Felis Historica - November 2021 = Volume 2 Number 5

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NOVEMBER 2021 Volume 2 No.5

FEATURES: LONGHAIR – LIFEGUARD SHORTHAIR – BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION PURRSONALITY – MISS GERTRUDE JAY CFAF – ANTIQUE SHOW RIBBONS CAT ART – VARIATIONS ON A THEME … …and much more! INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE FOR CAT LOVERS, LINECHASERS & FANCIERS OF FELINE HISTORY

“Today’s achievements are part of tomorrow’s history”




The first Virtual Museum of the Cat! – online now at: www.cat-o-pedia.org


HARRISON WEIR COLLECTION © A-Cat-Emy Concepts

PUBLISHED BY A-CAT-EMY CONCEPTS for THE HARRISON WEIR COLLECTION EDITOR

John G. Smithson editor@felishistorica.com HISTORY PARTNERS The CFA Foundation COLUMNISTS/CONTRIBUTORS

Karen Lawrence (St. Catharines, Canada)

Lorraine Shelton (California, USA)

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Dr. Leslie Lyons (Missouri, USA)

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Chloe Chung (Hong Kong)

Laura Vocelle (Muscat, Oman)

Florent Fissot (Monsegur, France)

Dr. Victor Zaalov (Acre, Israel)

Valerie Sheldrake Feline Historian (Suffolk, UK)

Jamie Christian (Ohio, USA)

PHOTOGRAPHY / GRAPHICS

Helmi & Ken Flick (Florida, USA)

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Jack Terry (Florida, USA)

CONTENT All Rights Reserved © A-Cat-Emy Concepts SUBSCRIPTIONS Published Monthly Single Issue $4.00 USD ANNUAL $48.00 USD

NOVEMBER 2021

VOLUME 2 NUMBER 5

EDITORIAL The Editor outlines the contents of Felis Historica – Volume 2 No.5!

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CONTRIBUTING TEAM MEMBERS Gallery of our Team of Columnists, Contributors & Correspondents

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‘LIFEGUARD’ – by John Smithson The story of an early ‘Orange’ Long-hair, born in 1895.

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RIBBONS, ROSETTES & AWARDS - by Karen Lawrence Historic Cat Fancy treasures held in the Feline Historical Museum

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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT GENETICS YOU CAN LEARN FROM YOUR CAT! PART 17 - by Dr. Leslie Lyons The genetics of Cats eyes! …the window into their souls!

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A GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

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‘CHAMPION BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION’ – by John Smithson The story of a Red Classic Tabby English Shorthair, born in 1894.

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THE DESCENDANTS OF BASTET – by Karen Lawrence. New Book release information…

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A PERSIAN RHAPSODY IN BLUE – by John Smithson. New Book release information…

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MISS GERTRUDE JAY – Early Breeder & Judge - by John Smithson. A Review of the successes of the ‘Holmwood Persian cattery’

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THE HARRISON WEIR COLLECTION - RECENT ADDITIONS The Cat – Her Placement in Society… and Treatment

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CELEBRATING MODERN DAY LEADING CATS – Blue Tabby Bi-Colour Persian male CFA GC, NW PINKPAWPAL VAYU - by Chate Ruengruglikit

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CAT POEMS and OTHER FANCIES / & TEN CATS – by Graham Harrop

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VARIATIONS ON A THEME – by John Smithson Insights into the varied uses of the art of Harrison William Weir

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Editorial ’FELIS HISTORICA’ JOHN G. SMITHSON EDITOR EDITOR

OUR COVER PHOTO OUR COVER PHOTO ‘Our Puss’ AAlarge largeoriginal originalpencil pencildrawing, drawing of a short-haired of a domestic short-haired tabby tabbypatterned patternedcat, cat, signed and dated 1862, heightened with white, bysigned Harrison Weir. andWilliam dated 1862, (Father of the Cat Fancy) by Harrison William Weir. (Father of the Cat Fancy) Now in the Archives of in the Archives of The Now Harrison Weir Collection. The Harrison Weir Collection. Photo by John Smithson Photo by John Smithson COPYRIGHT ISSN: 2744-4430 National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa © A-CAT-EMY CONCEPTS / FELIS HISTORICA THE HARRISON WEIR COLLECTION No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means – electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, screen capture, or otherwise, without prior written permission. No responsibility is accepted for accuracy of advertisements or information. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED www.felis-historica.com www.harrisonweir.com

The newest race in these unprecedented times, has, in the last few months, been the race to vaccinate as many people as possible in almost every nation on earth, with at least two doses of one or more of the various brands of Covid-19 vaccine, that may or may not be available. Most countries have had heated debates over whether or not the vaccinations should be compulsory or not, and in the debates for or against, I have never once heard anyone compare it with the need to vaccinate your beloved pets for Calicivirus, or Rhinotracheitis, or a host of other feline maladies faced by our precious companion animals. My question therefore is - that if a new vaccine were made available for cats that would protect them from the ravages of any potentially life-threatening disease, no matter what that was, would you even hesitate to give it to them? I think not! So why then, when faced with a disease potentially capable of killing literally millions of our own species, do we then hesitate? For well over 100 years, we have not hesitated to vaccinate our children against the threats posed by Polio, Measles, Chicken Pox, Rubella, and a host of other equally debilitating diseases… so it does not seem logical to me, that anyone other than someone at risk through allergies, would not jump at the opportunity to be protected. As a person who is medically compromised myself, I did not hesitate to get the vaccination, because it was clear to me, that should I ever contract the disease, that at least my immune system would have a better chance of knowing how to fight it. And if the opportunity arises for me to get a booster dose, I will be amongst those first in line… with bells on, to receive it. Our magazine this month is full of interesting articles, among which is another by Dr. Leslie Lyons which provides the lowdown on the genetics of eye colour and the effects of mela


