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Warwickshire

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Educating the changemakers of the future ECO-FRIENDLY FLOORING CYCLING IN WARWICKSHIRE THE BEST FACE OILS APRIL 2021 | ISSUE 51

PI C I’M K M FR E U EE P

TURN TO PAGE 26 FOR MORE DETAILS

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HOMES • GARDENS • EDUCATION • HEALTH & BEAUTY • PUZZLES • SENIOR LIVING


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Warwickshire

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Now

Contents

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16

APRIL 2021

HERE & NOW 04 All the latest news from around Warwickshire.

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HOME & GARDEN 08 Eco-friendly flooring

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HEALTH & WELL_BEING 16 Our guide to the best face oils 17 Cycling in Warwickshire

OUT & ABOUT 28 Exclusive discount for reopening of Karma Salford Hall

WA R W I C K S H I R E

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EDITOR

CONTRIBUTORS

Dawn Pardoe PW Media & Publishing Ltd dawn@pw-media.co.uk

Bowel Cancer UK Care UK Cycling UK Daisy Bennett Jonathan Small King’s High School RHS Warwick Prepatory School

ADVERTISING Kate Gilmartin 01905 727904 kate@pw-media.co.uk Lis Gardner 01905 727901 lis@pw-media.co.uk

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED: Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without permission. Colour transparencies, prints or any pictoral media for this publication are sent at owner’s risk and whilst every care is taken, neither PW Media & Publishing Ltd or its agents accept liability for loss or damage. No editorial submissions will be returned unless accompanied by a Self Addressed Envelope. DISCLAIMER: Whilst every effort has been made to ensure that adverts and articles appear correctly, PW Media & Publishing Ltd cannot accept responsibility for any loss or damage caused directly or indirectly by the contents of this publication. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of its publisher or editor. Please note that if you enter a competition in the Warwickshire Now magazine your name and address may be forwarded to the host of said competition.

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THE LATEST NEWS FROM YOUR AREA

Deichmann springs into Touchwood Lend Lease Retail Partnership (LLRP), a fund managed by Lendlease, has announced the signing of Europe’s largest footwear retailer, Deichmann, at Touchwood Solihull, following the German brand declaring expansion plans to support British high streets amid the ongoing pandemic. The brand has traded for over a century, starting as a cobblers’ shop in Essen-Borbeck, west Germany, in 1913. Since then, it has established a presence in 30 countries with over 4,000 stores, and has to date sold more than 180 million shoes from internationally recognised brands such as adidas, Nike, Skechers, and Hush Puppies. Located opposite EE and Schuh on the Crescent Arcade, Deichmann will be launching the new 15,200 sq ft Touchwood store in late Spring, working towards the government’s roadmap announcement for non-essential re-openings. The unit will stock a complete array of footwear, from smart to casual, and covering men’s, women’s, and children’s lines. Guy Thomas, Head of Retail at Lendlease, said: “Signing Deichmann is hopefully the first of more positive news as we move through 2021; securing them in this market is testament to what Touchwood has to offer. It has been a challenging 12 months, but deals have continued within the centre apace as we look to ensure Touchwood maintains its appeal when retail starts to re-open, and customers return in due course.” Andy Underwood, Director for Deichmann, said: “We’re delighted to have exchanged on Touchwood. Solihull is a great location, and we look forward to welcoming customers into our new store later this year. Our fantastic value-for-money footwear and accessories offer something for all the family. We’re happy we can do our part to support British high streets and shopping centres in the current climate.” CBRE and BNP Paribas acted for Touchwood, and Barker Proudlove represented Deichmann. n

Proposed cycle trail for Newbold Comyn There has been a recent planning application submitted by Warwick District Council for the proposed creation of some bespoke mountain bike and cycling trails in Newbold Comyn, match-funded by British Cycling. Trails designed will provide a range of opportunities for more people of all ages and abilities and from different backgrounds to ride together; to provide a safe, traffic-free, learnn 4 | Warwickshire Now | Issue 51 | April 2021

to-ride environment. It will provide an area for people to develop cycling skills, to try out mountain biking enabling progression from grass roots/ beginner level to potentially taking part in competitions. For more information and to read the plans in detail, visit planningdocuments.warwickdc.gov. uk/online-applications/ Ref: W/21/0256. n


ACROSS 10. Game Plan 11. Burgundy 12. Gekko 13. Snowball 14. Navigate 15. Essay 18. Dwarf 22. Defoe 23. Kidderminster 28. Stone Age 29. Geranium 35. Scotch Terrier 38. Flute 39. Dozen 41. Edgar 45. Twilight 46. Heritage 47. Hobby 48. Inca Dove 49. Musingly 50. Range

