Issuu on Google+

‘Our community newspaper’

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Inside the Sentinel

Part 7 of 7

Vol. 156, issue 18 $1 weekly

Tuesday night’s boys regional soccer

Ottawa seeking income tax increase

see B1

see A8

Serving Putnam County Since 1855

Putnam County Sentinel Visit us online at www.putnamsentinel.com

Staff photo/Jared Denman

Ottawa Village Council candidates answer questions during a public forum held on Monday, evening at the Putnam County Educational Service Center, (from left) Gene Hovest, Dean Meyer, Kevin Goecke, Jo Deskins, John Salsburey and Mark Schmeidebusch.

Four of six Ottawa council candidates support local income tax increase set to go to voters By Jared Denman Staff Writer PUTNAM COUNTY — Economic issues were the focus at Tuesday evening’s Ottawa Village Council Candidate's forum held at

the Educational Service Center hosted by this paper along with 106.3 The Fox. The candidate field was evenly split with three incumbents and three challengers seeking a position

on the village council and consisted of Gene Hovest, Dean Meyer, Kevin Goecke, Jo Deskins, John Salsburey and Mark Schmiedebusch. Hovest has served 20 total years on the Village Council. He is a graduate of OGHS, University of Dayton and completed the Executive Development program at the University of Michigan. He has worked as a human resource manager for GTE/Sylvania (Philips)

and W.C. Woods Co. His priorities are the viability of village finances, flood mitigation and bringing jobs to the area. He supports the .65 percent income tax increase. “I support the tax increase because I feel we need that to maintain our current services. However, the vote of the people is going to tell us everything. I think it's going to come back in four ways: It's either going to come back with a pass, or a fail, or

pass lightly, or a fail lightly. And each of those is a message from the taxpayers as to what the village should do,” said Hovest However, Hovest believes cuts can be made by retiring the aerial truck, outsourcing more services at the swimming pool such as what was recently done by paying the YMCA to maintain the pool and cutting back on police patrols. When asked about how he could make local

government more efficient, he cited perhaps reducing the amount of fire equipment by forming an Ottawa Township Fire Department. Hovest doesn't think tax incentives for businesses are a good idea but are necessary to attract businesses to the area.  When asked if the .65 percent increase does not pass should the one percent tax credit be revoked, he stated all options should ➤➤See Forum/A8

O-G schools to offer all day Kindergarten

Staff photo/Marlena Ballinger

By Marlena Ballinger Managing Editor OTTAWA — OttawaGlandorf School Board voted to implement an all day/ everyday kindergarten during its meeting held Tuesday, Nov. 1. The board approved the kindergarten to be offered based on a tuition rate and sliding scale fee and is set to begin during the 20122013 school year. The tuition is expected to cost parents $1,450 per year but will be prorated based on the household income. The scale was taken from the 2011 income eligibility guidelines from the Ohio Department of Health and Human Services. Brinkman explained his

reasoning for why the district is offering kindergarten. He said, “We feel it’s good for kids, the more children are in the school building with education professionals, the better off they will be.” Brinkman continued, “Research demonstrates that it’s good for children, especially economically disadvantaged children, especially in the area of reading. The more students are with teachers reading books to them, reading and writing and doing things that pertain to reading, that’s also very good for kids. The last reason is that our parents seem to want this option.” Brinkman noted that this is an option, they will continue

to offer half day kindergarten. Brinkman said that most county schools offer all day kindergarten and has received many inquiries asking when Ottawa-Glandorf would offer the same. The district is expected to send letters in mid-November or if a child is enrolled in an Ottawa preschool, the letters, explaining the tuition scale, will go to them immediately. Parents will also be asked in the letter to enroll students by Dec. 9 since the school will have to evaluate staffing options for the next school year. Later in the meeting, board members approved a supplemental contract for Lindsay Duling who will be the assistant varsity girls

basketball coach. Scott Ketner, Glandorf Elementary Principal told the board that his student council hosted a fundraiser for a family whose house burned last year. The council raised almost $1,200 that went to the family. He also updated the board on the many Red Ribbon Week activities that were held at the school. Brinkman told the board that the former Ottawa Elementary School is closer to demolition. He said crews should begin tearing down the building later this week and again reminded residents that bricks will be piled on the site for those wanting a piece of the school.

Woody’s Halloween roundup Gage Mullins, 3 of Ottawa, dressed as his favorite Toy Story character, Woody, during last week’s Trick-or-Treat. Gage traveled door to door on Thursday asking for residents to fill his treat bag with candy. For more photos of witches, dragons and zombies, flip to page A11.

Fall Back Nov. 6 Remember to set your clocks an hour back on Sunday, Nov. 6

Classifieds....................... B10 Death Notices.................... A6 Editorial............................. A5 Education......................... B7 Lifestyles........................... B6 Agribusiness...................... B9 Religion........................... A12 Sports................................ B1

Staff photo/Marlena Ballinger

Standing united against drugs and alcohol 6

7 4 8 2 5

3 3 6 0 2

8

Students from Glandorf Elementary joined hands as they circled the entire school last week. The event was done as part of the school’s Red Ribbon Week activities and showed students to standing united against drugs and alcohol.

00026544

Ask about our No Closing Costs program! Call Joe Laudick at (419) 879-4840 to find out more!

SuperiorFCU.com

1381 N. Perry Street, Ottawa


A2

In The News

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

It’s my job:

Putnam County Sentinel

Maag dreams of owning a full time ice cream business By Sandy Langhals Sentinel Correspondent OTTAWA — It is interesting how for some individuals, their path in life seems to find them. This holds true for Jim Maag, who has been an auto body repairman for 37 years. When he was 19, Maag was working at the Vaughsville Elevator where he drove the bulk truck, mixed feed and did a variety of other jobs. One day a man approached him and asked if he wanted to work for him at Amstutz Body Shop in Cairo. “If you can get a job with better pay, you just did it and that’s what I did,” explains Maag. At the time, he didn’t have any experience with auto body work but was given training and found that he was quite good at it. “Cars back then were a lot easier to work on than they are today, I mean, paint-wise.” Maag discussed how cars have changed over the years from metal to plastic, but the

transition has been gradual and not an issue for him. In 1989, his boss retired and Maag decided to continue on his own. In January 1990, he started his own shop behind his house and has been busy ever since. Maag strictly does body work, but if he is doing body work on a car that was in an accident and has minor mechanical work needed, he will complete that too. However, he doesn’t do oil changes or mechanical work for cars that he isn’t repairing. When approached with a project, Maag will give an estimate on the cost to the customer and if he is given the approval, he will order any parts, if needed, and schedule a time for the vehicle to be dropped off to be repaired. If the repair needed is on the door, Maag will take the door trim panel off to try to get inside to pop the dent out. “If it’s real bad, you can weld these little pins to it and it’s

got like a slap hammer that you can pop the dent out. We used to drill holes in it but we’ve done away with that because you have a hole in the panel that you have to fix,” says Maag. He further explained that for the pins he has a special gun that, when he pushes the trigger, it welds the pins fast to the panel. After he pops the dent out, he just breaks the pins off. This process is so much easier than having to drill holes and fix them. After the dent is taken care of, he will begin the process of preparing the panel to be painted and then paint. In most cases, he will paint the panel while it is still attached to the car. Although Maag is still doing auto body work, he has begun a new venture that he is very excited about and hopes to one day do full-time. For the last two summers, Maag and his wife have been going to area events selling home-

PUTNAM COUNTY — Putnam County polling locations for the Nov. 8th General Election: Blanchard Township — Blanchard Township House - Sugar Ridge Road, Gilboa Greensburg Township — Brookhill School - 7989 State Route 108, Ottawa Jackson Township — Jackson Township House Corner of Roads N-22 and K Jennings Township — Ft. Jennings Old High School Gym - 655 N. Water Street, Ft. Jennings Liberty Township — Liberty Township Building Corner of Roads D and 9-D, Leipsic Leipsic Corp. — Fogle Center - 815 Mathias Street, Leipsic Van Buren Township — Fogle Center - 815 Mathias Street, Leipsic Monroe Township/Conti-

nental — New Fire Station - 102 E. Elm Street, Continental Sugar Creek Township — Community Center - 115 E. Findlay Street, Vaughnsville Ottoville Corp. — Municipal Building - 150 Park Drive, Ottoville Monterey Township — Municipal Building - 150 Park Drive, Ottoville Ottawa Township West/ Glandorf — Glandorf Town Hall - 203 N. Main Street, Glandorf Ottawa Corp. 1 — Ottawa VFW - 212 W. Second Street, Ottawa Ottawa Corp. 2 —Ottawa VFW - 212 W. Second Street, Ottawa Ottawa Corp. 3 —Ottawa VFW - 212 W. Second Street, Ottawa Ottawa Township East — Ottawa VFW - 212 W. Second Street, Ottawa

Pandora Corp. — ArthurLugibihl Community Center - 301 N. Jefferson Street, Pandora Riley Township — ArthurLugibihl Community Center - 301 N. Jefferson Street, Pandora Kalida Corp. — City Building - 110 S. Broad Street, Kalida Union Township — Union Township House - 104 W. Plum Street, Kalida Palmer Township — The old M.C.H.S. Cafeteria 5400 Road 13-C, Miller City Perry Township — St. Barbara’s Parish Hall, Main Street, Cloverdale Columbus Grove Corp. — C.G. American Legion, 412 Plum Street, Columbus Grove Pleasant Township — C.G. American Legion, 412 Plum Street, Columbus Grove

Putnam County polling locations

Staff photo/Sandy Langhals

Jim Maag stands next to his homemade ice cream maker. He hopes to have a full time ice cream business in the future.

made ice cream. “You meet a lot of new people; it’s fun,” says Maag about his new passion. He purchased a hand-made wagon that holds two ice cream makers that are hooked up to a John Deere hit-and-miss, one-stroke engine for power. The wagon is a work of art. The barrels that hold the ice cream makers are on boards with hinges and can be lifted to empty the barrels and allow for easy clean up. “You just put your mix together and you dump your stuff in there and you have your ice and salt and everything to make the ice cold, which is hard to believe. I’ve always told people to think about, in the winter time you put salt on ice to thaw it and here, you make ice cream with salt on the ice to make it cold. Think about it; it’s weird,” he laughs. Maag mentioned that the hit-and-miss engine brings back a lot of memories for people; especially the older generation. He talks about how at events many people will approach him and start a conversation about the engine and how they remember many different ways those engines were used when they were younger. “There’s times

Home • Gifts • Florals

when it about brings tears to your eyes,” he shares. “You sit back afterwards, after they walk away and you think to yourself that man, they had a tougher life.” One time, Maag stated, he was at an event when a mother and her children came up to buy some homemade ice cream. When the mother asked her son what kind of ice cream he wanted, he told her that he didn’t want any ice cream. She asked him why to which he replied, “Because it is made with a John Deere engine and not an International.” “He was serious,” laughs Maag. “He didn’t get any ice cream.” It is funny how something like a brand of an engine can stop a young boy from wanting ice cream. In attending many different events, he has made great connections, which in turn has led to other contacts for even more events. Maag shared that they will also make ice cream for smaller events. If someone is having a graduation party or some other kind of event, they have no problem with just selling them the ice cream for the party without attending. Maag has created his own homemade ice cream recipes

for vanilla and chocolate and is excited about experimenting with new flavors. In addition, this winter, Maag is hoping to travel to a warmer region and explore the idea of selling his ice cream. “Someday I want to close this shop and just do ice cream, if I can,” expresses Maag. Understandably, working on concrete everyday is taking its toll on him and he would like to get away from it. His favorite part of selling ice cream is meeting new people. A glimmer in his eye is quite noticeable when he talks about it. He truly enjoys his new venture and talking with people; especially about the hit-and-miss engine. “It’s fun, it really is and I hope it works out for us,” smiles Maag. He doesn’t have a least favorite part of the job but says, “It's hard work at times, I mean you’ve got to make sure you have enough supplies. I always worry about that and sometimes you get too much. You don’t know how good of a show you’re going to have.” Maag resides in Ottawa with his wife Pam. They have three children: Jeremy, Julie and Josh. They are also the proud grandparents of three.

presents

Home For Ch r A Seasonal C i s elebrat tmas i

You are invited to our beautiful store...

on!

Friday, Nov. 4th ~ 9 am - 8 pm & Saturday, Nov. 5th ~ 9 am - 6 pm Everything you need to make your home and surroundings festive, fun and inviting! Home Décor • Unique Florals • Lights • Scents • Gifts • Food with Demos • Trees & Décor • Jewelry • Fashion Accessories • Candles • Fresh Flowers • Organic Teas •Live Music!!

1316 East Main, Ottawa

419-523-2222

www.serendipityohio.com Mon Wed Thurs Fri 9-5; Tues 9-7; Sat 9-1

Girls So Jewe mething lry Ne Nove Trunk Sh w! ow m Meet the y ber 19th 11:3 oung de 0 am s to 3 igner pm Find us on

Facebook

Serendipity Home Gifts Florals

We Deliver!


In The News

Putnam County Sentinel

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

A3

Gaining efficiency is the answer say Hite, Wachtmann at public forum By Jared Denman Staff Writer PUTNAM COUNTY — Last Monday, Oct. 24, county officials met at the Educational Service Center in Ottawa with Ohio 1st District Senator Cliff Hite, Ohio 75th District House Representative Lynn Wachtmann and a representative for 5th District Congressman Bob Latta for a Q&A session that was open to the public. The forum focused on state efforts to spur economic growth by attracting businesses to Ohio through making government more efficient; especially Issues 2 and 3 which both officials strongly urged those present to vote “yes” for on the Nov. 8 ballot. Topics ranged from energy and economic development to flood mitigation. There was concern regarding reports that the second installment of $3 million out of $9 million in flood mitigation monies earmarked for the region was not forthcoming. “I don't know how many of you opened your USA Today I don't know how many of you get it, but the whole front page was all about disasters and FEMAs running out of money... And as you probably know, there was no capital budget this last time so we didn't get that second $3 million that we desperately need to get things underway,” stated Hite in opening comments. He believes the solution lies in public-private partnerships and reducing costly regulations like those detailed in the Jobs Ohio and Common Sense initiative.  “Well, we were not making Ohio attractive from a business sense. So what they did with Jobs Ohio is

a study of what part of our Department of Development should be gotten rid of because it's a total waste of government money and what part is efficient and then lets set up a board of some of the top people that you could possibly ever come up with for no pay... then go around and attract businesses to Ohio. Even the extension of two years of wind, solar, biomass projects is going to allow the Leipsic area to have a project they might not have had. If you add 50 jobs to a community just like Ottawa or Leipsic the amount of money it brings into the district is astronomical in taxes, in food, in restaurants and all of these other things that get affected by it,” said Hite. Wachtmann concurred: “We think that restructuring Ohio to make it a more business friendly state, a lower tax state, is essential if we're going to turn the jobs situation around in this state. For the most part, development is going to be privatized.  And one of the long term goals is to really leverage state money with private investment.” When asked a question from the audience concerning inefficiencies in the state, Wachtmann cited Issue 2, legislation that seeks to save money by repealing collective bargaining rights, as a step in the right direction.  “Issue 2 is the legislative attempt to, start to at least, partially disassemble the most radical collective bargaining law in the country that's been in place since 1983. It will eliminate the outside arbitrators that come in and generally give away the taxpayers money

when cities, counties, and other entities can't afford it. It will allow for the first time since 1983 for teachers and other public employees to be judged on their merit and their competence versus on just seniority,” said Wachtmann. He also weighed in on unfunded mandates coming from Washington, specifically, the Obamacare bill which Issue 3 seeks to reject. “We are under great duress from Obamacare. We are expected to have to, in the next five years, spend probably $5 or $6 billion more than we're already spending on Medicaid to accommodate the growth of Ohioans who will be eligible for you to pay for their healthcare,” said Wachtmann. He continued, “Obamacare is the biggest mass assault on the free enterprise system and on the hard working people America has ever seen and Issue 3 that is on the ballot that will send a message to Ohio but also to Washington.” Federal regulations were also blamed for the inevitable rise in energy costs.  “There is some truth, perhaps to some increase in the electric bills. It's going to happen anyways.  It's not just because of windmills.  The thing is when you talk about the price and how much we're getting out of it, you hear people say, 'Well, coal is still our cheapest,' but the Obama administration is trying to eliminate that. You talk about other things that we've tried to do and the United States EPA is trying to squish us because they didn't get their cap and trade,” Wachtmann continued.

Pandora begins fall hydrant flushing

Look For These Advertising Inserts In This Week’s Sentinel • American Profile • Relish • Ollies • Beckmans • Ad Ohio • Tractor Supply •Rural King • Menards Selected Areas:

• Rite Aid • JC Penney • Family Dollar • Cabelas • Ron’s Supervalue • Wal Mart

1988 Dodge dump truck with a plow for $5,925. Fifty bids from 17 different bidders were received. A 1992 Ford F-150 was sold for $1,000 with 25 bids from nine different bidders received. The final vehicle was a 1970 Elgin street sweeper which sold for $725. There were 20 bids received from seven different bidders.

Putnam Acres introduces rehab unit, The Runway By Marlena Ballinger Managing Editor OTTAWA — One wing of Putnam Acres Care Center has recently undergone some major renovations. The Runway, a division of Putnam Acres, will offer many short-term rehabilitation services for patients in need of transitional care. Like many nursing homes around the state, Putnam Acres realizes that Ohio Governor Kasich is pushing to keep people at home as long as possible and also realizes that state funding for long term care is being cut. Therefore, the care center decided to make the move by adding short-term care options for residents in and around Putnam County. Putnam Acres administrator, Abel Quintero said that the new short-term care unit was designed with the goal to “get patients home as quickly and safely

as possible.” The recent renovation of the former Alzheimer’s unit included new flooring and a fresh coat of paint. The unit also garnered new, state of the art therapy equipment and each room is equipped with its very own recliner, flat panel television and hospital bed. Quintero is proud of the fact that most of the vendors utilized were local to the area. He said a lot of the furniture came from Dillers Medical Supply in Bluffton and the window treatments came from Heringhaus Furniture in Ottawa. The flooring was done by Matijevich Floor Covering and the wing was decorated with paintings from Bruce Stowe, a local artist. According to Quintero, The Runway is not expected to add staffing for Putnam Acres but will add stability to the current staff. Currently, therapy for

Jeffery H. Long, C.P.A. Jeff was appointed as Fiscal Officer in October 2010 and now seeks your vote to remain. Jeff is active in many professional organizations including the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the Ohio Society of Certified Public Accountants, and the Construction Financial Management Association serving as the Northwest Ohio Chapter’s current Treasurer and Steering Committee member. Jeff is a current board member and participates in the finance committee of The Family and Child Abuse Prevention Center, and he is a member of the Ohio Township Association and Knights of Columbus. Jeff and his family are members of St. Nicholas & Holy Family Catholic Church in Miller City.

Your Best Value in Family Entertainment! 119 South Main, Bluffton, Ohio

www.shannontheatre.com 419-358-1141 Playing Nov 4 - Nov 10

the residents is provided through Northwest Physical Therapy who will continue to offer services. The center currently has two full-time therapists on-site for residents. The nine room unit is expected to offer physical, occupational, speech, respiratory, restorative therapies along with amputee, orthopedic, stroke and neurologic rehabilitation services. The Runway is also designed to offer respite and hospice care. Quintero said future renovations are in the works for the remainder of the facility. Located at 10170 Road 5-H, just outside of Ottawa, Putnam Acres is hosting a public open house for those who would like to view The Runway on Nov. 10 from 2 until 7 p.m. Refreshments will be provided with entertainment from 2 until 4 p.m.

Retain Liberty Township’s Fiscal Officer

hannon Theatre

Lifelong resident

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG)

2D Show times are every evening at 7 PM with Sat & Sun matinees at 1:30 PM 3D Show times are every evening at 9:30 PM with Sat & Sun matinees at 4:00 PM

2D tickets are $3.00 3D tickets are $6.00 Join us on Sat. Nov. 5th for our annual Customer Appreciation Day! All concessions only $1.00 All day long! Door prizes! Giveaways with every ticket!

of Putnam County Miller City-New Cleveland High School, 1993 University of Toledo; Bachelor of Business Administration (Magna Cum Laude), 1997

00026055

week with the majority going toward water line material. Schneck also reported fall hydrant flushing has begun and two fire hydrants broken last year during flushing were scheduled to be replaced on Oct. 27. One is located on College Road between Washington Street and Diller Street and the other on the corner of Monroe and Krohn.      In other business, Schneck reported the sale of three village vehicles. Sold were a

00026334

By Dar Nevergall Staff Writer PANDORA — Scott Basinger, village solicitor for the village of Pandora, updated the members of the Pandora Village Council on the current status of a blighted property at their meeting Oct. 25. Robert Kirk, the contractor hired by mortgage holder Bank of America to inspect the property, informed Basinger and Pandora Police Chief Scott Stant he would be recommending the property be demolished due to the renovation costs being too expensive. Upon receiving the contractor's recommendation, Bank of America will make a final decision as to whether the residence be demolished or sold “as is.” In other business, Village Administrator Stanley Schneck reported the water line to St. John Mennonite Church is now complete and the hydrants have been installed along Road 4.  Workers were able to install the loop water line almost to State Route 12 and make the sewer hook-up along Basinger Road. They are now heading east toward the church. The first payment on the project, totalling $92,130.40 was made last

Staff photo/Marlena Ballinger

Shown above is the therapy section of the newly renovated wing at Putnam Acres Care Center dubbed The Runway. The Runway is a transitional care unit for those needing short term rehabilitation services.

Flavor of the Month for November: BLACK FOREST & BLUFFTON ICON

Hours: Thurs. - Sat. 9 am - 6 pm 117 S. Main St., Bluffton 419-230-7606 www.shirleyspopcorn.com

Employed by William Vaughan Company, Certified Public

Jeff is married to Sarah and together they have five childrent – Tyler, Abigail, Karyssa, Maxon and Maecyn.

Accountants, 1997 to present

Paid for by Jeffery H. Long. Jeffery H. Long, CPA, Treasurer, 10846 SR 613, Ottawa, Ohio 45875

00026445

The FDA Issued A WARNING on July 13, 2011 about the complications suffered from

TRANSVAGINAL MESH If you have been injured by the surgical use of a Transvaginal Mesh Insert, you may be eligible for legal compensation.

If you or a loved one have experienced: • infection • pain • urinary problems • vaginal scarring • tissue or mesh erosion • recurrence of prolapse and/or incontinence • bowel, bladder or blood vessel perforation Contact us immediately, as your state’s statute of limitations puts a time limit on your ability to file a claim.

Then open a Classic 1st Checking!

Please call (888) 474 - 4994 LAW OFFICES OF

KEVIN AGIN

Offices in Lancaster & Circleville, OH

Or Co-Council

RICHARD R. ROSENTHAL, P.C.

200 Title Building 300 North Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd, Birmingham, AL 35203-3357 00026137

“No representation is made that the quality of legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers”

00026351

for a FREE CONSULTATION of your legal rights.

NO monthly fees

FREE checks for life

NO minimum balance requirement

FREE paper statements

Ottawa 909 North Perry St. Phone: 523.3370

McComb 340 W. Cooper St. Phone: 293.3135 Please ask for complete checking account details. Accounts verified by ChexSystems.


A4

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

Grand Re-Opening November 1-30

PC Solutions & RadioShack have moved!

Moved From 820 North Locust Street

(next to Goodwill, Letter “A” on map)

to 250 Meadow Glen Drive (behind Arby’s, Letter “B” on map)

Enter to Win a Velocity Micro Cruz WiFi Tablet

7” 800x600 touchscreen Android 2.2 operating system Kindle for Android eReader app Supports video, picture and music

$25 Off

Virus Removal Must present coupon. Expires 11/30/11

Registration Form for Velocity Micro Cruz WiFi Tablet

Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ Phone ____________________________________ *Need not be present to win. Winner will be notified by phone. Deadline for registration for is 11/30/11. Drawing will be on 11/30/11.

00026130

419-523-0050 250 Meadow Glen Drive, Ottawa Next to Arby’s

NEW OR UPGRADE = GREAT PRICE. We are an authorized Dish Network Dealer

We Sell and Repair Computers


Opinion

Putnam County Sentinel

The Putnam County Sentinel

Ottawa, Ohio

Stephen Johnson Publisher

news@putnamsentinel.com

Our View The village of Ottawa will be asking voters for a .65 percent income tax increase on the Nov. 8 ballot. The increase will raise the village’s income tax to 1.65 percent. During a forum sponsored by the Putnam County Sentinel on Monday, Oct. 31 it was apparent that candidates running for village council seem split on whether this issue should pass voters. The current village council appointed an income tax committee and that committee has been pounding the pavement in an effort to educate residents regarding the use of income tax for the village. This is a good idea, it will allow voters to make an informed decision. We understand that everyone is tightening their belts, including municipalities. Candidates brought to light some new savings council could consider instead of asking residents and workers within Ottawa to give more money from each paycheck. Some of the proposed cuts include forcing village workers to pay a portion of their insurance premiums. One council candidate proposed the savings to the tune of over $91,000 for the village. Although we feel this is a good idea, it still would not be enough to bring the village out of a deficit spending. Current council members have already looked at ways they could cut services to save the village money. It will not be an easy decision if the income tax increase does not pass. When you go to vote on Nov. 9, keep in mind the things you may take for granted while living in Ottawa. Do you like the added protection of police officers during times of distress? Do you like driving on snow free roads? Do you like raking your leaves to the curb so someone can take them away? If you answered yes to any of these questions then you should consider voting yes for the income tax increase.

Guest Columnist

November is National Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month By Linda S. Petersen November is National Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month but unfortunately in light of this many are still not aware that it is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. It has been 40 years since the enactment of the 1971 National Cancer Act and over the past decade there has been significant improvement in overall cancer survival rates. Sadly, pancreatic cancer survival rates are not reflected in this. In fact this insidious disease has seen an increase of cases and deaths since 1998 and remains the only cancer that still has a five-year survival rate in the single digits at six percent. In January of 2008, my life and my family were changed forever by this disease. My dad had been ill for several months and underwent a variety of tests finding no reason behind his dramatic weight loss, stomach pain and out of control blood sugars. Finally his family doctor did a CAT scan of the abdomen and that is when the realization of a mass in his pancreas became very apparent. I, like many others, had no firsthand knowledge of this type of cancer but as we talked to specialists and oncologists in two different states, you could sense the severity of the illness. You learn early on that members of the medical profession are not inclined to tell you the statistics of survival. They will tell you your options, the complications and possible outcome of treatments but they can’t tell you if you’ll have another Christmas with your loved ones. Unfortunately, Dad’s type of pancreatic cancer was inoperable. The only chance we had at a fight was intense chemotherapy along with radiation as well as a lot of prayer and faith. Dad was never one to let pesky statistics he read stop him from his determination of surviving. He still got up every day and went to work at the office. The only time he missed work was for doctor’s appointments and chemo/radiation treatments and even then he would still return to the office the same day. “Giving Up” was two words not in his vocabulary. I’m sad to say though Dad lost his battle with pancreatic cancer on July 25, 2008; just a little over six months after his diagnosis. I had the opportunity several weeks before his death to spend a day with him while he received his chemotherapy. We talked about everything under the sun rather than listening to the IV drip into his vein as we sat for six hours. During an emotional part of our conversation, I finally asked him “How do you do it? How do you keep going? Keep fighting?” His answer was simple, “I have to. This cancer will not beat me.” Oddly, he was right about that in the end. The cancer didn’t beat him but the complications from it did. So as we start National Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month Nov. 1, I will be wearing my purple awareness ribbon in remembrance of my dad, Earl Miehls Jr. But for me, every day of the year is a day to advocate for more research in early detection and better treatment of pancreatic cancer. With more awareness, perhaps someday pancreatic cancer will not take away the experiences from another father of Christmas with his family, walking his only daughter down the aisle or the birth of his grandchild. For more information on pancreatic cancer and how to help, please visit www.pancan.org.

Putnam County Sentinel Serving Putnam County Since 1855

Stephen Johnson......................................Publisher Marlena Ballinger...........................Managing Editor Lisa Smith.................................Marketing Manager Mark Ranes..............................Circulation Manager Diane Schulte................................Creative Director PO Box 149, 224 East Main Street Ottawa, Ohio 45875 Ph. 419-523-5709

A5

Giving blood is your duty During a blood drive held at Putnam Acres on Monday, Oct. 31, I donated a pint of my blood to the Red Cross. I am always nervous about giving blood. I mean, who likes having a needle the size of a pencil lead jabbed into your arm. The Red Cross workers always look at me funny when I tell them, they get one stick. If they can’t get my blood with one try, they don’t get it. I don’t mean to be grumpy to the technician, I’m just not one for pain. I do however feel the obligation to give blood to help others out. My giving days began when I was a senior in high

school and I have tried to The Red Cross also has give as often as my sched- shown that I am not alone ule allows. in my donaWhile at a INFORM tion. In fact, in previous 2006 over 16 job, my million blood employer donations would were collected hold blood in a year and drives as the number of often as blood donors we were in the U.S. in allowed to EDUCATE that same year donate and MARLENA BALLINGER was over 9.5 I donated million. Keep Managing Editor each time. in mind that Giving blood is one of the you may give more than best gifts one can give to once per year. Those numsave another’s life. Accord- bers are pretty alarming ing to the Red Cross, every since only 36 percent of the two seconds someone in the U.S. population are eligible U.S. needs blood and more to donate blood. than 38,000 blood donaTo be eligible one must tions are needed daily. weigh over 110 pounds, be

ENTERTAIN

Marlena Ballinger Managing Editor

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

over the age of 18 and pass a series of health questions during a short interview prior to donating blood. The Red Cross cites that one pint of blood can save up to three lives. After one donates, their blood is separated into three components: red cells, platelets and plasma, which is where the three lives come into play. As a blood donor myself, I am sure I am joined in the opinion of the importance of giving and I would like to thank those who feel the same obligation. As we all know, Putnam County has a high cancer rate and cancer patients are a large recipient of donated blood.

Editorials from around Ohio By The Associated Press Excerpts of recent editorials of statewide and national interest from Ohio newspapers: The (Canton) Repository, Oct. 31 Ohio's lack of regulations governing ownership of wild animals turned a harsh spotlight on the state earlier this month. But in contrast to that glare of publicity, suddenly it has grown very dark and quiet in Columbus. At a time when public interest in this issue couldn't be higher, the group charged with making recommendations on how to change state law is meeting in secret. Terry Thompson of Muskingum County freed more than 50 of his exotic menagerie, including tigers and bears, before he committed suicide on his Muskingum County property. County sheriff's deputies then had the unenviable job of hunting for the dangerous creatures and shooting them before they could harm anyone. This worst-case scenario that came to life made it imperative for Gov. John Kasich to act. He assigned a study committee to come up with recommendations for changes in state law by the end of November. But as The Columbus Dispatch noted last week, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources has closed the group's meetings, saying that the committee isn't a public body and does not have to abide by the state's open-meetings laws. ... ODNR should abide by both the spirit and the letter of the state's Sunshine Laws and open these meetings to the public. There is simply no good reason to shut Ohioans out. Akron Beacon Journal, Oct. 29 The prospect of carrying for decades a load of student debt hardly encourages advanced learning. On Wednesday, President Obama took a well-advised step in issuing the “Pay As You Earn” executive order. There are many reasons postsecondary enrollment has increased 22 percent nationwide the past five years. In its recent “Trends in College Pricing” report, the College Board illustrated one of them, noting: “In 2010, the $99,716 median family income for families headed by a four-year college graduate was more than twice the median income for families headed by a high school graduate.” In short, the demand for higher education is growing along with the value, while college costs are rising faster than inflation. At the same time, family finances have been battered by a poor economy. ... Congress approved legislation last year to ease the loan repayment burden. The president's plan, in effect, expedites that initiative, pushing to have the relief fully in effect in

2012 rather than in 2014. The current law caps monthly payments at 15 percent of income and forgives outstanding loans after 25 years. Obama's order lowers the cap to 10 percent and loan forgiveness after 20 years. ... The president's plan isn't novel, and it doesn't address escalating college costs, the root cause of indebtedness. ... What it does is promise modest relief, when every last buck counts, to about 1.6 million borrowers, among them roughly 76,000 in Ohio. The (Toledo) Blade, Oct. 28 If Ohioans are safer when more people carry guns — even in bars — then why are firearms banned in the Statehouse, including the bar that just opened there? And why will guns soon be banned from the Statehouse grounds as well? When the gun lobby demanded that concealed-carry permit holders be allowed to pack heat wherever they go, Republicans in the General Assembly answered the call to arms by making it legal to bring concealed weapons to parks, sports and concert arenas, restaurants, bars and other public places. The pro-gun argument was that law-abiding permit holders are no threat to anyone. Indeed, they said, everyone would be safer because the bad guys would not know who might be armed. Yet lawmakers did not extend that level of supposed safety to themselves. Instead, they bravely banned legally licensed guns from the Statehouse and its underground garage, leaving themselves at the mercy of armed criminals. The Capitol Square Review and Advisory Board wants to go further. ... (I)t voted to prohibit concealed weapons from the grounds around the Statehouse as well. ... Self-evidently, lawmakers who voted to allow concealed guns in bars valued their own safety — and the favor of the gun lobby — more than they valued public safety.

