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TA B L E O F CONTENTS 6

What is a Pilgrimage?

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Je s u s , t h e D i v i n e C h i l d

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Te e n C o r n e r

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Pa r i s h i o n e r P r o f i l e : Je a n M o n d o r o

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T h e Fo u r t h Jo y f u l M y s t e r y : T h e P r e s e n t a t i o n o f Je s u s a t t h e Te m p l e

Strawberry Mochi, St. MaryAnne Cope

Wo r d S e a r c h , Pa r i s h D i r e c t o r y a n d Bulletins

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So What Is A


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A Pilgrimage? by Mary Gildersleeve

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The first time we ever went on pilgrimage, it was a side-trip to the Shrine of (at the time) Bl. Kateri Tekakawitha in Fonda, NY and the Shrine of North American Martyrs in Auriesville, NY. We had only two of our kids with us and I was pregnant with my third. We were on our way to CYO camps in New Hampshire – one for Joe and one for Catie – and we took a day, on either side of their camps, to pray at the shrines, join in attending Mass and generally wonder at the strength of the faith of these martyrs. The next time we went on pilgrimage (this time with four kids with the youngest being 6 months) it was a 6-week trip to France, Italy and a bit of Switzerland for the Jubilee Year of 2000. The blessings and graces received from this pilgrimage changed our spiritual and physical lives. But it just wasn’t about touring the Roman Colosseum … the Eiffel Tower … Montmartre and Sacre Coeur … Lourdes. It was about thinking, praying and learning about our rich Catholic faith and those who have gone before. The Jubilee Pilgrimage gave us opportunity after opportunity to deepen our faith. Having worked for an airline, I was tasked with working out our itinerary. With my husband and his deep love of the Catholic faith, together we made a list of all the places we wanted to see:

·Paris-with the ancient churches of Notre Dame, Sacre Coeur, Rue du Bac ·Lisieux-to pray to St. Therese and Montfort to pray to St. Louis Marie Grignon ·Lourdes-and LaSalette, sites of Marian apparitions ·Varallo-with its life-size Stations of the Cross and LaVerna where St. Francis received the stigmata ·Rome and Vatican City-with all the places of our 2000 year old Church including the four main basilicas and a Wednesday audience led by St. John Paul II. To further the experience, we found convents, monasteries and guest houses in which to stay. Never spending more than $100 per night, we experienced dining with the Franciscans at the LaVerna Monastery, praying with the L’Emmanuel Communite blocks away from the Lourdes Shrine, and receiving the sacraments from a Polish Priest at the French Shrine of Our Lady of LaSalette. One of our sons got to lead a decade of the Rosary and one daughter got to lead the English-language petitions at Lourdes thanks to a Chica-


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go-based chaplain who befriended us. So what is a pilgrimage? Is it just a fancy way of saying “trip”? Are we pilgrims or tourists? If you asked my then-11-yearold son, he defined it as “walkin’ and prayin’… prayin’ and walkin.’”. While that may be part of it, the best definition I’ve heard comes from Pope Benedict XVI, speaking at Santiago de Compostela (one of the most famous pilgrimage sites in the world): To go on pilgrimage is not simply to visit a place to admire its treasures of nature, art, or history. To go on pilgrimage really means to step out of ourselves in order to encounter God where he has revealed himself, where his grace has shone with particular splendor and produced rich fruits of conversion and holiness among those who believe. Pope Benedict XVI – Nov 6, 2010 at Santiago Compostela (http://www.vatican.va/content/benedict-xvi/en/speeches/2010/november/ documents/hf_ben-xvi_spe_20101106_ cattedrale-compostela.html) And for Catholics, going on a pilgrimage is relatively easy since Catholicism has had an impact in every part of the world for the last 2000 years. Pilgrimages don’t need to last weeks at a time or be 100 percent of the trip. The key to “going on pilgrimage” is to have the frame of mind that Pope Emeritus Benedict mentions: stepping out of self