CRISS-CROSS: DOWN 1. Barn Owl 2. Network 3. Clean 4. Angle 5. Pikes 6. Ebony 7. Drive 8. Juggler 9. Edition 16. Surf 17. Apiary 19. Fireplace 20. Adagietto 21. Asymmetry 22. Decorated 24. Usage 25. Dough 26. Visit 27. Lemma 30. Method 33. Beta 34. Glowing 35. Stellar 36. Routine 37. Seagull 40. Igloo 41. Ether 42. Gabon 43. Rhyme 44. Grass

You’ve found the answers, now turn to page 30 to find the puzzles!

ANSWERS

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THE LATEST NEWS FROM YOUR AREA Carluccio’s tackle food waste Italian restaurant and deli chain, Carluccio’s, has partnered with surplus food app, Too Good To Go, in a bid to combat food waste. Conscious consumers in Leamington Spa will be able to rescue surplus sweet treats from their local Carluccio’s Deli. Leading the food waste movement, Too Good To Go lets people buy surplus food and drink from restaurants, grocery stores, pubs and producers to stop it from going to waste. Consumers in Leamington Spa can simply download the free Too Good To Go app and search for their nearby Carluccio’s with unsold produce. They then purchase a ‘Magic Bag’, collect it at an allotted time and enjoy it. The Carluccio’s large Magic Bags contain a variety of surplus luxury Italian treats, including Panettone and festive biscuits such as Amaretti, worth at least £29 (if purchased at full price) available to rescue on the app for £9.50. The small Magic Bags contain a variety of surplus luxury Italian treats worth at least £14 for £4.50. A spokesperson from Carluccio’s said: “We are so delighted to be partnering with Too Good To Go to minimise our food waste in

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Carluccio’s. Reducing what we waste is a longstanding ambition for us and, after the year our industry has had, it’s never felt more important to put our money where our mouth is. We know that working with Too Good To Go, who have helped so many brands reduce their impact in this way, is the perfect next step for us on this journey. We are really excited to launch the surplus programme as we reopen our restaurants and delis across the UK.” Paschalis Loucaides, UK Managing Director at Too Good To Go, said: “It’s great to be fighting food waste alongside Carluccio’s. The partnership is helping to ensure that delicious Italian sweet treats do not go to waste and the Magic Bags are already proving popular with our app users. If you’re looking for creative ways to enjoy Panettone year-round, check out our blog for some mouth-watering inspiration.” As well as in Leamington Spa Too Good To Go Magic Bags are available to purchase Carluccio’s Deli in Solihull and Stratford Upon Avon. To purchase a Magic Bag, download the Too Good To Go App, available via the Apple Store and Google Play. For more information on Too Good To Go visit www.toogoodtogo.co.uk. n


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HOME & GARDEN Granorte, Element traditional cork floor www.granorte.co.uk

Eco-friendly flooring This month we take a look at how to make a dramatic and eco-friendly statement when it comes to choosing the right floor for your home. Creating a timeless asthetic to your home starts from the bottom and works its way up. Choosing the perfect flooring to balance out your interior design ideas can be daunting. With so many options available out there, we take a look at some of the most durable and eco-friendly ways you can change your flooring, to get your ideal home. CORK: Predominantly made in Mediterranean countries, cork is 100% natural and renewable, and biodegradable. It is harvested from the bark of the tree, so the tree can keep on living. A perfect sound and thermal insulator that doesn’t cause allergies. Granorte has a brilliant back-story as this Portuguese company uses cork that would normally be discarded during wine bottling. Each cork tree has a life span of about 300 years and when they’re over 25 years they can be used to harvest cork (this is normally undertaken every 9 years). The cork bark is regenerative making it a renewable, environmentally friendly resource. Using this material, Granorte have created a range of cork floor options, from natural cork tiles through to printed cork planks that replicate the look of timber. An example of their work is shown in the pictire above STONE: The enviromental impact of mining stone and marble can ring alarm bells when coming to decide what’s best for your home. Locally sourced stone, may be a good choice for when you are choosing a small part of your home to decorate, however dragging stone from one part of the world to another will dramatically increase your carbon footprint. One option is to choose a man-made material which is made to CONTINUED OVER THE PAGE