Letter to the Editor

Thank you for believing in us To the editor: All Pauline’s Children would like to thank everyone for all the donations you gave us to help bring awareness and fight Alzheimer’s. With all of your help we have raised over $21,700 for the Northwest Alzheimer’s Association. We could never have done this without you. Thank you for believing in us. De Johnson, Team Captain All Pauline’s Children

Remember When 31 October 1936 The Sentinel again stressed its readers to vote for Roosevelt and an entire Democratic ticket by comparing farm prices in 1932, under President Hoover with 1936 prices under Roosevelt. Hogs were $3 in 1932 with $9.80 in 1936; Wheat 43 cents bu. in 1932, $l.09 bu. in 1936; Corn 22 cents bu. in 1932, 95 cents bu. in 1936; Oats 13 cents bu. in 1932, 40 cents bu. in 1936; Barley 42 cents bu. in 1932, 99 cents bu. in 1936. Rev. Father Herman Lammers, native of New Cleveland and assistant pastor of Delphos St. John’s for a number of years, was painfully injured in an auto accident in that city on Friday. Father Lammers was confined to his bed for several days. A WPA project, which will employ on an average of 12 to 15 men for a period of several months, was started at the Ottawa Armory this week. This extensive repair and remodeling job includes a new roof and the building will be completely rewired for electricity. Services for Brother Ralph Vincke, native of Ottoville, were held in St. Charles Seminary at Car-

thagena Wednesday morning. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand F. Vincke. Had he lived until Tuesday he would have been 34 years of age. He became suddenly ill on Saturday morning and died the following day. 3 November 1961 A Halloween masquerade party was held at the Gilboa Grange Hall. The children’s division winners were Jane Ward, most original; funniest, Jimmie and David Wehrly; prettiest, Joey and Diane Radabaugh and best group, Tony and Kathy Sue Crawfis. Winners in the adult class were Mrs. Reed Radabaugh, Mrs. George Miller, Mrs. Grace Stewart, Mrs. Mary Pingle and Mrs. Dale Crawfis. The Putnam County Civil Defense Office will be open 3 days per week in the court house, due to the increase in world tension. This will give the public and directors an opportunity to have their questions answered. A county-wide meeting this past week included 35 key chairmen, staff members, mayors and directors. The possibility of group shelters was discussed. The following Kalida cheerleaders were elected

www.putnamsentinel.com ©Copyright 2011 by the Putnam County Sentinel The Putnam County Sentinel (USPS 45110000) is published every Wednesday by Putnam County Publications, Inc. Periodicals Prices Paid at Ottawa, OH. Subscription price Putnam County Sentinel is $42.50 per year in Putnam County and surrounding counties. Postmaster: Send address changes to PO Box 149, Ottawa, OH 45875. In addition, the Sentinel’s

for the ’61-’62 basketball season. Varsity: Delores Laudick, DeeDee Maag, Kay Reynolds and Sharon Unverferth; Reserve, Alice Smith, Linda Maag, Marilyn Foppe and Barbara Unverferth; Junior High, Linda VonderEmbse, Kathy By Helen Kaverman Kidd, Joyce Siebeneck and Sentinel Columnist Jane Duling. Orville Purdy, of Leipsic, a veteran employee of the ers and the cameras that go Ohio Power, retired after with them, playing a cassette and the tape deck in 41 years of service. her car. She planned to take lessons from her grandson 29 October 1986 Jerry Bunn has been the for all these new fangled cross country coach at Co- items. Tim Berelsman, son of lumbus Grove for 11 years. Mr. and Mrs. J. Berelsman, This year he sent the entire Ft. Jennings, was named to team to state. Jerry Stechthe Dean’s List for the sumschulte was coach when mer quarter at the Univerthe teams of 1969, ’70 and sity of Cincinnati. ’71 made it to state. The Don Kimmet, Putnam 1969 team ran barefoot. County extension agent, reSome of the 1969 team ceived a note from the agriwere Greg Verhoff, Mark cultural extension agent in Benroth, Denny Tavenner, Asheboro, N.C., thanking Tim Stechschulte and Steve Snider. As a result of the the Ft. Jennings farmers “barefoot brigade” the of- for the shipment of hay, via ficials enforced mandatory train to N.C., during the seshoes for all cross country rious dry spell in the south. Two Putnam County men meets. are expected to receive the Marguerite Calvin wrote in Personally Speaking 32nd Degree of Freemaabout her problems with sonry at the Scottish Rite modern technology, includ- reunion in Toledo. They are ing: computers, microwave William A. Hunt of Ottawa ovens, microwave popcorn and Robert N. Bryson of bags, videocassette record- Leipsic. Publishing date, Volume number, and Issue number are on the front of the newspaper as part of our masthead. Business Hours Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday 8 a.m. to noon; Closed Saturday and Sunday E-mail letters to the editor and other news releases to: news@putnamsentinel.com


A6

Obituaries

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Norbert Steffen

MILLER CITY — Norbert C. Steffen, 94, of Miller City died at 11:43 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2011 at Hilty Memorial Home, Pandora. He was born Sept. 27, 1917 in Miller City to the late John and Edna (Alt) Steffen. On April 23, 1941 he married his school sweetheart, Leona Eiden who survives in Miller City. Also surviving are five children, John (Elaine) Steffen of Findlay, James (Joyce) Steffen of Miller City, Tom (Christine) Steffen of Livonia, Mich., Jeanette (Charles) Meyer of Ottawa, and Teresa (Wayne) Hermiller of Ottawa; 20 grandchildren; and 40 greatgrandchildren. He was also preceded in death by two brothers, Paul

Naomi Bellman

OTTAWA — Naomi L. Heitmeyer Bellman, 76, of Ottawa died at 2:22 a.m. Thursday Oct. 27, 2011 at her residence. She was born June 21, 1935 in Putnam County to the late Cornelius and Elizabeth (Unverferth) Meyer. On Nov. 22, 1956 she married Paul Heitmeyer who died March 6, 1992. On Jan. 16, 1996 she married Virgil Bellman who survives in Ottawa. Also surviving are seven children, Charles (Lynn) Heitmeyer of Defiance, Sharon (Mark) Fortman of Kalida, Gail (Mark) Bockrath of Glandorf, Lisa (Larry) Ball of Findlay, Craig (Cindi) Heitmeyer of Berwick, Maine, Todd Heitmeyer of Kalida and Dawn (Tim) Kersh of Glandorf; four stepchildren, Linda (Steve) Blankemeier of Miller City, Ron (Sue) Bellman of Glandorf, Marilyn “Mert”

and Raymond Steffen; and a sister, Margie Steffen. Norbert was retired from Campbell Soups in Napoleon, had worked at GTE Sylvania, and was a dairy grain farmer. He was a 1936 graduate of Miller City High School where he played basketball. He was a member of St. Nicholas Catholic Church, Miller City; was U.S. Army veteran of World War II; a member of the Ottawa Eagles; Ottawa Knights of Columbus; and the Miller City Sportsman Club. Norbert and his wife Leona were awarded the Outstanding Senior Citizen award for 2011 and was a Red Cross volunteer. He enjoyed polka dancing, dancing the waltz, playing euchre, bowling, basketball and other sports. He loved being with his wife, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at St. Nicholas Catholic Church, Miller City with Fr. Matt Jozefiak officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Leipsic. Memorials may be made to St. Nicholas Parish Center or to the Red Cross. Condolences can be sent to www.lovefuneralhome. com. Recker of Glandorf, and Marlene (Doug) Niese of Ottawa; 17 grandchildren; ten step grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; four step great-grandchildren; two sisters, Marilyn Warnecke of Glandorf and Mary Ellen (George) Kuhbander of Leipsic; and a sister-inlaw, Mary Agnes Meyer of Leipsic. She was also preceded in death by four brothers, Virgil, Norman, Elmer, and Harold Meyer and three sisters, Alvera O’Toole, Florence Dye, and Beatrice French. Naomi retired from Weatherseal after more than 29 years. She was a member of Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church, Ottawa, Kalida Catholic Ladies of Columbia, and Kalida Fire Ladies Auxiliary. She loved spending time with her family and friends. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. Monday, Oct. 31, at Sts. Peter and Paul Catholic Church, Ottawa with Fr. Matt Jozefiak officiating. Burial was in St. Michael Cemetery, Kalida. Arrangements were handled by Love Funeral Home, Ottawa. Memorials may be made to Sts. Peter and Paul Education Fund, St. Michael Steeple Fund, or to Putnam County Hospice. Condolences can be sent to: www.lovefuneralhome. com.

Blanchard Township Trustees meeting scheduled

Rosalie Rosengarten

NEW CLEVELAND — Rosalie A.”Pose” Rosengarten, 86, of New Cleveland died 8:50 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 30, 2011 at The Meadows of Ottawa-Glandorf. She was born April 19, 1925 in Miller City, to the late Frank and Elizabeth (Luttfring) Niese. On Feb. 20, 1946, she married Tom Rosengarten who died March 22, 1999. Surviving are her children, Ron (Sharon) Rosengarten, Gene (Carolyn) Rosengarten, Steve (Judy) Rosengarten, Rick (Donna) Rosengarten and Allen (Stephanie) Rosengarten

Charlotte Miller

ARLINGTON, Texas — Charlotte Catherine Miller, 88, died on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, at the Medical Center of Arlington in Arlington, Texas. She was born April 14, 1923, in Kinston, N.C., the daughter of the late Louis Parham Baysden Sr. and Mary Owen. On Jan. 13, 1947, she married Clark David Miller and he preceded her in death on July 9, 1994. Surviving are a son, Dennis Clark Miller of Arlington, Texas; three daughters, Anita R. (Ronald) Boroff of Arlington, Texas, Alicia D. (Douglas) Hothem of West Lafayette, and Verna L. “Sue” (Marvin) Rau of Continental; seven grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren; six great-greatgrandchildren and one in the oven; a brother, Raymond Baysden of Bryan; and a sister, Lee Kretz of Palm Coast, Fla. She was also preceded in death by two brothers, Louis, Jr. and Roger Bays-

Rita Birkemeier

KALIDA — Rita M. Birkemeier, 89, of Kalida, died at 6:42 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31, 2011 at St. Rita’s OTTAWA — The next regular scheduled meeting of the Medical Center, Lima. Blanchard Township Trustees has been changed to MonShe was born Dec. 14, day, Nov. 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Blanchard Township Of- 1921 in Ft. Jennings to the fice. late John and Helen (Kramer) Maenle. On June 28, 1941, she married Raymond F. Birkemeier who died Feb. 16, 1995. Rita is survived by her children, Don (Connie) Birkemeier of Lima; John Birkemeier of Kalida, Jean (John A.) Herman of Ottoville, Judy (Dennis) Bendele of Kalida and Nancy Goedde of Kalida; 19 grandchildren and 38 great-

Elect Bernie Kahle Jackson Township Trustee

Putnam County Sentinel

all of Ottawa; 12 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren; two brothers, Robert Niese of Ottawa and Neal (Pat) Niese of Calif.; two sisters, Viola Schroeder of Leipsic and Luella (Don) Snyder of Defiance. She was preceded in death by two brothers, Theodore Niese and Vincent ”Jim” Niese; two sisters, Marie VonderEmbse and Ethel Burleson; and two greatgrandchildren. Rosalie had owned Rosengarten Construction in Ottawa with her husband. She was a member of Holy Family Catholic Church, New Cleveland. She enjoyed traveling, fishing, crafts, cards and dominos. A Mass of Christian Burial will begin 10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Holy Family Catholic Church, New Cleveland with Fr. Stephen Schroeder officiating. Burial will follow in church cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Love Funeral Home, Ottawa. Memorials may be made to the charity of donor’s choice. Condolences may be expressed at: wwwlovefuneralhome.com. den; and two sisters, Adell Turner and Josphine Jones. Mrs. Miller was a homemaker. She was a member of the Continental Motorcycle Club. She was a Girl Scout leader for Apple Seed Ridge - Lima, Dupont Ohio Chapter. She was involved with Oakwood Twirladiers and was a Continental band mother. She had a passion for cooking and was a wonderful cook. She loved people and loved to tease them. She was a hard working lady and loved to garden and put up canning for family and friends. Funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 29, at Hanenkrath-Clevenger-Schaffer Funeral Home, Defiance. Rev. Tim Tracy officiated. Burial was in Riverview Memory Gardens, Defiance. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association or the to the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. Condolences may be sent to www.HCSfuneralhome. com. grandchildren. She is preceded in death by two brothers, Gilbert Maenle and Ray Maenle and four sisters, Clara Kromer, Veronica Kehres, Mildred Reynolds and Margaret Maenle. Rita was a homemaker. She was a member of St. Michael’s Catholic Church, Kalida and its Altar Rosary Society and Catholic Ladies of Columbia. She enjoyed playing cards. A Mass of Christian Burial will begin 10:30 a.m. Friday, Nov. 4, at St. Michael’s Catholic Church, Kalida, with Fr. Mark Hoying officiating. Burial will follow in Lima Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m. Wednesday and 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home, Jackson Township, corner of St. Rts. 224 and 634, where a CLC and Alter Rosary service will be Thursday at 7 p.m. Memorials may be given to St. Michael’s Catholic Church or the charity of donor’s choice. Condolences may be expressed to: www.lovefuneralhome.com.

• Past president Ohio Turkey Marketing Program • Past president Ohio Poultry Association • Current member Ohio Poultry Association Board of Directors • Founding board member of the Ohio Farm Animal Care Commission (currently the Ohio Livestock Coalition) • Past president Kalida Atheletic Boosters • General Manager Kahle Turkey Farms Electric Fireplace starting at

249

$

5,200 BTU Infrared 5,200 BTU Infrared 5,200 BTU Infrared Quartz Heater ... only

5,200 BTU Infrared

Limited Supply Special

199

$

LARGEST SELECTION & BEST PRICES 00026474

00026519

NEW CLEVELAND — Dolores T. Heuerman, 79, of New Cleveland died at 11:07 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2011 at The Meadows of Ottawa-Glandorf. She was born Aug. 21, 1932 in Putnam County to the late Corneillus and Anna (Dulle) Slattman. On Sept. 12, 1953, she married Leonard C. Heuerman. He died Oct. 12, 2005. Surviving are three children, Dennis (Julie) Heuerman, Kathleen (Bob) Verhoff and Timothy (Beth) Heuerman all of Ottawa; 10 grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren; and a sister,

Legion auxiliary holding Veterans’ Day dinner OTTAWA — On Friday evening, Nov. 11, KernerSlusser American Legion Auxiliary Unit #63 will sponsor a Veterans’ Day Dinner for veterans, their families and the general public. The event will be held at the Ottawa American Legion Hall, 218 W. Main St., Ottawa. A social time will begin at 6 p.m. followed by a catered meal at 6:30 p.m. Entertainment for the evening will be provided by the Ottawa-Glandorf High School jazz band, under the direction of Brent Deskins. The speaker will be Jim Studer, retired 22 year Air Force veteran, presently living in Lebanon. Studer graduated from O-G in 1967 and Miami University in 1971. His first

OVER 200 UNITES ON DISPLAY CELINA LIMA Visit us

5217 Tama Rd.

419-363-2230

on the web www.kernsfireplaceandspa.com

4147 Elida Rd.

419224-4656

assignment then took him to Webb AFB, Texas where he completed pilot training in T-37 and T-38s. During his career, Studer served at eight permanent duty stations and numerous temporary stations throughout the world, logging over 8,000 flying hours. He is presently President of Financial Wings, LLC, an Independent Investment Advisory Firm. Reservations may be made and tickets purchased in the post club room from 3 to 10 p.m. daily at a cost of $10 per person. Veterans’ ticket cost will be refunded at the door the evening of Nov. 11. Tickets must be purchased by 10 p.m. on Nov. 8. No tickets will be sold after this date.

When you vote, take I.D. PUTNAM COUNTY — When you go to vote on Election Day, make sure you bring your identification. Acceptable identification includes: a current and valid photo identification (i.e. Ohio driver license, state ID card, government ID). Photo identification must include your name and address (does not need to be current address for driver license or state id card); or a military identification that shows your name, but not necessarily your address; or a copy of a current utility bill (including cell phone

bill), bank statement, paycheck, government check, or other government document that shows your name and current address (including from a public college or university). Please note that Ohio law provides you cannot use as proof of identification a notice that the board of elections mailed to you. Voters who do not provide one of these documents will still be able to vote by provisional ballot. For more information, please call your local county board of elections office, visit www.sos.state. oh.us, or call the Ohio Secretary of State.

Month end summary reported PANDORA — Guy Verhoff reported the month end weather summary for October. The average maximum temperature for the month of October was 64.5 degrees. The average minimum temperature was 43.5 degrees. This makes the average temperature for the month 54.0 degrees. The normal average temperature for the month of October is 52.1 degrees. The high temperature for the month was 83 degrees

Notice of meeting date change

I have lived my entire life and raised my family in Jackson Township. I would like to use my experience to serve the voters of Jackson Township. Paid for by Bernie Kahle 19760 Rd M-17, Cloverdale, Ohio

Dolores Heuerman

Joan Tobe of Ottawa. Dolores retired in 1994 from Philips Display Components in Ottawa. She was a member of Holy Family Catholic Church, New Cleveland and the Altar Rosary Society. She was also a member of the Red Hat Ladies and the Golden Steppers. She volunteered at The Meadows of Ottawa-Glandorf, Putnam Acres Care Center and was very involved at the Ottawa Knights of Columbus helping with weddings and various other events. She loved playing cards, Yahtzee, Uno and Dominoes with her grandchildren and family. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, at Holy Family Catholic Church, New Cleveland with Fr. Steve Schroeder officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery. Arrangements were handled by Love Funeral Home, Ottawa. Memorials may be made to Putnam County Hospice or a charity of the donor’s choice. Condolences may be expressed at: www.lovefuneralhome.com

OTTAWA — The Putnam County Educational Service Center Governing Board’s regular monthly meeting date has been changed. The board will meet Monday, Nov. 7, at 9 a.m. in the Putnam County Educational Service Center.

Visit us online at putnamsentinel.com

on Oct. 8. The low for the month was 29 degrees on Oct. 30. Precipitation for the month of October was 4.26 inches. Normal average precipitation is 2.27 inches. The weather for the past week: H L Precip. Oct. 25 69 39 .01 Oct. 26 68 47 .45 Oct. 27 48 35 .24 Oct. 28 52 32 Oct. 29 54 31 trace Oct. 30 54 29 Oct. 31 54 38 .08

Death Notices Zachrich, Danny Dale, age 56, of Leipsic died at 5:58 a.m. Friday, Oct. 28, 2011 at St. Rita’s Medical Center, Lima. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at the Leipsic Church of the Nazarene with Pastor Chris Riffle officiating. Burial was in Sugar Ridge Cemetery, Leipsic. Arrangements were handled by LoveHeitmeyer Funeral Home, Leipsic.


For The Record

Putnam County Sentinel

Civil/Contract William and Sarin Parkins of Ottawa to pay, judgment of $1,116 with interest and the costs of this action to the village of Ottawa. Small Claims David J. Closson, Ottawa, to pay judgment of $150 plus court costs and interest to Gary D. Shoemaker, Hamler. Criminal Billy Retcher, 48, Defiance, pleaded no contest to charge of non-support, found guilty, fined $100 and 180 days jail with $100 of fine and 180 days jail suspended on condition: 1) Pay support as ordered, comply with all seek work programs, report any changes to in employment and residence to CSEA. Elijah J. Hovest, 21, Pandora, pleaded guilty to charge of drug abuse/possession, found guilty, fined $50 and 180 day license suspension. Defendant is granted modification of driving privileges upon proof of in-

surance and proof of employment. Brian K. Bennett, 24, Continental, pleaded no contest to amended charge of menacing, found guilty, fined $150 and 30 days jail with 17 days jail suspended on condition: 1) No similar offense in two years or any offense of violence. 2) Defendant is on probation for one year, or until further court order, defendant not to possess firearms as term of probation. 3) Defendant complete an assessment at Pathways or equivalent counseling provider and abide by their recommendations. 4) Defendant is given credit for jail time served. 5) Temporary protection order and own recognizance bond or bond conditions are hereby terminated. Joseph B. Thayer, 28, Lima, pleaded no contest to charge of disorderly conduct, found guilty, fined $75. Traffic Brian C. Vorst, 43, Kalida,

County Court

pleaded guilty to an amended charge of OVI first offense, found guilty, six points, fined $750 and 180 days jail and two year class five license suspension, ALS is terminated and sentence is modified as follows: $375 of fine and 171 days jail suspended on conditions: 1) Attend six day Driving Intervention Program, defendant is to be given credit for six days jail upon completion of DIP Program. 2) No similar or alcohol related offense, no DUS or NOL and no refusal to take breath/blood alcohol test or field sobriety in two years from date of this entry. 3) No violation of driving privileges and maintain insurance. 4) Pay fine and cost. 5) Attend assessment at Pathway. 6) Probation for one year or until further order of the court. 7) Serve three days jail with work release, defendant is to report to jail to serve jail time. 8) The court ordered license suspension modified upon proof of insurance

Common Pleas Criminal Tamera J. Muncy, 29, Belmore, pleaded guilty to one count of possession of drugs. Sentenced to three years community control under general supervision and control of the adult parole authority. Court further imposes the following conditions and sanctions of defendant’s community control: 1) shall be accepted into and successfully complete Worth Center Program; 2) undergo drug and alcohol assessment and treatment as directed by supervising officer and follow all recommendations resulting from said assessments and/or treatments; 3) not consume any alcohol; 4) obtain employment upon release from Worth; 5) pay court costs. Violation of any term of this sentence shall lead to a more restrictive sentence for defendant of 12 months at ODRC. Court further advised defendant that she shall be subject to certain appeal rights. Defendant shall undergo drug testing as ordered by her supervising officer and shall be notified by her supervising officer as to when to report to Putnam County Jail pending placing to Worth Center and shall report as directed. Defendant’s bond continued.

Kristina L. Smith, 27, Tiffin, granted judicial release and placed on three years of community control under general terms and supervision of adult parole authority. Court further imposes specific sanctions and conditions of defendant’s community control as follows: 1)undergo drug assessments and treatment as directed by her supervising officer and follow all recommendations resulting from said assessment and/or treatments; 2 )undergo drug and alcohol use monitoring; 3) obtain employment upon release from custody; 4) pay restitution in the amount of $1,300 to victim, joint and several with co-defendants; 5) follow any conditions ordered by Seneca County; 6) pay court costs of this action. If defendant violates terms of community control she may be subject to a prison term of 12 months at ODRC on Count I and 18 months at ODRC on Count II. Defendant shall be remanded to custody of Seneca County Sheriff’s Office. Carlos R. Hernandez, Jr., 22, Findlay, pleaded guilty to one count of possession of cocaine. Sentenced to three years community control under general supervision and control of the adult parole au-

thority under any terms and conditions that they deem appropriate. Court further imposes the following conditions and sanctions of defendant’s community control: 1) serve 10 days in jail to be completed with/in 30 days of date of this entry with credit for four days previously served; 2) undergo drug and alcohol use monitoring; 3) undergo drug and alcohol treatment and assessment as directed by supervising officer and follow all recommendations resulting from said assessments and/or treatments; 4) pay court costs. Violation of any term of this sentence shall lead to a more restrictive sentence for defendant of 12 months at ODRC. Court further advised defendant that she shall be subject to certain appeal rights. Defendant’s driver’s license shall be suspended for six months with privileges for employment purposes and meeting with supervising officer for counseling purposes. Divorce/Dissolution Melanie Gritzmaker, 47, Kalida, and Mike Gritzmaker, 48, Edgerton, dissolution without children. Angela M. Maag, Ottawa, and Alan P. Maag, Leipsic, divorce with children.

and after 30 days for occupational, treatment, counseling, probation, DIP and personal and minor child related medical purposes with restricted plates. Defendant can apply for further modification of drivers license suspension after attending DIP, payment of fine and cost and passage of one year. If DIP is not completed any limited driving privileges will be revoked. Count II: OVI dismissed with prejudice due to plea negotiations and defendants plea to Count I: OVI. Matthew R. Burwell, 26, Ottawa, pleaded guilty to amended charge of second offense reckless operation, found guilty, four points, fined $250 and 30 days jail and one year class five license suspension, and sentence is modified as follows: 27 days jail suspended on condition: 1) Attend 72 hour driving intervention program and abide by any treatment recommendations and defendant is to be given credit for three days jail upon completion of DIP. 2) No similar or alcohol related offense, no DUS or NOL and no refusal to take breath/blood alcohol test in two years. 3) No violation of driving privileges and maintain insurance. 4) Pay fine and cost. 5) The court ordered license suspension modified upon proof of insurance and after 15 days to permit work commutation driving, to and from DIP, counseling and medical purposes. 6) Defendant can apply for further modification of drivers license suspension after attending 72 hour DIP, payment of fine and cost and passage of 180 days. If DIP is not completed any limited driving privileges will be revoked. Jeffrey L. Dickman, 27, Kalida, pleaded guilty to amended

oncoming traffic. Schreiber pulled into the path of a vehicle driven by Cheryl L. Hamilton, 56, of Springfield, who was traveling northeast on State Route 15. Neither driver was injured. On Oct. 31, Angelica E. Kaufman, 28, of Columbus Grove, was westbound on State Route 613 when she lost control on wet pavement, slid off the right side of the road, striking five tombstones before the vehicle rolled on its side. Kaufman was transported to St. Rita’s Medical Care Center with non-incapacitating injuries. Jennifer A. Siebeneck, 28, of Kalida, was eastbound on Road M on Nov. 1 when her vehicle struck a deer. Incidents An officer responded to a harassment call on Oct. 25 at the Car-E-It Party Shop in Ottawa. An officer responded to an unruly juvenile call in Columbus Grove on Oct. 25. An officer responded to a traffic complaint at Road P-9 and Old State Route 65 on Oct. 26.

The Putnam County Sentinel & Vidette are offering a Special Veteran’s Tribute page to honor members of your family with a photo in our special Veteran’s Day salute. The feature will include veterans, both living and deceased as well as those men and women who are presently serving our country in the armed forces There are two ways to have your tribute printed with or without a photo. With a photo = $15.00 Without a photo = $10.00

LOCAL TRADE

4,299

ONLY 10 MIN. FROM LEIP SIC! 20 MIN.FROM CONTINEN TAL! 15 MIN. FROM OTTAWA!

PARKING ON THE STREET

Stop in and see

Charlie McCullough Cell (419) 615-3909 WE NEED YOUR TRADE!

If we don’t have it ~ we can get it!

00026490

The tribute will be in the November 9th & 10th issue of the Putnam County Sentinel and Vidette. Deadline for submission is Friday, November 4th

SUNROOF

HUGE SELECTION ORE OF NEW! M LY! AI D ARRIVING

419-274-2441

Part of the Integrity Group Family

Toll Free 800-894-2441 128 Main St., Hamler

Name Rank & Branch

Hometown: Dates of Service: Wars/Conflicts:

To ensure a good reproduction of your photograph, submitted photos should be printed on photo quality paper or sent electronically by email to sales@putnamsentinel.com. If you want your photograph returned, please enclose or give us a self-addressed stamped envelope and indicate your request on the coupon below.

Name: ___________________________ Deceased: r

Killed in Action: r

Rank & Branch of Service _____________________________________________ Hometown: _________________________________________________________ Dates of Service: ____________________________________________________ Wars/Conflicts: ______________________________________________________ You can email photos to sales@putnamsentinel.com Payment method: r Cash r Check r Credit Card (Visa, Mastercard or Discover) All Tributes must be prepaid. Please submit as early as possible for payment to reach our office by 5 p.m. Friday, November 4th. r PLEASE RETURN PHOTO IN SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE ENCLOSED

WE BUY•SELL•TRADE!

Open 24 - 7 Visit hamlerchevy.com

(419) 523-0050 Radio Shack Brandon Stark (419) 969-9055 Cell Dish Network Installation Specialist 00025529

Paid for by the James Leopold for Ottawa Township Trustee 9452 Road 11, Ottawa, OH 45875

LOW MILES

$

820 N. Locust Suite 2 Ottawa, OH 45875

✜ Married to Sue (Liebrecht) Leopold for 25 years ✜ Children: Ryan (19), Jacob (16), Jeremy (10), Tyler (8) and Aubrey (4) ✜ Since my work schedule is flexible, I am available to attend daytime meetings related to Township issues. I also provide physical labor to complete necessary Township work (snowplowing, ditchwork, road maintenance). ✜ Occupation: Grain and Livestock Farmer and current Ottawa Township Trustee ✜ Lifelong resident of Ottawa-Glandorf area and graduate of Ottawa-Glandor High School ✜ Current and active member of Glandorf Fire Dept. for 23 years ✜ Member of Glandorf St. John the Baptist Church

CHARLIE’S SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 2000 PONTIAC GRAND AM

Jenna L. Doepker, 18, Ottawa, pleaded guilty to charge of failure to yield, found guilty, fined $50. Robert O. Carrillo, 29, Pandora, pleaded guilty to charge of driving under FRA suspension, found guilty, fined $150. Pleaded guilty to charge of child restraint, found guilty, fined $50. Jacob J. Fry, 18, Continental, speeding, fined $50. Ryan Thomas Carr, 19, Defiance, right-of-way/stop sign/ yield signs, fined $50. Nicole Jessica Bragenzer, 23, Findlay, stop sign, fined $50. Kayla R. Dukes, 18, Bluffton, speeding, fined $40. Steven D. Stimmel II, 19, Lima, speeding, fined $50. Brandon J. Adkins, 19, Oakwood, speeding, fined $50. Terri E. Grismore, 60, Pandora, failure to yield, fined $50. Jay R. French, 46, Rockford, Mich., traffic control device violation, fined $50. Kimberly M. Bockrath, 26, Fort Jennings, speeding, fined $60. Bethany Ann Deetz, 25, Kettering, speeding, fined $50. Matthew J. Niese, 29, Cloverdale, speeding, fined $60. Joseph A. Hoersten, 27, Fort Jennings, speeding, fined $80. Andrew M. Warner, 28, Cincinnati, speeding, fined $80. Eileen F. Alic, 71, Findlay, speeding, fined $50. Jay McGee, 50, Lima, speeding, fined $50.

James (Jim) Leopold for Ottawa Township Trustee

00026600

ditch, rolled onto the driver’s side and flipped over. Smith was transported to St. Rita’s Medical Center by the Ottawa EMS with incapacitating injuries. Bradley D. Nuveman, 16, of Glandorf was traveling east on Road I on Oct. 27 when he lost control at the curve where Road I turns into Road 13. The vehicle went off the left side of the road and struck a utility pole. Nuveman was not injured. On Oct. 28, Linda M. Cherry, 61, of Pandora was westbound on Road Q when her vehicle struck a dog that had ran into her path. Eric W. Maenle, 31, of Vaughnsville was northbound on Road 14-S on Oct. 28 when his vehicle struck a deer. On Oct. 28, Joe D. Fortman, 57, of Glandorf was westbound on US 224 near Road 11-J when a southbound deer struck his vehicle causing damage to the rear driver’s side door. Ronald C. Schreiber, 47, of Continental, was traveling north on Road 18 on Oct. 29 when he failed to yield to

charge of second offense reckless operation, found guilty, four points, fined $250 and 30 days jail, ALS is to continue and sentence is modified as follows: 27 days jail suspended on condition: 1) Attend 72 hour driving intervention program, defendant to be given credit for three days jail. 2) No similar or alcohol related offense, no DUS or NOL and no refusal to take breath/blood alcohol test in two years. 3) No violation of driving privileges and maintain insurance. 4) Pay fine and cost. 5) The court ordered license suspension modified upon proof of insurance and after 30 days to permit work commutation driving, to and from DIP and medical purposes. If DIP is not completed any limited driving privileges will be revoked. Freddie L. Miller, 63, Detroit, Mich., pleaded guilty to amended charge of speed, found guilty, fined $50. Julie M. Shaw, 45, Lima, entered guilty plea to amended speed, fined $50. Sebastian G. Venturella, 53, Wapakoneta, entered guilty plea to amended speed, fined $150 plus court costs. Count II: dismissal of failure to reinstate with prejudice due to plea negotiations and defendants plea to companion charge of speed. Defendant is ordered to pay court costs. Joshua H. Trenkamp, 21, Fort Jennings, pleaded guilty to charge of right-of-way/stop sign/ yield signs, found guilty, fined $50. Pleaded guilty to companion charge of failure to control, found guilty, fined $50. Michelle Arrizola, 27, Ottawa, pleaded guilty to charge of driving under suspension, found guilty, fined $150.

A7

RE-ELECT

Sheriff’s Log Accidents Jeremy R. Bishop, 35, of Ottawa, was westbound on State Route 694 on Oct. 24, when his vehicle struck a deer that ran into his path. Kyle Joseph Meyer, 17, of Ottawa, was eastbound on State Route 613 on Oct. 24 when he stopped at a stop sign at State Route 15. Meyer then pulled out in front of a vehicle driven by Deanna M. Nienberg, 32, of Ottawa. The Nienberg vehicle struck the Meyer vehicle, pushing it to the right where the Meyer vehicle struck another vehicle driven by Matthew Frisbee, 24 of Rossford. There were no injuries. Meyer was cited for a stop sign violation. Michael L. Knueven, 48, of Deshler was southbound on County Road 12 when a deer ran into the side of his truck causing damage to the door. The deer then ran off. On Oct. 25, James D Smith, 59, of Lima was northbound on State Route 65 when the right front tire blew out on his dump truck. The truck went off the right side of the road, struck a

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

00025343

Clip & mail with payment & photo to the Putnam County Sentinel Veteran’s Tribute P.O. Box 149, Ottawa, OH 45875


General

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Forum ➤➤From A1 be back on the table, including the credit, and focus groups should be consulted. Meyer is currently serving as mayor and is focused on remaining fiscally solvent: “We're at a point with the village where we're in deficit spending.  We have lost state funding. We're losing interest income. We're losing income tax dollars. We have done a good job of cutting costs and securing grants and we'll need to continue with that even if the tax increase is voted in,” said Meyer. His priorities are cutting costs by securing other revenue streams such as grants and job growth. Meyer points out the current council has helped to add 600 new jobs and retain 500; and flooding mitigation, especially spreading the cost over the entire Blanchard

River Watershed. He also supports the local income tax, “I do support the .65 percent increase. I also support the one percent tax credit that we give to the residents living in the village and working outside the village. This tax increase is needed to continue to provide the services, like safety services, police and fire, snow plowing and all the other services we provide. This increase will also allow the 44 percent of our residents who currently pay no income taxes to help pay for these services.” For Meyer, everything is on the table with the possibility that money could be saved in how Ottawa purchases equipment.  There could also be efficiencies gained by banding together with other local entities to increase purchasing power, especially with water and sewer services. Because

Putnam County Sentinel

they are needed to compete with other regions for businesses, tax abatements and incentives are necessary. Goecke is a life long resident of Ottawa and graduated with a BA from OSU and an MA from GMI. His top priorities are economic development, financial stability and flood mitigation. He also supports the tax increase. “I too support the tax increase. Because the village is in need of financing our current obligations to maintain our village. A projected increase of about $390 per $60,000 income sounds like a great deal for all the services we receive,” he said. Goecke believes cuts can be made in road and sewer maintenance, equipment can be shared and fire and police regionalized. Abatements are needed to bring jobs into the region.  Deskins is a 37 year Ot-

tawa resident and OGHS and BGSU graduate. Her top priorities are economic development, balancing the budget and flood mitigation. Regarding the income tax increase: “I would not support the .65 percent income tax increase at this time. Not to say that I wouldn't support it, but I think there are efforts to exhaust other avenues including a reduction in 100 percent health benefits to part-time employees and secondly a review of employee productivity to increase efficiency. I would like to know if there are any specific employee snags that require attention and a few ways to increase employee productivity possibly maintaining positive employee morale through production recognition awards, always promoting from within the village, and creative productive incentives as well,” she said. The top three expenditures she would make cuts to are all internal: shave Wellness and Nutrition, public employee health care What is Cholesterol? and Shop for Healthy Foods,” shared Luebrecht. “After each activity, I would like to offer a healthy snack or food item including fruits and vegetables. Foods will include bananas, EDITOR’S NOTE: This is pineapples, smoothies, yo- the final story from a seven gurts and veggie trays to part series meant to educate name a few. Besides being readers on the Village’s proa fun and educational activ- posed income tax uses. By Marlena Ballinger ity for all students, they will Managing Editor gain valuable information OTTAWA — The village about making good healthy of Ottawa is making one fichoices. Please vote for Kanal push this week to inform lida Elementary! This is the its residents of the uses of last week for the contest and monies generated from inwe would appreciate your come tax. votes!” The committee presented As of Tuesday afternoon two public meetings at the Luebrecht had 30 votes. If Putnam County ESC on you would like to cast your Monday to inform voters of vote for Kalida Elementary the uses of income tax. please visit teachermonday. Income tax is generated votigo.com. From there you can enter the site and via income earnings from vote for Kalida Elementary those who live and work inside the village. Currently, School. the income tax rate is set at one percent but those who work or live within the village are granted a credit that goes towards their existing village of residence. Over the last 10 years, the

Vote ‘yes’ for Kalida nutrition contest By Cortney Mumaugh Sentinel Correspondent KALIDA – Kalida Elementary Physical Education teacher Sherry Luebrecht is once again doing her best to make her students the healthiest they can be. As if teaching physical education is not enough, Luebrecht is currently in Del Monte’s “Teacher Monday: Cash for Classrooms” contest. “This (contest) would be a great opportunity to reach all of my students in promoting a healthy lifestyle. It would allow the students to understand the importance of making healthy choices in developing good eating habits as well as being physically fit for life.” “Teacher Monday: Cash for Classrooms” was created to help get school children to eat healthier. This contest is geared towards teachers of grades kindergarten though grade 12 to promote healthy eat-

ing and healthy messages to their students. In all, 60 teachers will win a total of $1,000 in cash to purchase school supplies and fresh fruit for their students with $750 in cash to purchase school supplies and $250 in Del Monte fresh fruit coupons for classroom fresh snacks and to use in fruit educational activities. A few winners will also get a Del Monte Fresh Field Day event for their school in which the entire student body will enjoy a day of Del Monte fresh fruit, games and fun activities. If Luebrecht wins, she plans to utilize every dollar. “After a completion of a physical education unit, I would like to introduce a one-day nutrition and fitness activity. Some ideas for the one day activity would include: Know your Food Pyramid Groups, Find your Target Heart Rate, Read the Label, Stress Management,

Part 7 of 7

Ottawa council seeking to increase income tax

Dean Rosengarten for Ottawa Township Trustee

village lost over $1 million in income tax revenue from job loss, loss of interest earnings on investments and state cuts. The village looked at ways to cut expenses and found over $373,000 annually to cut. This still leaves an approximate $775,000 deficit to fill. This is where the proposed .65 percent income tax increase will help. The new income tax rate will generate approximately $700,000 annually. This revenue will maintain the services currently provided by the village such as police and fire protection, maintenance of streets and sidewalks, leaf pickup and snow removal, mosquito spraying, economic development and more. “A ‘yes’ vote is important to maintain the services we provide,” said councilman Tim Macke who also sits on the income tax committee.