and worrying less about the place and more about the spiritual effect of place. A pilgrimage can be an unplanned detour along I-70 to the Cathedral of the Plains seen in the distance or a scheduled visit to the Basilica of the Immaculate Conception in Washington and praying at each of the Marian side-chapels. It can be heading to the Basilica’s crypt area to think about all the thousands of folks who, in faith, gave their “widow’s mite” to build this Romanesque beauty in the heart of D.C. A pilgrimage can be stopping to pray and reflect on the martyrs who gave their last breath at the Roman Colosseum or at the stone that marks the slaughter of St. Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. A pilgrimage can be walking the Pilgrim’s Way from Chartres to Compostela. A pilgrimage can be watching a series, like Steve Ray’s “The Footprints of God,” or a documentary on YouTube about the Pilgrim’s Way or the Abbeys walks in England. The key is the intentionality of the trip – whether couch surfing or walking in the footsteps of Jesus in the Holy Land. Take the time to meditate and pray on the events of the past, the present and the future. When we were in Rome for the Jubilee Year, the theme was “Christ: yesterday, today, forever.” This is what a pilgrimage celebrates. For our 20th anniversary, Rick and I opted for a pilgrimage to one of our favorite countries – Great Brit-

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*Photos courtesy of Mary Gildersleeve

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ain. With an Anglo-family heritage, Rick had been studying about all the English martyrs and saints of England, Scotland and Wales. Again, together, we planned our trip:

plaques marking the martyrdom of Sts. Thomas More, John Fisher and others on Tower Hill Sometimes, you’ll be surprised by a bit of Catholicity you weren’t expecting.

·Canterbury--to see the once-Catholic Cathedral with the shrine to St. Thomas Becket and searching the backstreets to find the spot of St. Thomas More’s bones.

When we visited the Catholic Church of St. Thomas of Canterbury, we found a very modern shrine. Relics (including the stole) of St. Oscar Romero of San Salvador, martyred in the 20th century. Or the numerous times in Austria that we stumble upon a glorious baroque pfarrkirche (parish church) in a small village or a wayside shrine where modern-day pilgrims still leave their intentions. A trip to Poland with Franciscan students and my 2-month-old placed me in a spot where I could see up-close the image of Our Lady of Czestochowa and the convent where St. Faustina prayed. Lest you think that we only do, as Joe put it, “walkin’ and prayin’”, we also do the touristy things to round out our lives: a trek to the Hard Rock Café in Rome to appease the 11-year-old; a few days on Shetland Island to appease my knitting fanaticism; a tour of the Louvre and a view from the top of the Eiffel Tower to check those off our bucket lists. These don’t lessen the impact of a pilgrimage but enrich the overall experience and the memories. Our Church is steeped in history, filled with beautiful art and architecture, but it’s the stories of the faithful that are most impactful when on pilgrimage. Studying the Catholic peo-

·Walsingham--site of one of the most popular Marian pilgrim sites during the Middle Ages, as well as the National Catholic Shrine to Our Lady of Walsingham (a mile outside of Walshingham). ·York--where we attended Mass in St. Margaret Clitherow’s house and saw her incorrupt hand, preserved in the chapel of Bar Convent. ·Durham--for its Cathedral, stripped of much of its former Catholic adornments, but still showing remnants of ancient Catholicism with its graves for St. Bede the Venerable and St. Cuthbert. ·Edinburgh--to walk the path of St. Margaret of Scotland, including a visit to the underground chapel where she would go for solitary prayer. ·London--to visit the Oratorian Shrine to Cardinal John Newman, attend Mass at Tyburn Convent, and see the