NOVEMBER 2021

IN CELEBRATION OF

ODD-EYED CATS

melanocytes, containing melanosomes that synthesize and store melanins (pigments) and their distribution. Then she explains how irides can be dichromatic, causing portions of the eye to be of a different colour, forming a ring or a pieslice of another colour! Examples are shown in the article, and our adjoining Gallery this month features odd-eyed cats from all over the world! Our sincerest thanks to the cat owners and photographers who shared their images. Karen Lawrence brings to life historic cat fancy ribbons and rosettes in her article on items housed in the CFA Foundation’s Feline Historical Museum. History features include one on the early English Shorthair, ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’ and the Longhair ‘Lifeguard’ born respectively in 1894, and 1895. We also take a peek into the life of a well-respected late Victorian breeder and judge of Blue Persians, Miss Gertrude Jay. Our feature cat this month is GC, NW. Pinkpawpal Vayu, a magnificent Blue Tabby Bi-Colour Persian, bred in Thailand by Pattama Weeranon and Chate Ruengruglikit, and exhibited with success in CFA both in his own Region, and Internationally. Our last feature, is ‘Variations on a Theme’ – in which we investigate the multiple uses of the artwork of Harrison William Weir, over a period in some cases, spanning as much as 39 years! The two cases we shine light upon in this issue are the cat in our cover page image and its various published variations; and then a dog, first published in 1863 and published as well as painted again, by Weir, as late as 1902, when the artist was already 78 years old! Stay safe and be kind to one another!

John EDITOR

One of our Genetics article cats is: ‘MALI’ a cat with three eye colours, shown here with her owner Tittungpak Sriprasom, and featured in the Thai street art below.


OUR TEAM OF COLUMNISTS & CONTRIBUTORS

KAREN LAWRENCE

LORRAINE SHELTON

LESLIE A. LYONS Ph. D

ADVERTISING MANAGER advertising@felis-historica.com Director: CFA Foundation, Inc Manager: Feline Historical Museum Co-Editor: The History Project

AUTHOR/LECTURER ‘Robinson’s Genetics for Cat Breeders & Veterinarians’ Director: CFA Foundation, Inc www.wegies.net www.featherland.net

RESEARCHER/COLUMNIST FELINE GENETICS SPECIALIST Prof. of Comparative Medicine Dept. of Vet. Medicine & Surgery University of Missouri

JAMIE CHRISTIAN

CHLOE CHUNG

LAURA A. VOCELLE

WRITER/COLUMNIST TICA INTERNATIONAL JUDGE OF THE YEAR 2016

COLUMNIST/PRESENTER CAT BEHAVIOURALIST/LECTURER CFA ALL BREEDS JUDGE Based in China & Hong Kong

COLUMNIST/AUTHOR FELINE HISTORY & ART HISTORIAN Creator and Founder The Great Cat www.thegreatcat.org

DR. VICTOR ZAALOV

HELMI & KEN FLICK

JACK TERRY

CEO – WORLD GOLDEN CAT

HELMI FLICK CAT PHOTOGRAPHY www.helmiflick.com

‘THE RESTORIAN’ Photo & Graphics Specialist Photo Humourist

President of World Organisation of Cats


OUR TEAM OF INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENTS

DARRELL NEWKIRK

PAM DELABAR

GAVIN CAO

(CFA, USA)

(CFA, EUROPE)

(CFA, CHINA)

NEVADA, UNITED STATES PRESIDENT CFA

TAMPERE, FINLAND

CFA DIRECTOR, REGION 9

CHENGDU, CHINA CFA CHINA BUSINESS ADVISOR

JOHN HANSSON

CHERYLE U’REN

ANNELIESE HACKMANN

(GCCF, UK)

(CCC of A, AUSTRALIA)

(WCF, EUROPE)

LONDON, ENGLAND PAST CHAIRMAN GCCF

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA PRESIDENT CCC of A VICE-PRESIDENT WCC

ESSEN, GERMANY PRESIDENT WCF

JOHAN LAMPRECHT

BOB GLEASON

JANE WEBSTER

(SOUTH AFRICA)

(CCA, CANADA)

(NZCF, NEW ZEALAND)

DURBANVILLE, SOUTH AFRICA PRESIDENT, C.A.S.A. (WCF)

LONDON, CANADA CHAIR - CANADIAN CAT ASSOC. LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE

PALMERSTON NORTH, NZ NZCF HISTORIAN


OUR TEAM OF INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENTS

JUN KOHNO

RUSSELL LAW

CHATE RUENGRUGLIKIT

(CFA, JAPAN)

(CFA, HONG KONG)

(CFA, THAILAND)

TOKYO, JAPAN SEC: MICINA CAT FANCIERS

HONG KONG SEC: UNITED FELINE ODYSSEY

CHAYAPON PUCHAROENYOS

ROBBIE WALKER

BANGKOK, THAILAND SEC: SIAM BLE-EYED CAT FANCIERS

SANDRA ALSUMAIT

(WCF, ASIA)

(ACF, AUSTRALIA)

(CFA, KUWAIT)

BANGKOK, THAILAND CHAIR: WCF DISCIPLINARY COMMISSION

GOLD COAST, QLD, AUSTRALIA PRESIDENT, FCCQ. QLD

KUWAIT CITY, KUWAIT PRESIDENT, K-CATS CLUB

IZADDIN SYAH YUSOF

FARAH DIANA

BAMBI J. EDWARDS (ANCATS, AUSTRALIA)