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HOME & GARDEN look like stone. Neolith is Sintered Stone - an all-natural, man-made material which is made to look like genuine stone such as marble, granite and even wood and metal, but which is much more durable, scratch/stain/waterproof, ultra-hygienic and produced in a carbon neutral environment. CONCRETE: Concrete is one of the most environmentally friendly building materials available today. Concrete is a mixture of cement, water,air, sand, and gravel; all readily available natural resources that can even improve air quality and cut down on heating bills. Extremely durable, easy to source and easy recyclable, it’s even scratch resistant. GLASS: Glass tiles are often made from recycled materials and require less energy than ceramic made tiles. Even toward the end of their life, when you want to change your flooring, they are easily turned into a new feature within your home, to help reduce landfill. Not only are glass tiles easy to clean, but they are impervious to water with absorbency rate of 0%, perfect for the bathroom or kitchen. Glass also comes in a variety of different translucent colours, to make your home feel brighter and larger. WOOL: Wool is a durable material with many benefits. Not only is it a natural insulator, it is renewable and flame retardant. The sustainable fibre is also highly resilient and recovers quickly from furniture compression.

Neolith Iron Frost www.neolith.com

Sisal & Seagrass, Coir Boucle www.sisalandseagrass.co.uk

Sisal & Seagrass, specialise in using only natural material floors in their collection, from sisal, coir, jute, pure wool and seagrass. All are sustainable and natural products that can be used within the home. CONTINUED OVER THE PAGE

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HOME & GARDEN

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HOME & GARDEN They recently introduced a bespoke Rug Creator tool so that home owners and interior designers can create a rug that fits in with their home or project. Their Pure Wool collection is created from 100% British wool yarn and patterns are created using various breeds meaning there are no harmful dying processes. RECLAIMED WOOD: One of the most eco friendly and budget ways to re-do your flooring is to use reclaimed wood. Using reclaimed wood reduces land fill and reduces the demand for newly sourced materials. Plus, it gives your home a unique aged look, that new timber just can not provide. There are many companies that specialise in reclaimed timber, but you can also find what you need on local marketplaces and eBay. A unique twist on reclaimed wood is the new wood flooring design from Havwoods. Havwoods bring a fresh take to wood flooring design, with their Foresso®️ collection. Their design has been made in Britain utilising a minimum of 65% waste material, making it an innovative and eco-friendly surface solution for interior design and construction. The new innovative concept is a timber terrazzo that has been beautifully crafted with sustainably sourced timber - forming a one of a kind materials.

Havwoods Foresso® - The Timber Terrazzo from: £294.95 per m2 www.havwoods.com

BAMBOO: Strand woven bamboo is a sure fire way to make your home look beautiful and it’s pretty high in the environmentally frienly stakes. Bamboo has a similarity to hardwood in its strength, durability and resistence to water. Native to China and Japan, the root is left in tact when harvesting so the plant can easily reharvest. Bamboo flooring is hygienic, easy to clean and great for allergy sufferers, and is more cost effective than hardwood. n By Daisy Bennett

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HOME & GARDEN

New RHS awards celebrate blossoming community spirit The Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) will celebrate community gardening across the UK through the RHS Community Awards this year. The new virtual awards replace the RHS Britain in Boom UK Finals competition for 2021 – for the first time in the campaign’s 57-year history - and will see Britain in Bloom groups recognised for their efforts to transform their local areas. Last year nine in every ten groups* carried on gardening, maintaining our all-important green spaces and harnessing their skills to help others, from growing food to lifting people’s spirits via imaginative planting displays. Walthamstow Village, London, shared virtual tours of their area, Penrith volunteers grew crops for food parcels and in Mablethorpe, Lincolnshire, plants and gardening tools were delivered to care home residents. A total of 63 groups will participate across five categories having been nominated by one of the 16 Britain in Bloom UK regions and nations.Entrants range from Truro, Britain in Bloom winner in 2018, to groups such as Gosfield, Essex, that are first-timers on the national stage. Groups will submit evidence digitally in up to three award categories to a panel of Bloom and RHS horticultural, wildlife and environmental experts. The categories are: • • • • •

Nourishing Your Community - Growing, sharing or enjoying food with others Nature-friendly Gardening - Creating habitats and using wildlife-friendly gardening practices Green Solutions – Tackling environmental challenges such as climate change, air pollution and flooding Cultivating Your Community – Bringing people together by involving a wide cross-section of the community Planting with Purpose - Addressing specific challenges such as transforming a neglected area or reducing antisocial behaviour

The results of the RHS Community Awards, including the most outstanding entries in each category, will be announced at the end of September with all participants receiving certificates. For more information about RHS Britain in Bloom and to search for community gardening groups in your area please visit www.rhs.org.uk/ communities/find-a-group-search-form n