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ple and events in areas you are going and viewing documentaries and fictionalized biographies of the players (FORMED, Netflix, Amazon are great resources) can add a spiritual depth to your break from the everyday. If this article has piqued your interest, check with your parish and see if there is a pilgrimage in the future. If you want to try planning your own, go for it! Just remember that planning a pilgrimage takes time, research and a healthy dose of faith and flexibility. Sometimes staying in convents or guest houses can be a bit different than the average American hotel. Your kids might also embrace some interesting habits: our kids learned to love “coffee-milk” in the French guest houses. Here are some resources that may prove helpful: ·15 Pilgrim Walks in Great Britain - https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/nov/02/15-pilgrimages-plilgrim-trails-walks-europe-uk ·The Ultimate List of Catholic Shrines in the US - https://www.coraevans. com/blog/article/ultimate-list-of-catholic-shrines-in-the-united-states ·Top 10 Monastery Guests Houses in Europe - https://religioustravelplanningguide.com/10-top-monastic-guesthouses-in-europe ·Steve Ray’s Footprints of God on FORMED - https://watch.formed.org/ footprints-of-god-with-stephen-ray

If you truly believe in God, in Jesus Christ his only begotten Son, and the Holy Spirit – in the Triune God, then revel in this belief. Revel in the promise of an eternity spent with the men, women and children who have also believed and are now in the beatific vision. Walk their steps, marvel at their art, and pray for their intercessions at their shrines. But most of all, remember “Christ: yesterday, today and forever!”

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Prince William County Catholic

Jesus, the Divine Child by Colleen Rooney

As Joseph returned to their home in the early evening, he smelled Mary’s lentil soup. Its fragrance wafted throughout their small house. His mind filled for a moment with a memory. The startling and sobering words of the angel in a dream: “Rise and take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt and remain there until I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” (Matt. 2:13) Those were harrowing days as he roused the sleeping mother and the baby and left in haste for Egypt. The child was but a few months old. Mary had scant time to prepare for this journey for she knew they must leave without hesitation. The time spent in Egypt was probably 2 or 3 years. Herod the Great died a couple of years after the birth of Jesus according to many scholars. Joseph and Mary would have settled in the diaspora, the Jewish community

in Egypt. Their arrival must have been surprising and a bit difficult, as they had left in haste. It is doubtful they took much with them. We can imagine they relied on the generosity and good will of those in the Jewish community to initially supply their basic needs. Since the language of Egypt was now Greek, their dealings with those outside the community would require learning some Greek. The everyday language within the diaspora might have been Hebrew or Aramaic among a few older members, but it is more likely that most of them spoke Greek. We know that the Septuagint was the Hebrew Scriptures translated into Greek for those in the diaspora starting in the 3rd century B.C. and ending in the 1st B.C. with additional inspired writings added to those not found in Palestine. Joseph, as he attended synagogue services on the Sabbath, would

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have listened to the Scriptures being read in Greek. No doubt the Holy Family acquired some knowledge of Greek during their sojourn in Egypt. The Christ Child, like most toddlers, hearing two languages spoken, one with his parents and the other with the community, was comfortable with both. Again, Joseph heard in a dream, “Rise, take the child and his mother, and go to the land of Israel, for those who sought the child’s life are dead.” (Matt. 2:20) And so he gathered up the mother and small child and returned. It seems that at first Joseph planned to settle in Judea where Elizabeth, Zachary, and baby John had lived, but he was uneasy when he heard that Herod Archelaus ruled there. And again, there was direction from an angel to return to Nazareth, where he and Mary had first made their home before the birth of the divine child. One can wonder about their return to Nazareth. Was their home still intact? Was it vacant or had relatives moved in? Were the animals still being cared for? No doubt, residents of Nazareth had heard of the terrible fate of the baby boys in Bethlehem and the surrounding areas at Herod the Great’s orders. Had they learned of Joseph and Mary fleeing with the child from Herod’s fury? The community of Nazareth must have been filled with joy and gladness to see the beautiful young child full of life and playfulness return safely home with his parents.

