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RAM ng ki in th Re t Ar d an ne hi ac M

A Museum Exhibition Celebrating the Pioneers of Art and Technology Pursuits Inc Art Advisory


Pursuits Inc Art Advisory Š 2014 No information in this catalogue may be published without consent from Pursuits Inc Art Advisory. Founding Museum: THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada


Curatorial Statement

Jim Campbell Manfred Mohr Alan Rath Daniel Rozin Peter Vogel

Video: Selected RAM Artworks Video: Artists’ New Projects Artist Press & Interviews RAM Exhibition Press Artist Bios


Curatorial Statement RAM: Rethinking Art and Machine explores the origins and evolutions of new media art. Celebrating the pioneering artists of the twentieth century, this exhibition traces their changing relationships with electronic technology, light, graphics, robots, and sound. RAM is comprehensive in scope: it includes historical works of computer art dating back to the 1970s, and culminates in the Canadian debut of the artists’ current projects. Moving through a series of mini-retrospectives, the audience will learn how uniquely each artist uses technology to integrate his personal life experiences. Bridging the traditional gap between the artistic and technological disciplines, each of these innovators shows how computers can translate human expression. Jim Campbell merges filmmaking and electronics to create sculptural light installations. His works feature very low-resolution imagery; this emphasizes the role of the viewers’ own ideas and faculties of perception, and blurs the lines between representation and abstraction. Throughout his career, Campbell has explored how information is received, processed, stored, and then simplified through the layering of media. At the core of Campbell’s work are human concepts such as memory, gesture, and intimate familial relationships. The psychological and emotional authenticity of his work is often rooted in his own biography. Manfred Mohr is a pioneer of computer-generated art who develops programming languages that transform complex mathematical rules into surprising visual forms. The drawings, paintings, and videos that Mohr has produced since the 1970s have focused on abstracting and deconstructing the cube into multiple dimensions. Through custom algorithms, Mohr transfers the creative process to a computer system that is largely independent of the artist. He views the computer as an intellectual extension of himself, and he challenges our traditional concepts about the necessity of the artist’s hand in a work of art. At the beginning of his career, Mohr inputted algorithms into a mechanical instrument called a plotter; now, he programs his algorithms digitally. Emphasizing issues of control, chance, and authorship, Mohr enables humans and machines to collaborate creatively. Alan Rath builds, by hand, mechanical sculptures that seek to communicate, and he writes the software that digitally animates them. His work is influenced by his studies in art history, human behaviour, sociology, and physics. Interested in the theme of surveillance, Rath incorporates censors that allow his sculptures to respond directly to the audience. They often feature eyes, hands and mouths that are based on the artist’s own chacteristics, or those of his friends and loved ones. His newest work challenges the distinction between animal and machine, and incorporates ostrich and pheasant feathers. Whether referencing human or animal bodies, Rath strives to show that technology is not alien but natural.


Daniel Rozin mobilizes technology to give us new perspectives on ourselves. Interested in human identity, Rozin creates artworks that function like mirrors, but that incorporate the textures and behaviours of materials including steel, stone, wood, fabric, plastic, collaged trash, and more. Interactivity is the core of Rozin’s work: his mechanical mirrors change and move with the audience, so that the image of the viewer is the primary content. Though the works are powered by complex computer software, Rozin often hides the mechanisms within the works, creating the uncanny impression that the art is as alive as the viewer it reflects. Peter Vogel works with circuitry to create interactive sculpture. Trained in physics, he explores technology’s intersections with dance, musical composition, and visual art. His materials include wires, photocells, speakers, microphones, and red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes. These raw electronic components are undisguised, and arranged aesthetically in his sculptures. They are built to pick up the moving shadows of viewers’ gestures, and to respond; the works wait to be “played” like musical instruments. Vogel’s art is about experience as much as it is about form, and emphasizes the uniqueness of each participant’s gestures. These pioneer artists are engineers, physicists, musicians, and educators. They are all leaders in the world of Art and Technology, and the exhibition RAM was created to celebrate and honour their innovative artistic paths. My curatorial mission was to remind audiences that, although technology is so often viewed as cold and neutral, there is emotion and vulnerability in the creative process and in the art that results. It is my hope that RAM, by reinterpreting technology as an artform, can bring audiences one step closer to a visual understanding and appreciation of their world.

