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Module 3 Perfect Fragility Paulina Pytka, Karolina B채ckman & Scott Rowe


Personal Space Analysis


Head Feeling of degradation associated with being patted

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Personal space

Torso Front considered more important than back since people are more comfortable with crowding behind them

Right hand vs. left hand The hand whose use is often neglected may be more vulnerable due to less developed skills


Head Focus on protecting the brain

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Feet In consideration of the Achilles heel as well as the discomfort of having one’s heels treaded on

Personal space

Torso Focus on protecting the heart which is equally vulnerable from both sides of the body


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Personal space

Head Connected to body to protect the neck and create a sense of enclosure as well a visual effect of consistency

Torso Extension from back is adequate in securing heel space


Idea Development


Maurice Velasquez’s Posadas Geomorfos Builds on assumption that personal space is fragile and easily intruded upon.

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Perfect fragility

Each design uses different shapes to mimic different motions. The points tend to be associated with stasis while the waves create a sense of fluidity. His use of origami techniques takes a very delicate material and makes it quite rigid without losing its integrity. This inspired a design that is so neat and perfect that is appears fragile. Hence, it would echo human vulnerability and caution any potential threats to personal space with a fear that they may damage something beautiful.


Thomas Heatherwick’s Seed Castle

• Multiple small members increase the sense of fragility. • Pipes can be used to create a threedimensional surface that extrudes form the body.  

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• A simple and solid shape multiplied several times can create an illusion of fragility and transparency.

Perfect fragility

The precedent study of Thomas Weatherwick’s ‘Seed Castle’ as well as inspiration from one of the exhibitors of Pratt Institute School of Art’s ‘Pratt+Paper & Ralph Pucci’ exhibition gave us knowledge of fragile effects created by materiality:


Experimentation with colour effects through gradual dispersion of red pipes among white ones. This was to appear before the heart as to show the connection between the most vulnerable part of the human and that of the design.

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Perfect fragility

Head piece prototype made from rolled paper pipes. The clean white colour built on the “wedding dress� effect.

Head piece prototype made from plastic straws. This material allowed for experimentation with opaqueness/ transparency in relation to fragility.


Panel Development


Panel refinement

The concept of having elements protruding away from the body seemed to be an effective way of securing personal space however, the panel pipes were believed to be overly simplistic and so it was necessary to introduce some creativity to the panel design.

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Panel forms

A highly geometric, three dimensional, triangular based, tapered prism employing folding methods with a pyramid point.

More precise geometry allows the points to come together in a neater fashion yet tabs still seem to be necessary. Improved stability at base as all sides are identical in geometry.

3D paper prototype

2D net


A three dimensional, triangular based, tapered prism with a pyramid point.

Panel forms

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2D net

Difficulty in meeting points precisely at the top. Tabs may allow for cleaner connections. Tapering the sides while maintaining a flat bottom on the net results in an unstable, uneven base. 3D paper prototype


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Panel forms

A highly geometric, three dimensional, hexagonal based, tapered prism employing folding methods with a pyramid point.

Point is accurately formed as tabs allow for the gluing and subsequent precision in aligning triangular ends. Improved stability at base as all sides are identical in geometry.

3D paper prototype

2D net


A three dimensional prism with a flat triangular base and top.

Panel forms

The effect of removing a pointed end is reduced fragility and a loss of emphasis of the qualities of the material being used.

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2D net

3D paper prototype


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Panel forms

Triangular based panels


Hexagonal and pentagonal based panels

Panel forms

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Panel Refinement


Delphine Jaulhac’s Tagua nuts sculpture

Panel refinement

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Using this example as inspiration, it was noted how cut outs or holes in panels further accentuated the fragility of a design by reducing its weight through the introduction of an air component to something previously more solid.


02

Panel refinement

The irregular triangular pattern creates an effect of shattering glass in consistence with the idea of fragility. Furthermore, it echoes a crystalline quality in the panel form.

3D paper prototype


Sides look flimsy and adopt a curving form.

Panel refinement

Elevation

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The horizontal slits reduce rigidity in the structure. Grouping multiples of such panels could mean that these become less visible.

3D paper prototype


Panel refinement

04

Creating unrolled models in Rhino from a scanned, unrolled physical prototype.


Fablab Submission Two different materials have been selected for testing; Optics card black 200 GSM and Ivory Card 290 GSM. Dotted cutting lines have been chosen instead of etched lines so that the prototype can bend in two directions.

Etched cut Elevation Section

Section

An economical approach to material use has been attempted on the second sheet whereby linking the different designs enables the use of one cut for two, separate curves.

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The purpose of the fourth design on the second sheet is to test the outcome of etching all of the valley and mountain fold lines.

Panel refinement

Dotted cut Elevation


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Panel refinement

The triangular shapes in this design brought about a sense of stability that did not necessarily respond to the need for a delicate effect.

The frilled cut outs were very effective in communicating beauty as well as fragility.

The point established by joining the taller ends creates a cleaner sense of order when the panels are examined collectively.


Red spray gradient trial on panel

Panel refinement

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An emotive effect was produced, however although this increases the sense of vulnerability of the individual who is wearing the second skin composed of such panels, it suggests that they have already been soiled and thus, reduces the sense of perfection that is intended to evoke fear of disturbance in the potential threat to personal space.