Settling back into life in Nazareth, Mary could not have helped recalling the kindness shown to her and her family in the diaspora. Now there were adjustments to be made on their return. The language spoken was Aramaic in the community and Hebrew in the synagogue with explanations in Aramaic. The Jews in Nazareth wished to maintain their faith and religious customs. Greek was frowned upon in everyday discourse. Familiar faces of family and friends welcomed them as they resumed life in Nazareth. Their routine with Jesus was much as it had been before his birth. They arose as a family in the morning, put away the mats that they slept on, and shooed the small animals outside for water and feed. The donkey and any other larger animals were also fed. Returning inside, Joseph led the family in the Shema. Jesus, who might be 3 or 4 years old, would join in with Mary and Joseph. The day would fall into a peaceful and orderly succession of tasks to be accomplished. They would eat. After eating they would work. Mary would make bread with a small Jesus helping. She would play with him and set him up with a few small toys, a ball, a little figure to amuse himself as she kneaded the bread. She might give him a small piece to knead, too. The morning would pass as Joseph found work for the family he had been called to support and protect. They would rejoin one another at


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midday. Joseph would come in from his work. His workshop was probably not more than a simple overhang constructed from a few wooden poles with sheaths of dried pieces of palm bark for a roof. It protected him and whatever he was working on from the heat of the day. The family would pray together, thanking the Lord God for the food. It would be a simple meal. Certainly, the child would be fed. If resources were limited, Joseph and Mary might not eat until dinner time. There would be a rest after the midday meal. Small children often sleep in the afternoon. We can imagine Mary, pulling out the mat for Jesus to have a rest or a nap on. The bread dough would rise as he slept. Then she would make lentil soup. When he awoke, they would go to the community oven and bake the bread for dinner that evening. There would be other mothers there with children. The women would be chatting as the bread baked while the children would be racing around playing with each other. When the bread was finished baking, they returned home. Joseph was there to greet them. He loved the smell of the freshly baked bread and the sight of the small child with sweaty curls, dusty feet, and dirty hands eager to be picked up and thrown high in the air. Dinner would be ready soon. They must feed the animals first and then wash their hands and feet. Joseph would lead Mary and Jesus in the evening Shema prayers. A

blessing would be said before eating. The bread would be broken and eaten this evening with lentil soup and figs. Jesus would have goat’s milk and Mary and Joseph would have watered- down wine. As the sun was setting, the holy family would get ready for bed. They would take their mats out of the niches in the wall and roll them out. There would be stories, songs, and prayers as the day ended. Sleep would come as a song of sweetness, domestic simplicity, and peace filling the home where the Divine Child lay his head.

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TEEN CO


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ORNER by Natalie Sutton and Kateri Foos

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happy new year! We all have finally been able to kiss the year 2020 goodbye and must admit, it feels pretty good. It was a year that was like none before, especially since we have the coronavirus to thank for all the carnage it has left in its path. Pretty much all of us know someone who has or had coronavirus and we must all pray that 2021 provides the coronavirus a door to walk out of, away from all of us. Through all of the sadness, pain, and agony many of us had to go through in 2020, we have to look back and remember what good things this year gave to all of us. We have to agree that, with all the shutdowns, the year 2020 presented us with a lot of alone time to ourselves. Before the onset of the pandemic, many people were busy with work and all they wanted was alone time. 2020 blessed us with that. Hopefully, most of us spent that alone time trying to grow a closer relationship with the Lord, and if we did, then we owe 2020 a big thanks for that opportunity. With 2020 out the back door, it is now time to focus on this brand new year that God has given us. Unfortunately, with a new year ringing in, the coronavirus is still with

us. But with another blessing of 2020, we now have a vaccine that can help us defeat coronavirus. With this vaccine, we think many people have hope that 2021 is the year that everything will return to normal. Besides the vaccine, we have an even greater thing to look forward to in this new year, given to us by the Holy Father, Pope Francis. Pope Francis has declared this year the “Year of Saint Joseph”. The “Year of Saint Joseph” began on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception in 2020 and will end on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception this year. With this year, the Church has also granted a plenary indulgence. Years like this are exceptionally special because they provide us with multiple opportunities to get closer to Christ and to deepen our prayer lives. Saint Joseph could not have been a better pick. He is one of the greatest role models we have besides the Blessed Virgin Mary. Saint Joseph was an obedient, tender, and loving foster father to Christ. Saint Joseph was just an ordinary man who was a carpenter when he had to take on the incredible duty to be the foster father of God’s son.