Marla Wasser, Curator — Marla Wasser is President of curatorial and art advisory firm Pursuits Inc. She created RAM as an original exhibit for THEMUSEUM, Kitchener, Canada. She has adapted RAM for the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia to reflect the evolving impact and intersections of art and technology. The exhibition will open in January 2015. — Click for Biography


Jim Campbell


engineer filmmaker video light photography pixel grid memory perception transformation electronic sculpture


Jim Campbell — “Since the mid 1990’s, I have been on a progression towards creating simpler and simpler representations, while at the same time I’ve been using more and more expressionistic methods. I believe that the trajectory of technological media in our culture towards higher resolution and more dimensions (HD…3D…Virtual Reality, for example) does not always reveal or express more. Another way of saying this is that all of the excess ‘information’ that is given to us and that our minds have to analyze can mask some of the more subtle perceptual sensory processes. It has been scientifically shown in many different ways that we see and process a lot more information than we are consciously aware of. It is these more primitive perceptual pathways that I am interested in walking.” - personal statement written for RAM


Motion & Rest #5, custom electronics and 768 LEDs, 2002


RAM Artworks

New Projects

Press & Interviews

Bios


Manfred Mohr


pioneer musician alphabet algorithms cubes logic chance rules surprise plotter computer


Manfred Mohr — “Inspired by the rational ‘Information Aesthetics’ of Prof. Max Bense in the early 1960’s, my artistic understanding shifted into new meaning. My longstanding interest in electronics (building radios and amplifiers since childhood), active involvement in jazz music as a tenor saxophonist and interest in abstract art turned in a new direction. My art slowly transformed from expressionism to computer generated algorithmic geometry. Learning a programming language came naturally to me and with the encouragement of my friend Pierre Barbaud, a French computer music composer, I was ready to work by the late 1960’s exclusively with a computer and therefore with the logic of a programming language to create art. Through this radical approach in creating art, which I consider an important part of my contribution to a systematic art, I learned an astonishing new way of thinking about my work. In fact, the computer became a physical and intellectual extension in the process of creating my art. It is, however, not the system or logic I want to present in my work but the visual invention which results from it. My artistic goal is reached when a finished work can visually dissociate itself from its logical content and convincingly stand as an independent abstract entity.” - personal statement written for RAM


P791_32, pigment ink on paper, edition 3/7, 2007


RAM Artworks

New Projects

Press & Interviews

Bios


Alan Rath


engineer animation handmade creatures mechanical sensors digitized surveillance LCDs artificial intelligence sculpture


Alan Rath — “I’ve ‘always’ been interested in electricity and machinery.

As a teenager in the Midwest, rock music concerts were like electronic science expositions that would periodically stop in town.

I like things that move.

Clothing is technology.

I was introduced to sculpture by NASA.

Writing is unbelievably artificial, yet you accept it (and find it useful).

As a kid, I was fascinated by electronic music synthesizers.

People equally accept all technology that was invented before their birth, without regard to whether it is 10 or 10,000 year old technology.

Science is a side effect of music. Almost every sculpture I’ve ever built plugs in.

Machinery is NOT unnatural. We are cyborgs already.”

As machines become more complex, they begin to resemble living things. Eyes help differentiate between plant life, and animal life. Eyes express much about the mental life of the one with the eyes. We look at art; why shouldn’t it look at us. Electronics can do things that are impossible by mechanical means.

- personal statement written for RAM


Above: Four Eyes, wood; acrylic; PVC, polyproplyene, software, computers, LCDs, 2006 Right: Swan, mixed media, 1994


RAM Artworks

New Projects

Press & Interviews

Bios


Daniel Rozin


designer software machines video pixels reflection identity perception interactive optics mirrors


Daniel Rozin — “Since 1995 I have been creating interactive digital art and found the mirror, as an object and paradigm, to be an excellent platform of expression. Initially unaware, and lately more deliberately, I have created a series of pieces that are, in some way, mirrors.