US Judgement Recovery

✯ Ottawa Township will save over $43,000 because I carry my own health insurance plan and will not require their plan

00026008

and reduce village employees and equipment. She's in favor of regional cooperation especially in police and fire but only if it's more efficient. She's not in favor of the current way tax incentives and abatements for businesses are structured and believes there are other ways to attract businesses to the area. She is not in favor of rescinding the one percent tax credit for those who live in Ottawa but work outside the village. Rather, that money should be found by gaining efficiencies such as subcontracting services. Salsburey has worked at Pro-Tec for 20 years as a maintenance planner and plans to bring his experience in private sector to public office should he be elected. He believes $300,000 a year could be cut from the current village budget across the board. He also does not support the local income tax increase. “I also do not want to approve the tax. If we approve this tax

Helping people get what is rightfully theirs

To l l F r e e : ( 8 5 5 ) 8 3 3 - C A S H ( 2 2 7 4 ) w w w. j u d g e m e n t r e c o v e r y. u s

✯ I will strive to satisfy the people of the township by addressing issues on road maintenance ✯ Life-long resident of Ottawa Township and presently serving on the zoning board for the past 12 years ✯ High school graduate of Miller City High School ✯ 4 years of vocational school ✯ Journeyman in Carpentry and Millwright ✯ Member of New Cleveland Parish ✯ Past member of the Church Maintenance Committee ✯ Full supporter member of Ottawa Eagles, Glandorf Rod & Gun, Miller City Sportsman Club, Napoleon Elks, and life member of Knights of Columbus

00026140

CASH NOW!!

Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: • Back pain • Muscle pain • Arthritis pain • Joint pain

Go Painlessly™ with THERA-GESIC.

Paid for by Dean Rosengarten, 7504 Rd 7-D, Leispic, OH 45856

THG-11905

A8

00026139

and this money is put into the village then there will be no reason for them to make cuts. Let's make the cuts first, make the adjustments and make sure that the money is needed. It could only be a .25 percent increase that's needed so let's make these cuts first. And those cuts are out there,” he said. Consolidation of government services, such as cutting redundant public employee positions, could yield savings. He believes the money employers and employees spend in the village is worth the money spent in tax incentives and abatements. He also holds that cutting the one percent tax credit would have negative consequences. Schmiedebusch graduated from OGHS and OSU with a BA in business marketing. His top priorities are increasing village revenue, especially by increasing the tax base through helping to create jobs and flood mitigation. While he does believe in an income tax increase, he doesn't think it should be .65. “I think there is a small amount of tax increase that should be taken into consideration. I'm not so sure that the .65 is exactly what we need but it looks like the council is making quite a few cuts. If the jobs can get back into the community maybe we can develop more income through that avenue.” He believes all cuts should be made across the board and further efficiencies could be gained by consolidating fire and police services. He regards tax incentives and abatements as necessary to attract businesses. As for repealing the one percent credit if the .65 percent increase does not get passed, he deferred to his earlier comments on seeking a smaller increase and across the board cut.

Maag to serve jail time By Marlena Ballinger Managing Editor OTTAWA — During a trial held in Allen County Court last week, the former mayor of Ottawa was ordered to serve jail time for his actions involving the solicitation of a prostitute. Reportedly, Kenneth Maag, 60 of Ottawa pleaded no contest and was charged with solicitation, a third degree felony. He was sentenced to 30 days in jail with 20 of them suspended. He will be required to serve nine of those days in jail since he was given credit for one day served. Maag was accused of soliciting a prostitute last August after police arrested him at the Econo Lodge Motel in Lima.

®

WATERPROOFING, CRAWL SPACE & FOUNDATION SOLUTIONS

Free sump pump check-up. Cannot be combined with any other offer or existing contracts. Expires 10-31-11

• 00025555

Discount is 10% of the installation price up to a maximum of $500. Cannot be combined with any other offer or existing contracts. Expires 11-30-11


236331_10_x_21 10/25/11 Putnam County Sentinel

10:21 AM Page 1

©2011 Media Services S-9014 OF24336R-1

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

Advertisement

We live in an area which is known for very cold winters. Our Enclosed you will find printouts of our electric bill and facility is nearly 7000 square feet in area. When we began to gas/heating/cooking bills for 2007 - 2008. Our gas compautilize the first unit we were amazed to see how even the heat ny, AmeriGas, stated that more money was saved than was for the entire living room area. We ordered a second and would show up because of the cost going up. We would turn a third unit which now warms the entire home. Much to our the gas on early in the morning and turn it down to 60 desurprise we are saving over $250 a month and had the lowest grees; We would use the EdenPURE heaters from then on and they provided such warmth and cozy heat. We, also, had expense for heating we have ever experienced here. I would fewer colds last winter than in previous years, before we purheartily recommend your products to anybody who is interested in really nice, even heat in their home and also interested in saving on their chased the EdenPURE heaters. Many of our friends have informed me recently that they are going to purchase these heaters for their homes this winter. utility expenses. Dennis Crystal, Troy, MT (Retired Airline Pilot) Gloria D. Smith, Boydton, VA (Retired Elementary Principal)

EdenPURE ranked #1 ®

00026282

Save $192 – biggest savings ever Bob Vila, America’s Favorite Home Improvement Expert, North Canton, Ohio I know why millions of Americans are saving on their heating bills with the EdenPURE ® Infrared Portable Heater. And now you can save up to $192, our lowest price ever on the new 2012 EdenPURE® Personal Heater. The heater I personally rank #1 in North America. And, I’m proud to add, the new and improved EdenPURE® is made in the U.S.A, here in North Canton, Ohio. The engineers at EdenPURE® listened to their millions of customers and somehow managed to improve the #1 portable heater in North America. Through old-fashioned American ingenuity the new EdenPURE® is more efficient to save you even more money. Now heat a larger room more efficiently with a 14% increase in square footage, from 300 to 350 square feet. Plus the safest heater in the world became even safer thanks to EdenPURE ® ’s American engineers. And the good folks at EdenPURE ® even reopened an abandoned factory in the heart of Ohio providing much needed jobs for hundreds of workers. For over 30 years as your home improvement television host, I have reviewed and experienced thousands of products. I have an EdenPURE® in my home and found it to be a very safe and reliable source of portable heat. This is one of those few comfort investments I can recommend for your home that will truly pay dividends. We all know heating costs are expected to remain at record levels. The cost of heating our homes will continue to be a significant burden on the family budget. The EdenPURE ® can cut your heating bills, and pay for itself in a matter of weeks and then start putting a great deal of extra money in your pocket after that. With over one million satisfied customers around the world, the new EdenPURE® heats better, faster, saves more on heating bills, and runs almost silent. # 1 Choice for Fire and Safety Professionals A major cause of residential fires in the United States is portable heaters. The choice of fire and safety professionals everywhere, the EdenPURE® has no exposed heating elements that can cause a fire. The outside of the EdenPURE® only gets warm to the touch so that it will not burn children or pets. And your pet may be just like my dog who has reserved a favorite spot near the EdenPURE®. Accept no imitations The EdenPURE® can also help you feel better. Unlike other EdenPURE® imitators, it will not reduce humidity or oxygen in the room. These

imitators use ceramic plates instead of our patented copper. These inexpensive ceramic plates reduce humidity, dry out your sinuses, make you more susceptible to illness, and make your skin dry. With other heating sources, you'll notice that you get sleepy when the heat comes on because they are burning up oxygen. The advanced space-age EdenPURE® Portable Heater also heats the room evenly, wall-to-wall and floor-to-ceiling. Other heating sources heat rooms unevenly with most of the heat concentrated high in the room and to the center of the room. And, as you know, portable heaters only heat an area a few feet around the heater. E d e n P U R E ® ’s E d e n FLOW ™ technology uses copper heating chambers to take the energy provided by our special SYLVANIA infrared bulbs and distributes the famous “soft heat” evenly throughout your room. And again, our new improved Personal Model heats a much larger area of 350 square feet, a 14% increase. With EdenPURE ® the temperature will not vary in any part of the room. How can I cut my heating bill with EdenPURE®? The 2012 EdenPURE ® has a new thermostat and a new high and low setting. This enables you to “turn down” the power on warmer days saving you even more money. In the EdenPURE® process, electricity is used to generate a type of infrared heat which, in turn, creates a very safe heat. Infrared is one of the safest forms of heat because it does not create carbon monoxide or harmful radiation. And, most importantly, the infrared heat will not reach a burning temperature. The EdenPURE ® ’s infrared heating source uses less energy to create heat than other sources for many reasons. One of the primary reasons is that heat at combustion level, which is what other heat sources use, causes the heat to instantly rise to the ceiling. Therefore, the heat is not evenly distributed, causing a very inefficient and uncomfortable heat source. Your EdenPURE® easily moves from room to room. Using zone heating (heating the area you live in) keeps you comfortable and reduces your heating bills. Therefore, you can turn the heat down in your house to as low as 50 degrees, but the room you are occupying, which has the EdenPURE ®, will be warm and comfortable. This can drastically cut heating bills; in some instances, the savings may be substantial. The EdenPURE® will pay for itself in weeks. It will keep a great deal of extra money in a user’s pocket. Because of today’s spiraling gas, oil, propane, and other energy costs, the EdenPURE ® will

provide even greater savings as the time goes by. Super - Safe infrared heat The EdenPURE® Personal Heater does not use burning heat. This heat actually floats out into the living area and is carried by the existing humidity in the air. This causes the heat to travel rapidly and evenly throughout a room. Photos using infrared lighting demonstrated that the heat was almost perfectly even from floor-to-ceiling and wall-to-wall. The EdenPURE® advanced infrared efficiency is based on the distribution of energized air, not on just fan movement. This heat is called "soft heat" due to how comfortable it is. Children or pets can come up to the EdenPURE® cabinet and touch it and not be harmed. Pets like my dog are actually drawn to this heat because it is a natural source of heat, just like the sun heats the earth. Animals are much more instinctive than humans. This heat not only heats the air, but it also heats the objects in the room. It is a perfectly balanced heat. The EdenPURE ® has a specially calibrated digital thermostat to continually maintain balanced comfortable heat, eliminating the inconvenience of having to constantly adjust the heat level like other portable heaters. Our Personal Heater comfortably heats an area up to 350 square feet. And its light weight allows you to easily move the Personal Heater from room to room. In other words; you can take the heat where you need it most. This product has been listed by Underwriters Laboratories. It is simple to operate and comes with well written and illustrated operating instructions. The EdenPURE® Personal Heater comes with a comprehensive three year warranty and a 60-day no questions asked satisfaction guarantee – EdenPURE ® will even pay for the return shipping. There is absolutely no risk. And EdenPURE ® is the only

How it works:

CUTAWAY VIEW

Heats floor to the same temperature as ceiling. 1. Electricity ignites powerful SYLVANIA infrared lamps.

2. The quartz infrared lamp gently warms the patented copper heating chambers.

3. The soft heat “rides” the humidity in the room and provides even, moist, soft heat ceiling to floor and wall to wall without reducing oxygen and humidity.

SYLVANIA is a registered trademark of OSRAM SYLVANIA Inc. used under license.

portable heater with a National Service Network. How to order: During this special 10 day offer we can deliver to your home our Personal Heater which comfortably covers an area up to 350 square feet. During our special you are eligible for a $175 DISCOUNT PLUS FREE SHIPPING AND HANDLING FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF UP TO $192 on the EdenPURE® Personal Heater. Our largest discount ever. This special offer expires in 10 days. If you order after that, we reserve the right to either accept or reject order requests at the discounted price. See my attached Authorized Discount Coupon to take advantage of this savings opportunity. The EdenPURE® carries a 60-day unconditional, norisk guarantee. If you are not totally satisfied, return it at our expense and your purchase price will be refunded. No questions asked. There is also a 3 year warranty on all parts and labor for the Personal Heater.

Never be cold again

Firemen and safety professionals choose EdenPURE ®. We all read about space heaters and the danger of fire. The EdenPURE ® has no exposed heating elements that can cause a fire. And your pet may be just like my dog that has reserved a favorite spot near the EdenPURE®. – Bob Vila

BOB VILA’S AUTHORIZED DISCOUNT COUPON

The price of the EdenPURE® Personal Heater is $372 plus $17 shipping and handling but, with this Authorized Discount Coupon, you will receive a $175 discount, free shipping and handling and be able to get the EdenPURE® Personal Heater for only $197 delivered. The personal heater has an optional remote for only $12. After 10 days we reserve the right to either accept or reject order requests at the discounted price. Check below the number you want (limit 3 per customer) • To claim your discount and order by mail: fill out and mail in this Authorized Discount Coupon. ■ Personal Heater, number _____ ■ I am ordering within 10 days, therefore I get a $175 discount, free shipping and handling and my price is only $197 for the Personal Heater delivered. ■ I am ordering past 10 days, therefore I pay full price of $372 plus $17 shipping & handling for the Personal Heater. ■ Optional Remote $12, number _____ • To claim your discount and order by phone: call toll-free 1-800-366-1315. Operators are on duty Monday - Friday 6am - 3am, Saturday 7am 12am and Sunday 7am - 11pm, EST. Give operator your Offer Code on this coupon. • To claim your discount and order online: visit www.edenpure.com and enter Offer Code EHS4827.

____________________________________________________________ NAME ____________________________________________________________ ADDRESS ____________________________________________________________ CITY STATE ZIP CODE

Enclosed is $_________ in: ■ Check ■ Money Order (Make check payable to EdenPURE) or charge my: ■ VISA ■ MasterCard ■ Am. Exp./Optima ■ Discover/Novus Account No. ____________________ Exp. Date ___/___ Signature ______________________________________

MAIL TO: EdenPURE® Offer Code EHS4827 7800 Whipple Ave. N.W. Canton, OH 44767

A9


General

A10 Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

Staff photo/Cortney Mumaugh

And we’re off! Area youth took part in a one mile Fun Run on Saturday, Oct. 29. The run took participants around Sts. Peter and Paul Church, School and through some of Memorial Park. This event was a fundraiser for the SPPS Endowment Fund. There were two other races that also took place on Saturday.

Register for YMCA Pee Wee Basketball old and will focus on the physical and social development of young athletes. Along with basic movement skills, children and parents will practice the basic skills of basketball,

◆ Wife Mandi & 3 children, Cambrie (4), Maci and Trey (7 Months) ◆ Current Job Position, Grain Buyer at Poet Bio Refining

00025965

◆ Passion is Farming ◆ Member of Sts. Peter & Paul Church 220322_4.937_x_10.5 10/25/11 9:26 AM Page 1

Paid for by Brad T. Ellerbrock, 258 S. Thomas St., Ottawa, OH 45875

such as dribbling and passing in a fun, non-competitive environment. Class will be held on Thursday nights from 6 to 6:30 p.m. starting Nov. 3. Cost for this seven week session is $20 for members and $40 for non-members. To register or for additional information contact the Putnam County YMCA at 419-523-5233.

By Dar Nevergall Staff Writer PANDORA — In action taken at the Pandora-Gilboa School Board meeting on Oct. 17, members of the Board approved building use requests from the Northwest Ohio Beekeepers Association to use a  classroom for monthly meetings, Erica Lucas to use the gymnasium and auditeria for a Marching Band Lock-in, and Leah

Breakthrough “Antioxidant” Diabetic Drink Hailed ‘A Miracle’ Naturally improves blood sugar, cholesterol, circulation, energy and more in as little as 2 weeks!

Unhealthy Blood Before

wine extracts, along with sleep better and have more lemon bioflavonoids, energy and better circularesveratrol, and 23 naturally tion,” says Charles Leavitt. occurring vitamins and enzymes. NIH Study Proves It! “I can feel it when I drink No more horse pills it,” says Ken Murdock. “It to swallow! gives a lot of energy.” Cell Essential’s OPC FacA National Institute of tor™ is the first 100% or- Health funded “double ganic formula fueled by a blind” clinical study pubrevolutionary, high-speed lished in July, 2008, supIsotonic ‘liquid’ delivery ports customer claims about system that mimics the energy. For diabetics, enbody’s natural pH. This pro- ergy equals better sleep, vides an amazing 97% ab- moods, and overall balance. sorption rate. “Studies have found that “Pills and tablets have ab- free radicals produce oxidasorption rates as low as 2 to tion that disrupts insulin. 20%,” says Dr. Berg. OPC Factor works 20-50 times better than traditional Results in as little antioxidants against oxidaas 20 Minutes! tion,” says Dr. Charles Berg. Actual blood scans taken “OPCs enhance insulin’s twenty minutes apart show ability to lower blood how OPC Factor virtually sugar.” flushes away free radicals, David Payne, a diabetic excess cholesterol crystals from Texas, echoes this, and sugar molecules in the "Since taking OPC Factor, bloodstream. my blood sugar is easier to Excess sugar in your blood manage. It boosted my imcauses oxidation which mune system and even leads to “slow sticky blood,” helped my cholesterol." a problem linked to neu“My doctor said, "I don't ropathy and edema in ex- know what you're doing, but tremities as well as kidney keep doing it." says Teresa damage and even blindness. Wood, WA. OPC Factor greatly improves circulation promotReceive One-Month ing faster blood flow; Free! crucial for diabetics. Try OPC Factor risk-free "OPC Factor has helped today and receive a free 30lower my glucose levels. I day Bonus supply along with a free book, The Aging Healthy Blood After Antidote-a $20 value. OPC antioxidants are clinically proven to boost your energy, and help restore youthful circulation, cholesterol and blood sugar levels. It’s backed by a 6-month satisfaction guarantee so you can experience the short and long term results riskfree, too! Call today! Free Shipping 1-888-804-3783

Washes away blood sludge by eliminating toxins, free radicals, and even parasites!

This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. Individual results will vary.

00026283

Better Blood Sugar! “My doctor was amazed! I don’t know what you’re doing, but keep doing it!” Holistic health specialist, Dr. Charles Berg, says, “Antioxidant therapy may slow progress of impaired glucose tolerance.” Diabetic Doyle Allen is living proof. “After only two weeks, my blood sugar went from 180 to 112 and stayed there!” The secret is a powerful blend o f s u p e r a n t i o x i d a n t s c a l l e d oligomeric proanthocyanadins, or OPCs including powerhouses like grape seed, green tea, pine bark, and red

Paula Wagner from Divine Designs in Delphos, helps Robyn Kuhlman try on a bracelet at the annual Autumn Harvest of Crafts at Ottawa-Glandorf High School on Saturday, Oct. 29. This event is hosted by the Friends of the Putnam County District Library.

Join the fun at the YMCA Family Fall Festival Saturday OTTAWA — The Putnam County YMCA will be hosting a Family Fall Festival on Saturday, Nov. 5, from 9 a.m. to noon. This event is

free and open to the public. Come and join the fun with giveaways, child identification kits, crafts, carnival games, open swim, clowns

and a magician. This event is sponsored by the Putnam County YMCA and the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative.

Pandora-Gilboa School Board approves 2012 Band and Choir trip to Cleveland

“After 2 weeks, my blood sugar went from 180 to 120 and stayed there!”

“I’ve been a diabetic for 48 years, my quality of life has been restored!” What part of your diabetes would you like to see ‘go away?’ Are you plagued by weight gain and food cravings, high and low blood sugar levels, mood swings, low energy and constant fatigue, poor circulation, vision problems, intermittent pain or aggravating bouts of brain fog or memory lapses? There is good news and it comes in the form of an effervescent drink called OPC Factor, which quickly revitalizes your entire body and mind.

Perfectly dazzling

Johnson to use the auditeria for the Pandora-Gilboa Recreation Committee Fundraiser Dinner. The Board also approved the hiring of Maranda Miller and Brandi Meyer as varsity cheerleader co-advisors and Adam Burris as freshman boy’s basketball coach, along with the following classified substitutes: Jennifer Higley for cafeteria, aide and secretarial, Brandon Sigler for custodial, cafeteria and aide, Ginelle Duling for cafeteria, aide, secretarial and custodial, Ami Sherer for aide and secretarial, Pam Watkins for aide, secretarial and cafeteria, and Carol Yager for an aide position. In other action, members of the board accepted a donation of concrete from K & L Ready Mix and approved an agreement to reorganize the Northwest Ohio Area Computer Services Cooperative as a Regional Council of Government. The Board further approved the Pandora-Gilboa Band and Choir trip to Cleveland in May 2012 and the PG Tech Club field trip to

Columbus State Community College during May 2012. Both principals also gave reports to the members of the board on activities in their respective buildings. K through 8 Principal, Jodi Schroeder, reported featuring the second graders this month. These students are in Mrs. Arthur and Mrs. Habegger’s classrooms. The students have been incorporating Marc Brown’s Arthur books into a variety of activities that included making postcards and having a campout. They have also been doing graphing such as bar graphs and Venn diagrams, according to Schroeder. John Schlumbohm, the Mayor of Pandora, and city council member Judy Stall visited the second grade to share what they do as mayor and council member and the second graders were also able to bring their pets to school for Pet Day. In addition, they took a field trip to explore local history at the Allen County Museum which included the Children’s Museum and learned

00026138

Truck Drivers WanTeD ThroughouT ohio Flexible scheDules To meeT your neeDs Hiring Solo and Team Drivers in Dedicated, Tanker and Van (OTR, Regional, Teams) Divisions Leasing Owner-Operators Experienced Drivers/Recent Driving School Grads Welcome Inexperienced? Take advantage of Schneider’s Tuition Reimbursement program and get your CDL at a local driving school. EOE M/F/D/V

OTTAWA — The Putnam County YMCA is currently taking registrations for the next session of Pee Wee Sports. This parent/child class is open to all kids ages 3 to 5 years

Staff photo/Cortney Mumaugh

apply at schneiderjobs.com/newjobs Call 1-800-44-PRIDE for more info

00021097

about a variety of animals at Clymer’s Museum in Columbus Grove before sampling local candy at Christie’s on the Square.  Schroeder also reported the kindergarteners through eighth grade students are learning and discussing a lot about safety, while the kindergarten through fourth grade participated in a magic show here at the school where they learned about different safety rules such as good behavior on the bus and stranger danger.  The middle school participated in the State of Ohio’s Cyber Safety Week, according to Schroeder, where they learned about cyberbullying and how to “delete” cyberbullying.  It was also Fire Safety Week last week and the students were able to do various activities to reinforce the fire safety rules. High School Principal, Jeff Wise, reported PGHS formed a Building Leadership Team to formulate building goals and an action plan that will increase the rigor of the school's curriculum to better prepare the students for their post-secondary lives in the 21st century. Members of the team, per Wise, are Matt Dube, Josh Klear, Monica Meyer, Leo Recker and Jeff Wise. At their first meeting, the group explored the idea of offering at least one AP class for the 2012-2013 school year. “The team feels that offering AP classes will benefit the students by offering them a chance to earn college credit that is accepted at the majority of colleges and universities,” stated Wise.  “Moreover, the team feels following an AP approved curriculum will increase the rigor in those classes.” Wise also reported that teacher Josh Klear is piloting a “flipped classroom” for his freshman World History class and his Psychology/ Sociology class. Students will be able to go to a website linked to the high school page of the Pandora-Gilboa website where Mr. Klear has uploaded class lectures in the form of .wmv files. Students will be able to use these lectures as a study tool, according to Wise.  Wise also reported the cross country girls team won the Putnam County League Team Championship and the Quiz Bowl Team took second place on WTLW’s “Whiz Quiz” television show. The team won three matches to make it to the final, where they were defeated by Spencerville. The episodes will air in February.    


GENERAL

Putnam County Sentinel

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

A11

Spook-tacular Trick-or-Treating Leipsic

Staff photo/Cortney Mumaugh

Recycling collection event held The Putnam County Medication/Recycling Collection Event was held at the Putnam County Educational Service Center on Saturday, Oct. 29. This event offered residents an opportunity to drop off expired and unused medications as well as household recycling of items such as cell phones, computers and scrap steel.

Ottawa teens hear about abstinence By Jared Denman Staff Writer OTTAWA — Nationally renowned speaker Jason Evert gave a talk on abstinence to Ottawa area teens and families in a packed Ottawa-Glandorf High School Gymnasium on Oct. 26. Using a candid humor, Evert talked about how society's view of sexuality disregards its sacredness. This is especially true regarding what women and men are told about their sexual roles, which affects how they view themselves and those of the opposite sex. He pointed out how men are socialized

to treat women as objects of desire and sex as a rite of passage. Evidence of this is seen in the rampant viewing of pornography, even among married men, which sabotages mens' ability to connect with women in more genuine ways. In a bold statement, Evert challenged the men in the audience to extend the kind of respect and honor for their future wives or daughters to every woman. On the other hand, women are taught they are only attractive based on their physical appearance and that desire for true intimacy with men is unrealistic. Using Scripture,

Evert highlights that the only way to becoming authentic women and men is through a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. Abstinence respects our sexuality and that of the opposite sex by viewing ourselves and others not as objects for our personal gratification but as human beings. Using humor and his own experiences, he challenges the myths of modern sexuality. Evert tours the country with his wife, Crystalina, giving talks on developing an authentic sexuality. For information go to www.chastity.com.

WHOLESALE PRICES to the Public!

Putnam Acres Photos by Marlena Ballinger, Jared Denman and Cortney Mumaugh

No hassle, rock bottom prices on these vehicles! Offers good until 11.9.11 2008 Chevy Impala $

2010 Chevy Cobalt

Was 14,995

$

Now $ 12,950

Was 13,450

Now $ 11,253

Stock #88067A

Stock #80091A

2010 Chevy Cobalt

2010 Chevy Cobalt

$

Was 12,995

$

Now $ 10,965

Was 12,995

Now $ 10,942

Stock #0090A

Stock #80089A

2007 Chevy Impala

2007 Chevy Impala

Was $ 11,995

Now $ 9,964

Now $ 9,254

Stock #870092A

Stock #870093A

2008 Chevy Malibu

2008 Buick Enclave

$

Was 17,995

$

Now $ 16,840

Stock #88099A

Team up against breast cancer.

Was $ 10,995

St. Rita’s Medical Center encourages you and your loved ones to join forces against breast cancer by getting the word out about early detection. Annual mammograms, along with regular self-examinations, can help

Was 27,995

women detect breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stage. Talk to the women in your life and help make a difference today.

Now $ 24,956

October is breast cancer awareness month which means it’s the perfect time to schedule a mammogram. Please call 1-419-226-9056 today.

Stock #980103A

Schedule a mammogram today.

2006 GMC Sierra 1500

CHECK OUT OUR Was 17,995 FULL INVENTORY Now ONLINE AT $ 16,989 WWW.H-KCHEV.COM

1-419-226-9056

$

1-800-858-0500

CONTINENTAL FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1960

00026206

The Region’s Leader In Health Care.

BUICK

CHEVROLET

1-800-596-3808

00024138

00026526

Stock #960109A

730 W. Market St., Lima, OH 45801 • 419.227.3361 • www.stritas.org

Living here has its advantages. Stop by or call to schedule a personal tour. The Meadows of Leipsic 419-943-2103

The Meadows of Ottawa-Glandorf 419-538-6529

The Meadows of Kalida 419-532-2961

Call a campus near you for more information about the services they offer.


Religion

A12 Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

Bluffton church holding Festival of Missions

Photo submitted

Collecting pop tabs for a good cause Students in grades K through 8 at St. Mary’s School of 118 students have been collecting pop tabs for the Ronald McDonald House. The school has already collected over 100 pounds. Kindergarten alone has gathered 26.6 pounds with first grade close behind at 26. It truly is a race to see which class brings the most in each day. They also are fully aware of the stewardship in what they are doing and where the tabs will be going and how that will help many sick children and families! A fourth grade student at St. Mary’s has Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Shown above are kindergarten students Abby Ellerbrock and Trent Siefker “depositing” some tabs.

Sts. Peter and Paul holding Fall Festival OTTAWA — Sts. Peter and Paul Parish in Ottawa is having its annual Fall Festival on Sunday, Nov. 6. Chicken and roast beef dinners will be served family style from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the

school cafeteria. Carry out dinners are available. Adult tickets are $8 and children under 12 are $4. Other features include: country store with crafts, baked goods, holiday items, games and raffles.

Gary Grant Insurance Continental, OH 419-596-3848

“Your Complete Insurance Professionals” See Dave, Mark, Gary, Tiffany, Shelly, Blaine or Mary

-

OTTAWA - GLANDORF OTTAWA MISSIONARY CHURCH 2031 E. Main St., Ottawa Rev. Marshall Metzger Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Morning worship—10:30 a.m. Sunday eve service—6 p.m. Wed. evening Bible study — 6 p.m.

FAITH ASSEMBLY OF BELIEVERS 1604 E. Main St., Ottawa Pastor Larry Bibler Sunday Worship—9:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study — 7 p.m. TRINITY UNITED METHODIST 137 N. Pratt St., Ottawa Rev. Lynda Lockwood Morning worship—10:30 a.m..

1831 E. Main St. Ottawa 419-523-6122

105 Dr. Thatye Drive Glandorf 419-538-7120

PO# BL-370

5000 County Road 5 Leipsic, Ohio 45856 Peaceful Rural Setting

Nursing Home 5570 St. Rt. 12 • Pandora • 419-384-3220

Glandorf, Ohio Ph. 419-538-6543

Bell Auto Supply Auto Parts & Supplies Ottawa - 419-523-5698 Delphos - 419-692-1010

FAITH BAPTIST CHURCH 8115 E. Main St., Ottawa Rev. Dennis Coates Sunday School—10 a.m. Morning worship—11 a.m. Evening service — 7 p.m. Wed. prayer meeting — 7 p.m. Ottawa PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Rev. Steve Elderbrock 150 N. Oak St., Ottawa Breakfast - 9:00 a.m. Sunday School—9:30 a.m. Morning Worship—10:45 a.m. STS. PETER & PAUL CATHOLIC CHURCH 307 N. Locust St., Ottawa Fr. Matthew Jozefiak C.PP.S. Fr. Alfons Minja, C.PP.S. Masses — 5 p.m., Saturday; 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., Sunday ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST CATHOLIC CHURCH North Main Street, Glandorf Fr. Tony Fortman Masses— 4:30 p.m., Saturday; 8 & 10:30 a.m., Sunday KALIDA ST. MICHAEL’S CATHOLIC CHURCH Fr.. Mark Hoying Masses— 4:30 p.m., Saturday; 8:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Sunday KALIDA FAMILY OUTREACH CENTER 404 West Northland Dr., Kalida Rev. James Swihart Sunday worship — 9:30 a.m. (With Children’s Church) THOMPSON PRIMITIVE BAPTIST Route 115, south of Kalida Elder Mark Pitney, 4th Sunday of each month— 10:30 a.m. LEIPSIC-BELMORE FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH (Disciples of Christ) 120 S. Poplar St., Leipsic Rev. Tim Eding Children’s Sunday School — 9 a.m. Adult Fellowship — 9 a.m. Morning worship — 10 a.m. Youth Refuge, 2nd and 4th Sundays — 6 p.m. ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 318 State St., Leipsic Fr. George Wenzinger Masses— 4:30 p.m., Saturday; 8 & 10 a.m., Sunday; Spanish language Mass, 11:30 a.m., first and third Sundays of month LEIPSIC CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 318 E. Sugar St., Pastor Chris Riffle Sunday School— 10 a.m. Worship Service— 10:50 a.m. Small Group Ministry—6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study — 7 p.m. Kid’s Club — 7 p.m.

00026363

serves his church as an elder, teacher, small group leader and mentor. He and his wife, Mary, make their home in Charlotte, N.C. On Nov. 20 Dr. Timothy Sisk will be the guest speaker. He is chair and professor of World Missions and Evangelism at Moody Bible Institute. Sisk served as a missionary in Japan for 10 years. He taught church planting, New Testament and theology at the Kansai Baptist Bible College and has served as president of the Japan Baptist Mission Society. He also served in Bolivia for three years to assist national churches in the formation of a training college. Sisk and his wife, Donna, have four children. Other missionaries that will participate are: Scott and Kaitlin Andrews, serving with TEAM and preparing to go to the Czech Republic; Norm and Gwen Bowman are with Global Outreach International in a music, counseling and prayer ministry; Jerad and Amy Diller work with ‘Rally Point’, Lima; Paul and Ruth Erdal work with the Slavic Gospel Union; Tim and Tiffany Gallant

Marsh to speak at Aglow LIMA — The Lima Chapter of Aglow International will be holding their monthly meeting on Thursday, Nov. 10, from 9:30 a.m. until noon at WTLW TV 44 Christian TV Station, 1844 Baty Rd., Lima. The guest speaker will be Karen Marsh. Marsh is a full time evangelist traveling across the country ministering in the gifts of healing, miracles, words of knowledge and the prophetic. She is an ordained minister and found-

er/president of, “Jesus Is the Answer World Wide Ministries.” “And You Too, Can Be Made Whole”, “I’ve Fallen and I Can Get Up”, are two of several books Marsh has authored sharing the grace, love, restoration and abundant life in Jesus Christ plus a children’s series, “Matches, the Traveling Dog”. Her heart’s cry is to see the lost saved, baptized in the Holy Spirit, and the wounded healed and set free by the power of God.

work with Global Partners in Cambodia; Don and Ann Leader serve with Findlay Area Youth for Christ; Daniel and Lynn Plett work with TWR in the Slovak Republic; Nick Powell works with Avant Ministries at Echo Ranch Bible Camp, Juneau, Alaska; Dan Reisacher serves with Trans World Radio; Jim and Deb Smith work with Wycliffe Associates and are on loan to Aramaic Bible Translation; Christina Wolber works with Push the Rock Ministries; Kerry Wright, Jr. serves with Converge Midamerica in church planting, Louisville, Ky.

There will be special meetings for children ages two through sixth grade each evening. The Children’s Missionary Adventure will be led by Patti Collins, who has been teaching children’s release classes in Hancock County and Leipsic Schools for more than 25 years. All services are free and open to the public; however, reservations are needed for the Friday evening family meal, the Saturday morning men’s breakfast and the ladies refreshment hour. For more information please call the church at 419-3588588.

BLUFFTON — While many Bluffton families are busy with holiday activities, a group of local volunteers is focused on filling empty shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Bluffton families are participating in the world’s largest Christmas project of its kind—Operation Christmas Child—an effort that has hand-delivered 86 million gifts to kids worldwide since 1993. This year-round project of Samaritan’s Purse is coming to its peak, as local businesses, churches and schools prepare to collect gift-filled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 14 through 21. Volunteers can drop off their shoe box gifts at one of eight bustling locations in the area to help kids in 100 countries know they are loved and not forgotten. Local collection sites: Ebenezer Mennonite Church, 8905 Columbus Grove Road, Bluffton, Op-

erating hours: Monday: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Sunday: 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday (Nov. 14): 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Operation Christmas Child, a project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritan’s Purse, uses whatever means necessary to reach suffering children around the world with these gifts of hope, including sea containers, trucks, trains, airplanes, boats, camels and dog sleds. Tracking technology also allows donors to “follow” their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and find out the destination country, use the Follow Your Box donation form found at www.samaritanspurse.org/occ.

Volunteers working to collect 900 gifts for needy kids this Christmas

Steps of Faith - CHURCH DIRECTORY - Steps of Faith

NEW CREATION LUTHERAN 8127 E. Main St., Ottawa Pastor Kenneth Pollitz Saturday Evening Alive Worship – 5 p.m. Sunday Learning Hour (for all ages) – 8:45 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Worship – 10 a.m.

Tucker Pharmacy

BLUFFTON — The 48th Annual Festival of Missions will be held Nov. 13 through 20 at Ebenezer Mennonite Church, Bluffton. The theme this year is: Jesus, You are Worthy”, based on Revelation 5:9. “....You are worthy to take the scroll and to open its seals, because you were slain and with your blood you purchased men for God from every tribe and language and people and nation.” Sunday services are at 10:15 a.m. Evening services begin at 7 p.m. nightly Sunday through Wednesday. Friday evening is a family meal at 6 p.m. A men’s breakfast will be held on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 7:30 a.m. and a ladies refreshment hour will be at 10 a.m. on Saturday. Guest speaker on Nov. 13 will be Dr. Bruce Johnson, president of SIM U.S.A. a global mission, based in Charlotte N.C. He has more than 35 years of leadership experience in Christian ministry. He has had a consulting practice, assisting churches. Johnson has worked cross-culturally in Asia helping to establish and strengthen indigenous leadership ministries. He

FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 7 W. Main St., Leipsic Rev. George Zornow Sunday School—9 a.m. Morning Worship—10:00 a.m. FOUNTAIN OF LIFE PENTECOSTAL Road 5F, Leipsic Pastor Jose Zamora Sunday School—10 a.m. - 12 noon Sunday worship/prayer serv —3 p.m. Wed. worship prayer service—6 p.m. Greater Leipsic Multi-site parish Rev. Bill Patterson Rev. Tom Graves Rev. Amy Haines LEIPSIC UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 127 W. Main St., Leipsic Sunday School—9 a.m. Morning worship—10:15 a.m. NEW HOPE BETHEL UNITED METHODIST Route 109 and Road B, Leipsic Sunday School — 9:45 a.m. Morning worship — 10:30 a.m. GILBOA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 102 Franklin St., Gilboa Sunday School — 9:30 a.m. Morning worship — 10:30 a.m. OAKDALE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 24994 Hancock-Wood Co. Line Rd., Deshler Morning worship — 9 a.m. Sunday School — 10 a.m. NEW BEGINNINGS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 140 E. Maple St., Deshler Sunday School — 10:30 a.m. Morning worship — 9:00 a.m. NEW BEGINNINGS MINISTRIES 112 Main Street Rev. Alex Gallardo HARVEST FELLOWSHIP F-288 S.R. 109 Hamler, Ohio 43524 Located 1 mile north of Hamler 419-274-2195 Pastor James Erven Sunday worship —10 a.m. Wed. evening Bible study—7:30 p.m. Children’s Ministry & Nursery at all services

COLUMBUS GROVE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 105 S. Broadway St., Col. Grove Sunday School— 9:15 a.m. Morning worship— 10:30 a.m. Sunday Prayer service—5:30 p.m. Sunday Contemporary Service — 7:30 p.m.