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He did this through obedience and took great care of Mary and Jesus through it all. Saint Joseph gave up himself in love. All of us should get particularly close to Saint Joseph this year and follow in his footsteps.

really all the time) because he knew very well how to bring young people to Christ. We both hope that all of you have the best 2021 possible. And while 2020 is still fresh in all of our minds, reflect back on it. While reflecting, though, don’t recall only Perhaps many of us have heard of Fr. Mike the bad things that happened, but also the Schmitz. If you haven’t, he is a priest with- good things. No matter how bad a year can in the Diocese of Duluth, Minnesota. He is be, especially 2020, there is always somean author and speaker and also has a You- thing good that the year can bless us with. Tube channel with great videos for anyone to watch, especially teenagers. (I, Natalie, To 2020 we say: You were not easy to deal tend to watch his videos a lot at school for with, but with the alone time and downmy religion classes.) Fr. Schmitz has cre- time you presented to all of us, you helped ated a podcast called “Bible in a Year.” The us remember that down time is the perfect podcast takes place every day for the entire opportunity to get close to Christ.To 2021 year, and guides both Catholics and any- we say: Don’t be too hard on us, but we all one else who listens to it, through all the believe you will be the year that we grow books of the Bible. The reflections present- in faith, love, and, most importantly, hope. ed by Fr. Schmitz help us to better understand the readings more in depth, rather Following are helpful links to go along with than if we were to just quickly read over some of the things we talked about, includthem. The podcast is a great way to spend ing Fr. Mike Schmitz’ videos. And also 20-30 minutes each day during 2021. check out an amazing book written by another faith-filled priest, Fr. Donald CalloIn January, the month that has started off way, Consecration to St. Joseph: The Wonthis brand new year, there are many great ders of Our Spiritual Father, which we hope saints who have feast days, including Saint to discuss in the coming months ahead. Thomas Aquinas and Saint John Bosco. Saint Thomas Aquinas was a great man and Father Mike Schmitz YouTube channel: Dominican who studied very much and https: //www.youtube.com/channel/UCas some of us may know, wrote the Sum- VdGX3N-WIJ5nUvklBTNhAw ma Theologica. It is a very difficult read in our opinion, but if you want to challenge Link to Father’s Bible in a year podcast: yourself this year, perhaps you may want to https://media.ascensionpress.com/all-bibleattempt to read it. As for our younger read- in-a-year-episodes/ ers, Saint John Bosco was a priest who had a great love for young children and teenag- Father Donald Calloway’s book: ers and helped them grow closer to Christ https://www.fathercalloway.com/booksand get to know Him at a younger age. For and-gifts/consecration-st-joseph-wonteenagers and younger people, it is good to ders-our-spiritual-father pray to Saint John Bosco this month (and

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parishioner profile:

JEAN MONDORO My name is Jean Mondoro and I am the fourth of eight children of two wonderful parents. I grew up as a homeschooler in the parish of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton and am now a junior at the University of Mary Washington, where I am double-majoring in Communications and Music and minoring in Journalism. I can hardly believe how blessed I am to have had the journey to get me this far. When I was a child, faith was just something that was a part of my family, and so I participated because I, too, am a part of the

same family. I developed a certain love for it as I watched my parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles live their marriages out in this faith, which inspired me from a very young age. My eighth grade Confirmation marks the first personal connection between me and my faith in the friendship I began with St. Therese of Lisieux. The graces I received in the sacrament of Confirmation proved to save my faith as I entered my sophomore year of high school. At this time, I began to struggle tremendously with my faith. I fell into a habit of