Increasingly, artists are using the tools of computers, media and technology to present their art. Usually they have a known body of content that they would like to bring forth and use new tools for presentation.

In the case of my art, the content of each piece is the viewer’s image itself. The interaction is for its own One of man’s earliest technological sake, and the technology is an inventions, mirrors have been loaded integral part of the inspiration. with meaning and myth from the When the visual content of every beginning. Mirrors have often been piece I build is the same – focusing thought of as objects of evil and on the viewer, it becomes a very many superstitions are linked to liberating notion that allows the them. Sometimes overlooked in the viewer to concentrate not so much search for important technological on the contents, but rather on the developments, I believe that no other ‘vessel’ of the image creation and invention has had a more significant its perception. impact on the way people perceive the world around them, and more The mirror continues to intrigue me. importantly the way they perceive Using the platform of mirrors for themselves. Mirrors have the ability the creation of my art is one that to let us observe ourselves in the same I will most likely continue to pursue.” manner we observe others, this is in complete contrast to the way we - personal statement written for RAM experience our being internally, which is a highly subjective process.

This unique behavior of a mirror’s simple optics is something that even high technology and computers cannot emulate because of its infinite complexity, and yet a polished piece of tin or a charcoal-covered glass can achieve this result easily.


X by Y, software; microcontroller; 44 wooden slats; motors; control electronics; optional video camera, custom, 2010


RAM Artworks

New Projects

Press & Interviews

Bios


Peter Vogel


physicist pioneer interactive behaviour language dance music shadow sound electronic circuits cybernetic objects


Peter Vogel — “Originally I wanted to be a painter, like my father and my mother. But at that time, it was difficult for artists to survive, and so I decided to have a profession where you can make money. For ten years I worked as a physicist. Physics is very abstract, but it turned out not to be my greatest calling. During that time I started to work with my cybernetic objects, but before that, I was painting always. At first I tried to show my art to get exhibitions, but no one was really interested. Then one day in 1969 I started to make my electronic objects. First of all, I am interested in behaviour. Actually I could say that all my objects are creatures, which each have certain behavioural characteristics. For example, if the spectator makes a shadow for a long duration, then the piece will react one way. When multiple short shadows are cast, it reacts differently. With these pieces I have developed a kind of language. It is a very elementary or simple language. It is based on movements within a time structure. These are objects, which react to input on a very low level, but with intelligence and memory. It’s a funny situation, creating objects that respond to a person. For me, the importance is in a spectator’s ability to produce sound series which he/she can influence – meaning that this series is not always the same. The sonic reaction is dependent on his/her movement and gesture.” - personal statement written for RAM


Moving Lights, microphone; light-emitting diodes, circuits, iron wire, 1980


RAM Artworks

New Projects

Press & Interviews

Bios


Video: Selected RAM Artworks Jim Campbell

Manfred Mohr

▶‖ Portrait of my Father 1994-1995

Cube Transformation Study 1972 via Manfred Mohr

via Jim Campbell I Have Never Read the Bible 1995 via Jim Campbell

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Motion and Rest 2002 via Jim Campbell

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example from P1011 Subset program, a real time algorithmic animation 2003-2005 via bitforms

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Running, Falling Apart 2004 via Bryce Wolkowitz

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example from P1271 Klangfarben program, a real time algorithmic animation 2006-2007 via bitforms

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example from P1411 Parallel Resonance program, a real time algorithmic animation 2009-2011 via bitforms

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▶‖ Home Movie 300-1 2006 via hosfelt Exploded View: Birds 2010 via Pursuits Inc

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Untitled (Store Front) 2010 via hosfelt

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Alan Rath

– Video of the works by Alan Rath in RAM are unavailable. The following works reflect many of the same themes and aesthetics as those originally included in the exhibition. Waiting 1989 via hosfelt

Daniel Rozin –

Time Ripples 2005 via bitforms

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X by Y 2010 via Pursuits Inc

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Triple Tongue Tree Too 2011 via Bryce Wolkowitz