ST. JOHN MENNONITE CHURCH Road 4 at Route 12, Pandora Pastor Lynn Thompson Sunday services—8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Sunday School—9:45 a.m. Wednesday : Pioneer Clubs, Jr. High Bible Studies & Sr. High Small Groups – 7 p.m.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 210 S. High St., Col. Grove Pastor Harry Tolhurst Sunday Worship— 9:30 a.m. Children’s Church during Worship Adult Study at 10:45 a.m.

PANDORA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 108 E. Washington St., Pandora Rev. Duane Kemerley Sunday School—8:30 a.m. Morning worship — 9:30 a.m.

CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD 224 S.Elm St., Col. Grove Rev. Michael Whitman Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Morning worship— 10:15 a.m. VAUGHNSVILLE COMMUNITY CHURCH Findlay Street, Vaughnsville Rev. Tom Brown Sunday school — 9 :30 a.m. Sunday worship—10 :30 a.m. OTTAWA RIVER CHURCH OF GOD 18906 Road 18-R, Rimer Pastor Mark Walls Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Morning worship—10:30 a.m. OTTOVILLE-FT. JENNINGS IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CATHOLIC CHURCH Ottoville Fr.. John Stites Masses—4:00 p.m., Saturday; 10:30 a.m. Sunday ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC CHURCH Main & Second Streets Ft. Jennings Fr.. Joseph Przybysz Masses – 5 p.m., Saturday; 7:30 and 9:30 a.m., Sunday

GILBOA PENTECOSTAL CHURCH OF GOD 3695 US 224, Gilboa Pastor Wayne Baldridge Nursery Available Morning worship — 10:00 a.m. Sunday evening worship — 6 p.m. Thursday Bible Study— 7 p.m.

DUPONT-CLOVERDALE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN Route 634 & Road I-18, Dupont Rev. Terry Porter Sunday School—9:00 a.m. Sunday Worship—10:00 a.m. Sunday Evening—7 p.m. DUPONT CHURCH OF GOD Maple and Grove Sts., Dupont Rev. Paul Carder Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship— 10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening praise— 7 p.m. (Every fifth Sunday of month.) Wednesday Bible Study and Kids Club— 7 p.m.

HARVEST ASSEMBLY 164 Main St., West Leipsic 419-943-7477 Pastor Nestor Reyes Adult Fellowship bible study —Sunday, 10 a.m. Sunday worship—11 a.m. Youth & Children’s church —11 a.m. Wednesday Bible Study & Children Church, nursery available—6:30 p.m. Spanish Service every Sunday 3-4:30 p.m. Wednesday Youth Bible Study — 6:30 p.m.

EBENEZER MENNONITE CHURCH 8905 Col. Grove-Bluffton Road Rev. Charles Warren Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship—10:30 a.m. Wed. eve service — 7 p.m.

CONTINENTAL AREA CHRIST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH South Main Street, Continental Rev. Charles Eagle Sunday School — 9:15 a.m. Morning worship— 10:30 a.m.

TRI-COUNTY FAMILY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 835 N. Main, Bluffton Pastor Terry Hunt Evening Service—6:30 p.m. Wed. Bible study — 7 p.m. Wed. Royal Rangers — 7 p.m. Wed. Impact Girls — 7 p.m.

ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH Continental Fr. Mark Hoying Mass — 9:30 a.m., Sunday

MILLER CITY-NEW CLEVELAND ST. NICHOLAS CATHOLIC CHURCH Miller City Fr. Stephen Schroeder Masses— 4:00 p.m., Saturday; 10:30 a.m. Sunday.

PANDORA-GILBOA GRACE MENNONITE CHURCH 502 E. Main St., Pandora Pastor Dennis Schmidt Sunday School — 9:15 a.m. Sunday Worship— 10:30 a.m.

HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH Route 109 New Cleveland Fr. Stephen Schroeder Masses— 7 p.m., Saturday; 8:30 a.m., Sunday

PANDORA MISSIONARY CHURCH Rev. Sam Ochstein 300 Rocket Ridge Rd., Pandora Sunday School— 9 a.m. Morning Worship—10 a.m. Wed. Evening — 7 p.m. Bible Study & Prayers Sat. Morning — 7 a.m. Men’s Bible Study

ST. ANTHONY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 520 W. Sycamore St., Col. Grove Fr. Tom Extejt Masses—4:30 p.m., Saturday; 8:30 and 11 a.m., Sunday

RILEY CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rev. Mark Hollinger Morning worship— 11:15 a.m.

419-286-2873 Delivery Available

SIEFKER Real Estate & Auction Co. Ottawa, OH 419-538-6039 Aaron Siefker-Broker & Auctioneer

Ottawa Party Mart 746 N. Perry, St. Rt. 65 Ph. 419-523-3888

ST. BARBARA’S CATHOLIC CHURCH Main Street, Cloverdale Fr. John Stites Masses — 5:30 p.m., Saturday; 8 a.m., Sunday BREAKTHROUGH HARVEST CHURCH 19072 Rd I-17, Cloverdale Pastor Jerry Meyer Sunday worship—10 a.m. Tuesday service—7 p.m.

PANDORA CHURCH OF CHRIST Monroe St., Pandora Rev. Steven C. Holbrook Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Morning worship — 10:30 a.m. Wed. prayer meet—7 p.m.

•Chairs - Steel Folding •Tables - Round & Banquet •Tents

LIVING WATER OUTREACH MINISTRIES Gilboa Evangelist Mark Rayle, 456-3105 Street, jail, prison outreach

BLUFFTON ST. MARY’S CATHOLIC CHURCH Elm & Spring Sts., Sister Carol Inkrott (Pastoral leader) Fr.. Tim Ferris, chaplain Masses— 4 p.m., Saturday; 10 a.m., Sunday

COLUMBUS GROVE VAUGHNSVILLE ST. JOHN’S UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 205 N. High Street, Columbus Grove Pastor Gary Ginter Sunday School—9:30 a.m. Morning worship—10:30 a.m.

MTC Rental & Sales

Knueve & Sons Inc. Plbg. & Htg.

Kalida 419-532-3699 Ottoville 419-453-3443 Ottawa 419-523-0025 Your Comfort is Our Concern

CONTINENTAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Rice and Main Sts, Continental Pastor Charles Schmunk Sunday School— 9:00 a.m. Morning worship—10:00 a.m. CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH Continental Rev. Jerald Rayl Sunday School — 10:30 a.m. Morning worship — 9:30 a.m. NORTH MT. ZION CHURCH SR 613/Co. Rd 18, Continental Pastor Brent Gibson Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Morning worship—10:30 a.m. Sunday evening— 6 p.m. FREE CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF GOD Routes 15 & 634, Continental Rev. James Fry Sunday School— 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship— 9 & 10:30 a.m. Sunday eve — 6 p.m. Wednesday Family Night — 7 p.m. NORTH CREEK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH North Creek Rev. Charles Eagle Sunday School—10 a.m. Morning worship—9 a.m.

419-596-3202

Paving

Parking Lots - Roads Driveways - Sidewalks Curb Work Seal Coating 385 Oak St. Leipsic, Ohio 45856 419-943-2450


Wednesday, November 2, 2011  A13

00026520

Putnam County Sentinel

NationalHomeCare

& Hospice

Month

What is homecare? What is hospice care? “Home care” is a simple phrase that encompasses Considered the model for quality compassionate care for people facing a life-limiting illness, hospice provides a wide range of health and social services. These services are delivered at home to recovering, disabled, chronically or terminally ill persons in need of medical, nursing, social, or therapeutic treatment and/or assistance with the essential activities of daily living. Generally, home care is appropriate whenever a person prefers to stay at home but needs ongoing care that cannot easily or effectively be provided solely by family and friends. More and more older people, electing to live independent, non-institutionalized lives, are receiving home care services as their physical capabilities diminish.

What are the benefits of homecare services?

• Provides individuals care with dignity & independence. • May prevent / postpone hospital or nursing home care. • Allows maximum freedom & comfort for the individual. • Offers care tailored to the needs of the individual. • Provides professionally supervised services. • Supports families while keeping them together.

expert medical care, pain management, and emotional and spiritual support expressly tailored to the patient’s needs and wishes. Support is provided to the patient’s loved ones as well. Hospice focuses on caring, not curing. In most cases, care is provided in the patient’s home but may also be provided in freestanding hospice centers, hospitals, nursing homes, and other long-term care facilities. Hospice services are available to patients with any terminal illness or of any age, religion, or race.

What hospice services are provided to patients and families?

Among its major responsibilities, the interdisciplinary hospice team: • Manages the patient’s pain and symptoms • Assists the patient with the emotional and psychosocial and spiritual aspects of dying • Provides needed drugs, medical supplies, and equipment • Instructs the family on how to care for the patient • Delivers special services like speech and physical therapy when needed • Makes short-term inpatient care available when pain or symptoms become too difficult to treat at home, or the caregiver needs respite time • Provides bereavement care and counseling to surviving family and friends - Information courtesy of www.nhpco.org.

T

Hospice myths versus facts

The following is a list of some of the most common misunderstandings about hospice care, along with the true facts about this type of care. Myth: Patients have to stop seeing their own doctor. Fact: Most patients keep their own private physician, who will work closely with Hope Hospices Medical Directors to plan and provide individualized care. Myth: Patients or family members have to pay for hospice care. Fact: Hospice care is 100% covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance companies. Myth: Hospice is used only for patients diagnosed with cancer. Fact: Many hospice patients are cared for with diagnoses of congestive heart failure (CHF), dementia, Alzheimer’s, chronic lung disease (COPD), stroke, coma, Failure to Thrive, end stage renal

diseases and, AIDS. Myth: Hospice is just for the patient. Fact: Hospice focuses on comfort, dignity, and emotional support. The quality of life for the patient and loved ones is one of the highest priorities. Myth: Hospice means giving up hope. Fact: When diagnosed with a terminal illness, many patients and family members are likely to dwell on the pending loss of life rather than on making the most of what life remains. Hospice helps patients and family members reclaim their determination to live life to the fullest. Myth: Once a patient makes a decision to choose hospice care, he or she cannot return to traditional, curative type medical treatment. Fact: Patients always have the right to re-establish traditional, curative type care at any time and, for any reason.

Continental 419-596-3898 Putnam Defiance County 419-784-4777 Ambulatory Wauseon Care Center 419-335-6901

• Oxygen • Mobility Aids • Lift Chairs • Hospital Beds • Mastectomy Forms & Bras We will bill Medicare, Medicaid or your private insurance for you.

Putnam County ACC Offers:

...or in Ours ...or in Ours

• 24-hour emergency services • Diagnostic radiology • Mammography • Ultrasound • Multi-slice CT

close to home.

Hospice understands and helps patients and families live each precious day in the fullest. We provide medical Additional services care to manage the pain at the Putnam and discomfort caused by the illness. Our mission is to affirm life, County YMCA and to provide respect and dignity to the terminally ill. In order to achieve our mission we act as a patient advocate, educating and guiding the patient and family through the dying and grief process. Whether you need emergency treatment or outpatient services, the Putnam County Ambulatory Care Center

is committed to offering the best care available close to the support of family and friends. We’re open

• MRI • Audiology exams • 24-hour lab services

24-hours a day, seven days a week with specialty

services available by appointment. For care you can

• EKG’s • Cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation • Occupational health services

always rely on, trust the dedicated professionals

• Dialysis • Specialty physicians by appointment

in Your Home

Hospice Care...

CHP’s Hospice Centers in Defiance & Van Wert provide care when a terminal illness is no longer manageable at home. All hands-on care is provided by trained hospice nurses. Private suites, amenities and support for family.

...or in Ours

View a tour at: ComHealthPro.org

Inpatient Hospice Centers

...or in Ours Community Health Professionals 602 E. Fifth St.,Care... Delphos • 419-695-1999 Hospice

6817 St. Rte. 66 N., Defiance ~ (419) 782-4131 1155 Westwood Dr., Van Wert ~ (419) 623-7125

Non-profit organization ~ Nine Area Offices

in Your Home

For your convenience, St. Rita’s Rehab Services offers Physical, Occupational and Speech Therapy services at the Putnam County YMCA located at 101 Putnam Parkway in Ottawa, Ohio. For more information, call 419-523-5391.

right here in your community.

• Pediatric speech therapy

770 W. North St. • Lima, OH 45801 For more information on the services available, call 419.538.6288.

419-226-9064 Putnam County Ambulatory Care Center • 601 State Route 224, Glandorf, OH 45848 • 419.538.6288 • www.stritas.org

N

ovember is national Homecare and Hospice month. Imagine yourself ill, disabled, or too sick to fully take care of yourself. Most people envision themselves confined to the sterile surroundings of a hospital or nursing facility. But if home is where you’d rather be, then Putnam County HomeCare and Hospice can help. Our professionals are dedicated to providing the highest quality of health care in the comfort of your own home.

PCACC_ad_revised.indd 1

Since 1975, Community Health Professionals has delivered a comprehensive range of home health and hospice care to residents throughout northwest and west central Ohio.

in Your Home

— Medical Equipment —

your family healthy, HKeeping ospice

HospiceCare... Care... Hospice ...or in Ours in inYour YourHome Home Hospice Care...

Hospice for your dedication and special care you provide for our community!

10/22/10 8:57:38 AM

Putnam County HomeCare & Hospice has been established since 1966 and is a pioneer

in the home care industry. Services include: skilled nursing, rehabilitation, home health aide services, parenteral/ enteral nutritional therapy and infusion therapy (IV). Pediatric nursing is also available and includes parental teaching, weight checks, bili light therapy and synagis injections. Another service offered by the agency is a home monitoring system. The system is installed in the patient’s home. It then transmits information such as weight, oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure to the agency for the nursing staff to review. Hospice provides a special kind of care for a person of any age and their families. A team of physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, aides and volunteers follow an individualized care plan. Emotional, spiritual, and social support is given throughout the process of both illness and bereavement.

I

f you are in need of home care or hospice, please specifically request Putnam County HomeCare & Hospice to your physician or social worker. For additional information on how to obtain these services, please call 419-523-4449 or visit www.pchh.net.

Bridge Home Health & Hospice Ranked Among Top 25 Percent of Home Health Providers in U.S. ...by the 2011 HomeCare Elite, a compilation of the most successful Medicare-certified home health care providers in the United States. This is the fourth year in a row that Bridge has received this honor. Winners are ranked by an analysis of performance measures in quality outcomes, process of care measures, and financial performance.

• Serving the community since 1966 • County based = quick response time • Available 24 hours a day / 7 days a week It’s Your Choice, Request

Hometown care you can trust for all the seasons of your life.

To learn more about Bridge Home Health, visit www.BridgeHomeHealth.org or call 1.800.982.3306.

We’re here for you.

United Way of Putnam County Partner Agency

139 Court St., Ottawa

419-523-4449

www.pchh.net


A14 Wednesday, November 2, 2011 00026527

Putnam County Sentinel

Good Luck at OMEA State Finals Kalida Marching Band

Cheer them on at the finals on Sunday, November 6 at 6:15 pm, at the Welcome Stadium in Dayton

ZERO                     Zero Interest If Paid In Full Within 36 Months* On A New Trane System.

Purchase a new qualifying high efficiency Trane heating and cooling system by October 31, 2010 and Knueve and Sons will give you up to 36 Months Zero Interest financing.

Or choose payments as low as $125 / month or up to a $1,000 Instant Rebate.* In addition Knueve and Sons will give you a 10-year parts and labor Peace of Mind Protection Plan on our installation. Did you know many high efficiency heat pumps, air conditioners, and furnaces qualify for New Energy Tax Credits up to $1,500? By installing qualified equipment you, the homeowner, may be qualified to claim 30% of the installed costs (up to the $1,500 limit). Call Knueve & Sons today so we can help you select equipment that will qualify for tax credits.

Good Luck at OMEA State

Interest will be charged from the purchase date if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment*. See your independent Trane dealer for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers OR instant rebate from $100 up to $1,000 valid on qualifying systems only. All sales must be to homeowners in the contiguous United States. Void where prohibited. The Home Projects® Visa® card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. Regular minimum monthly payments are required during the promotional period. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date at the regular APR if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 25.99% The APR may vary. The APR is given as of 7/1/2010. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 4% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Monthly payment if shown based on $7,100 purchase.

Since 1957

“We Can Help You Get Your $1,500 Energy Tax Rebate”

K&L

READY MIX

               

Ready Mix Concrete

“From the brickyard to your home.” www.kandlreadymix.com

US 224 & 115 Kalida, OH

532-3585

Way to go, Kalida Marching Band! • Banquets • Catering • Daily Buffets

DICK’S STEAKHOUSE

206 South Broad St. Kalida

419-532-3029

We are so proud of our Kalida Marching Band and all of their accomplishments!

Best of Luck in Dayton!

2011 Awards       

          

Ottawa Parade of Bands Maumee Music in Motion Purchase aGlandorf new WaterFurnace Geothermal System and Knueve and Sons will give you a 10-year

parts and labor Peace MindMarching ProtectionClass Plan on 6 Months Best Auxiliary Class C,ofBest C, our installation and Best MusicSame ClassAsC,Cash! Best Marching Class C, WaterFurnace geothermal systems use the free, renewable energy found in your own back yard to Best General Effect Class C, 2rd Place Class C, Best General Effect Class save up to 70% on heating, cooling, and hot water costs. These systems also qualify for the 30%C, of Best Auxiliary Class C, their in New EnergyExcellent Tax Credit!Rating Best ofcost Show Auxiliary, 1st Place Class C, Best of Show Marching, Call Knueve & Sons today so we can help you select qualifying equipment and get your tax credits. Best of Show General Effect, Best of Show Auxiliary, Columbus Grove Eyes with Pride Grand Champion Best Auxiliary Class C, Best Music Class C, Or ... How About A Best Marching Class C, Best General Effect Class C, Superior Rating Buckeye Invitational 1st Place Class C, Best of Show Auxiliary, Excellent Rating Best Percussion Class C, Best Music Class C, Best Marching Class C, Best General Effect Class C,                         New  Bremen Cardinal Invitational                          Best Auxiliary Class C, 1st Place Class C, Superior Rating 4th Place Class C, Excellent Rating

                                          

                 

Get 6 Months Same As Cash “Interest FREE”, with the purchase of a new Evolve Series® (for well water) or Evolve Series® RC (for city water) water conditioning systems. But you must purchase by 10/31/10. Be Green! Water-Right equipment uses a water meter and high-tech electronics to more efficiently use salt and water. So, call Knueve & Sons today for a quote . Isn’t it time your water tasted GOOD!!

Have you been planning to remodel your old bathroom, but the task just seems to daunting? Worried about the cost? Knueve and Sons will help you plan and implement a bath remodel from start to finish and give you 6 Months Located at: The Union Bank Same As Cash. Call Knueve 1410 Bellefontaine Ave., Lima, OH 45804 Scott for Mutual Funds* & Sons today so we can help you get started on See peter.rafaniello@lpl.com that dream bathroom! Why wait? and Fixed & Variable* Annuities Call today to schedule a free 1 hour consultation:

Good Luck Kalida Band

available 419E-fi 228ling 4646 or 800 837 8111 ext. 4709                                     Scott L. Kahle, CPA, Registered Representative Securities and insurance products offered through LPL SCOTT L. KAHLE CPA

K&nueve 800-676-3619 ons inc.

S

102 Water Street Kalida, OH 45853

Financial and it’s affiliates. Member FINRA/SIPC. 637 102 Crystal Avenue 106 W. 12057 Main St.SR - PO Box 466 • Kalida, OH 45853-0466 Findlay, OH 45840 Paulding, OH 45879

419-532-1040 • Fax 419-532-2088 Heating & Air Conditioning | Air Quality & Humidification | Plumbing Services | Water HeatersMobile 419-233-0026 • skahlecpa@bright.net

“Your Komfort Is Our Koncern!”

Way to go Kalida Marching Band!

Water Treatment Systems | Home Standby Generators | Bathroom Remodeling

www.knueve.com

(All offers in this ad are not valid with any other offer. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or specials.)

Go L od Kaluick Banda d

Miller’s Pharmacy & Gifts Kalida, Ohio 419-532-3489

207 E. North St. Kalida

419-532-3234

Putnam County’s Largest 30” Pizza

Peter J

Financia LPL Regi


Wednesday, November 2, 2011

www.putnamsentinel.com Leipsic 48, McComb 20 B2

Putnam County Sentinel

Sports

Kalida boys 1, LCC 0

B3

LCC girls 1, Kalida 0

B4

B

Second half outburst gives O-G 4-1 win By Charlie Warnimont Sentinel Sports Editor LIMA — OttawaGlandorf kept putting shot after shot on the Bowling Green goal. However, they didn’t have anything to show for it. That all changed during a six minute span late in the second half as the Titans put three shots into the back of the net. The quick outburst deflated a defensive minded Bobcat team as O-G rolled to a 4-1 win in the Division II regional semi-finals at Lima Stadium. The win sends the Titans (17-1-2) to the regional finals Saturday against Lexington, a 2-1 winner over Parma Padua. The game is scheduled for 3 p.m. at Lexington although that is sub-

ject to change. Ottawa-Glandorf spent much of the game on their offensive end of the field as Bowling Green seemed content to play defense. But they were unable to put a goal on the scoreboard as the Bobcats were nursing a 1-0 lead 61 minutes into the contest. However, O-G’s persistence paid off when Matt Kaufman settled a pass from Cody Bockrath in front of the BG goal. He turned and fired a shot into the left side of the goal to tie the contest at 1-1. O-G broke the tie three minutes later when the Titans were awarded a free kick after BG was called for a foul. O-G’s TJ Metzger quickly put the ball back in play and played a ball

towards the goal. Mike Rosebrock caught up to the ball, split a pair of defenders and sent the ball past Bobcat keeper Josh Simler. Just over another three minutes elapsed before the Titans went up 3-1 when Nate Toumazos scored a goal from the left wing after chasing down a crossing pass. “We would have liked to have seen it come a lot sooner. We are one of those teams that seems score in bunches, so once the first one happened you could feel the momentum shift,” O-G coach Mike Weihrauch said. “We just needed to make sure we took care of our own jobs, once everyone started taking care of their jobs the game became

a lot easier. I was afraid it was going to turn into one of those nights. Once that first one went in you could kind of feel it was going to happen.” O-G added a goal in the final five minutes when TJ Metzger knocked in a ball rolling towards the goal after the BG goalie came off his line to play a long pass and missed. Bowling Green took a 1-0 lead 10 minutes into the match when Justin Herman chased down a long pass and got behind the Titan defense before sending a shot into the right side of the goal. That was the only shot they had the first half and Staff photo/Charlie Warnimont the only shot they took until Otttawa-Glandorf’s Mike Rosebrock (18) chases O-G scored and they sent a down a loose ball in the Titans match with Bowling long free kick on goal. Green Tuesday night.

Kalida falls to Ottawa Hills in regional semi-finals Tuesday 2-0 By Jim Metcalfe Sentinel Correspondent FINDLAY — Two minutes. That’s all it took. It was enough for Ottawa Hills to dispatch Kalida 2-0 in a hard-fought and hotly-contested Division III boys regional soccer match before a nice crowd at Findlay’s Elmer Graham Memorial Soccer Stadium Tuesday night. After battling to a 0-0 tie at the end of 40 minutes, the

Green Bears (18-0-2) came out on fire the second half. Just 28 seconds into the half, Blake Pappas got control just outside the right post line and fired a rocket from 16 yards to the left, getting the ball past a diving senior keeper Drew Stechschulte (5 saves versus 8 shots on-goal) for that 1-0 edge. Just 1:23 later, off a corner kick from the left side, Pappas connected with Ian Trickey for a header from

within the goalie box that hit the crossbar and bounced over the goal line for a 2-0 edge. “I thought we were ready to come out the second half but perhaps we weren’t; perhaps that was on me. We just didn’t come out ready to play in those two minutes and they hit us hard,” Kalida mentor Mark Czubik noted. “Other than that, we played them even. They are a talented team but my kids have nothing to hang their heads

about.” It was coming out with more energy that was key, according to Ottawa Hills head coach Francis J. Stephens. “I just told them at halftime that we had to settle into the match. We had more energy in those two minutes,” Stephens explained. “It really helps us that we have a lot of kids that play soccer all year around; I can go 15 (players) and not have any dropoff.”

YOUNGSTOWN — One team and one individual from Putnam County have stamped their tickets to the state cross country meet this Saturday. The Columbus Grove boys cross country team and Kalida’s Jessica Doepker qualified to the Division III state meet at National Trail Raceway from their respective regionals. The Division III girls race starts the state tournament at 11 a.m. and the boys Division III race is at 1:30 p.m. National Trail Raceway is located in Hebron, just east of Columbus. The Grove boys and Doepker both qualified to state with fourth place finishes Saturday. Running as an individual in the Division III regional at Tiffin, Doepker, a junior, finished fourth to earn her second trip to the state meet. Doepker finished fourth in 19:30.03 as she was the first individual runner to cross the finish line. Liberty Center freshman Brittany Atkinson won the race in 18:46, followed by Coldwa-

ter freshman Sarah Kanney in 19:09 and Cavalier sophomore Christina Seas in third place in 19:23. Bluffton senior Hannah Chappell-Dick was fifth in 19:47. Pandora-Gilboa competed as a team in the regional meet finishing 15th with 320 points. The Lady Rockets were led by sophomore Vanessa McCullough as she finished 42nd in 21:16. Sophomore Audrey Sprunger finished 58th in 21:51, freshman Breana Hovest was 100th in 23:28, senior Megan Schmenk was 105th in 23:37 and sophomore Hunter Hovest was 107th in 23:42. Senior Candance Vance was 128th in 26:37 and freshman Thitichaya Leesura was 129th in 28:34. The Columbus Grove boys gamble of traveling to Youngstown for the regional meet at Boardman High School paid off as the Bulldogs finished fourth by a single point. The Bulldogs finished fourth with 159 points a single point in front of fifth

place New London with 160. McDonald won the regional with 45 points followed by Independence in second with 86 and Cortland Maplewood was third with 131 points. “Other than a tie, it could not have been any closer,” Columbus Grove coach Terry Schnipke said. “ We knew coming in it was going to be a close meet and I had prepared the guys to realize that every point counts. Every place matters. Every runner was going to be important. This is one case where the race was every bit as close as the prediction on paper. We were supposed to be one point ahead of Smithville and a few points behind New London. Independence ran really strong today and Providence shined on us as we were able to edge out Smithville and New London.” Running on an extremely wet and muddy course the Bulldogs continued their excellent season with the fourth place finish and trip

to state. Junior Jake Graham led the Bulldogs with a 13th place finish in 17:40 and junior Alex Shafer was three spots behind him in 16th at 17:52. Freshman Colton Grothaus was 32nd in 18:34, while freshman Jerry Kesselmeyer was 55th in 19:06 and junior Grant Schroeder was 79th in 19:42. Junior Nick Schmiesing was 97th in 20:07 and senior Josh Stephens was 98th in 20:11. “Our freshmen really came through today,” Schnipke said. “This is what a team is all about. Grant had an off day today and Colton and Jerry picked him up. There was nobody happier when we heard the news that we were fourth than Grant Schroeder. We have been consistent all year and we have prepared in all kinds of weather for an event just like this. All that practice in the rain and mud paid off today as our mental toughness and attitude carried us.” Kalida senior Connor Schmenk competed in the

After that, the Green Bears made things difficult for the Wildcats (16-3) in using their skill to possess the ball. Ottawa had a look at 30 minutes when Ahmed Abdel-Halim had a 19-yarder from the right wing grabbed by the keeper. Kalida had two prime chances in the final 14 minutes. At 14:01, senior Kevan Unverfertth got a look from the right wing but his

22-yarder just missed over the crossbar. At 12:37, off a battle in front of the net, Unverferth got a deflection from Ottawa Hills netminder Michael Geiger (3 saves versus 4 shots) and headed it in from 12 yards but the goal was disallowed due to an offsides call. From then on, neither unit could put a scoring sequence together. Ottawa Hills takes on Mansfield Christian Saturday at a site to be determined.

Kalida’s Doepker, Columbus Grove boys heading to state

Staff photo/Brian Bassett

Kalida’s Jessica Doepker (1677) competes in the regional cross country meet at Tiffin Saturday.

Youngstown regional as an individual finishing 48th in 18:49. Columbus Grove’s Amber Herron competed in the Division III at Troy Saturday coming up a few places

short of advancing to state. Herron, a senior, finished 22nd in the Division III girls race in 20:41. Only individuals in the top 16, not on a qualifying team, advance to state.

Crestview rallies to defeat Leipsic 3-2

Ottawa-Glandorf falls to LCC in district finals

By Brian Bassett Sentinel Correspondent OTTAWA — Unbeaten and state ranked Leipsic faced their toughest test of the season Thursday night as they faced a strong Crestview team in the Division IV district finals. And while the Vikings controlled play early they were unable to put the Knights away as Crestview rallied for a 22-25, 17-25, 25-21, 32-30, 15-10 win at the Robert J. Hermiller Gymnasium in Ottawa. The Lady Knights jumped out to a 2-0 lead to begin the first set, the Vikings answered, however, with a run culminating in a Lyndsay Krinke kill which gave Leipsic a 5-3 lead. A Ra-

By Charlie Warnimont Sentinel Sports Editor KALIDA — OttawaGlandorf’s volleyball team got off to a good start in their Division III district final against Lima Central catholic. The Titans opened the match by running off two strings of points as they were up 10-6. That’s when LCC took a timeout. The strategy worked well for the T-Birds as they were a different team after the timeout. Getting some quick instruction from their coach the T-Birds stopped the O-G momentum as they rallied for a 25-23, 25-20, 25-20 win over the Titans in Kalida. The win advances the T-

chel Rieman ace later in the match pushed the score to 11-6, Leipsic, before Crestview answered with three consecutive points. Leipsic put together a rally to lead 19-10 on a Amber Gerdeman kill and a Lady Knight error. Crestview answered, which would become a theme throughout the night, cutting the Leipsic lead to 23-20. The Vikings held strong and won the game 25-22. Leipsic led from start to finish in the second set. With a 23-17 lead late in the second set, consecutive Nadler kills sealed the win for the Vikings, giving them Staff photo/Charlie Warnimont a 2-0 match lead. Ottawa-Glandorf’s Jill Recker (24) blocks a shot by Leipsic marched out to a Lima Central Catholic’s Molly Clements (11). ➤➤See CRESTVIEW/B4

00026330

APPLES! BY THE POUND OR BY THE BUSHEL! • 10% OFF All Candys • Provolone Cheese: Reg. $3.89 Sale $3.59 • Fresh Pressed Apple Cider • Fall Squash ~ Butternut, Acorn, Spaghetti, Turk’s Turban

3 miles East of Ottawa on U.S. 224 419-456-3595

Birds to the regional semifinals at Findlay, while O-G saw its season end at 18-8. Ottawa-Glandorf started well in the opening game as they led 5-1 after four straight points, then after LCC came back to tie the game the Titans took an 11-6 lead with two three point scoring runs. That’s when LCC coach Wes Horstman called timeout. After the timeout LCC was a different team as they scored six of the next eight points to take a 14-13 lead. Despite O-G being able to stay close they never led again in the first game as the T-Birds took a 1-0 lead. “We came out and we were pretty tight,” Horstman ➤➤See O-G/B4

Northern Spy, Mutsu, Melrose, SEE US FOR Winesap, Jonathan, Jona Gold, YOUR FALL Macintosh, Yellow Delicious, Fuji, BAKING Cortland, Empire, Rome, & Ida Red NEEDS

Grabill Canned Meats ~ Chicken, Pork, Beef & Turkey STOCK UP FOR WINTER!

Nov. - Dec. Hours Thurs-Fri 9-6; Sat 9-2 Closed Sun-Wed


B2

Sports

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

Vikings rally to claim outright BVC title By Charlie Warnimont Sentinel Sports Editor MCCOMB — Leipsic didn’t need a motivational speech from the coaching staff at halftime of their Blanchard Valley Conference contest against McComb. The Panthers first half play was motivation enough for the Vikings. Having been pushed around the field by the Panther offense and trailing 2013 at the break Leipsic just needed to calm down and play their brand of football. And once they did it was the Panthers that were in trouble. “We were incredibly frustrated,” Leipsic coach Joe Kirkendall said. “At halftime, it wasn’t about motivation, it wasn’t the adjustments, which were small. It was about calming down, put your feet on the ground and play our game. Our varsity defense has not given up a lot of points and we had it taken to us the first

half. They took it personally. There was some anger and once we calmed down we played our game.” Given 20 minutes to calm down at halftime the Vikings were a different team in the second half as they turned the tables on the Panthers pulling away for a 48-20 win and an outright Blanchard Valley Conference title. The win allowed the Vikings to finish 9-0 in the BVC, 9-1 overall, and claim their second outright BVC title in three years. It was the fifth overall BVC title for Leipsic in school history. McComb finished 7-2 in the conference and 7-3 overall. Both teams are advancing to the OHSAA playoffs this week as the Vikings are at home and the Panthers hit the road in Region 22 of Division VI. McComb came out the aggressor as they built a 20-7 lead with 3:19 left in the first half. The Panthers were able to stun Leipsic’s defense early with big plays

that led to touchdown runs by Cody Wilson, on the opening drive, and Clay Dysert, early in the second quarter, before Dalton Buck hit Austin Westenbarger with a 19 yard scoring strike with 3:19 left that made the score 20-7. “This was the first time we physically got beat up,” Kirkendall said. “They did a good job pushing us around and that’s something we hadn’t experienced. You could say there were a lot of angry players in that lockerroom at halftime.” Leipsic answered the Panthers opening scoring drive with a five play, 75 yard drive as Trevor Schroeder scored on a one yard run. Schroeder had a 51 yard run to set up his touchdown run. After the score the Vikings recovered an onside kick and were driving before having to turn the ball over on downs. It wasn’t until McComb went up 20-7 Leipsic’s offense was able to score again.

After the Panthers third score Leipsic put together a five play, 88 yard drive. Zack Kuhlman opened the drive completing passes to Devin Mangas (16 yards), Caleb Barrera (nine yards) and Brady Schroeder (30 yards). After a short run by Trevor Schroeder, Kuhlman hit Barrera with a 31 yard scoring strike. Leipsic’s defense then came up with their first stop of the night and the offense attempted to put together a drive before the half to tie the game. The drive came up short as four straight incomplete passes left the Vikings at the McComb 31 as time expired. Leipsic pulled even one play into the second half as Trevor Schroeder took an inside handoff, found an opening and raced 74 yards to the endzone to tie the score at 20-20 with Devin Mangas’s extra point. Although the Vikings had the momentum they were unable to take the lead un-

Staff photo/Charlie Warnimont

Leipsic’s Trevor Schroeder (22) looks for running room against McComb as Devin Mangas (28) throws a block in an effort to spring him.

til a big defensive play by defensive back Nate Schey. Schey stepped in front of a Buck pass at the Viking 45, intercepted it and raced down the left sideline to the endzone giving Leipsic its first lead of the night with 4:32 left in the third quarter. On their next posses-

sion Leipsic hit another big play when Kuhlman and Mangas hooked up for a 64 yard touchdown pass that put them up 34-20. Trevor Schroeder pushed the lead to 41-20 with a 16 yard scoring run early in the fourth quarter before Leipsic’s ➤➤See Vikings/B4

Ottawa-Glandorf turns in strong effort against Van Wert The Titans drew blood on the first series of the night, when Brandon Kuhlman took the second O-G play from scrimmage 75-yards to the end-zone. The Josh Buckland extra point then gave the Titans an early 7-0 lead. The Titans then forced a Cougar punt, but returned the ball to Van Wert on a muffed punt. The Cougars could not get anything together, as a fumble returned the ball to the Titans. O-G made the Cougar turnover hurt, as Kuhlman recorded a 31-yard touch-

FREE

basic computer training for adults Feel comfortable using a computer and learn how to browse the Internet

Classes are FREE and forming NOW at your local library or community college.