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constantly asking God “why” certain things were happening in my life. Seeing people suffering and hearing about all the evil that occurs every single day led me to a place of deep and personal discouragement. I just couldn’t seem to find the hope in all of that despair. Looking back, I can see how Jesus took my hand and pulled me out of that darkness and into a place where my faith became the strongest part of who I am today. Every day found me wrestling with my reasons for being Catholic and why I bothered praying when there never seemed to be any light in the darkness. More than once I would break down, feeling so abandoned by God that I would tear off the crucifix which I always wore around my neck. But by the end of each of these frequent “breakdowns,” I would look at Jesus on the cross, who died for me, and I kissed the crucifix before gently clasping it around my neck again. I realized, over time, that no matter how angry I was at God or how confused I was by what I believe, I am nothing without my faith. This new understanding did not dissolve all struggles I had within my faith, but it did help me to remain steady in believing in God’s infinite mercy and love. By the time I finished high school, I had developed a prayer routine and cultivated a desire and determination to grow in faith in college. Through it all, my parents were a constant inspiration to me. Whatever suffering they encounter, they remain faithful in their love for each other and for Christ. Every day I am blown away by their example, which so beautifully illustrates the

love Jesus has for each of us as He hangs on the cross, and which makes me want to love Him and others in the same way. Since starting college in much better spiritual health than I was two years before, I have grown so much in faith as a member of the Catholic Campus Ministry at the University of Mary Washington. This community has provided me with so many inspiring examples in the students and staff whom I am blessed to call friends. Last year, I volunteered with certain parts of the ministry when I could, slowly building relationships with others and falling more in love with Jesus. This year, I am honored to be serving as evangelization and liturgy assistant. The importance of community in faith, serving in the apostolate and working in evangelization have set my heart on fire with a desire to spread the Gospel in a much more personal and intentional way than I have ever felt a desire to do. I am hoping to serve the church in a few different apostolates, including music ministry within the campus ministry and my parish, pro-life work with women and children and writing regularly for a Catholic news source, beginning right here with this magazine. My journey of faith is one that has been hard, but every day I am convinced that it is well worth the fight. And at the end of the day, I truly believe that faith is everything. I don’t know what I would do without it.

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THE FOURTH

JOY

THE PRESE

OF JESUS IN TH


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YFUL MYSTERY:

ENTATION

HE TEMPLE by Mrs. Mary Catabui, O.P.

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Almost one year had passed since the Angel Gabriel’s message was given. Joseph and Mary’s lives suddenly changed from moment to moment. Mary prepared her way of the journey to go to her cousin Elizabeth, to help in Elizabeth’s pregnancy and recovery. Mary knew quite well that the journey was long and was aware of the hardships of a dangerous journey. But she was not in fear for she knew her Joy would always protect her.

been conceived in her. She will bear a son and you are to name him Jesus, because He will save His people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: “Behold, the virgin shall be with child and bear a son, and they shall name Him Emmanuel,” which means “God is with us.”When Joseph awoke, he did as the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took his wife into his home.

Mary fulfilled helping her cousin and was again filled with joy to return to Nazareth. Joseph was eagerly building a home to share with her. When he greeted her, imagine his shock at seeing her already pregnant. He left her to go home, for sadness had completely overtaken him. In a dream he saw himself breaking off the engagement only to be filled with the brightness of light and the sound he heard of the angel’s voice:

Soon afterward, Emperor Caesar Augustus issued a decree that the whole world should be enrolled, each to his own town. Joseph went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to the city of David that is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and family of David, to be enrolled with Mary, his betrothed, who was with child. It was there, in a manger, Jesus was born. He was “Wonderful, Councilor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace!” The “Whole World” came to kneel down and to worship Him! A newborn Savior, the King of Peace. I think you can be assured that the many

“Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary, your wife into your home. For it is through the Holy Spirit that this child has