Darwinian Straw Mirror 2010 via Pursuits Inc

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Monocle V 2009 via hosfelt

Trash Mirror 2011 via Pursuits Inc

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▶‖ Handful 2010 via hosfelt Watcher VII 2011 via Bryce Wolkowitz

Peter Vogel –

Circular Structure 1979 via Pursuits Inc

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Sound Wall performed by Peter Vogel 2009 via Jean Martin

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Alternate Performances of Sound Pieces via Peter Vogel

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Click artist’s name to return to his page


Video: Artists’ New Projects Jim Campbell

Manfred Mohr

was honoured with a major retrospective at the Museum of the Moving Image (Astoria, New York) in 2014. Campbell has also realized several public art projects, including his largest work to date, “The Journey,” which was unveiled at the San Diego Airport in 2013. Campbell collaborated on the set design for the Alonzo King LINES Ballet, which continues to tour to major American cities. In 2012, Campbell was honoured with an American Academy of Arts and Letters’ Art Award.

was honoured in 2013 with a Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement in Digital Art from ACM (Association of Computer Machinery) SiGGRAPH. Since RAM debuted, Mohr has had important solo exhibitions in the US, the UK, Germany, and Switzerland. His work is shown in many museum exhibitions worldwide.

▶‖ example from P1622 Artificiata II series 2012-2013 via Manfred Mohr

▶‖ Tilted View 2011 via hosfelt

▶‖ Alonso King Lines Ballet Collaboration 2014 via HarrisTheaterChicago

▶‖ New Works at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery 2014 via Bryce Wolkowitz

Alan Rath has had recent solo shows in both New York and San Francisco. His 2013 solo exhibition, Irrational Exuberance at Hosfelt Gallery, was chosen as one of the year’s top shows by the San Francisco art authority Square Cylinder.

▶‖ Creature II 2012 via hosfelt

▶‖ Positively 2012 via hosfelt

▶‖ Unknowable 2013 via hosfelt


Daniel Rozin

Peter Vogel

was honoured in 2013 in the Interactive Category of the 2013 Prix Ars Electronica. He has had recent solo shows in the US and in Costa Rica. His work has also been exhibited in Austria and the UK, and in Fall 2014 his installation for the Taiwan Taoyuan international airport will open.

was honoured with a career retrospective at The University of Brighton in 2011. The same year, Vogel was also the subject of a documentary, The Sound of Shadows. His works continue to be shown internationally.

From Daniel Rozin’s solo exhibition, Angles, at Bitforms Gallery NYC, 2013:

▶‖ Angles Mirror 2013 via bitforms

▶‖ Fan Mirror 2013 via bitforms

▶‖ Mirror No. 12 2013 via bitforms

Video of new work by Peter Vogel is unavailable. The following list reflects Vogel's most recent projects/exhibitions. 2012 “Sound Art,” ZKM Karlsruhe 2013 Art Karlsruhe Art Fair “Good Vibrations,” Museum Paltinate Gallery Kaiserslautern “Drawings by Sculptures of the Present,” Dominicans Museum, Rottweil “Urban Sounds,” Electronic Arts Basel

Click artist’s name to return to his page


Artist Press & Interviews Jim Campbell

Manfred Mohr

▶‖ Jim Campbell on the genesis of Exploded Views via SF MoMA

Excerpt from 1979 documentary Ideas, Experiments, Results via Manfred Mohr

Jim Campbell’s Sculptural LED Light Installations via The Creators Project

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Salon | Artist Talk | The Algorithm of Manfred Mohr. 1963 - Now via Art Basel

– That Rumored 12-Megapixel iPhone? Jim Campbell’s London Art Installation Outperforms With Just 1000 Pixels. Keats, Jonathan, Forbes, Apr. 23, 2013

– Reviews: Manfred Mohr, bitforms gallery Merjan, Ara H., Artforum, Jan. 2012

LED artist has created the 50th piece in the Cowboys Stadium collection Granberry, Michael, Dallas Morning News, Apr. 27, 2013