Call 855-NOW-I-CAN (669-4226) for local class information

00026142

PIGSKIN PICKS ’11 FOOTBALL CONTEST The overall winner of our 10 week Pigskin Picks Football Contest is Kevin Schey! Total Points: 91

Prize: $50 Gift Card & 3 month subscription to the Putnam County Sentinel!

Other Top Overall Contestants

Laura Feeney - 87 pts Isaac Feeney - 85 pts Paul Lehman - 85 pts Ethan Ellerbrock - 84 pts

Troy Ellerbrock - 84 pts Sean Brickner - 83 pts Dennis Ellerbrock - 83 pts Mike Jones - 83 pts

Doug Snider - 83 pts Dustin Greer - 82 pts Bill Weis - 82 pts

Week 10 Winner of $20 Cash Courtesy of OSU Lima is Bob Michel!

Thank you to all who entered each week. A big THANK YOU to our sponsors who made this contest possible!

00026387

Car-E-It Party Shop

RadioShack.

Teds Market

Just Go Dry p r o f e s s i o n a l

x

c a r p e t

x

c a r e

down run with 3:53 to play in the first quarter. The PAT was good by Buckland to make the score 14-0, Titans. Both teams then traded wasted possessions which ended on turnovers-ondowns before the Cougars took over at their own fiveyard line. Van Wert was riding a wave of momentum after shutting out the Titans four consecutive times, holding them on a fourthand-two on the Van Wert five-yard line. They could not sustain the momentum, however, and fumbled the ball back to O-G on their second offensive play. The Titans again capitalized, this time with a nine-yard Kuhlman touchdown run. The Buckland PAT gave O-G a 21-0 lead with 7:45 to play in the second quarter. The Cougars were forced to punt on the ensuing drive, but held the Titans on the following drive, thwarting a fake punt attempt. The Cougar offense continued to have trouble moving the ball and were forced to punt again. The Titan special teams unit then did its job as Brad Racer blocked a Cougar punt and carried it in for a touchdown. Buckland’s PAT made the score

10,977 Hamler Chevrolet Welcomes

Chris Engle!

Give him a call today!

Cell (419) 956-9203

COLUMBUS GROVE — Derek Rieman sparked a strong Columbus Grove offensive performance and also picked off two passes on defense as the Bulldogs closed their season with a solid 42-14 thumping of Bluffton. Rieman caught five passes for 167 yards and two touchdowns, as Columbus Grove ended the season 7-3 overall and 5-3 in the Northwest Conference. Grove took just one minute to take a 6-0 lead as the Bulldogs took the opening kickoff and four plays later

SILVERADO Z71 4X4, LOCAL TRADE WE SOLD NEW!

IPSIC! ONLY 10 MIN. FROM LE TAL! 20 MIN.FROM CONTINEN 15 MIN. FROM OTTAWA!

00026489

If we don’t have it ~ we can get it!

419-274-2441

Part of the Integrity Group Family

third quarter. Van Wert responded on the following drive, driving the ball down the field, and scoring on a Caleb Lloyd 21-yard touchdown run. Austin Reichert then made the score 48-7 with his PAT at the 1:10 mark of the third quarter. The Cougars stopped the Titans on the following drive before giving the ball back via fumble. O-G took the ball 53 yards to score on a Logan Rieman touchdown run. The Tyler Morman PAT then made the score 55-7 with 6:16 to play in the fourth quarter. O-G would get one last score, by way of another Cougar turnover, on an interception returned by a touchdown by Blake Blevins. A missed PAT made the score 61-7 with 4:38 to play in the game, and would last the remainder. Kuhlman racked up 202 yards on 17 carries on the night, scoring four touchdowns. Kulhman, who missed the first part of the year with a neck injury, was filling in for starter Tristan Parker who was out with back spasms. The 201 yards by Kuhlman Friday night makes him the all-time leading rusher in O-G foot-

ball history as he surpassed Ned Laubenthal (1971-73) for that honor. Kuhlman now has 2,514 yards while Laubenthal had 2,508. “We knew, going in, that Parker was going to be out. Brandon has really been chomping at the bit throughout the year to get this opportunity, and this was his big chance to shine. He came out and showed he’s a quality back. He’s a returning first team All-WBL running back and showed he is very good. And I’m proud of the way the offensive line handled things up front too,” O-G coach Ken Schriner said. “This is a big feather in his cap after what he has gone through this season.” The Cougars had seven turnovers on the night, six fumbles and an interception. “It’s just a matter of needing to go out and take care of business. We understand Van Wert is struggling and our kids came out and played hard. Obviously with the number of turnovers Van Wert had, you can’t really be effective in a game like that. And our kids capitalized when they needed to. It was nothing fancy, but I’m proud of the way our kids came out,” Schriner said.

Bulldogs finish season by beating Bluffton

2004 CHEVY

$

28-0 with 2:53 to play in the first half. Another Cougar punt gave the Titans the ball at their own 42-yard line. They then put together a scoring drive which culminated on a Caleb Siefker six yard touchdown run with 15 seconds left to play in the opening half. The Buckland PAT made the halftime score 350, O-G. Van Wert forced a Titan fumble on the kick return to open the second half, they could not capitalize, however, as a incomplete pass resulted in a turnover on downs. The Titans then took the ball 60 yards in the opposite direction, scoring on an 18-yard run by Kuhlman. The Buckland PAT made the O-G advantage 42-0 with 7:46 to play in the third quarter. The Cougars fumbled the ball away to O-G on their ensuing possession, but forced the Titans to punt. Van Wert then fumbled again at their own 10-yard line, giving the Titans first-and-goal. Logan Rieman, who came in to replace Siefker earlier in the game, then connected with Luke Recker for a 15-yard touchdown pass. A missed extra point kept the score 48-0 with 2:13 to play in the

Toll Free 800-894-2441 128 Main St., Hamler

NOBODY HAS A BETTER SELECTION!

Open 24 - 7 Visit hamlerchevy.com

Jordan Travis hooked up with Zach Barrientes for a 47 yard touchdown. Travis finished the night seven for 16 passing for 226 yards and three touchdowns with no interceptions. The Bulldogs expanded their margin to 13-0 on their next possession, following a Travis interception, as Colin Grothaus (nine carries for 82 yards) swept the left end for a three yard touchdown run and Connor Kohls booted the extra point. After holding Bluffton to three-and-out, Grove went back to work at their own

36 yard line. Two complete passes moved the ball to the Bluffton 46 and Travis then hit Rieman wide open over the middle for a 20-0 first quarter edge. Bluffton narrowed the gap to 13 at the start of the second period when senior running back Jeremy Basinger (eight carries for 58 yards) went in from two yards out.  The Bulldogs responded with Wade Heffner (16 carries for 80 yards) bouncing out of a pile and veering right for a nine yard touchdown with 3:32 left in the half. A successful two-point

Need Cash? We are Buying! Sell Your Old Gold Jewelry, Coin Collections, & Sterling Silver! Need Cash? We are Buying!

run by Trent Kerns made it 28-7 at the break. Two plays into the third though, Bluffton was back within two scores when Basinger broke free for a 46 yard touchdown run. The Bulldogs continued to tack on points as Travis went over the top to Rieman for a 28 yard score to make it 35-14 and Heffner took it in from five yards out to close out the scoring.  Barrientes added 47 yards on one catch for Columbus Grove, while Kerns churned out 38 yards on 14 carries. For the Pirates (finishing the season at 6-4 overall and 4-4 in the NWC), Robbie Stratton was five of 14 for 66 yards with two picks.

O-G youth wrestling BUYING! • BUYING! • BUYING! schedules Paying Top Dollar! Sell While Prices are High! PayingTop TopDollar! Dollar! Sell SellWhile While Prices Prices are are High! High! practice Paying BUYING! • BUYING! • BUYING! Sell Your OldCash? Gold Jewelry, Coin Collections, & Buying! Sterling Silver! Need We are Need Cash? We are Buying! BUYING! • BUYING! • BUYING! BUYING! • BUYING! • BUYING!

• Gold Jewelry of all kinds

• Sets of Coins

• NGC, PCGS, ANACS Coins

Sell Your Old Gold Jewelry, Sterling Silver! • Gold Jewelry of all kinds • Sets Coin of CoinsCollections,• & NGC, PCGS, ANACS Coins • Gold Coins of all kinds • •US • Buffalo Nickels • Gold Coins of all kinds USProof Proof& & Mint Mint Sets Sets • Buffalo Nickels • Paying $25 & up for Silver Dollars • American Silver Eagles • Sterling Silver Jewelry • Paying $23 toYour $25 up for Silver • American Silver Eagles • Sterling Silver Jewelry • Gold Jewelry of all&kinds • Sets ofCoin Coins PCGS, ANACS Coins Sell Old GoldDollars Jewelry, Collections, &• NGC, Sterling Silver! • Gold Jewelry all kinds •Old Sets ofPaper CoinsMoney NGC, PCGS, ANACS Coins 1935 & Older US • Sterling Silver Flatware 1935 & Older •Old US Paper Money • Sterling Silver Flatware • Gold Coins of allofkinds ••US Proof & Mint Sets ••Buffalo Nickels • Paying Goldup Coins of kinds •Indian US Proof & Mint Sets • Verbal Buffalo Nickels • Paying to 22 to all 25 or more times face • •Indian Cents • Free Appraisals • up to 23 times face Cents • Free Verbal Appraisals • Paying $25$25 & up for Silver Dollars • American Silver Eagles ••Sterling Silver Jewelry • Paying & up for Silver Dollars • American Silver Eagles Sterling Silver Jewelry for for Silver Coins 19641964 & Older WheatCents Cents • References Available Silver Coins & Older • •Wheat • References Available • Gold Jewelry Sets of Coins 1935 & Older • Old USUS Paper Money 1935 & Olderof all kinds ••Old Paper Money Gold Coins kinds US Proof & Mint Sets •• Paying up23 toof 23all times ••Indian Cents • Paying up to times faceface • Indian Cents • Paying $25Coins & up1964 for Silver Dollars ••Wheat American Silver Eagles for Silver & Older Cents for Silver Coins 1964 & Older • Wheat 1935 & Older • Old Cents US Paper Money • Paying up to 23 times face for Silver Coins 1964 & Older

• Indian Cents • Wheat Cents

•Sterling NGC, PCGS, ANACS ••Sterling Silver Silver Flatware Flatware Coins •Free Buffalo Nickels Verbal Appraisals ••Free Verbal Appraisals •References Sterling Silver Jewelry Available ••References Available • Sterling Silver Flatware • Free Verbal Appraisals • References Available

Paying Top Dollar! Sell While Prices are High! OTTAWA — The OttaSilver Silver Coins Coins

Gold GoldCoins Coins

Proof Watches Diamonds Proof&&Mint MintSets SetsPocket Pocket Watches Diamonds

& Mint Sets Silver Coins Coins Proof & Mint SetsPocket PocketWatches Watches Silver Coins Gold Gold Coins Proof

Wedding Bands

Class Rings

Gold Chains

Earrings

Earrings

Diamonds Diamonds

Dental Gold

Dental Gold

Howard’s CoinEarrings ShopDental Gold Gold Chains Class Rings

Wedding Bands

Class Rings

Gold Chains

128 E Main Street, Leipsic, OH Dental Gold Earrings Gold Chains Class Rings Howard’s Coin Shop Howard’s Coin Shop 419-943-2612 128 E Main Street, Leipsic, OH 128 E Main Street, OH Howard’s Coin Monday - Friday, 8:00Leipsic, am Shop - 4:30 pm 419-943-2612 419-943-2612

Wedding Bands

Wedding Bands

00025539

By Brian Bassett Sentinel Correspondent VAN WERT — The 7-2 Ottawa-Glandorf Titans rolled into Eggerss Stadium Friday having only lost to undefeated Wapakoneta and Kenton on the season, they had their sights set on a home playoff game. The Van Wert Cougars had hopes of a season-ending upset, but Brandon Kuhlman and the O-G ground game were too much for the Cougars to overcome. The Titans ran to a 61-7 victory over Van Wert.

We are here all year long -Street, not just when Gold OH & Silver are Hot! 128 E Main Leipsic, Monday -NoFriday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm Appointment Necessary Weare arehere hereallallyear yearlong long- not - notjust just when Gold Silver Hot! We when Gold && Silver areare Hot! No Appointment Necessary

Monday - Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm 419-943-2612 Monday - No Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm Appointment Necessary

We are here all year long - not just when Gold & Silver are Hot! No Appointment Necessary

wa-Glandorf Jaycees Youth Wrestling Club is kicking off the beginning of their season with practices on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Thursday Nov. 17, 7:30 to 8:30 p.m in the multi-purpose room at the O-G high school. Anyone interested in joining the youth team (5 to 13 year olds) or Jr. High team (O-G seventh and eighth graders) should come to practice. Sign up information will be available at practice. For more information contact Mike or Becky Karhoff 419-538-6121.


Sports

Putnam County Sentinel

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

B3

Second half goal lifts Kalida past LCC 1-0 Kalida’s first half shots on goal saw them go wide, or over the bar, or into the waiting arms of LCC keeper Ben Stechschulte. Stechschute had four saves in goal the first half, while Kalida keeper Drew Stechschute didn’t have a save. The T-Birds only shot of the first half came in the final two minutes when Nolan Burkholder sent a header, off a crossing pass, over the crossbar. “We told the kids at halftime to stay positive,” Kalida coach Mark Czubik said. “And to keep working hard. We told the guys we were getting opportunities but a lot of them were right at their goalie. We said basically can you just show a little more composure and finish.” That happened for the Wildcats just under three minutes into the second half. Kalida was able to make a push at the LCC goal down the right side

of the field. Senior Kevan Unverferth took a pass on the right side of the penalty box and pushed the ball to the left side of the box. Fellow senior Tyler Erhart was making his run from that side of the field and got a foot on the ball knocking it past the LCC keeper with 37:01 left to play. “Kevan played a great through ball to Tyler Erhart and Tyler calmly put the ball into the corner of the goal. That was all we had been asking of the kids,” Czubik said. Kalida had a chance to go up 2-0 minutes later when Erhart put another shot on goal. The ball was deflected away by a T-Bird defender and over the inline. The Wildcats set up for a corner kick that was headed away by an LCC defender. The Wildcats had three more good shots on goal in the half as Cody Schnipke and Ian Richey launched

shots on the goal that Stechschulte grabbed. A shot by Unverferth late in the contest went wide. “We had a lot of opportunities, but give LCC credit their kids played fantastic,” Czubik added. “Stechschulte was strong in goal. You have to tip your cap to them because they hung in there all day long. They didn’t have a lot of opportunities, but they just kept hanging in there.” And now the Wildcats will have a short time to savor their first trip to the regionals in 10 years as they prepare for Ottawa Hills. “It feels great. It has been 10 years,” Czubik said. “We’ve had some really good teams in the past that Staff photo/Charlie Warnimont unfortunately were unable to break through. I’ve al- Kalida’s Tyler Erhart (12) moves the ball upfield ways told the kids you need against this Lima Central Catholic defender Satursome luck and in our first day. two games we had a little bit of luck. Fortunately the ball bounced our way today.”

Metzger’s overtime goal gives Titans 2-1 win By Charlie Warnimont Sentinel Sports Editor WAPAKONETA — When Ottawa-Glandorf was awarded a free kick late in the second overtime of their Division II district final with Shawnee they didn’t waste time taking a shot. What happened after that left them in limbo for a second or two. TJ Metzger took the free kick for O-G aiming for the right goal post. His shot hit the post and started bouncing across the goal mouth before trickling into the net setting off a mass celebration by O-G the score gave them a 2-1 win in double overtime over Shawnee. The win sends the Titans (16-1-2) to the regional semi-finals Tuesday night opposite Bowling Green at Lima Senior Stadium. Shawnee ended its season at 11-7-1. As the Titans and Indians battled back and forth looking for goal scoring opportunities O-G got the break they needed in the second overtime when a Shawnee defender was called for a handball just outside the box. Metzger quickly placed the ball and took a shot as the Indians tried to set their defense. Metzger’s shot hit the right post and started bouncing to the left before trickling into the back of the goal before the Shawnee keeper could grab it. “When I got the ball, I saw him (Shawnee goalie

much how the first game went with them (a 1-0 loss).” The Indians mounted an offensive challenge that saw Trey Brock dribble the ball down towards the endline. Getting pressure from the Titan defense Brock sent a pass towards the far side of the goal to a wide open Andrew Ritchie, who quickly settled the ball and knocked it into the goal with 49 seconds left in the first half. O-G managed a goal early in the second half when Chewey Kaufman took a pass from a teammate and split a pair of Shawnee defenders. Kaufman put another shot on goal that Brinkman was in perfect position to play. However, he came up too soon and the ball trickled between his legs to tie the match at 1-1 with 37:12 left to play. “Matt Kaufman shot right at him and luckily it went right through his legs and in. That was all we needed to get our confidence up,” Metzger said. Neither team would score again until Metzger did in the second overtime. “I didn’t think we played that well defensively,” Weihrauch said. “Maybe it’s the fact we just played three games in five days. It wasn’t a pretty game by any means. We didn’t play perfect and made way too many mistakes for this level of game, but we managed to hang on and do just enough to come out on top.” O-G outshot the Indians 11-10 for the match. Ottawa-Glandorf 3 Napoleon 1

Troy Brinkman) trying to get his defense together,” Metzger said. “I picked the right corner because it was open and I just kicked it and it went in. I didn’t see it off the post right away, but then I saw it roll to the other side and I was so excited to get this win.” O-G coach Mike Weihrauch didn’t know what to think once he saw the ball bounce off the post. “My heart kind of sunk down into my stomach when it hit the post thinking, “It didn’t go in,” Weihrauch said. “Then I saw it bounce and rolling and hit the side panel of the net and it turned crazy from there. I told the guys if you believe in karma that’s kind of how we got knocked out the tournament last year, maybe it was just our turn this year.” For the most part the game was a defensive struggle as neither team could convert a scoring chance. Ottawa-Glandorf had three solid scoring chances in the first half that all went into the arms of Brinkman. The one came just before Shawnee scored as Cody Bockrath put a hard shot on goal from close range on goal that Brinkman held on to for a save. “We had a lot of great shots,” Weihrauch said. “I think we kind of punished their goal keeper a few times with the power and closeness of the shots. He (Brinkman) did a great job all game. My heart kind of goes out to him for that one shot, but I’m not going to give it back. This was very

Playoff ticket info BATHING? for Leipsic TROUBLE NEW WALK-IN

TUB OR SHOWER LOCAL COMPANY ONE DAY INSTALL CLEARANCE SALE! CALL FOR PRICES

EASYBATH 1-866-425-5591 00026141

DID YOU KNOW THE...

OFFERS COPY & LAMINATING SERVICES?

Photos, newspaper articles,  signage, membership cards or  anything else that you want to protect  and preserve can be laminated.

TOLEDO — Continental’s boys soccer team gave top ranked Ottawa Hills all they wanted for a half Saturday in the boys Division III soccer final at Toledo Central Catholic. But once the Green Bears figured out the Pirates defense they were able to adjust their offense and rally for a 5-1 win. The win sends Ottawa Hills (16-0-2) to the regional semi-finals where they faced Kalida Tuesday evening. The Pirates finished the season at 9-8-2. Using a physical style of play against Ottawa Hills Continental was able to frustrate their opponent shutting them out the first half. The Pirates took a 1-0 lead just before the half when Brandon Burke was able to get a shot past the Ottawa Hills keeper. “We took it to them the first half,” Continental coach Brian Stegbauer said.

“We played on their end of the field most of the half. They were not ready for our physical style of play. We kept them turning and facing our goal. Our back four defenders and goalkeeper played their best half of soccer all year.” The second half was a different story as the Green Bears scored early and continued to add to that lead. Ottawa Hill’s Blake Pappas tied the match at 1-1 16 seconds into the second half with a goal. Two and a half minutes later the Green Bears took the lead for good when Brandon Zakeri scored as Pappas assisted on the play. Ian Trickey added a goal at the 31 minute mark, while Zakeri and Pappas added goals in the final 15 minutes of the match. “Ottawa Hills came out in the second half and were finally able to play up to their number one ranking,” ➤➤See Continental/B4

Why pay high prices for your prescription medication? There is a better alternative.

BetterThanMedicare.com Compare these prices! Drug

Strength

Qty

Retail Price*

BTM Price **

Actos Advair Celebrex Effexor XR Lexapro Lipitor Namenda Nasonex Nexium Plavix Singulair Spiriva Tricor Zetia

30mg 250mg/50 200mg 150mg 20mg 20mg 10mg 50mcg 40mg 75mg 10mg 18mcg 145mg 10mg

90 3 90 90 84 90 100 3 84 90 90 90 90 100

$778 $660 $422 $474 $311 $475 $366 $365 $525 $593 $473 $726 $455 $398

$119 $132 $85 $89 $53 $75 $75 $63 $89 $89 $85 $85 $75 $69

* Retail Price is the average price of brand name drugs from selected US pharmacies ** BTM price is the price for the equivalent generic drug All prices are in US dollars and have been rounded to the nearest dollar.

• Your medication not listed? We stock a large selection of brand name and generic medication. • There are no fees to enroll, no deductibles or any restrictions on who can join. • Call our friendly staff for a free price quote and start saving today!

CALL NOW Toll-Free: 1-877-835-9508 Mention this code N9 to receive $10 off your rst order.

Size Subscribers Non-Subscribers 3 3/4” x 5 1/4” $1.50 11 1/2” x 9” $2.00 11 1/2” x 17 1/2” $3.00

$1.75 $2.25 $3.50

75

Black Copies .............................. 10¢ each (more than 500) ............................6¢ each

The Putnam County Sentinel 224 East Main St., Ottawa 419-523-5709

00022332

LEIPSIC — Leipsic High School has announced its plan for the pre-sale of tickets to its Division VI football game with Arcadia Saturday night at 7 p.m. Tickets will be sold in the following manner and places: Thursday, Nov. 3 - during school hours in the high school office, and from 6 to 8 p.m. in the high school auditeria. Friday, Nov. 4 - during school hours in the high school office. Saturday, Nov. 5 - 10 a.m. until noon in the high school auditeria. All pre-sale tickets will cost $7 and the school receives a portion of pre-sale tickets sold only. All tickets sold at the door Saturday night will cost $9 The Ohio High School Athletic Association receives 100 percent of tickets sold the night of the event. Passes are not accepted, as this is an OHSAA Regional Quarter-Final event hosted by Leipsic High School. This includes but not limited to, Leipsic All-Sports, Senior Citizen, employee, league, and football season ticket passes. Noise makers are prohibited which includes air horns.

OTTOVILLE – OttawaGlandorf advanced to the district finals with a 3-1 win over Napoleon Thursday in a Division II district semifinal at Ottoville. In what was a defensive struggle for most of the first half the Titans (15-1-2) used a pair of late first half goals to grab a 2-0 halftime lead. TJ Metzger put the Titans up 1-0 with 5:50 left in the opening half as he scored off a pass from Korey Niese. O-G went up 2-0 just over a minute before halftime as Austin Maag converted a free kick. The Titans lone goal of the second half came with 38:24 left to play when Matt Kaufman scored. Trenton Schroeder picked up the assist. Napoleon scored its lone goal with 16:35 left to play when Jordan Lauf scored. Branden Homan had the assist on the play.

Continental falls to Ottawa Hills in finals

Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

A Global Pharmacy No deductibles! No co-pays! No Medicare Donut Hole! 236456_5.3_x_10.5.indd 1

www. Our Plan is for Everyone! You don’t have to be over 65 or signed up for Medicare

00026496

WAPAKONETA — In tournament soccer, nothing is ever easy. Although Kalida was outplaying Lima Central Catholic they were unable to sneak a shot past the TBird keeper. That was until the second half. Kalida managed a goal early in the second half and made it stand up in a 1-0 win over the T-Birds in the Division III district finals at Wapakoneta’s Ryan Field. The win sends the Wildcats (17-2) to the Division III regional semi-finals Tuesday night at Findlay against top ranked Ottawa Hills. The contest will start at 7 p.m. While the two teams defenses stood out in the opening 40 minutes much of contest was played on Kalida’s side of the field. The Wildcats had a 9-1 edge in shots on goal but had nothing to show for it as the two teams were deadlocked at 0-0.

10/27/11 10:27 AM


B4

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Sports

Putnam County Sentinel

Kalida girls fall to LCC in double overtime Crestview By Dave Boninsegna Sentinel Correspondent LIMA — The Kalida Lady Wildcats were no strangers to overtime games in this year’s soccer tournament, after all they defeated Ottoville in a shootout to advance from the Sectionals. On Saturday afternoon at Lima Stadium the Wildcats would find themselves in a similar situation as after 80 minutes of their Division III district final against Lima Central Catholic the match was tied at 0-0. It remained that way through one over time and through 14 minutes of the second until T-Bird freshman Sydney Santaguida’s left-footed shot slipped past Kalida goalkeeper, Erika Brinkman and into the net to give LCC a shocking 1-0 victory and the district title, the first in the school’s history. “I didn’t think I would get it, I had a chance and just shot. I didn’t think it would go in, but it did.” Santaguida excitingly stated. Santaguida’s shot came

with exactly one minute left in the second overtime as it appeared that Kalida was headed to their second shoot out of the tournament, but the ball took a weird twist on the Lima Stadium turf and appeared to hit off of Brinkman’s forearm and into the goal, to give the Thunderbirds the win. Kalida appeared to score a goal earlier in regulation when Summer Holtkamp sent a header to Jackie Gardner that Gardner put into the net, but an offsides was called negating the score. “I feel terrible for the girls; our goal was to get to this game and advance on. We just came up a little bit short.” Kalida coach Dave Kehres commented. The Wildcats (14-2-3) had the majority of chances in the first 40 minutes of play as Gardner and Holtkamp pounded the ball towards the net, but Lima Central Catholic goalkeeper Jayna Clemens turned away each effort On the other end of the

pitch, Brinkman’s job was easy as the Thunderbirds were denied a shot on goal as sweeper Kaylyn Verhoff was a brick wall, not allowing anything past, making her goalies job tranquil. “We controlled the possession the first 40 minutes and didn’t capitalize, we had opportunities.” Kehres remarked. LCC’s best chance came with just under two minutes left in the first half on a corner kick by the Kelly Ahman. After a hosts of bodies knocked around the ball it finally deflected to the far post where Kalida’s freshman fullback Mariah Doepker made a spectacular save and cleared the ball out to keep the game scoreless at the half. Holtkamp and Gardner continued to get their opportunities late in the first half, with 17:21 to go before the break, Holtkamp sent in a shot from about 25 yards out, but Clemens was there for the save. Five minutes later Gardner placed in a shot from just inside the 18, but the deliv-

ery went just wide. LCC had the best chance in the second half thwarted as a scramble in front of Kalida goalkeeper Brinkman with 25 minutes left in the game sent the senior goalkeeper sprawling on the ground, Brinkman fell on to the ball amid a myriad of players to keep the game at nil-nil. In the first overtime, the Wildcats got the first real attempt at bringing the game to an end when Makenna Vorst sent a shot in from 35 yards out, but it hit the post and went across the goal line. Santaguida brought a chance for the Thunderbirds, but Brinkman was there to answer the challenge. That was followed up by another opportunity for the Cats, Vorst booted a shot with 12:39 to go, but it just hit the curve of the crossbar, keeping it at a stalemate. Again, the Wildcats continued to push and with 1:42 to go, Clemens made a game saving save for the T-Birds off a Justine Vorst attempt.

➤➤From B1 said. “Maybe we had a little nerves, but once we settled in we were eight or nine points better the rest of that game. And I think that carried over into the second and third game. We were a solid six or seven points better than they were in those two games.” Although O-G never led again in the opening game they kept the pressure on the T-Birds hoping to find a break and regain the lead. The T-Birds were leading 23-20 when the Titans used a timeout. O-G came out of the timeout and scored three straight points to tie the match at 23-23 on a kill by Jill Recker. LCC halted the Titan rally there as they scored the final two points of the game to win 25-23. “After the timeout they picked up their passing and run their offense,” Titan coach Ann Ellerbrock said. “Tylyn Taylor did a good hitting as she found the lines and when we adjusted she went crosscourt. She

had hey day at the net. And you have to credit Madison George for putting the ball where she needed it.” Coming off the first game rally the T-Birds grabbed a quick lead in game two scoring the first five points. The Titans stopped the rally there and scored two quick points before LCC scored seven of the next nine points for a 12-4 lead. The two early scoring runs by LCC were hard for O-G to overcome as the T-Bird defense never allowed the Titans to get into any kind of rhythm offensively. Their biggest run of the second game was four points that pulled them within 21-16 on a block by Michelle Ruhe. After another LCC point pushed their lead to 22-16 the Titans scored two quick points as Kayla Eastman had a block, then served an ace. Sarah Pajka stopped the Titan run with a kill before an O-G hitting error had LCC at game point. A wide serve by LCC and a Ruhe block had the score at 24-20

before the T-Bird’s Shanna Farler delivered a kill putting her team up 2-0. The third game saw the two team’s trade points early before LCC scored five straight points for an 8-4 lead. The T-Birds were leading 9-7 before they started putting points on the scoreboard in bunches while O-G could only manage a side out every two points as the T-Birds were up 21-12. O-G didn’t quit as they came within 22-18 as Constance Letso had a kill, Kaela Croy served up an ace and Ruhe had a block kill. LCC stopped the Titan run there as Taylor pounded a pair of kills. The Titans were able to pick up two more points on LCC mistakes before a long serve by O-G ended the match. “I can’t fault the play of my girls they gave 100 percent right until the final point,” Ellerbrock said. “They were flying around trying to touch every ball, so I appreciate the effort they gave, we weren’t able

to put an offense together. We couldn’t find the openings and when we thought we had an opening they had a defender diving in there to pick up the ball. LCC had a nice team effort tonight.” Ruhe finished with six kills and five blocks for the Titans, while Recker had four kills and three blocks. Letso had five kills and 10 digs, Jerwers six kills and 1 digs, Kelsey Baldwin had 27 digs and Kelley Selhorst had 28 assists and eight digs.

O-G

Vikings ➤➤From B2 final score came on a 13 yard run by Brady Schroeder. This scoring drive was setup by an interception by senior defensive lineman Josh Turnwald as he leaped to block Buck’s passing lane and instead came down with the ball. McComb was hurt by three turnovers in the second half, two interceptions and a fumbled punt.

➤➤From B1 6-1 lead in the third set, behind consecutive blocks by Emily Gerten and Nadler and a Lady Knight error. It looked, momentarily, like the Vikings had the match easily in hand. The scrappy Lady Knights answered with a run featuring two Mekale Clifton kills which prompted a Leipsic time-out. Two quick Nadler kills out of the break gave the Vikings some breathing room, but consecutive Kirstin Hicks kills and a Taylor Springer and Courtney Trigg combined block gave the Lady Knights their first set lead since 2-0 in the first set, 9-8. The teams then played to ties at 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21 before a Springer kill gave the Lady Knights a 22-21 lead and forced a Viking time-out. Crestview rolled off three straight points out of the break to take the second set, 25-21, and keep their match hopes alive. The fourth game was back and forth as the teams traded points all the way as they needed extra points to decide the outcome. The teams traded points, as a Hicks kill tied the game at 27. Leipsic answered back with a Nadler block to make the score 28-27. The would-be game-winning block was negated by the line judge to tie the game at 28, giving Crestview unexpected new life. Nadler and Danica Hicks traded kills, as did Trigg and Krinke, to make the score 30-30. A Kirstin Hicks

block gave Crestview setpoint, and a Springer kill gave Crestview the set, 3230 - causing an eruption on the Crestview side of the gym. The two-two tie sent the match in to a fifth set. The Lady Knights again gave the momentum to the Vikings to begin the fifth set, spotting them a 7-3 lead on a Nadler kill. A Springer kill and a Taylor Hamrick block made the score 7-5, and caused Leipsic to use their time-out. The Lady Knights continued to roll out of the break, seizing the 8-7 lead on a Hamrick kill lead. The Crestview advantage grew to 12-8 on consecutive Springer blocks before a Crestview error gave the Vikings a point. The Knights out-scored the Vikings 3-1 on a Springer kill, a Danica Hicks and Clifton block, and a Danica Hicks kill - to cap a dramatic comeback for the set (15-10) and match (3-2) victories, and a District Championship. Leipsic coach Chelsea Rogers said the team played well the first two game, but could not overcome the wave of Lady Knight momentum. “After winning the first two the way we did, I knew it wouldn’t be over without a fight. It wasn’t going to be easy. Those first two games we played almost perfect, everyone did what they had to do. We knew if we relaxed, even the slightest bit, they would grab the momentum. With the type of defense they play, the scrappy defense they play is just unreal,” she said.

Continental ➤➤From B3 Stegbauer said. “They figured out we were pushing up very hard and devised a play to get behind our defense and they scored three early second half goals to put us behind. Playing from behind we had to take chances that lead to the 5-1 loss. I am very proud of our guys for playing as hard as they did and playing with a very good Ottawa Hills team.” Ottawa Hills outshot the Pirates 18-13 for the match.

Pirate goalie Chaz Slattman had 13 saves and Ottawa Hills goalie Mike Geiger had 10 saves for the Green Bears. Continental 2 Bluffton 1 CONTINENTAL — Continental advanced to the district finals in Division III with a 2-1 overtime win over Bluffton last week. Dakota Scott scored the game winner for the Pirates (8-8-2) in overtime with a goal.

Fort Jennings selling basketball season passes FORT JENNINGS — Fort Jennings will begin selling basketball season tickets to last year’s holders beginning today (Wednesday) from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tickets also will be sold Thursday, Nov. 3, from 10 a.m. until noon. Any remaining tickets will be available Monday, Nov. 21st, through Wednesday, Nov. 23rd, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the high school office. Student season tickets may be purchased at any of

the above times. Cost is $55 for adults and $30 for students. Adult winter season passes and student winter season passes will be available again this year. The passes allow one to attend home boys and girls varsity and JV games and junior high games. An adult winter season pass is $100 ($5 discount if you are a current member of the Musketeer Athletic Boosters). A student winter season pass is $45. Winter Season passes are non-transferable.

Fritz’s Feature Of The Week 2008 Buick Enclave CXL

FWD, Auto, 3.6L V6 58,924 miles

00026350

HERE’S MY CARD Advertise Your Business Here!

00026536

Sale Price $

For only $30 a week, your business card will reach 15,000 households Appearing in the Putnam County Sentinel, The Weekender and on our website directory listing. Contact your Putnam County Sentinel representative today!

Come in and see

Fritz Fortman

419-523-5709

for more details on this super deal!

Verhoff’s

Automatic & Standard Differentials & Transfer Cases Rebuilds & Replacements 15282 Rd. 25N Ottoville, OH 45827

419-453-3620 Mobile - 419-236-2765

Joe Verhoff 1316 East Main Ottawa, OH 45875

Ph: 419-523-9500 Fax: 419-523-9700 Cell: 419-784-6957

00026028

Carpet Mart FREE TILE, VINYL OR LAMINATE WITH EVERY CARPET PURCHASE

24,415

CHEVROLET

BUICK

CONTINENTAL FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1960.

We have a professional sales and financing staff on hand that will work hard to find the exact vehicle you need while saving you money.