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HOME & GARDEN

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HEALTH & WELL BEING

Skin deep Prepare the skin for the summer months, and take a look at our selection of nourishing, natural, face oils that will give your skin a replenished boost. FACIAL OIL REJUVENATING FRANKINCENSE & BERGAMOT from £18 A beautiful rejuvenating facial oil by Valley Mist. Blended with 6 plant oils this light and gentle oil is a luxuriant treat to your evening beauty routine. www.peacewiththewild.co.uk

ENRICH FACE SERUM £30 Enrich Face Serum is designed to replenish and rejuvenate normal and combination skin. It is made with a number of skin boosting active ingredients and has an indulgent scent. www.conscious-skincare.com

BIO-RETINOL + C SKIN BOOSTER £30

ANGELA LANGFORD BLOOM & GLOW FACE OIL £20.50

This Bio-Retinol + C Booster is an oil-based booster for your skin, designed to improve the appearance of dull and tired skin, and provide the nourishment your skin needs to look radiant. www.evolvebeauty.co.uk

Chia seed & sea buckthorn are blended together to deliver high levels of essential fatty acids, vitamins & antioxidants - it improves skin’s elasticity, calms inflammation & restores radiance. www.angelalangford.com

PIXI ROSE OIL BLEND £26 A luxe, ultra-nourishing oil that rejuvenates, restores and renews skin’s luminosity. www.pixibeauty.co.uk

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VITA MIN FIX 24-HOUR CREAM 50ML £21 A 24-hour anti-ageing moisturiser to boost skin hydration and reduce wrinkles www.greenpeople.co.uk


HEALTH&& WELL HEALTH WELL BEING BEING Orbea Courtesy of Warwickshire eBikes

Cycling in Warwickshire Looking for information about cycling in Warwickshire? Cycling UK’s guide to cycling in Warwickshire gives you routes, events, and advice to inspire you to cycle in the county. The best approach to Shakespeare is by bike – almost literally, thanks to the Stratford Greenway, part of NCN5. The family-friendly railpath runs 5 wellsurfaced miles northeast up to Stratford-on-Avon from the north Cotswolds. It brings you right into Bard country, past the famous Royal Shakespeare Theatre and across the River Avon. NCN5 continues northwest out of the town along a canal towpath, and it forms part of the 163-mile West Midlands Cycle Route that runs from Oxford to Derby and gives you a glimpse of all the best of Warwickshire’s countryside – a good option for the seasoned tourer. Warwickshire is no great place for mountain biking, but some level off-road that needs a mountain bike can be had on the canal towpaths of the Grand Union and the Stratford Canal between Solihull, Stratford and Warwick; the surfaces vary, but at least the standard of pubs is generally better. Grand Leamington Spa is a good place to visit by bike, and the Offchurch Greenway east of the town gives some fine views across South Warwickshire on the brief mile or two railtrail. Part of the Lias Line (NCN41), it takes you past Draycote Water Park near Rugby – a good family destination with its roundreservoir bike paths. Kingsbury Water Park is another child-friendly place, with bike hire and miles of surfaced paths around the lakes.

If rain’s in the air, pack a rainproof top. If it might turn chilly, take a fleece or warm top. But the thing you’re most likely to forget is the sunblock. It’s remarkable how often you enjoy being out on the bike so much that you suddenly realise it’s getting dark. So take lights (which are legally required at night). They’re price of a sandwich, take no space, are easy to put on thanks to tool-free plastic clips, and the batteries last for ever. Take a puncture repair kit (with tyre levers) and pump. Make sure it fits your valves, which will be either ‘Presta’ or ‘Schraeder’ – realising they don’t match is a very common roadside discovery! Carrying a spare inner tube (make sure it matches your tyre size) makes puncture repair much easier: mend the old one back at home. If you do get in trouble, some kindly passing cyclist will probably stop to help. Using a helmet is a personal choice – they’re not legally required. Cycling makes you thirsty, so take lots of water. Long-distance riders talk about ‘the bonk’ – a sudden loss of energy rendering you almost stationary. It’s miraculously and instantly cured by eating something sweet. On short rides you’re unlikely to run out of energy, but just in case, take a snack like flapjack, banana, chocolate or jelly babies. Taking a packed lunch or picnic will save you money, though that hot drink and cake in a cosy cafe could yet prove very tempting!

The four miles of car-free Kenilworth Greenway (NCN 523) links to the University of Warwick. Warwick itself, with its grand castle, is a decent cycle destination, and the independent tourer can enjoy passing through fine Warwickshire villages such as Armacote, Luddlington or Welford-on-Avon.