Mounting Piece


Mounting piece development

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Separate head piece

Longer elements at the back than the front Symmetric across the vertical axis, however the top section is larger than the bottom one as it must allow for the comfortable movement of the hands and avoid interference with day to day activities


Plan

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Axonometric

A series of panels wraps around the body to create a sense of enclosure. They sit flat against the back but extend away from the front and center around the heart and eyes in order to accentuate the human qualities of the individual that allow them to breathe and perceive.

Mounting piece development

Elevation


Mounting piece development

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Incorporating the headpiece into the body piece was believed to improve the sense of continuity and little disturbance in the effect of “perfection� in this design.


It was believed that a more solid body piece would better showcase the panel designs and their arrangement.

Mounting piece development

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The form to which the panels were to be secured had to effectively mold to the model’s body but also avoid restricting their movement. It was concluded that curves had to be introduced as well as cropping along the torso.


Panel arrangement

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The triangular base of the panels consisted of 6 individually folded sides, allowing each to be bent and secured within a frame. Similarly, the base has allowed for star-like, geometric arrangements of the panels


Using the rhino software, the complex, star shaped arrangement could not be replicated using paneling tools. Only a regular, repetitive, linear pattern could be achieved.

Panel arrangement

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Mounting piece with panel arrangement

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The final digital model required that each panel was individually rotated and positioned on the mounting piece using the gumball control.


Mounting piece with panel arrangement

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Mounting piece refinement

The flexibility of chicken wire demonstrated by these sculptures was also promising in creating a freeform mounting piece for the body however, the toughness associated with metal diminished the delicacy and subtlety toward which this design strived.

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/chicken-wire-sculptures.html


http://bedaonline.com/weight-stigma-awareness-week-call-for-art/#.UlUu7xYWZhA

Mounting piece refinement

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Taped body molds offered the most potential for adopting the organic form of the models body as well as a rigid base for the mounting of panels. Furthermore, the plastic was transparent and would have a minimal visual impact on the design outcome alternatively, the material could be painted.


Fabrication


01

Fabrication

Step 1. Calculate, draw, trace and cut out layout pattern of panels to use as a stencil


Fabrication

Step 2. Wrap model in gladwrap then layer in packing tape to form tape sculptured base template

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Fabrication

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Step 3. Send digital file of panels to FabLab to be cut from white card paper by the laser cutter. Collect panel cut outs and detach them from their sheets. Fold along etched lines and glue end tab to finish


Step 4. Use stencil to mark out layout pattern on tape sculptured base. Cut holes where panels are to be inserted. Insert panels and fold the bottom of each panel on the inside of the tape sculpture for stability.

Fabrication

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Fabrication

Step 5. Spray paint the design white to unify the panels with the underlying mounting piece and enhance the sense of perfection.


Final presentation

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Front view


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Back View

Final presentation


Final presentation

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Side view


Limitations The first problem we encountered was concerned spray painting the prototype. Our decisions to do so was influenced by a number of factors. The most prominent was that the laser cutter burnt the edges of our panels, which made our panels look rustic and dirty, not very delicate.

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Reflection

To resolve this we considered using black panels. However, their colour brought a new challenge to the concept of fragility and it was concluded that white was most effective, being associated with purity. Another surprise that affected our decision was that the tape sculpture did not turn out as transparent as we would have liked. Similarly, cutting and marking the mounting piece meant that a coat of paint could disguise these. Another significant problem we encountered was that the tape sculpture would not close back up once all the panels were applied. This, along with a limited amount of panels, lead us to a more minimalistic design.


Reflection on design influences

The major precedent that influenced our design was Mauricio Velasquez Pasadas’ ‘Origami Geomorfos’ which uses the body as a metaphor of the geographical creating intimidating yet fragile effects by different kinds of folding techniques and tessellations. As his design centres around the human body we found it to be extremely applicable to our design. It inspired us to explore origami and test different styles of paper panels, some with holes, curves, points etc. We found, after extensive testing, is that curved paper panels with holes in them give the affect of fragility, illustrated in Pasadas’ dresses. The curves were nonthreatening, whilst holes gave the delicate, unstable design that we had intended for.

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What we took away from this precedent is that if we incorporated a substantial amount of differentiating paper panels closely spaced from one another an effect of lightness and fragility could be achieved.

Reflection

Another precedent which influenced our design was Thomas Heatherwick’s ‘Seed Castle’. This precedent illustrates the ability to create illusion through materiality and form, in terms of ‘Seed Castle’ the illusion is that the solid, unyielding building appears to be light and ‘fluffy’ thanks to the use of thousands of long, thin glass rods.


Final Outcome We believe that our prototype reflects the intended design criteria to create a second skin that defined personal space through fragility. Our prototype radiates fragility through a sense of purity, lightness, illusion and multiplicity.

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Reflection

The white paper repeated panels promote fragility through its curved long thin edges. Panels of differencing height have been strategically placed according to our group’s agreed upon definition of personal space.


Assembly drawings

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13 Assembly drawings


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