1-800-596-3808


November 3 — Attention Wartime Veterans and Spouses: If you are in need of assisted living, you may be entitled to a significant monthly income (ranging from $1,056 to $1,949 per month) from the Dept. of Veteran Affairs. Join them for a workshop at The Meadows of Kalida, at 6:30 p.m., on Thursday, Nov. 3. RSVP to 419-943-2103. 4 — Bluffton Public Library will host an after-hours “whodunit” Murder in the Stacks fundraiser on Friday, Nov. 4, at 6:30 p.m. A cast of eight directed by Pat Rodabaugh will provide a fun-filled evening. Watch as the mystery unravels before your eyes. Enjoy live music as you search for clues. Indulge in delicious appetizers and sumptuous desserts throughout the evening. Tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for senior citizens 60 and older and $10 for students 16 and older with ID. Tickets will be available at the Bluffton Public Library from Sept. 19 until Oct. 28 at 145 S. Main St., Bluffton. 4 — The Findlay Art League 2011 Juried Show will open to the public Friday, Nov. 4, with a reception for the artists at the Findlay Art League Gallery, 117 W. Crawford St., from 5 to 9 p.m. Awards will be made at 7 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The show will close Friday, Dec. 2. 5 — Ottoville Craft Show at the Ottoville Parish Center, 9 a.m. til 2 p.m. sponsored by the Rosary Altar Society, Admission is free and open to the public. Homemade soups, sandwiches and desserts available for lunch. Religious articles for sale, 50/50 drawing - need not be present to win. 5 — The Lima Symphony Orchestra will present KidStuff at the Lima Public Library on Saturday, Nov. 5 at 10 a.m. KidStuff is presented free of charge four times a year as part of the Lima Symphony Orchestra’s continued commitment to arts education. It is perfect for preschool and earlyelementary students and is open to the public. 5 — Findlay Singles Dance, Saturday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m. to midnight at the Hancock County Humane Society Hall. For more information call 419-992-1215. 6 — Sts. Peter and Paul Parish Fall Festival on Sunday, Nov. 6, with chicken and roast beef dinners

from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the school cafeteria. 7 — The next regular scheduled meeting of the Blanchard Township Trustees has been changed to Monday, Nov. 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Blanchard Township Office. 8 — Putnam Pet Pals meeting (providing help to the homeless dogs of Northwest Ohio) at the Presbyterian Church, 150 North Oak St., Ottawa. 8 — Election Day Luncheon Soup and Salad Buffet, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the First Christian Church, Poplar St., Leipsic. Homemade soup, salads and desserts. Eat-in or carry out. 8 — Election Night Supper at St. Joseph Catholic Church basement, Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 4 to 6 p.m. Menu includes ham or pork loin, mashed potatoes and gravy, corn, homemade applesauce, dinner roll and dessert, Cost is $7. Serving in the dining room with carry-outs available. Sponsored by Fort Jennings CLC Council #88. 8 — The Ottawa Boy Scout Troop 224 is sponsoring a Pancake and Sausage Dinner on Election Night, Tuesday, Nov. 8, from 4:30 to 7 p.m. at the Ottawa VFW. Adults are $6 and children $3. 8 — The Columbus Grove American Legion will host an Election’s Day Breakfast and Luncheon on Tuesday Nov. 8. 8 — The Pandora United Methodist Church will be hosting their Annual Election Day Dinner on Tuesday, Nov. 8, serving from 5 to 7 p.m. This will be a baked steak supper including salad bar and dessert. Cost is $7 for adults 13 and older and $3.50 for children 3 to 12 years old. Children under three are free. Carry-out orders for local delivery are available in Pandora. Call that day: 419-384-3905. 8 — Music Boosters’ Election Night Dinner, Tuesday, Nov. 8, at the Kalida High School Auditeria. The menu includes: roast beef, baked potato, green beans, applesauce and a Sudoku Solution #2164-D

9 1 7 6 3 5 1 5 8 4 4 7 3 2 2 9 6 8

7 3 9 5 8 6

1 8 6 4 2 3

5 4 2 9 7 1

2 5 4 7 9 8 6 1 3

8 6 3 2 1 4 9 5 7

6 9 5 3 4 7 2 8 1

4 7 8 1 6 2 3 9 5

3 2 1 8 5 9 7 6 4

dinner roll, for $7. You can dine-in or carry-out from 5 to 7 p.m. Contact any band or choir student or call Linda Honigfort at 419-5322379 for tickets. 10 — The “American Civil War Museum of Ohio” at 217 S. Washington Street Tiffin, will be having a presentation by Jennifer Distel on “The Role of Women in the American Civil War.” Women on both the North and South played significant roles during the war. The presentation will be on Thursday, Nov. 10 at 6 p.m. You will also be able to tour the museum before (starting at 5 p.m.) and after (until 8:30) the presentation and admission all for the reduce price of $3 per person. Members are always free. Contact: 419-509-0324. 12 — Findlay Service League’s Holiday Homes Tour and Christmas Market, Saturday, Nov. 12, from noon to 8 p.m. Presale tickets are $10, at the door $15, available from any FSL member of www. FindlayFSL.org. Also at Readmore’s Hallmark Books & Gifts, DeHaven Home & Garden Showplace and Coffee Amici. 12 — A Touch of Vegas starring Elvis Presley Jr. (actual son of Elvis Presley Sr.) and guest star Ann Flamingo, Nov. 12 at the Ottawa-Glandorf Auditorium, 630 Glendale Ave., Ottawa. Doors open at 6 p.m. Show at 7 p.m. General admission only. Tickets $10 each. Proceeds go to the Henry Fought Memorial Scholarship Fund. For information and tickets call 419-6155948. 12 — The Lima Symphony Orchestra will present a concert of transcendent musical beauty on Saturday, Nov. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Crouse Performance Hall of the Veterans Memo-

Excursions Trailways P.O. Box 449 Ottawa, OH 419-523-3500

Excursions Trailways

Destination Greektown Firekeepers Greektown Hoosier Park

Sponsor “Casino Hot Spots” “Casino Hot Spots” “Casino Hot Spots” “Casino Hot Spots”

Tickets for Dueling Pianos available FINDLAY — The Lupus Foundation of America, NW Ohio and Michigan Chapter, Inc. is currently selling tickets for their Annual Dueling Pianos fundraiser. This year’s event will highlight Midwest Dueling Pianos Show based out of Rochester, Mich. This musical team performs an all-request show with a healthy dose of interactive comedy which promises for a fantastic evening. Enjoy a heavy hors d’oeuvres’ dinner, featuring area restaurants, cash bar, entertainment featuring a live performances from the Midwest Dueling Pianos along with door prizes and raffle items from many area businesses. Presale tickets are $50 each until Nov. 11, 2011 and then can be purchased for

Sudoku Puzzle #2164-D

2 5

1 3

4 6

5 8

3 2

7 6

1

7

4

3

4 9

4 2

1 3

OTTAWA KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HALL 10759 Road H, Ottawa

8

The menu is chicken, Alaskan pollock, baked potatoes, french fries, applesauce, cole slaw, garlic toast, desserts, coffee, and milk.

The cost is $8.50 per meal 12 years & under $3.00 - Carry Out $8.50 per meal

Difficult

www.putnamsentinel.com OTTAWA VFW

POST 9142

VFW OHIO CHARITIES

Friday, November 4th

5 pm til gone!

Fish & Chicken Fry

8

$ 00

Includes: baked potato or wedge fries, sides, dessert, roll & beverage

saucy 212 W. Second St., Ottawa

419-523-5870

777 N. Perry St., Ottawa 419-523-3533

K of C Bingo every Monday - Early Bird starts at 6:30 pm and Regular Bingo starts at 7:30 pm

00025535

End of Season Titanburger Sale!

2.69

$

Last day of the season November 27 Stock up NOW on your favorite Ice Cream Novelties!

Ice Cream Bars • Ice Cream Sandwiches • Nutty Fudge Bars

The McRib® sandwich is back and every bit as good as you remember! Tender boneless pork smothered in hickory BBQ sauce, pickles and onion all on a corn-dusted roll. Try one with a Dr Pepper® and America’s Favorite Fries.®

The Cow Tipper This sandwich is a cheeseburger with swiss cheese on top of a veal sandwich with American cheese and Titan Lettuce!

3.95

$

TONY’S

00026487

Check it out for

“Home of the Titanburger” In A Hurry!! Call 419-523-5262 1702 E. Main, Ottawa

At participating McDonald’s. Limited time only. ©2011 McDonald’s DR PEPPER is a registered trademark of Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc. 00025546

6 5

Jerry Lewis’ McDonald’s

From 4:30 to 7:00 PM

5 9 3

© 2009 Hometown Content

(Formerly Executive Coach)

Date Wed., Nov. 9 Thurs., Nov. 17 Mon., Nov. 28 Sun., Dec. 4

$65. V.I.P. reserved tables are also available. This special event will be held beginning at 7 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 2, at the Hancock Agency on Aging in Findlay and is set to help raise funds to help patients and families whose lives are affected by the autoimmune disease, lupus. The mission of the Lupus Foundation of America, Michigan and NW Ohio Chapter is to offer support and services to all those whose lives are affected by lupus. If interested in purchasing tickets please call the office at 419-423-9313 or purchase your tickets at www.lupusnwoh.org. The Lupus Foundation, NW Ohio and Michigan Chapter is located at the Family Center on N. Blanchard Street in Findlay.

my celebration

© 2009 Hometown Content

ChiCken & Fish Fry

November 4 -

rial Civic and Convention Center featuring violin soloist Stefan Milenkovich. Tickets: Adults: $30 / $25; Students: $15 / $10; special discount ticket rates for Veterans and Service Members: $17. 12 — Come see the many shades of green in the world of moss and lichen. The Hancock Park District is hosting guest speakers Jim and Janet Toppin, members of the Ohio Moss and Lichen Association. Saturday, Nov. 12 from 10 a.m. to noon, participants will meet at Oakwoods Nature Preserve, Discovery Center for a brief indoor introduction before venturing out on the trails, with the Toppins, for a fall foray. Participants will receive handouts and should be prepared for weather and ground conditions; the foray can be conducted in light rain. This is an Adult Nature Education program, minimum 18 years old, and qualifies for Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist credit hours. Please contact Sarah Betts, Natural Resource Coordinator, sbetts@hancockparks.com, with any questions. Please register for this free program at the Hancock Park District Office, 419425-7275, by Thursday, Nov. 10. 16 - 20 ­— Community Health Professionals of TriCounty will hold its 13th annual Festival of Trees, Nov. 16 through 20 at The Gardens of Wapakoneta, 505 Walnut St. The festival is open to the public with free admission, refreshments and entertainment. Festival hours are 1 to 8 p.m. Wednesday - Saturday and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. Pictures with Santa will be held Saturday, Nov. 19 from 2 to 8 p.m. 17 & 18 — Ottawa Senior Citizen Holiday Bazaar.

419-523-3500

B5

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

00025538

Calendar

Entertainment

00026486

Putnam County Sentinel


B6

LIFESTYLES

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

Fort Jennings School holding parent teacher conferences

Photo submitted

Miller City Class of 1976 gather The Miller City High School Class of 1976 celebrated their 35th class reunion on Oct. 22. The reunion was held at Pike Run Golf Club with 23 members of the class attending.

FORT JENNINGS — Fort Jennings High School and Grade School will be having Parent-Teacher Conferences on Wednesday evening, Nov. 2, and Thursday, Nov. 3. All conferences are at scheduled times which will be sent home with the students. Also, there will be “no school” for students in grades K through 12 on Thursday, Nov. 3 and Friday, Nov. 4.

Critten competing for Miss Ohio Teen USA ALGER — Ginnie Critten of Alger competed for the title of Miss Ohio Teen USA 2012. The 2012 Miss Ohio Teen USA competition was held Oct. 14 and 15 in Portsmouth at the Vern Riffe Center for the Arts on the Campus of Shawnee State University. Portsmouth hosted nearly 110 outstanding young women representing every corner of every major city in Ohio. “We are overwhelmed by the response and caliber of all the participants

from Ohio,” Melissa Pitchford, Executive Director with the Miss Universe Organization said. “There is not a better opportunity for ambitious young women out there today. The Miss Ohio Teen USA competition offers women in the state of Ohio a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to advance their personal and professional goals. The Miss Ohio USA and the Miss Ohio Teen USA Pageants will be offering close to one million dollars in col-

lege scholarships to be awarded to the winners, finalists and semi-finalists. The final competition was held at the Vern Riffe Center for the Arts on Oct. 15, and consisted of three proportional segments: evening gown, fitness/swimsuit, the final question, and the crowning took place. Ginnie is the daughter of Brian and Billy Sallee, and granddaughter of Charles and Virginia Critten of Leipsic.

nology is considered by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to be one of the 20 fastest growing careers in the country! With a growth rate ranging from 20 to 40 percent over the next decade, choosing to study Health Information Technology is a great investment for anyone’s future. Students who graduate and pass their cer-

Can’t Decide on a Wedding Gift? Give the Newlyweds a way to stay “in the know” of local events with a subscription to the Putnam County Sentinel!

Wedding Gift Subscription Offer:

14 month subscription for the price of 12 ($42.50)

tification exam could be employed in hospitals, officebased physician practices, nursing homes, home health agencies, mental health facilities and public health agencies. RHIT’s may be employed in any organization that uses patient data or health information, such as pharmaceutical companies, law and insurance firms and health product vendors.

Ginnie Critten

Don’t miss out on this special offer!

Call the Putnam County Sentinel

419-523-5709 ext. 245

00022330

Competitive salaries also await UNOH HIT graduates. More than half of new health information graduates with a two-year associate’s degree have starting salaries in the $30,000 to $50,000 range according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. By five years out, statistics show one can earn upwards of $50,000 to $75,000 annually.

Births

Clarice Miller

Bruce and Barb Stephens of Columbus Grove, have announced the engagement of their daughter, Briana Lynn to Steven Joseph Kahle, son of Norm and Ranae Kahle of Glandorf. The bride-elect is a graduate of Columbus Grove High School and Rhodes State College. She is employed as a registered nurse at Hilty Home in Pandora. Her fiancé is a graduate of OttawaGlandorf High School. He is a self employed farmer. The couple will exchange wedding vows Nov. 26, 2011, at St. Anthony’s Catholic Steven Kahle & Church in Columbus Briana Stephens Grove.

HomeCare and Hospice holding bake sale

Charles Jack Zell

A son, Charles Jack, was born Sept. 22, 2011, to Brian and Valerie Zell of Pinellas Park, Fla., in St. Pete General Hospital, St. Petersburg, Fla. Maternal grandparents are Donald and Betty Nienberg of Glandorf. Paternal grandparents are Patricia Marion of Jeffersonville, Ind. and Charles and Susan Zell of Hopewell, Va.

*New subscribers only

Please join us for an Open House to celebrate Clarice Miller’s 95th Birthday. It will be held in the Lounge of the Hilty Memorial Home on Sunday, Nov. 6, from 2 to 4 p.m. No gifts, but cards welcomed. Clarice was married to George Fruchey and Irvin Miller respectively. She had two daughters (Jackie and Betty) and five step-children. She is an avid OSU Football fan and loves to listen to the Cincinnati Reds on the radio. She still has a passion for gardening and attends church services at the Hilty Home on a regular basis. Clarice would love to spend her 95th birthday celebration with friends and family so please stop by to say “hello” and wish her well on her special day.

Stephens - Kahle to wed in November

UNOH to offer Health Information Technology Degree LIMA — The University of Northwestern Ohio will begin offering an Associate’s Degree in Health Information Technology starting with Fall Quarter 2012. Students who complete this degree program will take an exam to be a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT). Health Information Tech-

Clarice Miller celebrating 95th birthday

OTTAWA — Putnam County HomeCare and Hospice Agency along with the Agency’s Professional Advisory Committee is sponsoring a bake sale the day before Thanksgiving. The proceeds will benefit the various programs of Putnam County HomeCare and Hospice. All types of delicious homemade goodies will be tant, and Andrew Michael available. Also, they will Stechschulte, 24, Columbus Grove, mechanical tech. Sara Lynn Mack, 22, Ottawa, accounting clerk, and Joshua Kelly Strick, 30, Ottawa, police officer. Jessica Lea Maas, 23, Columbus, STNA, and Taylor FINDLAY — Blanchard John Brinkman, 22, Ottawa, Valley Hospital invites past Marine Corps. and present rehab patients

Marriages

Sara Marie Heitmeyer, 25, Kalida, nurse, and Kevin Donald Beining, 25, Cloverdale, landscaper/farmer. Mallory Lynn Schroeder, 25, Columbus Grove, occupational therapist, and Darren Joseph Siefker, 28, Columbus Grove, iron worker. Lindsay Marie Neumeier, 24, Delphos, dental assis-

BVH hosting annual cardiovascular and pulmonary rehab holiday dinner

Saints Peter & Paul Catholic Church Ottawa, Ohio

FALL FESTIVAL Sunday, November 6, 2011 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Featuring Roast Beef and Chicken Dinners Served Family Style

Providing advanced for all women.

again have 50/50 tickets available with three winners. The bake sale will be held Wednesday, Nov. 23, at the Putnam County HomeCare and Hospice office at 139 Court Street, Ottawa. The office has moved up to the third floor but the bake sale will be on the first floor (entrance from Main Street). Hours are from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Adults

cancer care

$

800

Children

Carryouts Available

400

$

CHRISTMAS SALE, BASKET RAFFLE, WHITE ELEPHANT SALE, COUNTRY STORE, ROSARY ALTAR BOUTIQUE, GAMES, RAFFLES

to the annual cardiovascular and pulmonary rehab holiday dinner Thursday, Nov. 10 beginning at 4:45 p.m. in the Marathon Auditorium at Blanchard Valley Hospital. The dinner serves as a holiday celebration for past and present cardiovascular and pulmonary patients and a guest. Easy Breathers and Smart Hearts support group members are also invited to attend. RSVP is required and must be made by Nov. 4, by calling the BVH Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehab department at 419423-5153. A $5 per attendee donation is suggested.

00002742

ProMedica Defiance Regional Hospital is committed to improving the health and well-being of those we serve through prevention, education and superior service.

Holiday Open House

The Discounted Mammogram Program at Defiance Regional Hospital helps qualifying uninsured women receive important screening mammograms for $25 using state-of-the-art digital mammography technology.

CANCER INSTITUTE

00025531 MH-300-11 Women's Center AD 5.25x6_b/w.indd 1

November 5th • 9am-4pm & November 6th • 12pm-4pm

Now available October through December, feel comfortable taking this important step toward ensuring your safety and well-being by getting a discounted mammogram.

For information about this program, please visit www.promedica.org/defiance or call 419-783-6931.

© 2011 ProMedica

10/26/11 4:34 PM

00026332

DEFIANCE REGIONAL HOSPITAL

Readmore’s Hallmark

Come in and sample our New Gourmet Coffee during our Open House. We will be serving coffee & hot tea the whole month of December.

150 W. Main St., Ottawa

419-523-4969


Education

Putnam County Sentinel

B7

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

Help Me Grow offers free screenings PUTNAM COUNTY — Putnam County Help Me Grow will be providing free screenings (hearing, development, speech, vision, be-

havioral and play skills) for infants, toddlers and preschoolers by appointment Nov. 8 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Educational Service

Center. Please call Ann or Marcie to schedule an appointment at 419-523-6059 or 1-877-738-1866.

School Lunch Menus

Week of Nov. 7-11 Ottawa-Glandorf High School Monday – Chicken patty or BBQ rib sandwich, carrots and celery with peanut butter, corn, fruit, milk. A la carte - Funnel cake. Tuesday – Pepperoni pizza or BBQ shredded chicken, tossed salad, California blend, cookie, fruit, milk. A la carte Popcorn chicken. Wednesday – Lasagna or chicken fajitas, tossed salad, green beans, breadstick, fruit, milk. A la carte - Pepperoni cheese breadstick. Thursday – Chicken strips or turkey sandwich, noodles, peas, rolls, cake with fruit topping, milk. A la carte - Burrito. Friday – Hamburger with cheese slice or mini corndogs, fries, broccoli, fruit, cookie, milk. A la carte - Cream cheese pretzel. *** Ottawa Elementary School Monday – Hamburger or PB sandwich, french fries, dill pickles, cheese tray, fruit, milk. Tuesday – Pepperoni pizza salad, cookie, fruit, milk. Wednesday – Grilled cheese, tomato soup, crackers, carrots with dip, fudge bar, fruit, milk. Thursday – Breaded chicken or PB sandwich, au gratin potatoes, peas, fruit, milk. Friday – Spaghetti with meat sauce, breadstick, salad, PBJ bar, fruit, milk. *** Glandorf Elementary School Monday – Hamburger sandwich, french fries, cheese, fruit, milk. Tuesday – Spaghetti, meat, cheese, salad, breadstick, fruit, milk. Wednesday – Pepperoni pizza, green beans, fruit, butter bread, milk. Thursday – Walking taco, corn, fruit, turnover, milk. Friday – Popcorn chicken, macaroni and cheese, fruit, roll, peas, milk. *** Sts. Peter and Paul School Monday – Hamburgers with cheese, pickles, french fries, dessert, fruit, milk. Tuesday – Pizza, tossed salad, vegetable, fruit, milk. Wednesday – Popcorn chicken, mashed potatoes, dinner roll, cheese stick, fruit, milk. Thursday – Pizza casserole, green beans, breadstick, applesauce, milk. Friday – Grilled cheese, tomato soup, vegetable, cookie, peaches, milk. *** Miller City - New Cleveland School Monday – Breaded chicken patty sandwich, scalloped pota-

toes, pears, pudding, milk. Tuesday – Beef sandwich, steamed carrots, pineapple, cookie bar, milk. Wednesday – Pizza, tossed salad, mandarin oranges, butter bread, milk. Thursday – No school. Friday – No school. *** Leipsic School Monday – French toast, potato, sausage, orange wedges, milk. Tuesday – Chicken fajita, lettuce, salsa, Fritos, banana, milk. Wednesday – Hamburger sandwich, broccoli, cheese, rice, gummies, applesauce, milk. Thursday – Chicken patty sandwich, potato soup, crackers, strawberries, milk. Friday – Bosco stix, dipping sauce, carrots with dip, peaches, milk. *** Pandora-Gilboa School Monday – Popcorn chicken, broccoli and cheese, pudding, fruit, milk. A la carte - Curly fries. Tuesday – Hamburger, cheese and pickles, French fries, fruit, milk. A la carte Bosco pizza. Wednesday – Pizza, corn, chips, fruit, milk. A la carte Chicken tenderloin. Thursday – Tacos, lettuce cup, cheese, salsa, fruit, milk. A la carte - Taco salads. Friday – Teriyaki chicken and rice, Oriental vegetables, fortune cookie, fruit, milk. A la carte - Gyros, mushrooms. *** Columbus Grove School Monday – Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, roll, fruit, milk. Tuesday – Nachos with cheese sauce, sunflower seeds, carrots and celery fruit, milk. Wednesday – Taco in a bag (4-12), soft shell taco (1-3), with lettuce and cheese, corn, fruit, milk. Thursday – Meatball sub, green beans, fruit, cookie, milk. Friday – Chicken nuggets, fries, roll, fruit, milk. *** Fort Jennings School Monday – Hot dog sandwich, cheese stick, baked beans, fruit, milk. Tuesday – Chicken fajita, cheesy rice, peas, fruit milk. Wednesday – Charbroil beef sandwich, cheese slice, corn, fruit. Thursday – Spaghetti and meat sauce, bread stick, green beans, fruit, milk. Friday – Breaded chicken sandwich, cheese slice, mixed vegetables, fruit, milk. ***

Ottoville School Monday – Chicken patty, rice, corn, pineapple, milk. Tuesday – Pizzaburgers, tossed salad, pears, brownie, milk. Wednesday – Chili soup with crackers, butter-pb-tuna, cheese stix - relish, apple crisp, milk. Thursday – Chicken fajita with cheese-lettuce-tomato, corn, cookie, peaches, milk. Friday – Corn dog, corn chips, green beans, mixed fruit, milk. *** Continental School Monday – Nacho chips, meat and cheese sauce, corn, peach cup, milk. Tuesday – Burrito, green beans, applesauce cup, cookie, milk. Wednesday – Stuffed crust pizza, fresh carrots and ranch dip, peaches, milk. Thursday – Chicken strips, mashed potatoes and gravy, peas, apricots, breadstick, milk. Friday – Hot Pockets, corn, blueberry crisp, milk. *** Kalida Elementary School Monday – Hot dog sandwich, potato, fruit, cookie, milk. Tuesday – Chili soup, crackers peanut butter bread, fruit, milk. Wednesday – Pizza, corn, fruit, cookie, milk. Thursday – Chicken and noodles, mashed potatoes, mozzarella cheese sticks, fruit, milk. Friday – Chicken nuggets, green beans, breadstick, fruit, milk. *** Kalida High School Monday – Chicken strips or nuggets, vegetable, fruit, bread, milk. Tuesday – Soft beef taco, taco chips, cheese sauce fruit, bar, milk. Wednesday – Sausage, French toast sticks, egg cheese omelet, potatoes, fruit, milk. Thursday – Toasted cheese sandwich, vegetable soup, crackers, fruit, milk. Friday – Pizza, vegetable, fruit, cookie, milk. *** Brookhill Center Monday – Bologna salad sandwich, green beans, creamed rice, pineapple, milk. Tuesday – Steak nuggets, mashed potatoes with gravy, tossed salad, buttered roll, peaches, milk. Wednesday – Fish sandwich, peas, tossed salad, pears, milk. Thursday – Chili, cheese and crackers, buttered roll, apple crisp, milk. Friday – Veterans Day, no program. ***

Photo submitted

P-G chooses ‘Rockets of the Month’ Shown above are the students from Pandora-Gilboa School (grades K-4) who have been chosen as “Rocket of the Month,” front, from left, Macy Wilson, Colin Harris, Autumn Schulte, Gabe Ball, Alijandra Lopez and Chloe Beckman; middle, Taelor Miller, Lacie Fenstermaker, Alivia Sanchez, Aliyah Wise, Maxwell Wilson, Ethan Luginbill, Dalton Durst and Grace Torres; and back, Cole Sansom, Alexis Augsburger, Bella Basinger, Silas Schmenk, Isaac Stall, Molly Baumgartner, Sydney Norton and Kaleb Sherer. During the month of October, students focused on “Self-Esteem.”

Rhodes to host one stop admissions event LIMA — Rhodes State College will host a “One Stop Admissions Event” on Wednesday, Nov. 9, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. as part of special recruitment days for Winter 2012 classes. This event, designed for students who plan to start classes on Jan. 3, 2012, allows potential students to apply for admission, complete financial aid, take placement testing, register for classes or sign up for a New Student Orientation program. Persons who are interested in attending should pre-register at www.RhodesState.

edu or call (419) 995-8320. Required materials for admissions and financial aid are listed on the website. In addition to financial aid and admissions, representatives from Career Services, the Learning Centers, Disability Services and Distance Education will also be available. Academic advisors, admissions and financial aid personnel will be on hand throughout the event to answer questions regarding specific college-related issues and available programs.

YMCA Kids Night Out this Friday OTTAWA — The Putnam County YMCA is holding its monthly Kids Night Out program this Friday, Nov. 4 from 7 to 10 p.m. Children will participate in swimming, games, food, movies and more. Fee is $6 for YMCA members and $12 for non-members and is open to all kids age 5 to 10 years old. Register now as space is limited. To register or for more information contact the Putnam County YMCA at 419-523-5233.

Around Campus

LIMA — The University of Northwestern Ohio is proud to acknowledge its Dean’s List for August Session 2011 for students in the College of Technologies. The following full‑time students received a grade point average of 3.5 or better: Columbus Grove — Ryan James Birkemeier, Erik John Maitland Fort Jennings — Craig Anthony Elwer, Joshua Eli Kuhlman Ottawa — Lauren M Gerten, Nathan Douglas Verhoff Vaughnsville — Dylan

Scott Baker

LIMA — Seth Bendele, son of Mike Bendele and Jennifer Bendele of Ottoville, has been accepted to the University of Northwestern Ohio in Lima to begin classes in the fall quarter where he will be majoring in the Business Administration program. Seth attends Ottoville Local Schools. ASHLAND — Alexis Kesler of Ottawa, is a member of Alpha Lambda Delta at Ashland University. Kesler is majoring in interven-

Media

tion specialist mild to moderate. She is the daughter of Joe and Lisa Benroth of Ottawa, and is a 2009 graduate of Ottawa-Glandorf High School. Alpha Lambda Delta honors students who in their first or first two semesters have achieved a 3.5 cumulative grade point average. The honor society’s purpose is to encourage superior academic achievement among students in their first year, to promote intelligent living and to assist students in recognizing and developing meaningful goals.

education

in

The Putnam County Sentinel is launching a new education program, Media in Education (MIE) with the new school year. This program will provide area elementary schools with copies of the Putnam County Sentinel once a month for use in the classroom. In cooperation with this program we are asking area businesses and individuals to help sponsor schools with their donations. Participating Elementary Schools include:

Ottawa Ottoville Miller City St. Mary’s Catholic School

Kalida Pandora-Gilboa Continental Columbus Grove Mail to PO Box 149, Ottawa, OH 45875

Sponsor Name_____________________________________ Mailing Address____________________________________ City___________________ State__________ Zip_________ Phone________________ E-Mail ______________________ School To Sponsor__________________________________ q $500 includes free 1/4 page ad in Donation Amount (Please Mark) PCS & Weekender

q $50 includes free 2x2 ad in Weekender q $100 includes free 3x5 ad in Weekender q $250 includes free 3x5 ad in

q $1,000 includes free full page ad in PCS & Weekender

q Other Amount

PCS & Weekender

If paying by phone, call 419-523-5709 ext. 245 r Visa r Discover r MasterCard # _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Expiration Date: __________on credit card If sending payment in form of a check, indicate donation is for MIE.

00026418

Also thanks to these current sponsors for their donation:

Miller Precision Industries

Pandora Lunch Box Pandora

419-384-3383 Nationwide®

Insurance & Financial Services

Nationwide

00025900

Nationwide Is On Your Side®

131 Progressive Drive Ottoville

Greg Brown, Agent 419-286-2660

Craig and Gary

419-286-2181

Pandora’s Hometown Pharmacy Serving You Since 1906

112 E. Main St., Pandora • 419-384-3303

Sean Harlan Austin, Ph.D. 200-204 N. High St., Columbus Grove, Ohio

419-659-5998

www.psychosocialassociates.com

ONLINE BRANCH at www.e-fnb.com

THE OTTOVILLE BANK CO.

161 West Third St., Ottoville 419-453-3313 Lending Center: 940 E. 5th St., Delphos • 419-695-3313

677 Woodland Dr. Ottawa Division

615 Agner St. Ottawa, OH Visit419-523-3722 our NEW

Dave, Mike, Randy, Tammy,

346 E. Main 20 W. Second Street Ottawa, Ohio Ft. Jennings, Ohio

419-523-5527

332 East Main St., Ottawa 419-523-6880

www.ottovillebank.com

Dr. Douglas Wine

Eye Care For You

Family Optometry Inc. www.visionsource-drwine.com

113 First St., Oakwood

140 W. Spring St., St. Marys

419-594-3340

419-394-2397

Grant Insurance Agency Continental, OH 419-596-3848

Defiance, OH 419-782-7176

“Your Complete Insurance Professionals”

www.grantinsurance.com

· Apply for a loan

Pandora 419.384.3221 · Open an ·account Visit our NEW · Give us your feedback Bluffton · 419.358.5500 ONLINE BRANCH Findlay · 419.429.6000

Pandora · 419.384.3221 Bluffton · 419.358.5500 Findlay · 419.429.6000 Pandora · 419.384.3221 Bluffton · 419.358.5500 Findlay · 419.429.6000

at www.e-fnb.com www.e-fnb.com · Apply for a loan · Open an account Member FDIC · Give us your feedback Equal Housing Lender

www.e-fnb.com

Member FDIC Fraternal Order of Eagles Equal Housing Lender No. 2234 135 W. Main St., Ottawa

419-523-6637

Ottawa-Glandorf

Rotary

www. ogrotary.org

Visit our NEW ONLINE BRANCH at www.e-fnb.co

· Apply for a loan · Open an account · Give us your feedbac

www.e-fnb.c

Member

Equal Housing Le


B8

Business

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

h c t a W Market LocalStocks Stocks Local

00026535

• Wal Mart • Verizon • Whirlpool • Ford • Union Bank • Procter & Gamble • Cooper Tire • First Federal Bank

WMT VZ WHR F UBOH PG CTB FDEF

Dow Jones

+220.96 Close: 12,082.77 Change:

+1.86%

Putnam County Sentinel

NASDAQ

+29.29 Close: 2,712.41 Change:

+1.09%

+19.81

S&P 500

Close: 1,269.13 Change: +1.59%

For All Your Financial Needs

• Mutual Funds • Roth IRA’s • Annuities • Retirement Funding • College Funding • Long Term Care, Disability & Life Insurance — CALL —

57.16 37.20 51.51 11.88 8.00 64.50 14.47 14.42

419-523-3434 DAVID ELLERBROCK Ottawa

Indexes are not managed funds, have no identifiable objectives and cannot be purchased. Past Performance of an index does not guarantee the future performance of any specific investment. Quotes are from Monday, October 31, 2011 prices.

Securities offered through SagePoint Financial, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. (Strategic Financial Resources is not affiliated with SagePoint Financial, Inc. or registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor.)

Paulding Putnam Trustee retirement set for March 2012

Photo submitted

Modern Woodmen ‘Makes a Difference’ On the fourth Saturday in October, local Modern Woodmen volunteers along with volunteers from coast to coast, improved communities on Make a Difference Day, a national day of service. Stan Haselman, local Modern Woodman representative, Chapter 7867 made a difference by donating puzzles, puzzle books and electronic games to The Meadows of Kalida.

IRS plans to hold tax practitioner institute classes in Lima on Dec. 5 and 6 COLUMBUS — In preparation for the upcoming tax-filing season, the Internal Revenue Service has partnered with colleges and universities across Ohio to offer two-day tax institutes during November and December. The institutes will educate and inform tax professionals and tax practitioners on tax law updates for individual taxes and business taxes. “The Ohio tax practitioner institute classes can help tax pros position themselves

for a successful filing season,” said Jennifer Jenkins, Ohio’s IRS spokesperson. Instruction is generally provided by college professors, tax professionals and IRS personnel. Institute topics may vary by location; those who complete the training may qualify for continuing education credits. An institute is scheduled for Dec. 5 and 6 at Veterans’ Memorial Civic and Convention Center, 7 Towne Square, Lima. Sessions will be held from 8:15 a.m.

Scott Wagner

PLUMBING AND HEATING The Perfect Match in HVAC.

00023685

Call us today for your free estimate! ®

turn to the experts™

State ID #25024

419-876-3199

to 5 p.m. The registration fee – which includes the workbook and other reference materials, instructor fees, refreshments, lunches, meeting rooms and other expenses – is $330 through Nov. 18 ($355 after). For more information and to register online, visit The Ohio State University’s website at http://incometaxschools.osu.edu/. Additional Ohio tax practitioner institute offerings and can be found at the official IRS website page http://www.irs. gov/businesses/small/ article/0,,id=140450,00. FINDLAY — In honor of html. Dates and locations of Veterans Day Community the tax classes are subject to Markets would like to thank change. those men and women who have served in our country’s Stay up-to-date armed forces. All Community Markets locations will with us! Pick be offering service members up our weekly 11 percent off of their total printed edition in order on Nov. 11, 2011. “We are proud to honor stores every Wednesday! our service men and women on Veteran’s Day,” says Eric Anderson, CMO. “We hope

“Women are unique in that they experience life in chapters. Just as Henry County Hospital’s staff provides individualized care, I provide personalized care to each patient taking into account their chapter of life.”

Erast J. Haftkowycz, M.D. 1600 Riverview Ave, Suite 105 • Napoleon, Ohio 43545 419-599-0055 Dr. Haftkowycz was born, raised, and educated in Rochester, New York. He moved to Cleveland, Ohio where he completed his residency and has worked as an OB/GYN since 1983. Dr. Haftkowycz is a widower and proud father of three children, Natalia age 24 and her husband Dan reside in Cleveland, Ohio with their three children, Peter age 23 resides in Cleveland, Ohio and Andrew age 20 resides in Athens, Ohio. The family enjoys outdoor activities such as water sports, hiking, and scouting.

Interesting facts about Dr. Haftkowycz: Dr. Haftkowycz is Board Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology Received a Masters Degree in Medical Ethics Served as Chairman of the Ethics Committee at Fairview Hospital Named Teacher of the Year by medical students at Fairview Hospital

Office Hours

00026605

Medical Specialty: Obstetrics and Gynecology Practice Emphasis: All aspects of obstetrics and gynecology including but not limited to: Annual Exams/Pap Smears • Biopsies Endometrial Ablation • Hysterectomies (Vaginal & Abdominal) Infertility • Menopausal Issues • Menstrual Issues Pre- and Post-Natal Care • Sexual Dysfunction

demands for efficient and reliable power continue to be a challenge for the electric utility industry. Electric co-ops must look after the best interest of rural members while still maintaining valuable relationships with legislators. “My years on the board have reinforced my belief that one must take an active role in the community and how critical it is to work with local, state and national politicians to insure the making of honest and fair laws for our citizens.” Oedy further stated, “I am proud to have been involved with the cooperative organization that continues to deliver high quality, competitively priced energy, while remaining committed to the communities it serves.” Oedy has spent eight years as Paulding Putnam EC’s representative on the Buckeye Power and Ohio Rural Electric Cooperative board. He found the experience both interesting and educational. Even though Bill considers himself semi-retired, he maintains a presence in his community and remains active in many organizations including the Putnam County DD Board and the Conservation Action Project Board. Rural Miller City is home for Bill and his wife Jane.