(CFA, MALAYSIA)

(CFA, INDONESIA)

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA NAT.SEC: ANCATS AUSTRALIA

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA CFA INT.DIV. CLERK OF THE YEAR 2016

JAKARTA, INDONESIA RICIMACKA CATTERY


OUR TEAM OF INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENTS

ELLEN CROCKETT

STEVEN MESERVE

LUIZ PAULO FACCIOLI

(TICA, UNITED STATES)

(TICA, EUROPE SOUTH)

(TICA, SOUTH AMERICA)

PORT TOWNSEND, WA, USA TICA DISTINGUISED JUDGE

VILA DE CUCUJAES, PORTUGAL TICA REGIONAL DIRECTOR

PORT ALEGRE, SOUTH BRAZIL TICA REGIONAL DIRECTOR

LIESBETH VAN MULLEM

EVA PORAT

DONATELLA MASTRANGELO

(TICA, EUROPE NORTH)

(FIFe, SWEDEN)

(FIFe, BELGIUM)

UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS TICA REGIONAL DIRECTOR

OREBRO, SWEDEN PRESIDENT SVERAK, (FIFe)

ROME, ITALY CHAIR: JUDGES & STANDARDS COMM.

STEVEN JONES

JINSON CHOI

LISBETH FALLING

(FIFe, NORWAY)

(CFA, SOUTH KOREA)

(NRR, NORWAY)

STAVANGER, NORWAY SEC: JUDGES & STANDARDS COMM

PAJU-SI, SOUTH KOREA PRES. CAT FANCIERS OF KOREA

OSLO, NORWAY PHOTOGRAPHER/EDITOR - ARISTOKATT


‘LIFEGUARD’ (aka ‘Windsor Lifeguard’ and ‘Richmond Lifeguard’) Photo by E. Landor, Ealing. ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson. Backgrounds © www.gographic.com

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


AN HISTORICAL PORTRAIT OF

AN EARLY ‘ORANGE’ LONGHAIR BORN IN 1895 BY

JOHN G. SMITHSON

Adapted from the author’s text in an article for ‘The History Project’ at www.cat-o-pedia.org

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND The cats that today we refer to as ‘Reds’, were originally known as ‘Oranges’. In fact, a description of the colour by Frances Simpson was: “There is a dash of red in the orange cat, suggestive, perhaps, of the blood oranges with which at Christmastide we are so familiar.” ¹ Writing in 1903, on the classification for ‘orange’ long-hairs at early shows, she then provides the following insight:“In 1895, orange and cream cats were placed together in one class. A specialist society for orange, cream, fawn and tortoiseshell cats was founded in 1900, and although the number of members is small, yet have they proved a strong body of staunch supporters of these breeds, and a really astonishing amount of good work has been done by these few enthusiasts. “The classification at the large shows has been greatly supplemented, and, whereas before the formation of the society the sexes were never separated, now this energetic little club asks for, obtains, and often guarantees extra classes. The result, therefore, to breeders of orange and cream cats is much more satisfactory, the males and females have their respective classes; and right well have they been filled.

result, therefore, to breeders of orange and cream cats is much more satisfactory, the males and females have their respective classes; and right well have they been filled. “At the Richmond show of 1902, there were thirteen entries in male and thirteen in female orange and cream classes, the sexes but not the colours being divided. This was really a splendid testimony to the efforts of a specialist society of less than two year’s standing. It is such a short time ago that orange, cream, and tortoiseshell cats were relegated to the ‘any other colour’ class, even at our largest shows; now it is often remarked by reporters in the cat papers that the well-filled cream and orange classes were the chief attractions of the show.” ¹ ORANGE SELF OR TABBY It is interesting to note that the original standard adopted by the specialist society included a description and points as follows: “Colour and marking: - Colour to be as bright as possible, and either self or markings to be as distinct as can be got - 25.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


LADY MARCUS BERESFORD Former owner of ‘Windsor Lifeguard’ From a painting by Edward Hughes. ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson

Coat: - To be silky, very long, and fluffy. - 25. Size and Shape: - To be large, not coarse, but massive, with plenty of bone and substance; short legs. - 20. Head: - To be round and broad, with short nose, ears small and well opened. - 15. Eyes: - To be large and full, and bright orange or hazel. - 5. Condition. - 10. The following observations and comments are drawn from Frances Simpson numerous notes with specific regard to the standard: “I incline towards a self-coloured orange in the Persian breeds, and a very handsome cat this would be – of just one tone of bright even colour, perhaps slightly lighter on the flanks and stomach, under the tail, and with a frill of paler tone.....”

‘WINDSOR LIFEGUARD’ An interpretative sketch by Louis Wain. ‘The Illustrated London News’ October 24, 1896. Image: Courtesy of The Harrison Weir Collection.