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Interview with Manfred Mohr: Art as a Calculation Waelder, Pau, Arte Cultura Innovación, Jun. 22, 2011 Manfred Mohr: one and zero Spencer, Catherine, This is Tomorrow, Dec. 11, 2012

Airport Expansion Includes New Artwork Carone, Angela, KPBS News, Aug. 1, 2013

Manfred Mohr Plays The Machine, Turning Algorithms Into Visual Music Newlove, Chris, The Creators Project, Dec. 4, 2012

Airports For Art Lovers McCartney, Scott, The Wall Street Journal, Sept. 18, 2013

Is the World Now Ready for Computer Art Pioneer Manfred Mohr? Sheerin, Mark, Hyperallergic, Dec. 5, 2012

Artist Jim Campbell Takes Over an S.F. Gallery With Fluttering LEDs Curiel, Jonathan, SF Weekly, Jan. 1, 2014

Manfred Mohr Atwood, Roger, ARTNews, Apr. 2013

Pixelated: The LED Work of Jim Campbell Behringer, David, Design Milk, Mar. 19, 2014 Jim Campbell’s Sculptural LED Light Installation Rosenthal, Emerson, The Creators Project, Mar. 19, 2014


Alan Rath

Daniel Rozin

▶‖ Bird Cage and Word Processor 1988

ITP Morning Show via ITPmorningshow

via oxkarrus

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– Digital Museum Explores New Realms in Interactive Designs Thakur, Monami, International Business Times, Feb. 20, 2012

– Four New SF Art Exhibitions for the Curious Viewer Bigman, Alex, 7X7 Magazine, Mar. 27, 2013

Mechanical Mirrors Reflect Your Image With Wooden Pixels Campbell-Dollaghan, Kelsey, Fast Co. Design, Mar. 26, 2013

Artist Talk at Berkeley 2007: Ambulatory Sculptures and Dancing Robots via citrusuc

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Talk at Video Sculpture Symposium 2011 via daapelectronicart

‘Irrational Exuberance:’ Alan Rath’s Art Chun, Kimberly, San Francisco Chronicle, Mar. 27, 2013 Alan Rath @ Hosfelt Roth, David, Square Cylinder, Apr. 9, 2013 Alan Rath “Irrational Exuberance” at Hosfelt Gallery San Francisco Arts Quarterly, May 2013 Alan Rath: “Irrational Exuberance” at Hosfelt Gallery Morris, Barbara, Art Ltd, May 2013 Artforum Critics’ Picks: Alan Rath Artforum, May 2013

Seeing and Being Seen, Across Millenniums: A Review of ‘Eye to I … 3,000 Years of Portraits,’ at the Katonah Museum of Art Hodara, Susan, The New York Times, Nov. 15, 2013

Peter Vogel –

▶‖ Excerpt from documentary Peter Vogel: The Sound of Shadows via Jean Martin Cool Hunting documentary Peter Vogel at Bitforms via coolhunting

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– Interview with Peter Vogel Nakagawa, Shin, Sound Arts Vol. 5, 1992 Brighton art exhibition sees sculptures ‘come alive’ BBC News, Oct 14, 2011

Click artist’s name to return to his page


Exhibition Press Arts Award Waterloo Region RAM: Rethinking Art and Machine received the “Art Event of the Year” Award in 2011 –

▶‖ RAM: Rethinking Art and Machine – An Introduction via Pursuits Inc

▶‖ RAM Curator Marla Wasser Interviewed on CTV’s The Beat via Pursuits Inc – TheMuseum At The Corner Of Art And Machine Prong-Parkhill, Charlotte, Kitchener Post, Sept. 22, 2011 RAM exhibit At TheMuseum Explores Interplay Between Art And Technology Reid, Rob, KW Record, Sept. 15, 2011 Celebrating Pioneers Of Art And Technology Loi, Becky, Imprint, Sept. 20, 2011 Beyond The Classroom Allen, Ronda, Education Forum, Fall 2011 Rethinking Art & Machine: A Second Take on Technology Rhodes, Richard, Canadian Art, Dec. 8, 2011