Oedy

They have four grown children and nine grandchildren living in Northwest Ohio. During leisure time Oedy especially enjoys small game hunting and attending Notre Dame football games. This is a great opportunity for anyone interested in serving their neighbors to step up and represent District 7 in a big way. Interested members should refer to the November issue of Country Living for specific information regarding becoming a member of Paulding-Putnam’s board of trustees. Everyone who is interested is welcome to fill out the necessary paperwork for a nomination in District 7. Other districts also up for reelection are District 3 (Paulding County) and District 8 (Putnam and Allen County).

Community Markets offers military members 11 percent off on Veterans Day

Welcomes a New Arrival!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

PUTNAM COUNTY — District 7 - Monroe, Palmer, Liberty and Greensburg Townships in Putnam County will be without a board member beginning March 17, 2012. Paulding Putnam EC members living in these townships may become a candidate by completing a simple four step process. • Obtain a petition form from the co-op’s office. • Obtain at least twenty (20) valid signatures of PPEC members who reside within the district • Complete the petition form • Return properly completed petition to PPEC’s office on or before Dec. 16, 2011. For almost 15 years, Bill Oedy has been representing the members of Paulding Putnam Electric Cooperative’s District 7. Since being elected to the board in 1997, Oedy says he has enjoyed serving as a cooperative trustee. What stands out to him is the enormous size of the electric cooperative system and the amount of time one must spend to keep up with all the changes that come along. “This is necessary for a trustee to make good decisions in the board meetings.” Rapidly-changing technology and environmental

7:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Dr. Haftkowycz welcomes new patients. All major insurances are accepted, including Medicare and Medicaid. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 419-599-0055.

this will not only serve as a thank you to veterans and military members, but will also be a reminder for others in our community to recognize them for their service.” All veterans and active military members are eligible for this promotion. Headquartered in Findlay, Ohio, family owned Fresh Encounter, Inc. is Ohio’s largest independent grocery retailer; now operating 32

outlets throughout Ohio and Indiana. Fresh Encounter operates supermarkets under the brands of Community Markets, Great Scot Community Markets, Fulmer Community Markets, Save-a-Lot and Sack-NSave Supermarkets. For information on family owned Community Markets, visit the website at http://www.CommunityMarkets.com.

Real Estate Transfers

Paul J. Hoehn LE and Marilyn L. Hoehn LE, Lot 250, Ottoville, to Larry J. Hoehn and Steven J. Hoehn. Gina M. Geise, 2.00 acres, Monterey Township, to Jeffrey M. Geise. Jeffrey A. Caton, Jeff Caton, 1.00 acres, Sugar Creek Township, to Jeffrey A. Caton and Regina L. Caton. Agnes G. Mattern, Lot 8, Lot 60, Leipsic, to Ronald Paul Mattern, James W. Mattern, Charles F. Mattern and Patricia M. Spring. George P. Osting and Jacqueline L. Osting, parcel, Jennings Township, to Ralph Knippen and Doreen Knippen. Isaac A. Myers, parcel, Perry Township, to Daniel J. Recker and Dawn A. Recker. Jill A. Smith and Brian L. Smith, Lot 365, Kalida, to Timothy Klausing and Jamie Klausing. Brian Thomas Crawford, Lot 18, Lot 19, Lot 20, Columbus Grove, to Village of Columbus Grove. Valita A. Lammers TR HPL Trust, Lot 597A, Lot 597B, Kalida, to Kenneth B. Vennekotter and Carol A.

Vennekotter. Jeffrey P. Schroeder and Louann M. Schroeder, 3.0 acres, Union Township, to Keith R. Meyer and Lisa M. Meyer. Mike Gritzmaker, Lot 502, Kalida, to Melanie K. Gritzmaker. David E. Fanning, Lot 18, Lot 19, Lot 20, Ottoville, to Michelle T. Fanning. David E. Fanning, Lot 483, Lot 483 A., Ottoville, to Michele T. Fanning. Teresa A. Rodriguez and Lambento Rodriguez, Lot 27, Leipsic, to Lambento Rodriguez and Teresa A. Rodriguez. Dale E. Lewellen and Eileen G. Lewellen, 3.87 acres, Blanchard Township, to Adam C. Forney and Heidi L. Forney. Troy M. Ellerbrock and Dana M. Ellerbrock, 8.23 acres, Liberty Township, to Nicholas Morman and Amy Morman. The Deck Farm LLC, .71 acre, 36.46 acres and parcel, Van Buren Township, to Steven P. Ellerbrock, Michael E. Ellerbrock and Judith A. Lovell. Judith A. Lovell, parcel,

Van Buren Township, to Steven P. Ellerbrock and Michael E. Ellerbrock. Steven P. Ellerbrock, Kimberly Ellerbrock, Michael E. Ellerbrock and Bonny Ellerbrock, .71 acre and 36.46 acres, Van Buren Township, to Judith A. Lovell. Karen S. Schnipke TR, 1.883 acres, and 24.403 acres, Perry Township, to Schnipke Logging LLC. Eric R. Brinkman and Lindsay R. Brinkman, Lot 690, .359 acre, Kalida, to Michael C. Kahle and Lucille M. Kahle. Carol E. Miller, 2.606 acres, Union Township, to Robert A. Schultz and Rebecca M. Schultz. Alvin F. Schulte and Maxine Schulte, parcel, Blanchard Township, to Jeffrey A Schulte. Wayne C. Schroeder and Jane E. Schroeder, Lot 767, West Ridge Estates Sub., Columbus Grove, to Wayne C. Schroeder and Jane E. Schroeder. Joseph A. Chavalia and Pamela S. Chavalia, 2.036 acres, Sugar Creek Township, to Amanda Cole.


Farm

Putnam County Sentinel

Farm Market Report

EATON, OH United Producers

617 South Franklin Street, Eaton, OH 45320 Phone: (937) 456-4161 October 26, 2011 Hogs Headage: LOW HIGH Market Hogs: 68.25 69.75 Light: 62.00 Heavy: 60.00 65.25 Sows Headage: LOW HIGH Light: 55.75 57.75 Heavy: 59.75 61.00 Boars Headage: LOW HIGH Heavy: 34.75 Feeder Pigs Headage: LOW HIGH By Head: 27.00 39.00 Cows Headage: LOW HIGH Comm & Utility: 64.00 70.00 Canner/Cutter: 55.00 63.00 Bulls Headage: LOW HIGH All Bulls: 65.00 74.00 Feeder Cattle Headage: LOW HIGH Yearling Steers (600 - 800): 107.00 Yearling Heifers (600 - 800): 105.00 Steer Calves (300 - 600): 120.00 GALLIPOLIS, OH Heifer Calves(300 - 600): 120.00 United Producers Sheep & Lambs Headage: 357 Jackson Pike, LOW HIGH Gallipolis, OH 45631 Feeder Lambs: 146.00 Phone: (740) 446-9696 Aged Slaughter Sheep: 80.00 October 27, 2011 Goats Headage: Feeder Pigs Headage: 1 LOW HIGH LOW HIGH All Goats: 44.00 100.00 By Head: 2.00 Cattle Headage: CRESTON, OH LOW HIGH United Producers Cow/Calf Pairs: 775.00 256 South Main Street, PO Cows Headage: 59 LOW HIGH Box 182, Creston, OH 44217 Phone: (330) 435-6867 Comm & Utility: 62.00 73.50 November 1, 2011 Canner/Cutter: 48.00 61.00 Hogs Headage: 42 Bulls Headage: 7 LOW HIGH LOW HIGH 62.00 66.00 All Bulls: 73.25 85.00 Market Hogs: Light: 62.00 66.00 Total Headage: 807 Heavy: 62.00 66.00 Total Hogs: 2

Sows Headage:

24 LOW HIGH Light: 42.00 59.00 Heavy: 42.00 59.00 Feeder Pigs Headage: 3 LOW HIGH By Head: 30.00 50.00 Cwt: 30.00 50.00 Cattle Headage: 53 LOW HIGH Choice Steers: 110.00 124.00 Select Steers: 104.00 110.00 Holstein Steers: 95.00 112.00 Choice Heifers: 108.00 117.00 Select Heifers: 100.00 107.00 Holstein Heifers: 85.00 100.00 Cows Headage: 94 LOW HIGH Comm & Utility: 67.00 80.00 Canner/Cutter: 60.00 65.00 Comments:thin down $58.00 Bulls Headage: 8 LOW HIGH All Bulls: 62.00 87.00 Total Headage: 321 Total Hogs: 42 Total Cattle: 277 Goats: 2 Feeder Cattle Headage: 35 LOW HIGH Yearling Steers (600 - 800): 80.00 135.00 Yearling Heifers (600 - 800): 80.00 135.00 Steer Calves (300 - 600): 80.00 135.00 Heifer Calves (300 - 600): 80.00 135.00 Holstein Steers (550 & dn): 80.00 135.00 Holstein Steers (550 & up): 80.00 135.00 Back to Farm Calves Headage: 87 LOW HIGH Cwt: down 147.50 Goats Headage: 12 LOW HIGH All Goats: 25.00

CALDWELL, OH United Producers

Sheep & Lambs Headage:10 LOW HIGH Choice Wool: 175.00 176.00 Roasters: 175.00 176.00 Aged Slaughter Sheep:78.00 86.00 Goats Headage: 4 LOW HIGH All Goats: 50.00 122.00

BUCYRUS, OH United Producers

3153 State Route 98, Bucyrus, OH 44820 Phone: (419) 562-2751 October 28, 2011 Hogs Headage: 178 LOW HIGH Market Hogs: 65.00 66.50 Light: 57.00 67.00 Heavy: 63.00 65.50 Comments:3.00---4.00 lower Sows Headage: 67 LOW HIGH Light: 52.00 58.50 Heavy: 59.00 62.00 Comments:1.00--2.00 higher Boars Headage: 23 LOW HIGH Light: 51.00 52.00 Heavy: 24.00 40.00 Comments: higher Feeder Pigs Headage: 0 LOW HIGH Cattle Headage: 335 LOW HIGH Choice Steers: 115.00 128.25 Select Steers: 105.00 114.00 Holstein Steers:105.00 (choice steers)117.50 (choice steers) Choice Heifers: 115.00 127.50 Select Heifers: 103.00 114.00 Holstein Heifers:95.00 (select steers) 104.00 (select steers) Cows Headage: 83 LOW HIGH Comm & Utility: 60.00 79.00 Canner/Cutter: 35.00 59.00 Comments:thin: 35.00 & down Bulls Headage: 10 LOW HIGH All Bulls: 65.00 105.00 Total Headage: 924 Total Hogs: 268 Total Cattle: 503 Total Sheep/Lambs: 114 Goats: 22 Feeder Cattle Headage: 75 LOW HIGH Steer Calves (300 - 600): 100.00 126.00 Heifer Calves (300 - 600): 85.00 120.00 Sheep & Lambs Headage:114 LOW HIGH Choice Wool: 161.00 172.00 Choice Clips: 165.00 171.00 Roasters: 170.00 (60-85#) 192.00(60-85#) Feeder Lambs: 165.00 170.00 Aged Slaughter Sheep: 56.00 76.00 Comments:lambs: 7.00 higher Goats Headage: 22 LOW HIGH All Goats: 72.50 170.00

39902 Marietta Rd., Caldwell, OH 43724 Phone: (800) 935-5450 October 26, 2011 Cattle Headage: 308 Cows Headage: 40 LOW HIGH Comm & Utility: 56.00 66.25 Canner/Cutter: 40.00 56.00 Bulls Headage: 6 LOW HIGH All Bulls: 65.00 75.00 Total Headage: 524 Total Hogs: 1 Total Cattle: 308 Total Sheep/Lambs: 10 Goats: 4 Feeder Cattle Headage: 262 LOW HIGH Yearling Steers (600 - 800): 100.00 123.00 Yearling Heifers (600 - 800): 100.00 120.00 Steer Calves (300 - 600): 100.00 148.00 Information courtesy of Heifer Calves www.uproducers.com (300 - 600): 100.00 140.00 United Producers Inc.

Putnam County Educational Service Center receives $25,000 in traffic safety grants

00026294

safety for the community regarding the importance of seat belt use, dangers of distracted driving and impaired driving will impact the safety and welfare of the citizens in Putnam County. The E.S.C. through the Safe Communities Coalition will use the grant funds to deliver the many

dangers of traveling our roadways and tips to being safer while traveling our roads and highways. The E.S.C. and the Safe Community Coalition is committed to the local effort of saving lives, reducing the fatalities in our community and by improving the quality of life for our citizens.

I herd that! The cattle pictured above live off of old State Route 65 near Columbus Grove.

Roses need winter protection PUTNAM COUNTY — will also prevent rabbits In our area, roses such as from feeding on the stems. the hybrid teas, floribun- Dig the soil for the mound das and grandifloras need from an area away from the some kind of protection roses, so as not to damage to survive winter’s cold their roots. winds and wild temperature Some gardeners prefer to swings. Exposure to low prepare the rose plant by tytemperatures and rapid temperature changes can severely injure and often kill unprotected roses. Most gardenBy Glen Arnold ers don’t think about burying their roses, but that’s essentially what they should do to ing the canes up with twine, protect them from winter’s not only to prevent excesextremes. Similar to hiber- sive wind whipping but also nation in animals, roses to make mounding easier and other woody plants go as well. Other gardeners, through a dormant (rest) pe- like me, prefer to prune the riod in the winter. roses to a height of about The first step to winter- 15 inches and then cover izing roses is to keep them them with soil, compost or healthy through the growing mulch. Branches cut in fall season. Gardeners should tend to die back a few inches protect roses from insect and disease damage and maintain adequate fertility and moisture. If the soil is dry, give the soil a thorough soaking. Plants underneath overhangs of buildings often are very dry, even during wet seasons. After several killing freezes in late fall, plants become dormant; this is the time to protect roses from winter’s extremes. Pick up and remove debris, such as leaves and dead stems, on and around the plants to prevent diseases from overwintering. The most foolproof method of protection is to mound soil around the plant to protect the graft union. A 12-inch-high mound–approximately five gallons– of soil provides excellent protection. A soil mound

Across the fencerow

419-286-5400 www.RichmarkGutters.com

23734 St. Rt. 189, Ft. Jennings, OH a division of Northwest Building Resources

Ohio Scan

Reach Over 2 Million Readers for one cost! Up to 25 words...$295 in Daily and Weekly Newspapers throughout Ohio For more information call the Putnam County Sentinel at (419)523-5709

Announcement CARS WANTED! PayMax Car Buyers pays the MAX! One call gets you TOP DOLLAR offer on any year, make or model car. 1-888-PAYMAX-7. (1-888-729-6297). Business Services REACH 2 MILLION NEWSPAPER READERS with one ad placement. ONLY $295.00. Ohio’s best community newspapers. Call Kathy at AdOhio Statewide Classified Network, 614-486-6677, or E-MAIL at: kmccutcheon@adohio.net or check out our website at: www.adohio.net. Business Services REACH OVER 1 MILLION OHIO ADULTS with one ad placement. Only $975.00. Ask your local newspaper about our 2X2 Display Network or 2x4 Display Network Only $1860. or Call Kathy at 614-486-6677/E-mail kmccutcheon@adohio. net or check out our website: www.adohio.net Help Wanted CDL-A Regional Drivers Earn More! 37-42.5 cpm w/1+ years experience (depending on location). Only 4-12 Months Experience? Paid Refresher Course Available. 888-362-8608 or AVERITTcareers.com. Equal Opportunity Employer.

Your guide to local farm services

Putnam 2 Col x 7�

Advertise your services in the Farm Directory! $ 00 Rates as low as 24 per week. Call Kim Andreasen at 419-523-5709 ext. 233.

               

        

Statewide Classified Advertising Network

Wanted: Diabetic Test Strips. Paying up to $15.00 per 100 strips. Call Alan (888) 7753782. www.diabeticteststripswanted.com.

from the cut through winter weather so plan to prune off a couple more inches of the canes in the spring. Commercially available rose cones have been used with varying success. Some soil mounding is still advisable--about six to eight inches to protect the graft union and to anchor the cone. Plants must be pruned to fit under the cone which can require a lot of work. And it’s important to provide holes or slits in the top of the cones to provide air ventilation, because excessive moisture buildup encourages fungus growth. A heavy rock or brick placed on top of the cone will help secure it in place. In early spring, both soil mounds and cones must be removed in March as soon as plants begin new growth.

Farm Directory

00026392

OTTAWA — Mike Klear, Project Director of the Putnam County Safe Community Coalition, recently announced the Ohio Department of Public Safety’s (ODPS) Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) awarded $25,000 in federal traffic safety funding to the Putnam County Educational Service Center for federal fiscal year 2012. “Partnerships are critical to the success of any safety effort and we are committed to working with law enforcement and other safety partners to address traffic safety concerns in Putnam County,� said Klear. The Putnam County Educational Service Center, (E.S.C.) has identified that education about traffic

Staff photo/Dar Nevergall

Help Wanted Driver - CDL-A. Experience Pays! Up to $3000 SiIGN - ON BONUS. Call Us Today! 6 mo. OTR exp. & CDL required. 6 mo. OTR exp. & CDL required. 888-463-3962 www.usatruck.jobs Help Wanted Drivers - CDL-A. DRIVERS NEEDED! We Have The Miles! OTR Positions available! Teams Needed! Class A CDL & Hazmat Req’d. 800-942-2104 Ext. 7307 or 7308 www.totalms.com Help Wanted Drivers - CDL-A Flatbed Drivers Needed. Teams, Solos, & O/O’s. Great Pay, Consistent miles, Hometime. Full Benefits And Much More!!! 1-888-430-7659 www.systemtrans.com. Help Wanted Drivers - No Experience - No Problem. 100% Paid CDL Training! Immediate Benefits. 20/10 program. Trainers Earn up to 49c per mile! CRST Van Expedited. 800-3262778 www.JoinCRST.com Help Wanted Drivers/CDL Training - Career Central No Money Down CDL Training. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee* Company Driver* Lease Operator Earn up to $51K* Lease Trainers Earn up to $80K. (877)369-7209 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.net

Help Wanted Exp. Flatbed Drivers: Regional Opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great Pay! 800-277-0212 or primeinc.com Help Wanted FLATBED DRIVERS - New Pay Scale-Start @ .37cpm Up to .40cpm Mileage Bonus Home Weekends Insurance & 401K Apply @ Boydandsons.com 800-648-9915 Help Wanted NAVY RESERVE HIRING in all fields. Serve part-time. Paid training & potential sign-on bonus. Great benefits. $ for school. Call Mon-Fri (800) 282-1384, email: jobsOhio@navy.mil or www.navy.com/ local Help Wanted Run with a Leader! Dry Van and Flatbed Freight! Offering Top Miles, Excellent Equipment, Benefits After 90 Days and Regular Hometime. CDL-A, 6 mos. OTR 888-801-5295. Help Wanted Sales/Distributor to set up new vending operators in local and surrounding areas. Location leads and Equipment Financing provided to your customers. Income up to $100k. Factor training provided. Call 1-800247-2446 or email jkinning@wittern.com Help Wanted Top Pay On Excellent Runs! Regional Runs,Steady Miles, Frequent Hometime, New Equipment, Automatic Detention Pay!

CDL-A, 6 mo. experience required. EEOE/AAP 1-866-322-4039 www.Drive-4Marten.com Help Wanted Wanted - Experienced, Solo, Team Drivers for dedicated runs with good hometime. Need CDL-A Live within 100 mile radius of Wauseon, Ohio. For Information: 1-800-621-4878. Help Wanted “You got the drive, We Have the Direction� OTR Drivers APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass. Pets/Passenger Policy. Newer equipment. 100% No touch. 1-800528-7825. Instruction Attend College Online from Home. Medical, Business, Paralegal, Accounting, Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer Available. Financial Aid if Qualified. Call 877-295-1667. www. CenturaOnline.com. Misc. Airlines Are Hiring - Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job Placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 877-676-3836. Want To Buy Cash Paid for Diabetic Test Strips. Up to $10 per box. Most brands. Call Tom Anytime Toll Free 1-888-881-6177.

     

                                Â  Â?  Â?    Â?     Â?   Â?    

        ­ 

€  ‚ €   ƒ  „   …  † €  �           ‡  

 ˆ ‰       It is Clean and Clever! The Eternal Hybrid Water Heater is 98%+ Efficient with a Stainless Steel Heat Exchanger has a 20 year warranty. With a built-in 2 gallon reserve tank the Eternal meets NSF Standards for health and cleanliness. Ultra low emissions leave almost no carbon footprint and the patented selfcleaning heat exchanger utilizes turbulent flow to flush sediments out. The Eternal maintains consistent water pressure even with multiple taps in use. Purchase a new Eternal Hybrid Water Heater from Knueve & Sons by 11/30/11 and get Zero interest financing for six months. Call Knueve today for Instant Hot Water!

K&nueve ons inc.

S

800-676-3619            

www.knueve.com “Your Komfort Is Our Koncern!� 102 Water Street | Kalida, OH 45853 Heating & Air Conditioning | Air Quality & Humidification | Plumbing Services Water Heaters | Water Treatment Systems | Home Standby Generators Bathroom Remodeling

00024109

976 West Main Street, PO Box 757, Hillsboro, OH Phone: (800) 937-5105 November 1, 2011 Hogs Headage: 67 LOW HIGH Market Hogs: Light: 85.00 Sows Headage: 21 LOW HIGH Light: 64.25 Boars Headage: 2 LOW HIGH Heavy: 33.25 Feeder Pigs Headage: 67 LOW HIGH By Head: 20.00 39.00 Cwt: 52.00 64.00 Cattle Headage: 2 LOW HIGH Choice Steers: 118.25 Choice Heifers: 116.00 Cows Headage: 32 LOW HIGH Comm & Utility: 62.00 75.00 Canner/Cutter: 50.00 62.00 Bulls Headage: 10 LOW HIGH All Bulls: 55.00 79.00 Total Headage: 704 Total Hogs: 157 Total Cattle: 171 Total Sheep/Lambs: 335 Goats: 41 Feeder Cattle Headage:120 LOW HIGH Yearling Steers (600 - 800): 90.00 120.00 Yearling Heifers (600 - 800): 80.00 110.00 Steer Calves (300 - 600): 100.00 138.00 Heifer Calves(300 - 600): 95.00 130.00 Back to Farm Calves Headage: 9 LOW HIGH Cwt: 100.00 170.00 Sheep & Lambs Headage:335 LOW HIGH Choice Wool: 174.00 180.00 Roasters: 180.00 191.00 Aged Slaughter Sheep:50.00 100.00 Goats Headage: 41 LOW HIGH All Goats: 30.00 220.00

Total Cattle: 769 Total Sheep/Lambs: 18 Goats: 18 Feeder Cattle Headage:668 LOW HIGH Yearling Steers (600 - 800): 90.00 120.00 Yearling Heifers (600 - 800): 85.00 118.00 Steer Calves (300 - 600): 90.00 152.00 Heifer Calves (300 - 600): 90.00 135.00 Holstein Steers(550 & dn): 70.00 Holstein Steers (550 & up): 70.00 Sheep & Lambs Headage:18 LOW HIGH Feeder Lambs: 118.00 174.00 Aged Slaughter Sheep:67.50 80.00 Goats Headage: 18 LOW HIGH All Goats: 24.00 130.00

00026268

HILLSBORO, OH United Producers

B9

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

*See Knueve & Sons for complete program eligibility, dates, details and restrictions. Special financing offers valid on qualifying systems only. All sales must be to homeowners in the United States. Void where prohibited. The Home ProjectsÂŽ VisaÂŽ card is issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank. Special terms apply to qualifying purchases charged with approved credit at participating merchants. Regular minimum monthly payments are required during the promotional period. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date at the regular APR if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. For newly opened accounts, the regular APR is 27.99% The APR may vary. The APR is given as of 1/1/2011. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 4% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00.

(All offers in this ad are not valid with any other offer. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or specials.)


B10 Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Putnam County Sentinel

419-523-5709 Fax: 419-523-3512

110 Card Of Thanks

The Family of Norbert Steffen want to express our sincere thanks to all. For the help, prayers, support, visits and condolences we received. Thanks also to Fr. Matt, Deacon Erford, Miller CityNew Cleveland Church Family, O-G Meadows, Hilty Home, Home Health and Hospice for their care; Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home and all the doctors, nurses and aides. We will always remember the neighbors, family and friends for cards, flowers, food and memorials. Thanks to the servers, readers, distributors and lovely music at Mass and to the Faith Assembly Church who provided food. Special thanks to the Miller City Fire Dept, Ottawa Knights of Columbus and Putnam County Veteran Service Commission for the flag staff and case. Hugs to Nick Meyer and Ben Geiser for a tribute in remembering dad after the wonderful food prepared by Dorothy Niese. We continue to grieve for our husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, but also rejoice in his glorious homecoming. Cherish your continued prayers, the Dear Lord bless and keep you.

l

110 Card Of Thanks

The families of Velma Atlman Schmenk would like to express our sincere thanks to Love-Heitmeyer Funeral Home for their kindness following the death of our Mother, Velma. The Meadows of Leipsic for their care and concern leading up to the final hours of Mom's life. Also to the wonderful aides who have helped assist Mom over the years. I will all of you. Thank you to the Legion Auxillary, ClofC and Rosary Altar for the services at the funeral home. Thank you to Sharon Peterson for the delicious meal. For everyone's prayers, cards, food and visits following Mom's death, it means so much to us. Sue & Bruce Meyers & Family Carl & Janet Altman & Family Don & Connie Altman & Family

l

235 General

Driver -Bulk Division. Health/Life, 401K w/match, Vacation/Holiday, Safety Bonus. CDL-A; 2 yrs experience, good driving record. 800-936-6770 x 111/112 www.transportinc.com

l

305 Apartment 1 & 2 Bedroom Furnished Water, Electric, Cable Garbage All One Price 419-943-2371

My HEARTFELT thanks 1 Bedroom Upper to my wife, family, Level Apartment in Pan neighbors, friends, & dora. W/D, Stove and churches for all your Refrigerator, 1 CarPort, prayers to God for me. No Smoking, No Pets!! Only by God's Grace 419-384-3111 could I feel so well. Remember God is good 2 BR Country all the time. Apartment. Outside of ~Ron Verhoff~ Ottawa. Appliances, Garbage, Lawn Care, and Snow Removal Included. 419-523-5709 419-523-3396

Classifieds

Putnam County Sentinel

PAINTING

• Over 40 Years experience • interiOr/exteriOr • FullY insured

Klausing Painting

419-384-3795 00025787

Drivers

COMPETITIVELY PRICED FOR ALL YOUR STORAGE & BUSINESS NEEDS! LOCK & KEEP THE KEY!

806977 00025548

CALL 419-523-5960

Start up to $.41/mi. Home Weekly or Bi-Weekly. CDL-A 6 mos. OTR exp. Req. Equipment you’ll be proud to drive! (888) 247-4037

00025599

Classifieds 419-523-5709

Buckeye Storage Units Many Sizes Available - Low Monthly Rates!

No Deposit Required Office Space for rent. Call for details. 00025549

419-523-5590

Putnam Village ii aPartments

00025527

March into a new apartment for only a $99 security deposit and FREE 1st months rent! Now accepting applications at 25 Vine St., Leipsic, Ohio 45856 • 419-943-2210 1 & 2 bedroom apts. W/ appliances furnished. On site laundry facility. Call for details or pick up application at the rental office. • Possibility of Rental Assistance • Handicap accessible • Equal Housing Opportunity

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

TDD: 419-526-0466

Office Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri.; 10 am - 3 pm

This is an equal opportunity provider and employer

Putnam Village aPartments i March into a new apartment for only a $99 security deposit and FREE 1st months rent!

00025528

Now accepting applications at Putnam Village Apts. 45 Vine St., Leipsic, Ohio 45856 • 419-943-2210 1 & 2 bedroom apts. W/ appliances furnished. On site laundry facility. Call for details or pick up application at the rental office. Possibility of rental assistance. • Handicap accessible • Equal Housing Opportunity

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

TDD: 419-526-0466

Office Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs. & Fri.; 10 am - 3 pm

This is an equal opportunity provider and employer

Call to Advertise in this space

419-523-5709

Eliminate High Heating Bills. Reduce Carbon Footprint. EPA qualified. Up to 92% Efficient.

CENTRAL BOILER E

Call Today 419-358-5342

2 Bedroom Upstairs Apartment in Leipsic for Rent. $400 per month with 1 month deposit. Garbage pick up included. Call 419-943-3837 Pandora 3 Bedroom with washer/dryer & storage No Pets 419-890-7059 Apartment 312 N. Sixth St. Kalida. 2 Beds, garage, clean, very spacious. $525.00 Monthly 419-532-3492, 419-234-3969 Duplex, 2 Bedroom, Clean, New Carpet, Appliances, W/D Hook up, Garage NO Pets 419-523-6551

l

Supplies and 535 Farm Equipment International 800 6 Row Planter plus 5 Row Splitter $7500 419-230-7515 (Putnam County)

Sales/Yard 555 Garage Sales

298 Glandorf Rd. Ottawa November 2,3,&4th 10-6 32" Sharp Color TV, DVD's, Oak Entertainment Center 55" Long, Lamps, Ladies Coats, Clothing, shoes & misc.

NEW Still in Box 7 1/2 foot Pre Lit Kennedy Fir Christmas Tree. Call 419-943-2784 after 6 p.m.

l

FOR RENT Deluxe Adult Apt. in Indian Knoll Sub-Division, Ottawa Call: 419-523-5960 (Days) 419-538-7304 (Evenings) Kalida Duplex 2 Bedroom With Garage NO Pets 419-532-3807 or 419-303-3489 2 bedroom near Leipsic. Fridge, range, air, W/D hook up, new carpet, Dish Network. 419-538-6490 2 bedroom apartment Quiet, nice. No pets. Leipsic 419-943-3020 OR 419-943-1509

CLASSIFIEDS

419-523-5709

1307 E. FOURTH ST., OTTAWA 419-523-4780 EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

OPEN HOUSES

Saturday, November 5th • 1:00-3:00 509 W. Sugar-Leipsic New* Well maintained 3BR, full basement w/FR finished. Large finished & heated garage. 60’s. Mary will be your hostess. 9 Poplar-Leipsic New* 4BR on corner lot, basement, encl. porch. Updated windows. 70’s. Paulette will be your hostess. 317 Sugar-Leipsic New Price* 3BR, 1BA ranch w/full basement. Updated heating, flooring, plumbing. 50’s. Marlyn will be your hostess. 10443 Rd. X-Leipsic Brick 2146 sq.ft. stately 2 story on 1.65 Acre lot. 3BR, 2BA. 20x50 Bldg. 130’s. Sue will be your hostess. 60 McClung-Leipsic 2353 sq.ft. 4BR, 2.5BA offers private office, basement, FR, DR, LR. $102,500. Marnie will be your hostess. ********************************** 604 N. Taft-Ottawa New* Extensive renovations… new kitchen w/all stainless steel appliances, new windows plus 24x30 garage w/floored attic & heated shop. 80’s. Sue 419-303-9279 TxtERA3144666 629 N. Locust-Ottawa Drastic price reduction* Formal LR, fireplace in FR, 3BR, 2BA. nice kitchen w/dining area. 130’s. Marnie 419-236-8794 TxtERA3093746

FOR INFORMATION TEXT MESSAGE:

TXT ERA (898372)

TXT ERA

Simply send a text message to(898372) TXT ERA (898372)with the ERA Express number listed at the end of each property and in an instant you will receive a return text message with the basic property information. ERA Real Estate, the 1st choice for mobile technology within our industry. NOW ALL LISTING DETAILS FIT INTO THE PALM OF YOUR HAND! ©2006 ERA Franchise Systems LLC Each ERA® Office is Independently Owned and Operated. ® is a licensed mark of ERA Franchise Systems LLC.

Always There For You

erageyernoakes@bizwoh.rr.com www.geyernoakesrealty.com 419-523-4780 Fax: 419-523-6086

Get response from the

Cla ssifie ds

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:

SIEFKER

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION CO. OTTAWA, OH

Complete Real Estate & Auction Service * Appraisals Aaron Siefker, Real Estate Broker/ Auctioneer • Ottawa, OH 419-538-6184 Office • 419-235-0789 Mobile Marlene Beckett, Agent 419-303-6531 Find us on the web @ www.siefkerauctions.com

HOMES FOR SALE

805 Auto

2000 Pontiac Grand AM SE. 145,000 miles, runs good $2000 419-231-2934

2002 Ford Escape XLT, V6, Auto, 2WD, Blue, 100,000 miles excellent condition $6500 805 419 Auto659-5116

l

2004 4x4 XLT Escape with sunroof. 101,000 miles, excellent condition. $7,000. Call 419-538-6916

114 S. High St., Columbus Grove 408 N. Elm St., St. Rt. 65, Ottawa

OPEN HOUSE SAT. 1-3

202 S. Fourth St. Kalida: Large, like new home on a corner lot in great neighborhood, close to shopping and churches. Large master suite with luxurious bath and walk in closet. Eat in kitchen with lots of oak cabinets and appliances stay, oversized garage. PRICE REDUCED $145,000. Teresa Irwin 419659-5151 will greet you. New Listing: Ottawa: ranch, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, updated kitchen with hardwood floor, new roof. $130,000. Call Dan Irwin 419-302-9647 New Listing: Kalida Country, 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, just outside town. $142,500. Call Jason Birkemeier 419-796-9973 Commercial building just outside Col. Grove: formerly a dog grooming business. Lots of potential. $39,900. Call Teresa Irwin 419-890-6950 Ottawa: 3 bedrooms, 1 bath, deck, 2 car garage. $75,500. Call Dan Ottawa: updated 2 story, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage. PRICE REDUCED $132,000. Call Dan Continental: 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, oversized garage, on corner lot. $145,000. Call Dan Kalida: newer quality built ranch, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, custom oak cabinets, partial basement. $182,500. Call Dan

www.IrwinRealEstate.com

EVERYBODY’S TALKING ABOUT WHAT’S IN OUR

925 LEGAL NOTICES 950 SEASONAL

All Display Ads: Mon @ 12 noon Mon @ @ 10am 5pm Classified Liners: Tues

577 Miscellaneous

2 BEDROOM 1 Bath Apartment at Kalida Golf Course W/D hook-up, garage. No pets. 419-303-8186

l

l

Newer 2 Bedroom Apartment Close to Ottawa with Garage & appliances No Pets call 419-523-5641

ERA Geyer-Noakes Realty Group

TO:

l

305 Apartment

Classic Outdoor Wood Furnace.