Then she muses, as if observing a scene from the future like a seer: “Of course, it is possible that in time orang cats maybe bred to such perfection that two distinct classes will be given, namely ‘orange’ (selfs) and ‘orange tabby’. As regards the eyes in orange Persians,....I should prefer the terms, ‘golden bronze, or hazel,’ as there is a special shade of gold with a dash of bronze or brown which seems to tone best with the bright coats of these cats.” ¹ Also, from ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903), when Miss Frances Simpson was reviewing some of England’s most notable catteries, and that especially of ‘Bishopsgate’, owned by Lady Marcus Beresford; she made specific mention of some of its former celebrated inmates, among them, ‘Lifeguard’, whom she described as “a grand orange of massive build”.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


The Stud Quarters at Lady Marcus Beresford’s cattery at Bishopsgate. Note: The home of ‘Windsor Lifeguard’ between 1896 and 1899. Note the long and spacious runs, segregated fully by solid walls and the fully covered exercise yard where the attendant is waiting on a female Persian cat. Photo: Cassell & Company Ltd. ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson ¹

whom she described as “a grand orange of massive build”. Then in another note within the chapter on ‘Oranges’, she also observes: “Coming down to the present day, I may remark that the number of orange cats placed at stud is very limited. A great loss to the ranks of male orange Persians was ‘Lifeguard’, formerly the property of Lady Marcus Beresford. This cat was almost unmarked, of a beautiful bright shade, and had an unusually round head and short face, with long silky coat.” ¹ Hallmark ‘red’ Persians in England during this early period of the fancy, included cats such as ‘Lifeguard’.

‘Lifeguard’, ‘Puck’, ‘Benjamin of The Durhams’, ‘Fulmer Prince of Orange’ ,‘Torrington Rufus’, ‘Torrington Sunnysides’, ‘Golden Butterfly’ and ‘Orange Girl’, while in the United States the march of the ‘red’ began with imports such as ‘Napoleon the Great’, ‘Ravenswood Hamish’ and ‘Red Knight’, followed by some of their respective sons, ‘Bunch’, ‘Kephren’ and ‘Dandelion’, as well as ‘Prince of Orange’ and ‘Red Prince of Gladdisfenn’. PARENTAGE & OWNERSHIP: ‘Lifeguard’ was born in March, 1895, bred by Mrs A. Spackman of Great Bedford St, Bath; by her orange male ‘Puff’ and out of ‘Topsey’ (aka Topsy). Although we have no indication of the colour or heritage of ‘Topsey’,

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


Lady Marcus Beresford’s ‘Windsor Lifeguard’ Photo: E.Landor, Ealing. ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson

Topsy). Although we have no indication of the colour or heritage of ‘Topsey’, she also appears to have been the dam of ‘Lifeguard’s’ sire ‘Puff’(born 21st March,1890); who is listed in The Cat Club Register (CCR) as sired by Mrs Frost’s ‘Yankee’ , and bred by Mrs Spackman , out of Mrs Spackman’s ‘Topsey’. So, the breeding which produced ‘Lifeguard’ was in fact, that of a mother to son. A little light is further thrown on the activities of Mrs Spackman as a breeder and exhibitor from this quote, again from Miss Frances Simpson in her chapter on ‘Orange Persians’: -

“Puff was exhibited by exhibited by Mrs Spackman in 1894; this orange cat was not much marked, and ‘Lifeguard’ was bred from him. It was about this date, that unmarked orange Persians became more fashionable. Among females, ‘Lifeguard’s’ sister, ‘Goldilocks,’ owned by Mrs Marriot, was one of the very best queens ever shown.” ¹ As to exactly when ‘Lifeguard’ became the property of Lady Marcus Beresford is unclear, but it is likely to have been when quite young. His was listed as her property in The Cat Club Register Vols. 1 & II for 1898 and 1899, although it seems likely from the information available that he changed hands again, shortly after that, probably in the first quarter of 1899.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


COVER PAGE of the February 8, 1902 edition of ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, featuring Miss Cartmell’s ‘RICHMOND LIFEGUARD’ Image © From and original bound copy held in The Harrison Weir Collection

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


likely from the information available that he changed hands again, shortly after that, probably in the first quarter of 1899. Mrs. Cartmell, appears to have been an admirer of ‘Lifeguard’ while he was standing at stud with Lady Marcus Beresford, at Bishopsgate. She is listed as the owner of ‘Richmond Al Roy’ (CCR), an orange male sired by ‘Lifeguard’ and out of Mrs Bagster’s ‘Pixie’. ‘Richmond Al Roy’ was born in July 1897. Nevertheless, we find some illuminating information with regard to the change of ownership of ‘Lifeguard’, plus a little insight into his photographic portrait by Landor, in this letter written by his next owner, Mrs Cartmell, published in the Editorial columns of ‘Our Cats’ on January 4, 1902: “I was greatly pleased to see photos of my two cats, Lifeguard and Sweetboy, among Mr Landor’s sheet of cat pictures in the Christmas Number of OUR CATS. That of Lifeguard was taken while he still belonged to Lady Marcus Beresford. I wonder whether you would mind just mentioning that he has been my property now for nearly three years, and is now known as Richmond Lifeguard. There being only one Lifeguard, I should not like there to be any mistake about him.... “Lifeguard sired a litter of five born last January, all are living now all are prize winners. Two at the Crystal Palace, three in Paris. I think this is rather good. I never show myself, so my cats depend upon their children for fame in that way.” ⁷

Persians, but who never exhibits. This lady has been very successful, in breeding numerous fine female orange cats, and many a winner has been born to blush unseen in the Barham cattery, near Canterbury.” ¹ SIBLINGS & SHOWS The only full sibling to ‘Lifeguard’ appears to be an orange female named ‘Goldy Locks of Heale’, an older sister, born February 13, 1894. (NCC:1780). She was bred of course by Mrs Spackman of Bath, and owned and shown by Mrs H.M. Marriott. She is credited with a 3rd prize, at the Crystal Palace in 1894. From the National Cat Club Stud-book & Register, the show wins listed for ‘Lifeguard’ included: - 1st and 3 Specials – Windsor,1895; Two 1sts – Holland Park, 1896, 1st, Crystal Palace, 1896; 2nd, Westminster, 1899. BREEDING & PROGENY Only a few progeny of record can be found for ‘Lifeguard’, and these are from a small selection of queens:-of Out ‘PIXIE’ a Tortie Persian female born in 1894, bred and owned by Mrs. Bagster: ‘BLUE PRINCE’, a Blue Persian neutered male, born 25th July, 1897, owned by Miss Grace Shaw. ‘RICHMOND AL ROY’, an Orange Persian male, born 25th July, 1897, owned by Mrs. Cartmell. Out of ‘ZINGARA’ a shorthaired female, owned by Mrs. Stennard Robinson:-