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sacrifices make these three mysteries turn into the Joyful Mysteries. Now, as we approach The Fourth Mystery, The Presentation of Jesus in the Temple, we have a mix of ‘sweetness and sadness’ as told to us in the Gospel of Luke. In those days, on the day of purification, Joseph and Mary took Jesus to Jerusalem to present Him to the Lord, as it is written in the Old Testament, “Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord,” and to offer the sacrifice of “a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons.” We definitely find JOY in the fact that Simeon, an old, righteous and devout man who was awaiting the consolation of Israel, had been instructed by the Holy Spirit that he should not encounter death before he had seen the Messiah. After waiting his entire long life, he saw Mary and Joseph bring the child Jesus into the temple to perform the custom of the law. Simeon took Him into his

arms and blessed God, saying: “Now Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, for my eyes have seen your salvation which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and glory for your people Israel.” Both of Jesus’ parents were amazed at what was said about Him, and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary, “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted and you yourself a sword will pierce so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” Mary pondered these words in her heart, and through the gift of the rosary we are able to share in these mysteries and ask our Blessed Mother to help us on our journey to heaven.

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STRAWBERRY JELL-O MOCHI

FEAST OF ST. MARIANNE COPE (JANUARY 23RD) by Colleen Rooney

foodsandfestivitiesofthechristianyear.blogspot.com

Sister Marianne Cope was a German born religious sister who came to the United States when she was one year old. She was raised in Utica, New York, where after helping to support her family, she entered the Sisters of the Third Order Regular of St. Francis in Syracuse. She was a very capable religious and held many positions within her Order. I encourage you to read her life story which is available in many biographies. She is best known for answering the call of the King of Hawaii and Fr. Damien of Molokai to come to Hawaii and help with the lepers. She accepted the invitation and with five other sisters sailed to Hawaii. They arrived on the island of Oahu in 1883. Sister Marianne died in Molokai in 1918 serving the lepers continuously throughout her religious life in Hawaii. Most notably, she nursed Fr. Damien in his last days. This simple recipe uses mochiko, which is rice flour. This is a common ingredient in Hawaii. It is versatile like white flour. You can purchase it in most grocery stores. It also calls for katakuriko, potato starch. Bob’s Red Mill Potato Starch is found in some grocery stores. International grocery stores should carry potato starch.


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YIELDS: 24 pieces

INGREDIENTS I cup boiling water 1 3-ounce package strawberry jell-o 1/3 cup sugar 1 cup mochiko 1 teaspoon vanilla ½ cup katakuriko (potato starch) Cooking spray EQUIPMENT Measuring cups Teaspoon Silicone Bundt pan Plastic wrap Serving plate

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DIRECTIONS: 1. Dissolve Jell-O in boiling hot water and stir till dissolved. 2. Add the sugar, mochiko, and vanilla into the hot water mixture and stir well. 3. Spray the silicon Bundt pan with cooking spray. 4. Add mixture to Bundt pan. Cover with plastic wrap. 5. Microwave on high for five minutes. 6. Remove from microwave. Take off plastic covering. Let cool completely. 7. Invert Bundt pan onto a serving plate which has been lightly dusted with potato starch. 8. With a serrated knife, cut into half inch pieces. Roll in potato starch. Enjoy!


FEBRUARY SAINTS & FEASTS


COUNTY PARISH DIRECTORY

OUR LADY OF ANGELS 13752 Marys Way, Woodbridge, VA 22191 (703) 494-2444 Online Bulletin Here

ST. FRANCIS 18825 Fuller Heights Rd, Triangle, VA 22172 (703) 221-4044 Online Bulletin Here

SACRED HEART 12975 Purcell Rd, Manassas, VA 20112 (703) 590-0030 Online Bulletin Here

HOLY FAMILY 14160 Ferndale Rd, Woodbridge, VA 22193 (703) 670-8161 Online Bulletin Here

ST. ELIZABETH ANN SETON 12807 Valleywood Dr, Lake Ridge, VA 22192 (703) 494-4008 Online Bulletin Here

HOLY TRINITY 8213 Linton Hall Rd, Gainesville, VA 20155 (703) 753-6700 Online Here Bulletin

ALL SAINTS 9300 Stonewall Rd, Manassas, VA 20110 (703) 368-4500 Online Bulletin Here


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Profile for Prince William County Catholic

Prince William County Catholic January 2021 Issue 15