Your phone GPS could be invaluable for showing where you are when lost; you can download free detailed UK maps and GPS software before your trip. Paper maps are still useful, though, so take one: no power source or wifi signal required, and they’re great for suggesting possibilities or changes of plan.

What to take with you on your ride The only thing you really need for cycling is a bike. And maybe a phone, and credit card: in Britain you’re only a call away from any service you might need.

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But unless money is no object, it’s wise to take a few things with you on a day ride. A saddlebag, panniers or bikepacking bags are best for carrying stuff. A front basket is second best. A rucksack is third best. Your sweaty back will soon tell you why. Cycling short distances in jeans and t-shirt is fine, but on a long or strenuous ride – over ten miles say, or in hills – those jeans will rub and the t-shirt will get damp and clingy. Shorts or, yes, lycra leggings and padded shorts will be much comfier, and merino or polyester cycling tops wick away the sweat, keeping you dry and comfy. (They don’t have to be lurid colours.)

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HEALTH & WELL-BEING

National Bowel Cancer Awareness Month As part of Bowel Cancer Awareness Month, Bowel Cancer Uk are asking people to take part in their Step Up to 30 fundraiser. It’s really simple, just get active every day and ask people to sponsor you. Here, we take a look at the facts surrounding the disease which affects more than 2,500 new cases every year. Bowel cancer is also called colorectal cancer. It affects the large bowel, which is made up of the colon and rectum. The cells in your body normally divide and grow in a controlled way. When cancer develops, the cells change and can grow in an uncontrolled way. Most bowel cancers develop from pre-cancerous growths, called polyps. But not all polyps develop into cancer. If your doctor finds any polyps, he or she can remove them to prevent them becoming cancerous. Cancer cells may stay in the bowel or they might spread to other parts of the body, like the liver or lungs. Facts and figures about bowel cancer These statistics can only give you a general idea of how bowel cancer affects the UK population. They cannot tell you what will happen to you, as this depends on lots of things, like what treatment you have. Your GP or healthcare team can tell you more about your individual situation and how these statistics may affect you. How common is bowel cancer? Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK and the

diagnosed in people aged 70 or over. But bowel cancer can affect anyone of any age. More than 2,500 new cases are diagnosed each year in people under the age of 50. 1 in 15 men and 1 in 18 women will be diagnosed with bowel cancer during their lifetime. How many people survive bowel cancer? Bowel cancer is treatable and curable especially if diagnosed early. Nearly everyone survives bowel cancer if diagnosed at the earliest stage. However this drops significantly as the disease develops. Early diagnosis really does save lives More than 16,000 people die from bowel cancer in the UK every year. It is the second biggest cancer killer in the UK. But the number of people dying of bowel cancer has been falling since the 1970s. This may be due to earlier diagnosis and better treatment. Bowel Cancer Screening In England, Wales and Northern Ireland people over the age of 60 are invited to take part in bowel cancer screening. From April 2021, the NHS in England will start rolling out bowel screening to people over the age of 50. In Scotland, screening starts from age 50. You’ll be invited to take part in screening every two years until you reach the age of 75.

diagnosed with bowel cancer.

Each of the screening programmes in the UK use home tests, which look for hidden blood in poo. If you’re registered with a GP and within the eligible screening age range, a test will be automatically posted to you, so you can complete it in the privacy of your own home. n

More than nine out of ten new cases (94%) are diagnosed in

www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk

second biggest cancer killer. Over 42,000 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer every year in the UK. Around 268,000 people living in the UK today have been

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HEALTH & HEALTH BEAUTY & WELL-BEING

The Cost of...Diabetic Foot Ulceration (DFU)

For those of you who have followed this series of articles, you may recall a frustrating & upsetting incident some years ago where someone in Warwickshire had died from an ingrowing toenail. This could have been avoided had they received appropriate care, which unfortunately they had not! The patient had diabetes which can influence the feet in so many ways. It can affect skin, nails, soft tissues, bone, sensation, circulation, and the ability to fight infection. As I explain to my patients, basically anything can go wrong with their feet as a result of their diabetes. The vica versa also applies in that foot problems can impact on diabetes itself, especially if foot ulcers develop as they all too often can. So lets look at the costs associated with such ulceration:

Physical There are 3 main types of DFU – ischaemic, neuropathic, and neuroischaemic, the first one of which can be extremely painful rendering any activity nearly impossible. Even putting footwear on or lying in bed can cause intense pain. The other 2 types aren’t generally painful as the foot has lost sensory feedback. However to assist with healing of these, the ulcers need to be offloaded with padding or insoles or footwear modifications or cast boots (fixed or removeable). These can make normal weightbearing activities difficult, even if the treatment is just restrictive on the type of footwear patients are able to wear. Then there is the possible outcome of amputation because of complications with the ulcer which could threaten the viability of the foot / leg / life itself. If that is the case, then wheelchair use for the rest of life may be the long-term outcome. Emotional DFU can be distressing. The journey to resolution can seem to be haphazard, with the constant risk of deterioration, and that

can challenge even the most resilient of people. If the patient is apparently accepting of the journey, then that can be due to a lack of understanding of the possible consequences or just a blasé attitude to their foot problem. In which case, it is often the patient’s partner / carer who is emotionally invested in the foot ulcer and this can cause anxiety, frustration, even anger within the relationship with the patient. Financial DFU can lead to multiple episodes of time off work, or necessitate a change in the type of employment that is possible, which can then reduce income for the patient and their family. Whilst good NHS care is freely available for treatment of DFU, the financial cost of recurrent hospital appointments, parking costs, and non-earning time spent waiting at those appointments can soon mount up. High quality, effective private care is available from a limited number of Podiatrists (Foot Specialists) who have the skills, experience, & equipment (such as low level & high intensity laser therapy) to help resolve DFU. The private option does bring benefits to patients in terms of choice, flexibility, and continuity of care by the same practitioner, but it is important that good links with other members of the multi-disciplinary team are in place for patients to access timely and appropriate care in the event of complications developing such as spreading infection. As each case really is unique, then it is difficult to provide good guidance on private costs, but potentially allow £200 to £1000+ to resolve DFU, and additional costs to maintain that resolution. n Jonathan Small Lead Podiatrist (and former NHS Diabetic Foot Specialist) Health First Foot & Gait Clinic www.healthfirstsoutham.co.uk @healthfirstsoutham

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SENIOR LIVING

Looking for a quality care home you can trust? At Care UK’s care homes in Warwickshire, compassionate and expert teams deliver quality care you can trust, in a safe, warm and welcoming environment. Priors House in Leamington Spa and Ambleside in Stratfordupon-Avon provide long and short term residential, dementia and nursing care, giving families the reassurance that their loved ones can stay living at the home should their needs change. Care UK leads the way in safety, with enhanced infection control measures and purpose-built visiting suites. They are championing the Covid-19 vaccination programme to protect those living, visiting and working in their care homes. Living at Ambleside and Priors House is all about quality of life. The lifestyle team are passionate about enabling residents to

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enjoy a fulfilling lifestyle and there’s plenty going on each day with a huge variety of group and one-to-one activities. If your loved one enjoys a quiet cuppa in bed with Woman’s Hour, wishes to attend their video church service, or loves a beer every evening, the team will make it happen. Experts in award winning care, Care UK is one of the UK’s most successful care home operators, with over 35 years’ experience of delivering high quality care to older people and more outstanding rated homes than any other provider.* Priors House, Leamington Spa, CV32 6RW, 01926 677586. Ambleside, Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 9TG, 01789 863750. www.careuk.com/care-homes/warwickshire *As rated by the Care Quality Commission in England and the Care Inspectorate in Scotland. n


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SENIOR LIVING

Damaging impact of homes in poor conditions A new investigation commissioned by the Centre for Ageing Better as part of the Good Home Inquiry has revealed the damaging impact of homes in poor condition on people in their 50s and 60s. There are an estimated 4.1 million homes in England that do not meet basic standards of decency, and around half of those homes are lived in by someone aged 55 or over. A report last year by Ageing Better warned that those living in cold, damp or poor-quality homes could be at a greater risk from COVID-19. The new analysis, released today, finds that problems such as cold and damp, or fall hazards, are leaving people feeling ‘miserable’ and ‘overwhelmed.’ However, emotional attachments to the home can prevent people from making the changes needed – or people don’t see themselves as ‘old enough’ to make adaptations that would help them live more safely. When people do recognise the need to make changes in the home, they can be put off for a number of reasons. Many do not have the finances available, and don’t know where to access support or advice. Without support to improve their homes, many face risks to their health and wellbeing. Previous research by Ageing Better found that households headed by someone over 75 are disproportionately likely to be living in a non-decent home, and the problem has worsened for this age group, while two million households headed by someone over 65 find it difficult to heat their home.