Miss Simpson also confirms the change of ownership of ‘Lifeguard’ to Mrs. Cartmell, as well as her reluctance to exhibit: -

‘TOMMY DODD’, a Red & White Bi-Color Shorthair neutered male, born in 1897, owned by Mrs. A. Kindall.

“He was purchased by Mrs. Cartmell, who is well known as an enthusiastic breeder of orange Persians, but who never exhibits. This lady has been very successful, in breeding numerous fine female orange cats, and many a winner has been born to blush unseen in the Barham cattery, near

‘PUSSINKAT’, a Tortoisehell Shorthair female , born in 1897, owned by Miss R. Mortivals.

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STUD ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE RICHMOND CATTERY OF MISS CARTMELL SHOWING LIFEGUARD NOW NAMED AS ‘RICHMOND LIFEGUARD’ The Cat Club Register, Volume 2.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


Out of ‘TRILBY LINKWOOD’ a Brown Tortie Tabby Persian female, born in 1898 and owned by Mrs. Fendale Charles: ‘ROBERT ORANGE’, an Orange Persian male, born 28th January, 1901. Owned by Mrs. G.E. Charles. ‘TOM TIDDLER’ a Brown Tabby Persian Male, born 28th January, 1901. Owned by Mrs. G.E. Charles. ‘WYNNSTAY GUINEA GOLD’ an Orange Persian male, born 28th January, 1901. Owned by Mrs. F.W. Western. (later owned by Miss M. Bellamy). The most interesting point to note from the above list is Mrs. Stennard Robinson’s decision to breed her Tortie Shorthair female to a Red Longhair. Whether it was usual to breed longhaired cats to shorthairs in order to produce more shorthairs and to register them with impunity is not clearly known, but the register speaks for itself. This is all the more interesting when you realise that Mrs. Stennard Robinson was the very capable Secretary of the National Cat Club at the time, as well as popular Secretary of The Ladies Kennel Association. In Volume 2 of The Cat Fanciers’ Association Stud-book, we also find an imported grandson of ‘Lifeguard’ registered as ‘RED ADMIRAL’. His dam is a female dam ‘Cinders’,a daughter of ‘Lifeguard’ out of an unnamed Blue-cream.

Whether this is because they love the warm hot tones, or as is the case with the tabbies, the depth of color and contrast of a rich mahogany red upon a warm but lighter red ground, or for some other factor; each will have a reason they can relate to explain their relentless passion for this truly beautiful hue. For a few, it may be a genetic factor, like the noticeable predisposition for depth of eye color, or it will be something more intrinsic, such as their personalities, intelligence or their affectionate natures, or, even on occasion, their diffidence! Regardless of the reason, the lovers of Reds are loyal to their cause and very often specialists in their variety. Today, Reds the world over are among the very typiest of Persians, being counted amongst the most celebrated Persians of all time. They often sport the deepest and most intense eye color. This is certainly not a new trait, and finding a red with intensely copper or even mahogany eye color is now very much the norm. But it is easy to forget, that this development has taken over 130 years. Reds continue to have the ‘wow’ factor when presented in a full flowing coat, and it is important that we never lose sight of the wonderful work done within this variety, by the exceptionally passionate breeders who have ‘lighted the pathway’ making it possible for us to enjoy what we, in this day and age, so very often take for granted.

IN SUMMARY

REFERENCES:

Fanciers of ‘Orange’ or ‘Red’ cats are usually conscientious devotees to their color. And although they will also be admirers of other colors and/or patterns, for them, the red retains a special place in the heart and they are very often passionate about preserving it.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson ‘The Cat Club Register’ (Vols 1-5) ‘National Cat Club Stud-Book and Register’ (Vols 1-6) ‘Stud Book and Register of The Cat Fanciers Association,(Vol.2) ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, February 8, 1902. ‘The Illustrated London News’ 24th October, 1896. ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, January, 1902. ‘Living Animals of the World’ (1900)

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


MISS CARTMELL’S - ‘RICHMOND LIFEGUARD’ Photo by E. Landor, Ealing. Scanned from ‘Living Animals of the World’ (1900) The Harrison Weir Collection

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc


The CFA Foundation’s

Feline Historical Museum

INTERIOR OF THE MUSIC HALL, BOSTON, AT THE CAT SHOW OF 1880 Image: © The Harrison Weir Collection


RIBBONS, ROSETTES & AWARDS A LOOK AT EARLY CAT FANCY AWARDS IN THE COLLECTION OF BY

THE FELINE HISTORICAL MUSEUM

KAREN LAWRENCE We know that unofficial exhibitions of cats, often as part of agricultural fairs, took place in England long before the first organized cat show was held at the Crystal Palace in 1871. In North America, the first “National Cat Show” was held at the Music Hall in Boston in 1878. Shows had been held previously, again always as part of agricultural fairs. The cat show of 1895 at Madison Square Garden is often referred to the beginning of an organized cat fancy in North America. Of course, the object of shows is to win an award, referred to as a “Premium” or “Specials” in the early days. A Premium list was often printed ahead of the show and listed all of the awards to be presented at the show. For this 1913 show, held by the Empire Poultry Association (and organized under CFA rules), the printed Premium List was 15 pages long, and included a multitude of Cups and Medals for winners as well.


