterday, today and tomorrow. In particular, we look at India’s rapid rise as the superpower of the South Asian region and its implications for Australia.

Griffith Film School presents: Beyond Bollywood: Indian Identity through Film and Television A panel discussion by Meenakshi Shedde, Professor Herman Van Eyken, Maxine Williamson, and Anupam Sharma 11.30am – 1pm Thursday 16 May 2013 Cinema A, Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), South Bank, Brisbane

PANEL BIOGRAPHIES Meenakshi Shedde is a film curator and critic based in Mumbai, India. She is India Consultant to the Berlin and Dubai Film Festivals. She has been India/ Bollywood/Asia Consultant to the Toronto, Locarno, Pusan, IFFI-Goa and Mumbai Film Festivals. She was on the FIPRESCI jury at Cannes, Berlin, and Venice. She freelances for Variety, Screen International, and Cahiers du Cinema. Anupam Sharma is a film director, actor, producer, and author. He has been named as one of the fifty most influential professionals in the Australian film industry (Encore Magazine). He is best known for producing Bollywood films filmed in Australia.

Herman Van Eyken is a scriptwriter, producer and director. He has directed more than 190 films, and has been shortlisted into competition of the leading film festivals (Cannes, New York, Biarritz, London, Stockholm, Vienna, Montreal, Lyon). Many of his films have received top awards in their respective categories. His long feature fiction film Le Bal des Pantins (Ties and Ropes), 2001, has been released in more than ten countries, among them Australia, Canada, France, Italy and Taiwan. The film was screened in thirty international film festivals and won several major awards. Van Eyken developed the first film degree program in Singapore at LASALLE College of the Arts, and has been invited to serve on the jury of several international competitions.

Maxine Williamson is the Artistic Director of the Asia Pacific Screen Awards (APSA), which is the highest accolade given in film within the Asia-Pacific region. She has been with the APSA since 2007, the inaugural year. Prior to this, Maxine was General Manager, Dendy Cinemas, Brisbane; a cinema company specialising in independent, foreign language, and art cinema. She has over ten years experience in cinema exhibition and distribution, is a member of the Network for the Promotion of Asian Cinema (NETPAC), the Asia Producers Network (APN), and has a degree in film and television production. Maxine has presided on international juries for the Berlinale Generation program, Goterburg and Eurasia film festivals.


CURATOR Herman Van Eyken CONTRIBUTORS Maxine Williamson

NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA CATALOGINGIN-PUBLICATION ENTRY

C I N E M A I N D I A N O F M O T H E R

I N D I A

1 0 0

The Griffith Film School acknowledges and thanks all contributors for their active participation and contribution to this Showcase. We greatly appreciate the generosity of the filmmakers in sharing these films with our students and staff.

Y E A R S

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Authors: Herman Van Eyken, Aruna Vasudev

Anne Demy-Geroe

Title: Showcase Cinema: 100 Years of Indian Cinema

Aruna Vasedev

ISBN: 9781922216021

Sheree Kumar Ravi Gupta Meenakshi Shedde Jeannette Hereniko Dan Hamid Donna Hamilton

Donna Hamilton d.hamilton@griffith.edu.au

S H O W C A S E

CONTACT

C I N E M A

Margaret McVeigh


Asian Studies in Video


Asian Studies in Video Asian Studies in Video is an online streaming video collection of nearly 600 narrative feature films, documentaries, and shorts. With Asian voices addressing Asian issues, and through works selected by Asian film experts, the collection offers highly relevant perspectives and insights. Its themes—such as modernity, globalization, national identity, female agency, inequalities in opportunity amid social and political unrest, and cultural and sexual identity—are central to any meaningful discussion of Asian culture. More than 75 percent of the films stream exclusively in Asian Studies in Video, and more than 60 percent are award winners. Twenty-four countries across the region are represented, with a strong concentration on China, India, Iran, South Korea, and Southeast Asia. The collection features internationally acclaimed directors such as: • Xie Fei, an award winner from China (A Girl from Hunan; Black Snow; Woman from the Lake of Scented Souls; A Mongolian Tale; Song of Tibet). • Iranian new-wave director Dariush Mehrjui (The Cycle; Pari; The Lodgers; Mum’s Guest). • Leading Indonesian director Garin Nugroho (And the Moon Dances; A Poet; Bird Man Tale). • South Korean feminist documentarian Kim Soyoung (Koryu: Southern Woman; New Woman: Her First Song; I’ll Be Seeing Her: Images of Women in Korean Cinema).

Also included are works that have rarely been seen outside their native countries, from filmmakers including Adoor Gopalakrishnan (India), Kim Dong Won (South Korea), and James Lee (Malaysia). Coverage of West Asia (Middle East) includes filmmakers from Iran (Majid Majidi, The Color of Paradise and Baran), Lebanon (Jocelyn Saab, Kiss Me Not on the Eyes), and Iraq (Shawkat Amin Korki, Crossing the Dust), who offer personal perspectives and alternative analyses of events in their homelands. Asian Studies in Video also includes more than 30 films highlighting Persia’s rich history and the diverse societies that define the country, each paired with a contextual video introduction from a leading film scholar or expert. In addition to providing a general introduction to Asia and the Pacific, the collection is particularly valuable for scholarship in Asian studies, Middle Eastern studies, political science, postcolonial theory and criticism, anthropology, and linguistics. The works also explore a wide variety of cinematic styles and techniques relevant to the study of film, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Other highlights of the collection include: • Five internationally acclaimed films by Bangladeshi director Tanvir Mokammel. • A strong selection of Sri Lankan films directed by Prassana Vithanage, Asoka Handagama, and Dharmasna Pathiraja, of particular relevance to South Asian scholars. • Fourteen of the significant films made by “sixth generation” filmmakers, as discussed by Dr. Sun Shaoyi and Li Xun in their book Lights! Camera! Kai Shi!: In-depth Interviews with China’s New Generation of Movie Directors. • The Water Cries, a 16-part series produced by CCTV in China, which examines the largely untold story of water rights in China’s past, present, and future. All the films are indexed by filmmaker, country, language, genre, theme, and original language. Subtitles and synopses further expand accessibility. Additional functionality will be available in mid-2013, when films will become available in streaming format through the Alexander Street Video unified cross-search platform.

Asian Studies in Video is available worldwide through annual subscription, with prices scaled to library budget and size.

800.889.5937 • +1.703.212.8520 • sales@alexanderstreet.com • http://alexanderstreet.com copyright © 2012 Alexander Street Press, LLC 110612


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RRP $10.95

ISBN 978-1-922216-02-1


Griffith Film School Showcase Cinema