expensive major adaptations. Despite this, many participants were unaware of the existing grant and loan schemes available to them and didn’t understand the detail of such schemes. Grants rather than loans were sought by homeowners which could reflect the scale of the financial barriers they faced. They also expressed concerns about loans in that they would not want “debt hanging over them” at an older age. However, homeowners did see lowinterest loans for completing minor renovations and repairs as “better than nothing” but argued that financial support options should be means-tested to ensure that those who needed support can access it – regardless of your tenure. Participants emphasised that financial support should be readily available to help people make their homes safer and more suitable as they grow older, even if primarily targeted towards those on the lowest incomes. Ultimately, there was a strong emphasis on creating a system that avoided putting individuals in financial difficulty, as one participant put it, “let people upgrade their homes… without making people go bankrupt when they are older”. n

Warwickshire

Now

A consistently cold home can worsen the impact of many common long-term health conditions particularly experienced by older people, such as arthritis and respiratory conditions, as well as increase the risk of a stroke or heart attack. An estimated £513 million is spent by the NHS on first-year treatment costs for over 55s living in poor housing. The Centre for Aging Better are calling for better access to financing options and accessible information and advice on home improvements, and renters need more confidence to request repairs and adaptations from their landlord – for example through stronger regulation. The report is part of the Good Home Inquiry, launched last year in order to establish why so many of England’s homes are in poor condition, as well as exploring what we need in a good home.   The report has made suggestions to government on the finance support options such as grants or loans were viewed as critical to enable repairs and adaptations for later life. Both grants and loans were perceived as a way to fill an immediate funding gap for unexpected repairs and high upfront costs for the sometimes n 22 | Warwickshire Now | Issue 51 | April 2021

To book into the May issue of Warwickshire Now, contact: Kate Gilmartin Lis Gardner kate@pw-media.co.uk lis@pw-media.co.uk 01905 727904 01905 727901


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EDUCATION

'Aspire, achieve, enjoy' Warwick Preparatory School is a nurturing environment where children thrive and flourish. Our school’s ethos is naturally warm-hearted, supportive and inclusive and we encourage our pupils to ‘Aspire, Achieve, Enjoy’. At Warwick Prep we foster a vibrant school community, built on trust and respect, and instil a sense of social responsibility. While pupils are with us, we want them to enjoy the most rounded learning experience possible. To that end, we offer great strength and depth in both team and individual sports; we provide rich and diverse musical opportunities; we organise a broad and engaging programme of visits and extra-curricular activities designed to widen our pupils’ interests and skills. We recognise the unique talents and skills of each individual child and aim to foster a lifelong love of learning enabling them to run, play, and imagine. Our Nursery is for children aged 3 upwards, catering for children in the year before they start Reception. It is a large, open plan Nursery, accommodating 60 children. The Head of Nursery works closely with the Reception Coordinator and Head of Pre-Prep to ensure that the children have a seamless transition into school. Pupils at Warwick Prep are taught in small classes and make excellent progress. The academic curriculum is broad, balanced and appropriately challenging, designed to ensure children are introduced to the academic world in a style that is both stimulating and fun. We aim to engage, excite and challenge pupils to provide them with a wide range of skills. We are very proud of our tremendous academic reputation both locally and far beyond, enabling children to fulfil their potential and be the best they can be. We have a number of pupils who go on to be awarded scholarships at senior school level. The children benefit from our wide range of onsite facilities. Our state-of-the-art music school opened in September 2020, complete with an auditorium, rehearsal studio, two music classrooms, one keyboard suite running Cubase and Sibelius workstations, percussion studio, 14 practice rooms, a music library, and instrument storage. As well as fantastic new outdoor learning and play spaces, including our Forest School and our Nursery garden. Warwick Prep is part of the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, also comprising Warwick Junior School, Warwick School and King’s High School, providing unparalleled opportunities across the Foundation family. Together, we are united in excellence. n