FIGURE 01 – A rosette awarded to a 3-colour Manx named ‘Daisy’ at the Northampton, England Show in January, 1896. The CFA Foundation, Inc. Photo: Karen Lawrence


FIGURE 02 Ribbons awarded at shows of the Boston Cat Club 1907-1916 The CFA Foundation, Inc. Photo: Karen Lawrence

Exhibitors DO love their awards – and their rosettes. Rosettes have grown in size from about 7 inches in the late 19th century to several feet long at large shows held in the 21st century. Budgets have affected the offering of rosettes over the years, and they have gone from extremely embellished, fancy ribbons to paper ribbons designed and printed on a computer. Still, regardless of the size, shape and material, rosettes maintain their importance at cat shows and are highly prized. The following is just a sample of ribbons and/or rosettes in the collection of The CFA Foundation’s Feline Historical Museum. 01 – This 7-inch rosette, with a 3-inch round head, dates from a show held at Northampton, England on January 22-23-24, 1896. The ribbon was awarded to entry #64, a three-colored (calico?) Manx named Daisy, by judge W.L. Rolla. Daisy was owned by F.F. Reynolds of Hadley, UK. This was awarded at the club’s first annual show. No registration records have been located for Daisy. 02 – This is a series of ribbons, each with an enamel pin, awarded at shows held by the Boston Cat Club at their early 20th century shows. The 1907 award is a First Prize ribbon for a cat attending its first show, i.e. a Novice entry. The 1908 ribbon is Third Prize for a Senior Kitten, assuming aged 6-8 months. Awards, in those days, were often referred to as ‘Premiums’, and the 1912 ribbon is for Second Prize, with an enamel pin reading “Second Premium”. The 1915 ribbon is merely labeled “Special” and was probably given to a cat favored by a specific judge. The 1916 ribbon is for a “Third Premium” prize.


FIGURE 3a Atlantic Cat Club Badge Photo: John Smithson

FIGURE 03 Photo: Karen Lawrence

03 – This ribbon, with an enamel pin, was awarded at an Atlantic Cat Club show. The Atlantic Cat Club is one of North America’s oldest cat clubs having been incorporated in 1903. They must, however, have been holding shows prior to 1903 as this 1908-1909 ribbon states that it’s the “7th Annual Exhibition”, which would date the club back to 1901. During this era, Madison Square Garden was well-known as being the venue for large and well-attended cat shows.


FIGURE 04 Photo: Karen Lawrence

04 – It’s not often that a photo of a cat accompanies a rosette! The cat has been identified as a silver Longhair named Altarek Dai, who was a Special Prize winner at the August 20-25, 1917 show held by the Vancouver Exhibition Association, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.


FIGURE 05

Photo: Larry Johnson

05 – Agricultural fairs were held in Canada as early as the 1840's. The City of Toronto leased lakefront land as a permanent fairground in 1878 for its own exhibition, originally called the Toronto Industrial Exhibition. By 1912, the Toronto Industrial Exhibition had been renamed the Canadian National Exhibition (CNE). For decades, cat shows were a part of the CNE, produced by clubs such as the Royal Canadian Cat Club and the Canadian National Cat Club. A report in the October 1926 issue of The Cat Courier indicated that the 1926 show attracted 240 entries. Mrs. Gertrude Taylor, a former President of CFA and then the current Vice-President, judged at the 1927 show. This enameled 1927 CNE pin holds a ribbon stamped “Cat Show Committee” and was presumably worn by committee members at the show.


FIGURE 06 Photo: Karen Lawrence

06 – Cat shows had extended to the Midwest states by the 1920s, and this 1927 rosette from the Nebraska Cat Fanciers Society was a Special Prize award. The club appears to an unaffiliated one, and the rosette button reads “Seal of the State of Nebraska.”


FIGURE 07 Photo: Karen Lawrence

07 – In the early 1900s in North America if a shorthair cat wasn’t of a recognized breed, i.e. Abyssinian, Siamese, Manx, etc., they were all lumped together at shows in a class simply called “Shorthairs”. As the years passed, those that were from lineage imported from overseas and/or were hunters on local area farms that bred true to color/pattern, became officially known as the Domestic Shorthair. This breed eventually developed into the American Shorthair that we know today. This 1939 rosette was awarded to the ‘Best Domestic’ at a show sponsored by The Lake Erie Cat Club which, at the time, was associated with the American Cat Association (ACA).


FIGURE 08 Photo: Karen Lawrence

08 – By 1952, the Lake Erie Cat Club had changed its affiliation from ACA to the Cat Fanciers Federation (CFF). CFF was a splinter group formed by disgruntled CFA clubs in 1919. Originally named the United Cat Fanciers Association (UCFA), the name was soon changed to Cat Fanciers Federation. This rosette, sponsored by the Homewood Cattery was a 1952 award for Best Domestic Shorthair.


FIGURE 09 Photo: Karen Lawrence

09 – Back in the early days of showing, final awards were given to the Best Cat and the Best Cat Opposite Sex. So if a male cat was named Best Cat, a female cat had to be named Best Cat Opposite Sex regardless of whether there was a male of better quality at the show. In 1971, CFA began to change this practice by allowing the licensing of "Alternate Shows" that had scoring for Best Cat and Second Best Cat, rather than Best/Best Opposite Sex. This 1956 rosette is from a CFA affiliated show run by the Cat Fanciers of Washington. Held in Hyattsville, Maryland, the rosette was awarded to the Best Opposite Sex Cat in an Allbreed ring.