00025552

WANTED

Central Boiler Outdoor Wood & Corn Furnaces Stop paying the high energy prices and use renewable energy. Call for current specials. CLASSIC COMFORT HEATING & SUPPLY Greenville, Ohio 888-296-3875

l

305 Apartment

Accepting applications for a part time property manager at Old Farm Village Apartments. 631 W. Sycamore St, Columbus Grove, Ohio 45830. Fax resume to: 419-659-5809 or stop by for an application. TDD# 419-526-0466. This Institution is and Equal Opportunity Provider and Employer

Service Guide

POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

00026488

l

GENERAL INFORMATION

419-523-5151 419-659-5151

00026506

224 E. Main St. Ottawa, OH 45875

800 TRANSPORTATION 900 PERSONALS

Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8am-5pm,8-5 Friday 8am-Noon Classified Office Hours: Monday-Friday

Ottoville Office: 419-453-2281

Delphos Office: 419-692-SOLD

Leipsic Office: 419-943-2220

Columbus Office: 614-529-0101

OTTOVILLE *** OPEN SUNDAY 12:00-12:20: 125 Sunset, Ottoville: 3 BR, 1 ½ Bath Ranch, Freshly painted interior, great neighborhood. REDUCED! ***OPEN SUNDAY 12:20-12:40: 390 Wayne, Ottoville: 4 BR, Remodeled home in town. Only asking $70’s. Call Tony; 233-7911. ***OPEN SUNDAY 12:401:00: 309 4th, Ottoville: 3-4 BR, 1 ½ Bath, Corner lot, Sunroom, Classic look. Updated, Asking $99K NEW! 240 SE Canal, Ottoville: 5 BR, 2 Sty Home with 28’ x 60’ Garage, concrete floor. $70’s. Tony. ***OPEN SUNDAY 1:00-2:00; 337 Walnut, Ottoville: 3/2 Big & Beautiful on excellent street. Remodeled, Tony: OTTOVILLE SUBDIVISION LOTS: Select yours before they’re all gone. Next to new school. Tony. FT. JENNINGS New Listing! 40 W 4th, Ft. Jennings: Nice 3 BR, 1 ½ Bath on Full Bsmt. Move-in Ready! Call Tony. 20105 Road R, Ft. Jennings SD: 3 BR, 2 Bath Updated Home. 3 Car Garage, Barn. Tony: 233-7911. COLUMBUS GROVE 222 West St.: 4 BR, Fenced Yard, Att’d Garage + Det’d Garage. Porch and Deck. Nancy. 943-2220. KALIDA New Listing! 406 Ottawa, Kalida: 3 BR, 2 Bath, Brick Ranch with 2+ Car Garage. Excellent condition and location. Call Tony: 233-7911. 15631 Rd 17-N, Kalida: 3 BR, 2 ½ Bath, Ranch on 2.8 Acres. 3 Car Garage and 32’ x 48’ Shop. Tony Kalida Country Acres: 2 Building lots on the course. Call Denny: 532-3482 or Tony: 233-7911. OTTAWA 823 N. Defiance, Ottawa: Excellent 3 BR, 1 ½ Bath on bsmt. Call Nancy: 943-2220. Ottawa Commercial Lot: Unlimited possibilities. Near US 224/SR 65. Call Ron Pohlman: 523-4897. LEIPSIC 4503 Road Y, Leipsic: 3 BR, Country property. Priced right for a quick sale. Call Nancy: 943-2220. NEW LISTING! 2562 Road B, Leipsic: 3 BR, 1 ½, 1 acre. 1900 sq ft. $48K. Call Nancy: 943-2220. NEW! 8507 Road X: 3/2, Mostly remodeled, large lot. Country living close to town. Nancy: 943-2220. 420 Ohio St: 3 BR, Many improvements made. New windows, Asking $40’s. Nancy: 419-943-2220. McCOMB 124 S. Meadow: 3 BR, 1 Bath, Ranch Home, Storage Shed. Asking $60’s. Nancy: 419-943-2220. PATRICK HENRY SD B 397 CR 12, Holgate: 5 BR, Ranch built in 2003. 5 Acres, 60’ x 100’ Pole Bldg. Nancy: 943-2220 00026507

Putnam County Sentinel

500 MERCHANDISE 600 SERVICES

See these listings & more at:

See Pictures & More Details on the web or Call for Brochures!

NEW LISTING! EXCEPTIONALLY NICE FAMILY HOME 320 BIRCH DRIVE * KALIDA, OH

1 Story Brick/Vinyl 3 Bedroom Home w/ 1908 Sq. Ft. Built 1991, Kitchen, Dining Room, Living Room, Utility Room, Foyer, 3 Bedrooms, 2½ Baths, Finished Drywall Basement, 19’ x 17’ Wood Deck/ Extra Storage Area in Basement, 28’ x 27’ Attached Garage, Concrete Driveway, Public Water/Septic, 135’ x105’ Lot, Kalida Schools ***********************************************************************

NEW LISTING!! PRIVATE PEACEFUL COUNTRY SETTING 11946 ST RT 613 * OTTAWA, OHIO

OPEN HOUSE: SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6 • 2:00-3:30 PM 1 Story, 3 Bedroom, Vinyl & Brick Sided Home w/ 2,120 Sq. Ft., Plus 650 Sq. Ft. Partially Finished Basement, Nice Kitchen w/ Corian Countertops, Family Room w/ Fireplace, Living Room w/ Crown Molding, 1½ Baths, Large Utility w/ Built In Cabinets, Beautiful Large Rec Room w/ Cathedral Ceiling, Ceramic Tile & 5 Person Hot Tub, Large Attached Garage, Extra 30’ x 30’ Storage Building, Rear Deck, Rear Patio w/ Brick Path to the ½ Acre Pond, Miller City - New Cleveland Schools ***********************************************************************

VINYL & BRICK PANDORA RANCH 308 E. DILLER STREET * PANDORA, OH

3 Bedroom Ranch Home w/ 1,524 Sq. Ft. Living Area, Kitchen, Dining Area/ Family Room, Living Room, Utility, 2 Baths, 3 Bedrooms, Finished 2 Car Garage, Blacktop Driveway, Rear Cement Patio, P-G Schools ***********************************************************************

OTTAWA HOME VERY INVITING INSIDE & OUT! 618 N. TAFT STREET * OTTAWA * OH

1 ½ Story 3 Bedroom Frame Home w/ 1,784 Sq. Ft., Nice KitchenDining Area w/ Floating Floor Tile, Living Room, Family Room, 1 Bath, 3 Bedrooms (1 Down, 2 Up), Extra Upstairs Storage Room, Covered Patio between the Home and a 26’x24’ Detached Insulated Garage, Patio Leads to a Private Open Deck, Very Beautifully Landscaped Property, Flagstone Stepping Paths Guide you through Gorgeous and Creative Gardens, Arches, Trellises, Trees, Shrubs, and Plants Galore in a Tasteful Garden Landscape, Blacktop Driveway, OttawaGlandorf Schools ***********************************************************************

WHY RENT?? *2 STORY COZY GILBOA HOME READY TO MOVE IN! 207 PEARL ST.*GILBOA*OHIO

Newly Remodeled Eat-In Kitchen (New Appliances in 2007 All Stay) Open to Family Room. Totally Remodeled Bath, Utility Room (Washer and Dryer Also Stay!!) 2 Large Bedrooms, Shaded Porch, Rear Private Patio and Huge Back Yard. Ready to move in and feel at home! ***********************************************************************

CONTINENTAL RANCH TOTAL REMODEL UPDATE IN 2004 201 N 3RD * CONTINENTAL * OH

Total Remodel in 2004, Nicely Updated Kitchen and Both Bathrooms, 3 Bedrooms, Family Room, Utility, Attached 2 Car Garage, Rear Deck Added in 2010 to Enjoy the Large Back Yard w/ Mature Trees for Shade, Continental Schools Sellers will help with Closing Costs UP TO $ 2,000.00!! ***********************************************************************

3 BEDROOM BRICK RANCH IN OTTOVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT 12909 ROAD 21-L CLOVERDALE, OH

1988 Brick Ranch Home w/ 1834 Sq. Ft. Plus Full Basement, 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Attached 2 Car Garage, Above Ground Pool, 40x56 Pole Barn Built 1997, 24x40 Storage Shed, New Roof Just Installed!, Ottoville LSD ***********************************************************************

OTTAWA COUNTRY “NO NEED TO GO TO THE LAKE VACATION AT HOME” 14100 ST. RT. 15 OTTAWA, OH

Beautiful Home Styled as a Country Farm House on 3.7 Acres, Raised Gardens with a White Picket Fence, Pond, Sand Volley Ball Court, and Storage Shed-Man’s Cave finishes this Country Setting for a Large Family that Enjoys the Outdoors. This 2 Story, Vinyl Home has 2,426 Sq. Ft. Living Space with a Full Basement Mostly Finished-Perfect for Lots of Activities, 4 or 5 Bedrooms - Master Suite with Lg Walk-In Closet, Additional 2/3 Bedrooms in Basement, 4 Unique Full Baths Keeps Everyone on Time! ***********************************************************************

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES I.O.O.F. BUILDING-DOWNTOWN OTTAWANEXT TO COURTHOUSE > ** ENERGY STAR PERFORMANCE BUILDING!! ** <

They are investing in several other projects to reach even a better energy rating! Call our office for more details!!! 227 E MAIN ST. * OTTAWA, OH Three Story Office

Building * First Floor Street Grade, Presently Used for Fraternity Lodge / Commercial Office Building, Accessible from Main St., Court St., and Rear Alley, Elevator 1-3 Floors, Village Water & Sewer, Gas & Electric Utilities, Most Units on Ground Floor Have Own Entrance, Restrooms on All Floors, 8095.5 Sq. Ft. Per Floor, Standing Seam Roof ***********************************************************************

6 UNIT COMMERCIAL INCOME E. MAIN ST. * OTTAWA, OH

INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE Building Renovated & Updated 2006 FENCED RETAIL OR STORAGE LOT

WWW.TLREA.COM

Classifieds 419-523-5709

“Great Location”

***********************************************************************

WE HAVE SEVERAL POTENTIAL BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE > > > > > CALL FOR MORE INFO!!!! < < < < < 00026532

100 ANNOUNCEMENTS 300 REAL ESTATE/RENTALS 200 EMPLOYMENT 400 REAL ESTATE/FOR SALE

SEE MORE OF OUR LISTINGS:

www.siefkerauctions.com


Putnam County Sentinel

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 

UPCOMING

Call Marti Leopold 419-235-0511 to see:

FARM REAL ESTATE

160 Fifth Street, Ft. Jennings - 1915 sq. ft. ranch home on corner lot. $139,000 209 W. Main, Kalida - 3 bed/1 bath, full dry basement, all appliances! $99,500

Call Ron Leopold 419-235-2278 to see any of the following:

WEDNESDAY * NOV. 9th, 2011 7:00 P.M.

00026525

5471 Campbell Road, Columbus Grove - 3BD/2BTH country home, open floor plan, built-in appliances, Pella windows, 2.76 acres. $174,900 210 Elm, Columbus Grove - Home with deep lot, detached 2-car garage. $84,900 614 Main, Ottawa - 3 apt. home, all currently rented, a good investment! $97,000 15706 Road 6, Pandora - “Rare opportunity! 2/3 bedroom, 2.5 bath ranch home with 3100 grass runway and 3 hangars on 11 acres. $290,000 18564 S.R. 189, Ft. Jennings - “Fully carpeted, all electric, 2 bedroom ranch nestled in quiet country setting. Would make a great starter home! $65,000

AUCTION LOCATION: For your comfort and convenience this Auction will be conducted at Columbus Grove Legion Hall @ 412 Plum St Columbus Grove, Ohio

FARM #1 78.21 +/- TOTAL ACRES in 3 PARCELS

Section 21 of Pleasant Twp. in Putnam County, OH GREAT LOCATION * FRONTAGE ON ROAD “P-9” Off St. Rt. 65 Farms located 1 miles North of Columbus Grove, Ohio “WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS”

“ALL PARCELS IN COLUMBUS GROVE SCHOOL DISTRICT” “ACREAGE PER TAX CARD” ORDER OF AUCTION PARCEL #1:

40.11 Acres +/- In Section 21 in The West ½ of SE ¼ Frontage on Rd. P-9 off St. Rt. 65 Mostly Hoytville/ Mermill Soils, Well Tiled, All Farmable, Good Productive Farm PARCEL #2: 38.1 Acres +/- In Section 21 in the East Part of West ½ of SE ¼ Accessed from Rd. P-9 Off St. Rt. 65 w/ 100% Hoytville Soils, Well Tiled Farmable Acres Per F.S.A. Good Productive Farm PARCEL #3: 78.21 Acres Parcels 1 & 2 as a Single Unit “Collective Bidding Method Used”

2895 Harding Highway, Lima, OH 45804 419-228-8899 www.rsre.com

SALE OF 128 ACRES

Approximately 128 acres of farmland in Palmer Township in Putnam County, Ohio is being offered for private sale: A FARM CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 128.4 ACRES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS, situated in Sections 26 and 27 of Palmer Township, Putnam County, Ohio. 1.The Property will be sold in two (2) tracts, consisting of approximately 43.5 acres and 84.9 acres respectively. 2.The sale will be held by sealed bid, and bid packages are available at the Law Offices of Schroeder, Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP, 315 East Main Street in Ottawa, Ohio. 3.All bids must be delivered to the Law Offices of Schroeder, Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP on or before 5:00 p.m. on Friday, November 18, 2011. Only bidders will be permitted to participate when BIDS ARE OPENED AT THE LAW OFFICES OF SCHROEDER, BLANKEMEYER AND SCHROEDER, LLP, 315 EAST MAIN STREET, OTTAWA, OHIO ON NOVEMBER 22, 2011. 4.Further terms and requirements of sale noted in the bid package.

SEE WEBSITE FOR COLLECTIVE BIDDING PROCEDURE

OWNER: Robin Ebling Miller

FARM #2 99.67+/- TOTAL ACRES in 4 PARCELS

Section 30 of Pleasant Twp. in Putnam County, OH GREAT LOCATION * FRONTAGE ON ROADS “Q” & “12-Q” Farms located 2 miles West of Columbus Grove, Ohio “WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS”

“ALL PARCELS IN COLUMBUS GROVE SCHOOL DISTRICT” “ACREAGE PER TAX CARD” ORDER OF AUCTION PARCEL #1:

17 Acres +/- In Section 30 in the North Part of NE ¼ Frontage on Rd. “Q” and Rd 12-Q, 100% Hoytville Soils, Well Tiled, All Farmable, Good Productive Farm PARCEL #2: 39.85 Acres +/- In Section 30 in the Middle Part of West ½ of NE ¼ Frontage on Rd. “12-Q” 100% Hoytville Soils, Well Tiled, Good Productive Farm PARCEL #3: 42.82 Acres +/- in Section 30 Middle Part of South Part of NE ¼ Frontage on Rd 12-Q 100% Hoytville Soils, Well Tiled, Good Productive Farm PARCEL #4: 99.67 Acres Parcels 1, 2, & 3 as a Single Unit “Collective Bidding Method Used”

CRAIG A. WARNIMONT Agent for Owners

00025984

SEE WEBSITE FOR COLLECTIVE BIDDING PROCEDURE

OWNER: Timothy A Pohl SOLD SEPARATELY 2 GRAIN BINS LOCATED NEXT TO PARCEL #1 off Rd. “Q” Farm (1) 8,000 Bu. w/ Grain Drying System Stirator and (1) 6,500 Bu. w/ Air Floor Built App. 1979 Must be settled for on Day of Auction and Removed by June 30, 2012 View TERMS, MAPS & FURTHER INFO on the web @ www.siefkerauctions.com Conducted By:

SIEFKER REAL ESTATE & AUCTION CO.

Classifieds 1

10/31/11

00026508

WAY 111342 OpenHouseAd_M.pdf

419-523-5709

OTTAWA, OHIO 419-538-6184 Office 419-235-0789 Mobile Aaron Siefker, Broker/ Auctioneer Tom Robbins/ Auctioneer 3:20 PM Licensed and Bonded in Favor of State of Ohio CLIP & SAVE

OPEN HOUSE Preview The Winchester Family Under Construction!

STOP IN AND REGISTER TO

WIN A $25 GAS CARD

WEEKLY RARE COIN AUCTION

Tuesday’s 12:00 Noon Howard’s Coin Shop 128 E. Main Street, Leipsic

Gold, Silver, Rare Coins & More

00024576

in the

Tyler Abel, Auctioneer

★ Ohio License #2011000138 ★

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Citimortgage Inc, 1000 Technology Drive, MS 314, O Fallon, MO 63368, Plaintiff vs. Mario Hernandez Jr et al, 8622 County Road P, Napoleon, OH 43545, Defendant, Case No. 2010 CV 00236. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Leipsic to-wit: 117 West Sugar Street, Leipsic, OH 45856 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel No: 61-058170.0000 Said Premises Located at 117 West Sugar Street, Leipsic, OH 45856 Said Premises Appraised at $45,000.00 (Forty Five Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Peter L. Mehler, Plaintiff Attorney 2450 Edison Blvd. P.O. Box 968 Twinsburg, OH 44087 (330) 425-4201

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Huntington National Bank, Succ by Merger to Sky Bank, 2361 Morse Road, Columbus, OH 43229, Plaintiff vs. Becky J Snavely et al, 15892 State Route 115, Columbus Grove, OH 4830, Defendant, Case No. 2010 CV 00215. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Township of Union to-wit: 15892 State Route 115, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel Numbers: 53-020060.000 & 53-020120.0000 Said Premises Located at 15892 State Route 115, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Said Premises Appraised at $105,000.00 (One Hundred Five Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Robert H. Young, Plaintiff Attorney 323 W. Lakeside Avenue, Suite 200 Cleveland, OH 44113 (216) 685-1170

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Chase Home Finance LLC, 3415 Vision Drive, Columbus, OH 43219, Plaintiff vs. Delia Delarosa et al, 122 Liberty Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830, Defendant, Case No. 2010 CV 00291. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Columbus Grove to-wit: 122 Liberty Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Permanent Parcel No. 47-056060.0000 Said Premises Located at 122 Liberty Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Said Premises Appraised at $50,000.00 (Fifty Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419523-3208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy S. Scott Martin, Plaintiff Attorney P.O. Box 5480 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5480 (513) 241-3100

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County JP Morgan Chase Bank, National Association Succ by Merger to Chase Home Finance, 800 Brooksedge Boulevard, Westerville, OH 43081, Plaintiff vs. Cathy J. Lawhorn et al, P.O. Box, Cloverdale, OH 45827, Defendant, Case No. 2011 CV 00124. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Cloverdale to-wit: 219 Mahoning Street, Cloverdale, OH Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. PPN #: 41-033140.0000 Said Premises Located at 219 Mahoning Street, Cloverdale, OH Said Premises Appraised at $50,000.00 (Fifty Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than twothirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Peter L. Mehler & Douglas A. Haessig, Plaintiff Attorney 2450 Edison Blvd. Twinsburg, OH 44087 (330) 425-4201, Ext. 191

COUNTY: PUTNAM PUBLIC NOTICE The following applications and/or verified complaints were received, and the following draft, proposed and final actions were issued, by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) last week. The complete public notice including additional instructions for submitting comments, requesting information or a public hearing, or filing an appeal may be obtained at: http://www.epa. ohio.gov/actions.aspx or Hearing Clerk, Ohio EPA, 50 W. Town St. P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio 43216. Ph: 614-644-2129 email: HClerk@epa.state.oh.us FINAL ISSUANCE OF RENEWAL OF NPDES PERMIT VAN HAM DAIRY 7089 RD 22 CONTINENTAL, OH ACTION DATE : 11/01/2011 RECEIVING WATERS: UT BLANCHARD RIVER FACILITY DESCRIPTION: CAFO OR RENDERING PLANT IDENTIFICATION NO. : 2IK00016*BD This final action not preceded by proposed action and is appealable to ERAC.

October 19, 26 & November 2, 2011

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

Time to sell your old stuff... Get it

Saturday, November 5, 1 – 4 pm 13079 Road 11-J • Glandorf, OH 45848 Bowling Green Model Center 1-866-578-9425 or visit us at WayneHomes.com

SOLD

with the

Classifieds 419.523.5709

00026510

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Huntington National Successor in Interest by Merger to Sky Bank,WAY 2361 STRADA ADVERTISING / 303.407.1976 PUTNAM COUNTY SENTINEL 111342Morse Road, Columbus, OH 43229, Plaintiff vs. Timothy OPEN HOUSE AD 11/2/11 3.847 X 4.0Lynn B/W Krogman et al, aka Timothy L Krogman’s Unknown Heirs, Creditors, Devisees, Legatees, THURSDAY * NOV. 10th, 2011 Administrators, Defendant, Case No. 2011 CV 00103. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled 7:00 P.M. REAL ESTATE action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door AUCTION LOCATION: Auction held at the Ottawa V.F.W. of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named Hall Front Room @ 212 W 2nd Street Ottawa, OH County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Gilboa to-wit: 203 Blanchard Street, Gilboa, OH 45875 Legal Description Section 25 of Ottawa Twp. in Putnam County, OH A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT FARM LOCATION: On East Side of Ottawa, Ohio on US THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. 224 - Just East of Ottawa Dr. w/ Frontage on US 224 Parcel Number: 5-047140.0000 “WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS” Said Premises Located at 203 Blanchard Street, Gilboa, OH 45875 PARCEL #1: App. 23.4 Acres +/- in the North Part of NE ¼ of Section Said Premises Appraised at $30,000.00 (Thirty Thousand 25 in Ottawa Twp. Putnam Co., OH. Mixture of Mostly and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than twoFulton/ Toledo Soils w/ Good Access off of St. Rt. 224 thirds of that amount. Just East of Ottawa Dr. Ottawa, Ohio, Ottawa-Glandorf TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the sucLocal School District. “THIS PARCEL WAS LAID OUT IN 47 cessful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil LOTS YEARS AGO” Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation For TERMS, Maps, FSA Please Contact AARON SIEFKER or of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by view on web @ www.siefkerauctions.com certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, Owners: which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payElizabeth & Jeff Ducey Trustees & able as of the date of the sale and may not include special Eileen Schumacher Trustee assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by Conducted By: this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and SIEFKER REAL ESTATE & AUCTION CO. “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinOTTAWA, OHIO quent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of Aaron Siefker, Broker/ Auctioneer the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper Tom Robbins, Auctioneer identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer 419-538-6184 Office 419-235-0789 Mobile in charge of the sale. Licensed and Bonded in Favor of State of Ohio Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have Find us on the web @ www.siefkerauctions.com been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff CLIP & SAVE and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Kris D. Felty, Plaintiff Attorney 1500 West Third Street, Suite 400 Cleveland, OH 44113 (216) 588-1500

00025962

23.4 ACRES +/- FARMLAND in OTTAWA TWP.

Buy • $ell • Trade

October 19, 26 & November 2, 2011

00025291

00026436

00025294

Make a

in the

Classifieds 419-523-5709

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

00026437

B11

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County First Federal Bank of the Midwest, P.O. Box 248, Defiance, OH 43512, Plaintiff vs. Raymond L. Thomas, P.O. Box 166, Ottawa, OH 45875, Defendant, Case No. 2011 CV 00091. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Township of Monroe to-wit: 23215 State Route 613, Continental, OH 45831 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Permanent Parcel No. 22-031010.0000 Said Premises Located at 23215 State Route 613, Continental, OH 45831 Said Premises Appraised at $70,000.00 (Seventy Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419523-3208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Maria Divita, Plaintiff Attorney P.O. Box 5480 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5480 (513) 241-3100

& sell it in the

Classifieds

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

October 19, 26 & November 2, 2011

00026435

00025292

VAN HAM DAIRY 7089 RD 22 CONTINENTAL, OH ACTION DATE : 11/01/2011 RECEIVING WATERS: UT BLANCHARD RIVER FACILITY DESCRIPTION: CAFO OR RENDERING PLANT IDENTIFICATION NO. : 2IK00016*BD This final action not preceded by proposed action and is appealable to ERAC. APPROVAL OF FACILITIES PLAN COLUMBUS GROVE 113 E SYCAMORE ST COLUMBUS GROVE, OH 45830 ACTION DATE : 10/25/2011 FACILITY DESCRIPTION: CW FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE IDENTIFICATION NO. : CS390275-0003 This project is for improvements to the Village’s wastewater treatment plant. SOLID WASTE LANDFILL OTHER AUTHORIZING ACTION PUTNAM COUNTY COMMISSIONERS 245 EAST MAIN STREET, SUITE 101 OTTAWA, OH 45875 ACTION DATE : 10/25/2011 FACILITY DESCRIPTION: SOLID WASTE IDENTIFICATION NO. : CID 36057 Pursuant to OAC Rule 3745-27-10(D)(7)(c)(ii), notice is hereby given that on October 25, 2011, the director of Ohio EPA authorized the owner or operator of the Putnam County Landfill, County Road H-11, Ottawa, OH 45875, Putnam County, to continue the detection monitoring program at the Facility for monitoring well MW-6. This authorization is subject to all rules, regulations, and specified conditions.

Get response from the

November 2, 2011

00026476

Cla ssifie ds


B12 Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Novebmer 2 & 9, 2011

00026289

LEGAL NOTICE Area Agency on Aging 3, located in Lima, Ohio, funds needed social services for persons aged 60 and older residing in Allen, Auglaize, Hancock, Hardin, Mercer, Putnam and Van Wert Counties. Area Agency on Aging 3, has applied for a grant from the Ohio Department of Development / Ohio Housing Trust Fund to provide Emergency Home Repairs and Modifications for income eligible senior citizens for 2012 - 2013. Examples of repairs and modifications include roofs, windows, furnaces and entrance ramps. Those interested in becoming contractors for this service may contact Jeff Wahl, LSW at (419) 222-77323, Ext 234 or pick up an application packet from AAA 3 Area Agency on Aging, Inc. The office is located at 200 East High St, 2nd Floor, Lima, Ohio 45801. Criminal Background checks are required and references will be checked. We are an equal opportunity employer and grantor agency. November 2, 2011

00026290

00026432

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Schmidt Mortgage Company, 20545 Center Ridge Road #250, Rocky River, OH 44116, Plaintiff vs. Bradley Wayne Fuller et al, aka Bradley Wayne Fuller, 24312 Roac C, Continental, OH 45831, Defendant, Case No. 2011 CV 00147. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Continental to-wit: 304 W. Rice Street, Continental, OH 45831 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel Number: 24-060190.0000 Said Premises Located at 304 W. Rice Street, Continental, OH 45831 Said Premises Appraised at $75,000.00 (Seventy Five Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Robert R. Hoose, Plaintiff Attorney 4500 Courthouse Blvd. Suite 400 Stow, OH 44224 (330) 436-0300 00026431

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

Got ' e m We

Over

30

LINCOLN

OH

y, dla

, Fin

t 161 2012 FOCUS SE 4 DR. SEDAN

• Cruise control • Fog lamps • My key package • Trip computer/compass

00026518

Was $19,720

$

Sale

17,599*

includes factory rebate

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County HSBC Bank USA, NA, 1661 Worthington Road, West Palm Beach, FL 33416, Plaintiff vs. Richard Eugene Elston Sr. et al, aka Richard E. Elston, P.O. Box 23, Cloverdale, OH 45827, Defendant, Case No. 2011 CV 00160. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Cloverdale to-wit: 159 Main Street, Cloverdale, OH 45827 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel Numbers: 41-033110, 41-033100, 41-033080 & 41-033090 Said Premises Located at 159 Main Street, Cloverdale, OH 45827 Said Premises Appraised at $55,000.00 (Fifty Five Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Kriss D. Felty, Plaintiff Attorney 1500 West Third Street, Suite 400 Cleveland, OH 44113 (216) 588-1500

November 2, 2011

00026477

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Household Realty Corporation, 636 Grand Regency Blvd., Brandon, FL 33511, Plaintiff vs. Grace A Stechschulte et al, 101 West Maple Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830, Defendant, Case No. 2010 CV 00199. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Columbus Grove to-wit: 101 West Maple Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel No: 47-076090.0000 & 47-076190.0000 Said Premises Located at 101 West Maple Street, Columbus Grove, OH 45830 Said Premises Appraised at $50,000.00 (Fifty Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419523-3208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Matthew I. McKelvey, Plaintiff Attorney P.O. Box 5480 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5480 (513) 241-3100

Get response from the

00025297

October 19, 26 & November 2, 2011

Cla ssifie ds 419.999.5277

2006 Cadillac STS

2007 Durango

2000 Explorer

Moonroof, Navigation, Chrome Wheels, Heat/Cool Seats, Black

4x4, 3rd Row Seat, Heated Seats, Rear DVD

V6, Air Automatic

$16,990 $248/mo.

$16,890 $283/mo.

$5,990 $88/mo.

2004 GMC Denali 2003 GMC Envoy 2001 Dodge Ram

$17,990

$8,990

$11,990

$302/mo.

$142/mo.

$195/mo.

Black, Local Trade, Loaded

AVAILABLE for this Sale Special!

PROBATE COURT OF PUTNAM COUNTY, OHIO PUBLIC NOTICE (R.C. 2109.32-.33) “TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE FOLLOWING DECEDENTS’ ESTATES; WARDS’ GUARDIANSHIPS; AND TRUSTS PENDING IN THE PUTNAM COUNTY PROBATE COURT. The fiduciary, guardian, or trustee in each of the following estates, guardianships, or trusts respectively have filed an account of his or her trust. A hearing on the account in each case will be held at the date and time shown below. The court is located on 245 East Main St., Ottawa, OH 2nd Floor of the Courthouse. Goedde, Mary E., Case No. 20111014, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Estate. Hartman, Jennie M., Case No. 20111046, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Estate. Unverferth, Virginia M., Case No. 20111107, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Estate. Boecker, Ean William, Case No. 20032025, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Guardianship. Maas, Gary J., Case No. 00382895, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Guardianship. Burgei, Marietta R., Case No. 19993002, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Trusts. Diller, Kenneth A., Case No. 19983001, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Trusts. Shroyer, James H., Case No. 00192988, Hrg. Date 12/07/2011, Time 10:00 o’clock a.m., Case Type: Trusts.

1710 N. West St. Lima

00025295

October 19, 26 & November 2, 2011

Black, Local Trade Nice

Ext. Cab, 4x4 Bright Red

2006 Monte Carlo ’02 Honda Accord 2003 Ford F-150 ........$7,990

$10,990

Moonroof, automatic, black, aluminum wheels

This car is perfect,

2006 BUICK LACROSSE all black, aluminum wheels, every power button made.

............$5,990

$8,490

4.0, 6cyl., auto, white & tan, loaded

2 Dr., Auto

2006 JEEP COMMANDER V6, Moonroof

$142/mo.

$16,990

...........$23,990

$14,990

Diesel, ext. cab, loaded, like new

Crew Cab, Red

2008 GRAND MARQUIS Power Everything, Sharp

$249/mo.

carcountryoflima.com 2003 F-150

See inventory online at ’08 our Town & Country 2008 Taurus X

Focus on

Limited, DVD Moonroof

3rd Row Seat, Quad Buckets Jet Black and Tan

$13,990

$11,990

$284/mo.

$231/mo.

$195/mo.

Dark Blue, Fx4 4x4 with Fiberglass Cap

1999 Ford Ranger 2007 Ford Escape ’07 Chevy Uplander

I-75 Exi New

00026434

November 2, 9 & 16, 2011

CALL 419-523-5709 TO PLACE AN AD.

00026413

ORDINANCE NO. 11-27 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING ORDINANCE NO. 11-04 THE ANNUAL APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE COMPLYING WITH SECTION 4.11 OF THE VILLAGE OF OTTAWA CHARTER Ordinance No. 11-27 in its entirety is on file in the Clerk’s Office for public inspection during normal business hours. PASSED: October 24, 2011 ATTEST: Barbara J. Brickner Clerk-Treasurer APPROVED: J. Dean Meyer, Mayor

GET NOTICED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS!

November 2, 2011

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP %Bank of America/Countrywide, Plano, TX 75024, Plaintiff vs. Michael A. Speiser, et al, 23410 State Route 613, Continental, OH 45831, Defendant, Case No. 2009 CV 00131. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Township of Monroe to-wit: 23410 State Route 613, Continental, OH 45831 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Permanent Parcel Number: 22-029060.0300 Said Premises Located at 23410 State Route 613, Continental, OH 45831 Said Premises Appraised at $125,000.00 (One Hundred Twenty Five Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than two-thirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Ashley R. Carnes, Plaintiff Attorney P.O. Box 5480 Cincinnati, OH 45201-5480 (419) 241-3100

$4,990 Automatic with Fiberglass Cap

SALE New

New

2012 FOCUS SE 2012 FOCUS SEL 4 DR. SEDAN 5 DR. HATCHBACK

• Moonroof • Sync • Sport package • Rear spoiler

Was $21,985

$

Sale

19,499*

includes factory rebate

• My Ford Touch • Power seat • 17’’ alloy wheels • Rear parking aid sensor Was $24,245

$

Sale

21,299*

includes factory rebate

*Plus tax and title and fees, includes all Ford factory rebates to dealer; some rebates may require financing through FMCC, with approved credit, prices valid through Nov. 15, 2011

Reineke 12000 CR 99 • Exit 161, Findlay

Open: Mon.-Thurs. 9-8; Fri. 9-6; Sat. 9-5

2006 Lincoln LS

$12,490

New

2012 FOCUS TITANIUM 5 DR. HATCHBACK

• Heated seats • Power seat • 18’’ alloy wheels • push button start

$

22,999*

419-422-1661 • 800-333-1661 www.ReinekeFamilyDealerships.com

$213/mo.

$186/mo.

51,000 Miles Quad Seats

2004 GMC Envoy ’08 Town & Country XUV, You must see this one, Moonroof Special Rear Compartment

$12,990

$18,990

$204/mo.

$213/mo.

$320/mo.

Moonroof Automatic, Black Aluminum Wheels

DVD, Quads Rear Air

$5,990

4.0 6 Cyl. Automatic White & Tan, Loaded

$23,990 Diesel, Ext. Cab Loaded, Like New

$409/mo.

’06 Buick LaCrosse ’06 Jeep Commander ’08 Gr. Marquis

$9,990

includes factory rebate

LINCOLN

$11,490

Auto, Air, Loaded Burnt Orange Metallic

What a nice car Moonroof, Leather, Navy, Black

$7,990

Was $26,050

Sale

$12,990

’04 Pontiac Sunfire ’00 Jeep Cherokee 2008 Ford F-250

00026473

LEGAL NOTICE Notice is hereby given that a request for a variance of the Zoning Ordinance No. 1135, and all amendments thereto, has been filed with the Chairman of the Planning Commission of the Village of Ottawa, Ohio by Donald E. Morman, for the property described as follows: Situated in the Village of Ottawa, State of Ohio 1855 East Fourth Street 1N 7E 23 SWcor S SE, Zoned R-1 For the purpose of obtaining a variance to construct a detached garage 2 feet from the north and east property lines. The zoning ordinance requires 10 foot setbacks for all sides of an accessory structure in any Zone. Said Appeal will be for public hearing in the Council Chambers, Municipal Building, Ottawa, Ohio at 8:30 a.m. on November 18, 2011. J. Dean Meyer Planning Commission Chairman Of the Village of Ottawa

Putnam County Sentinel

SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Revised Code, Sec. 2329.26 The State of Ohio, Putnam County Lasalle Bank National Association %Litton Loan Serving LP, 4828 Loop Central Drive, Houston, TX 77081, Plaintiff vs. Raymundo L Nunez Jr et al, 701 East Liberty Street, PO Box 11, Leipsic, OH 45856, Defendant, Case No. 2008 CV 00198. In pursuance of an Order of Sale in the above entitled action, I will offer for sale at public auction, at the east door of the Court House in Ottawa, Ohio in the above named County, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the following described real estate, situate in the County of Putnam and the State of Ohio, and in the Village of Leipsic to-wit: 701 East Liberty Street, Leipsic, OH 45856-1426 Legal Description A FULL LEGAL DESCRIPTION CAN BE OBTAINED AT THE PUTNAM COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Parcel Numbers: 61-088010.0000, 61-102070 & 61-087200 Said Premises Located at 701 East Liberty Street, Leipsic, OH 45856-1426 Said Premises Appraised at $60,000.00 (Sixty Thousand and 00/100 Dollars) and cannot be sold for less than twothirds of that amount. TERMS OF SALE: An initial deposit of 10% of the successful bid is due and payable at the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, by 4:00 P.M., the day of the sale. The balance of the amount bid is due and payable upon confirmation of sale and delivery of deed. All payments are payable by certified check or Money Order. The only real estate taxes, which shall be paid from the proceeds of the sale of the subject real property, are those which are due and payable as of the date of the sale and may not include special assessments. Federal tax liens may not be extinguished by this sale. All property sold at Sheriff’s sale is sold on and “as is” basis. There is no warranty or guarantee. Any delinquent water and sewer bills may be the responsibility of the purchaser. The successful bidder must present proper identification at the time their bid is accepted by the officer in charge of the sale. Note to the public: The appraisal may or may not have been an inside inspection of the property and the Sheriff and the Appraisers are not liable for the condition of the property that was appraised. Phone inquires may be directed to the attorney listed below, or to the Sheriff’s Office, Civil Division, at 419-5233208. Web address: www.sheriffoff.com James R. Beutler, Sheriff, Putnam County, Ohio Greg Westrick, Deputy Robert R. Hoose, Plaintiff Attorney 4500 Courthouse Blvd. Suite 400 Stow, OH 44224 (330) 436-0300

CX, V6, Auto, Air, Loaded You need to see this one

Metallic Red, Limited, V8 Moonroof, Leather, DVD

$14,990

$12,990

$160/mo.

$249/mo.

$213/mo.

Low Miles Like New Condition

See our inventory online at

www.carcountryoflima.com Payments are for 66 months, 5.99 APR with $1,000 cash or traded down and approved credit


News Coverage 3