About Marla Wasser Marla Wasser is a curator and art consultant who heads the advisory firm Pursuits Inc. Her projects aspire to build expansive narratives around pop, contemporary, and new media art. Before RAM, Wasser created the original museum exhibition: The Art, Inspiration and Appropriation of Andy Warhol. Supported by the Andy Warhol Museum (Pittsburgh) and the Andy Warhol Foundation (New York), it featured Andy Warhol, Richard Pettibone, Elaine Sturtevant, Douglas Gordon, David LaChapelle, Deborah Kass, and others. Wasser has written on the business of collecting as well as on topics in art history. She has supported the Art Gallery of Ontario’s smART Women and the National Gallery of Canada, and has held positions with the Canadian Art Foundation Art Advisory Committee and the North American Acquisitions Committee for the Tate Museum in London, among many others. pursuitsinc.com


Artist Bios Jim Campbell

Manfred Mohr

(b. 1956, Chicago, USA) is a pioneering media artist who works with cinema, sculpture, and light. He received degrees in Mathematics and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978. His art career began with filmmaking, transitioned to interactive video installation, and now often employs LED technology. Campbell’s work has been exhibited at and collected by museums including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art, in New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He has been honoured with a Lifetime Achievement Award from SF MoMA, among a variety of other awards. Campbell is represented by Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York City, and by Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco, where he lives.

(b. 1938, Pforzheim, Germany) is considered the leading pioneer of computer-generated art. He studied in Germany at the Kunst + Werkschule in Pforzheim, and at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris. In 1968, he was a founding member of the seminar ‘Art et Informatique’ at the University of Vincennes. In 1971 he was the first artist to exhibit a solo show of work made entirely by digital machine. Since then, Mohr has been exhibited internationally at museums including the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the National Museum of Art in Tokyo, as well as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and The Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art. Mohr is collected by the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and the Musée d’Art Contemporain, Montreal, among many others. Mohr is the recipient of a Golden Nica from Ars Electronica and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, among other awards.

www.jimcampbell.tv www.hosfeltgallery.com

www.emohr.com www.bitforms.com


Alan Rath

Peter Vogel

(b. 1959, Cincinnati, USA) is a pioneer in electronic art who builds, by hand, mechanical sculptures with life-like characteristics. He received a degree in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1982. Since 1984, his electronic sculpture has been featured in over 150 group and solo exhibitions at major institutions including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Walker Arts Centre in Minneapolis, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. He is represented by Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York City and by Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco, where he lives.

(b. 1937, Freiburg, Germany) is a pioneer in the field of interactive electronic sculpture and sound. He studied physics at Hoffmann-La Roche Basel from 1965 to 1975. His work has incorporated painting, dance and choreography, composition, video, and cybernetic sculpture. Vogel has been celebrated in Germany by awards including the Reinhold Schneider Prize and the German Sound Art Award, and with a retrospective at the Freiburg Museum of Contemporary Art. International accomplishments include exhibiting at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the Goethe Institute in Uruguay, the Musée d’Art Contemporain in Lyon, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He continues to live in Freiburg.

www.alanrath.org www.hosfeltgallery.com

www.petervogel-objekte.de www.bitforms.com

Daniel Rozin (b. 1961, Jerusalem, Israel) is a pioneer of interactive digital art who uses mirrors as his platform. He received degrees from Jerusalem Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and from New York University. An industrial designer, he develops and patents custom software for his artwork; he is also an educator who teaches at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts. Rozin’s art is collected by institutions in the USA and in Beijing, Jerusalem, London, Madrid, Manchester, Moscow, and Taipei. He has been acknowledged by major awards including the ID Design Review and the Chrysler Design Award. Rozin is represented by bitforms gallery in New York City, where he lives. www.smoothware.com www.bitforms.com

Click artist’s name to return to his page


Pursuits Inc Art Advisory 51 Jackes Avenue, Suite 101 Toronto, ON M4T 1E2 416-487-0008

RAM: Rethinking Art and Machine  

Rethinking Art and Machine explores the origins and evolutions of new media art. Celebrating the pioneering artists of the twentieth century...

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