FIGURE 10 Photo: Karen Lawrence

10 – The Tonkinese had a turbulent road to acceptance as a breed in CFA, and they were eventually advanced to Championship Class in 1984. This rosette was the first one awarded to a Tonkinese cat in any class at a CFA show. On May 5, 1984 judge Dick Koepp presented 5th Best Cat in Premiers to Shanfoo Sybil of B’ssa, a natural mink spay bred by Norma & Sharon Roy, and owned by Lou & Jane Barletta. Sybil went on to become a Grand Premier in five associations - CFA, CFF, ICF, ACFA and TICA.


Everything you need to know about Genetics… You can learn from your Cat! BY

DR. LESLIE LYONS

College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri

Backgrounds © www.gographic.com

THE GENETICS OF CATS EYES… …THE WINDOWS TO THEIR SOULS The genetics of eye color in cats has not been formally investigated. However, since cats are mammals and 90% of genes are shared between humans and cats, we can glean information from human studies to help infer what may be influencing eye color in cats. Some structures and functions of cat eyes are different from humans. The muscles in the cat’s iris can change the pupil from round to a narrow horizontal slit. The tapetum lucidum, a reflective layer behind the retina, increases the amount of light for night vision in many nocturnal vertebrates. These differences from the human eye are due to a cat’s vision being highly adapted for their survival as nocturnal predators within their ecological niches. Although humans and cats have different but now overlapping niches, eye color has been under artificial selection by breeders and less natural selection by the niche. The iris and eye color

EDITOR: This is the Seventeenth article in a series based on feline genetics by Dr Leslie Lyons being published in FELIS HISTORICA during the 2020/2022 period Article Graphics ©www.gograph.com

The color of the eye is caused by the same cells that produce color in the skin and fur, melanocytes, which are also present in the iris.1 The iris is the colored part of the eye that contains muscles, which control the size of the pupil, hence, the amount of light that enters into the eye. Light passes through the pupil, through the lens to the back of the eye where the cells of the retina process the light and image. The iris has two tissue layers, both having melanocytes, however, the types of pigments produced in each layer are different. The two layers are the anterior stromal layer and the posterior epithelial layer, which are each derived from different embryonic tissues therefore, the layers have different origins of development.


MALI, is a strikingly beautiful cat that sports three eye colours. She is a de-sexed domestic female and a local celebrity cat living in Thailand, that was rescued as a homeless street kitten by her owner, Mr. Tittungpak Sriprasom.


Mr. Tittungpak Sriprasom with his famous spay ‘MALI’ in Thailand.

The melanocytes of both layers contain melanosomes, specialized organs that synthesize and store the melanins (i.e., pigments). The two major pigments synthesized in all melanocytes are eumelanin (black/brown) and pheomelanin (red/yellow).

EDITOR: This is the Seventeenth article in a series based on feline genetics by Dr Leslie Lyons being published in FELIS HISTORICA during the 2020/2022 period

Mutations in different genes can affect the amount of each pigment produced (as we have described for coat colors). The posterior epithelial layer produces only eumelanin (black) while the anterior stromal layer, which has the same origin as skin, produces both eumelanin and pheomelanin. Mainly, the density of the melanosomes in the stromal layer but also the ratio of the two pigments strongly affects eye color.2 Humans have a continuum of iris coloration from blue to grey and from green to brown. Eyes with less pigment, present mainly only in the posterior epithelial layer (a.k.a., iris pigment epithelium (IPE)), appear blue due to the refraction of light through the tissues (i.e., similar to why the sky is blue or the greenhouse effect).2


An example where pigmented freckles have presented as a ‘nevus’ ring, around the pupil, of a different colouration. Photo: Michael Izquierdo’s ‘Lindsaylover Antartida’

Cats have more variation in their eye color likely due to differences in the amount of pheomelanin produced. Cat eye colors range between blue, aqua, yellow, green, orange and copper. Some irides can have pigmented freckles present (i.e., nevus), a ring around the pupil of different coloration, or irides can be dichromatic where a portion or “pie-slice” of the iris may have a different color.2 Generally, heterochromatic cats have a different eye color for each eye. Overall, iris patterns of coloration are so diverse, they can be used for individual identification, however, the genetics of patterning has minimal scientific investigation. Besides giving eyes color, melanin helps protect eye tissues from sun (UV) damage. Lighter eyes are much more sensitive to UV damage than darker eyes because of the reduced pigment.

College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri

The prevalence of eye colors varies geographically in people. Most people in Africa and Asia have dark brown eyes, where the sun is stronger. In the United States, about 40% of the American population has brown eyes and about 9% of Americans have green eyes. Blue eyes are more common for individuals with lighter skin color and in northern regions . intense.1,2 where the sun is less


Tricia Simpson’s Latvian imported Persian male ‘San-Fe Chanan’ provides us with an example of where ‘dichromatic irides’ have altered colour in a portion of the cat’s left eye. Bred and photos by Svetlana Fedorenko

However, in cats, eye color is more associated with certain breeds, fur colorations and genetic variants associated with pigmentation. Both infants and kittens are generally born with blue eye color, which then changes as the pigments are produced in the iris cell layers. In kittens, the adult eye color begins to appear by 4 to 6 weeks and is commonly mature by 4 months of age.