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EDUCATION

Educating the Changemakers of the Future at King's High Dr Stephen Burley, Head Master of King’s High, knows that a King’s High education opens doors, hearts, and minds. He explains: ‘As one of the UK’s leading schools for girls, we are educating the Changemakers of the future – young women who will go out into the world and make a positive difference, inspired by strong values and a powerful sense of social responsibility.’ Dr Burley grew up in the north east of England and, as a schoolboy, used to cross the River Tyne each day by ferry to travel to school. His encounter with inspirational teachers bred a passion for education, founded on his belief that inspirational teaching transforms lives. He believes that wellbeing and happiness should be at the heart of every student’s experience. He is an advocate of dynamic, forward-thinking, innovative education that develops the confidence and skills that prepare young people to be the Changemakers of the future. He says: ‘The values of resourcefulness, resilience, empathy and community have never been so important.’ At King’s High, the foundations for this have already been laid, through recent work to foreground creative thinking skills, digital learning and educational innovation as part of the school’s DNA. Dr Burley says: ‘Changemakers are innovators and creative thinkers, inquisitive and open-minded, keen to test out new ideas and explore new ways of doing things. Changemakers have a positive impact on others and their community through inspirational leadership, creative ideas, by demonstrating kindness, compassion, emotional intelligence and empathy. Their commitment to leadership is driven by a sense of others rather than self, by a deep-rooted conviction about the importance of social responsibility and making a positive

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contribution to community.’ As part of King’s High’s new Changemaker programme, to be launched soon, pupils will get to submit a proposal, whether it is to start up a social enterprise, a new charity or an environmental project. Pupils have been studying and discussing Changemakers in the public eye. ‘The work Marcus Rashford has done for food poverty and holiday hunger has influenced the work our Social Justice Group is doing and I’m really proud of that’, says Dr Burley. ‘We also have girls involved in some wonderful community projects.’ King’s High is a national flagship centre for Creative Thinking, having developed and launched its own new and innovative Certificate in Creative Thinking. Dr Burley says: ‘We’ve had Years 10 and 11 solving real world problems, working on their own or in collaboration with others, and there’s been some lovely work covering a huge range of topics they’re passionate about. In our rapidly-changing world, we know that our students will need core skills and values to enable them to thrive: creativity and curiosity; empathy and emotional intelligence; teamwork, networking and leadership opportunities – as well as the digital skills that are so valuable in the age of Artificial Intelligence.  As a flagship centre for creative thinking, our forward-thinking and futureinspired curriculum is carefully designed to nurture and develop these skills, building the confidence and self-belief for leadership.’‘ Our vision – and my priority as Head Master of King’s High – is to become a community of Changemakers, or a Changemaker school. As rapid and often unpredictable change becomes the new normal for us all, I am eager to look ahead with hope and optimism at how we can build to create something very special: an inspired and inspirational community of Changemakers. n


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OUT & ABOUT

Escape to the English countryside with Karma Salford Hall A new chapter begins for an historic retreat in the Cotswolds with Karma Group Karma Group, an award-winning international travel and lifestyle brand, offering extraordinary experiences in the world’s most beautiful locations, is delighted to introduce a new addition to its Northern Hemisphere portfolio Karma Salford Hall. Karma Salford Hall dates back to the 14th Century and once belonged to King Henry VIII. Guests can stay in any one of the delightful bedrooms in the historic retreat and enjoy the many facilities from restaurants to meeting and conference rooms, games areas, libraries, and bars. The estate is set in beautifully manicured gardens, with a wedding marquee and tennis court. Karma Group has plans to add a pool, spa and more guest suites in the near future. Days at Karma Salford Hall can be spent relaxing and strolling the estate, or exploring the Cotswolds with its quintessentially English villages of honey-coloured stone; splendid, lively market towns and some of the country’s greatest palaces, castles and country houses. Sought after restaurants, the beautiful River Avon and Stratford-uponAvon, the birthplace of Shakespeare, are all nearby. Karma Group chairman and founder John Spence is delighted with Karma Group’s latest addition, which joins new Javanese venture Karma Salak. “In the week that Karma Group celebrated its 27th anniversary, I am delighted to announce the tremendously exciting news that we can welcome two new resorts into our international stable,” he says. “Karma Salak is in the stunning western Javanese highlands in Indonesia, while Karma Salford Hall is in the beauty of the English Cotswolds. Although on other sides of the world, I am immensely proud both properties officially join Karma Group’s portfolio this week.”

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The reasoning behind both purchases relates to a rise in travel in the domestic market. “Earlier in the year we predicted that when it was possible, domestic tourism would be extremely strong,” says John, “and that the difficulty and uncertainty of international travel would lead not to people staying at home, but instead embracing local destinations within their own countries. “We have seen this borne out, and when people can travel, they indeed will do, and are making the most of the opportunity. Therefore, we have been keenly searching out domestic resorts which will appeal to our existing clients, and to new potential clients and guests.” For hotel and restaurant booking enquiries please call: 01386 871300. Email: reception@karmasalfordhall.com Karma Salford Hall, Abbot’s Salford, Warwickshire, WR11 8UT Quote “Warwickshire Now” when booking to receive a 10% discount in celebration of reopening.


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