EDITOR: This is the Seventeenth article in a series based on feline genetics by Dr Leslie Lyons being published in FELIS HISTORICA during the 2020/2022 period

For some breeds, the eye color may become more intense within a few years. Overall, eye color should be stable but health, nutrition, trauma and aging can cause changes. Genetics of eye color The genetics of eye color was originally considered a simple dominant – recessive trait, however, this model is now recognized as too simplistic, hence, eye color is considered a complex, polygenic trait. In humans, a DNA variant within an intron of the gene called OCA2 (OCA2 melanosomal transmembrane protein, formerly known as the P gene for pink-eyed dilution in mice, a.k.a., oculocutaneous albinism Type II, tyrosinase-positive) has a strong influence and explains a majority of blue-brown eye color.


Michael Izquierdo’s ‘Lindsaylover Aslan’ who has one eye split into shades of blue and copper. Bred and photos by Michael Izquierdo.

Fifteen different genes are often tested in humans to predicted eye color, including multiple DNA variants in HERC2, OCA2, SCL24A4, SCL45A2, TYR, IRF4, MC1R, DEF8, (MATP), OLFM3, TYRP1 (OCA3), DCT, SILV, MYO5A, ASIP, and ARFIP2, with the first six genes having the most influence.2,3 In cats, blue-eyes are clearly associated with mutations in the KIT and TYR genes. As presented in Dec.2020 P6, Jan 2021 P7, KIT affects melanocyte development, migration and survival and can cause dominant white cats or cats with white spotting to have blue eyes or to be odd-eyed (heterochromatic).4,5 As presented in Oct. 2020 P4, DNA variants in tyrosinase (TYR) are temperature-sensitive in cats, leading to the disruption of the tyrosinase enzyme and thereby a failure to produce pigment in the melanocytes, resulting in “points”.6 College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri

Pointed cats (cscs) have blue eyes and cats with one copy of the cs variant tend towards aqua eyes, such as in a Tonkinese. The Burmese TYR (cb) variant is less temperature sensitive and leads to a more normal eye coloration (yellow). In humans, variants in TYR cause oculocutaneous albinism Type I, tyrosinase-negative (OCA1A), thus, pointed cats (Siamese, Himalayan, Ragdolls and others) are models for this disease and why these cats are often called albinos.7


A newly developing breed, tentatively named “Topaz”, are cats with full coloration, perhaps a white spot on the neck, but blue eyes. These cats are not pointed like Siamese or Tonkinese, hence will represent a new DNA variant for the phenotype. Cats with the dominant silver phenotype, Inhibitor (I), have a strong association with green eye color thus this yet unidentified gene that affects pheomelanin production will be part of the eye color defining variants for cats. Other pigment dilution genes also affect eye color, such as blue Dilution caused by a DNA variant in melanophilin (MLPH) (Figure 1). Thus, breeders should assume that many DNA variants affecting fur coloration will possibly affect eye coloration as well. Cat breeds tend to have more intense eye color than random bred cats. Over the decades of judging to breed standards, cat breeds have been selected for richness of eye colorations, which will likely be the effect of minor DNA variants that will be difficult to identify and prove for association. Of the 15 genes listed for human eye color above, only four (TYR, TYRP1, ASIP, and MC1R) have an associated coat color change in cats, thus, these other genes identified in humans and their DNA variants may also influence cat eye color! As noted for the OCA2 DNA variant in humans, some mutations may not cause changes in the protein of the genes and may be affecting the regulation of nearby or even distant genes on the chromosome! How to find genes controlling eye colors in cats?

EDITOR: This is the Seventeenth article in a series based on feline genetics by Dr Leslie Lyons being published in FELIS HISTORICA during the 2020/2022 period

Many of the major genes controlling fur coloration have been identified in cats. Whole genome sequencing of a few of the Topaz cats may easily identify a causal mutation for this new coloration. However, other studies may be more complicated. For dominant White or white Spotting, a comparative study of many cats that are white, bicolor or van – with and without blue eyes or odd-eyes, should be conducted. In these cases, the major gene affecting pigment is known, the KIT gene, but perhaps modifiers are present, either in the same gene or elsewhere. The modifiers may be more influential on the eye color and which eye may be blue. Breeders could easily develop a study by gathering DNA samples, via buccal swabs, from cats of the same breed, but different eye colors. This same procedure could work for defining the modifiers between orange and copper eyes or yellow and green eyes. Genetically, one should work with cats of the same genetic populations, hence, breeds need to be selected that have eye color variation within the breed. If breeders would like to work on eye color genetics – please contact Dr. Lyons (lyonsla@missouri.edu).


Fig.1

Figure 1. Sibling male cats with different eye color. Right – Prince HarryHausen is an orange mackerel tabby with greenish-yellow eyes. Left – male sibling MeowMeow Kitty is a cream mackerel tabby having the variant for dilution in MLPH, resulting in lighter pigmented eye color. References 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri

https://www.reviewofophthalmology.com/article/the-colors-of-ocular-health Sturm Pigment Cell – Melanoma Res. 2009; 22: pp. 544-562. Kukla-Bartoszek, Int J Legal Med. 2021; doi: 10.1007/s00414-021-02645-5. Frischknecht Anim Genet. 2015; 46(1):98. Bergsma Hered. 1971; 62(3):171-85. Lyons, Animal Genet. 2005; 36:119– 26. Castle, American Naturalist. 1919; 53:265–268.

Mr. Tittungpak Sriprasom’s rescue kitten MALI.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Three close-up images of 4 year old MALI, owned by Tittungpak Sriprasom of Thailand. Photos courtesy of Tittungpak Sriprasom.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

An excellent piece of Thai street artist by ‘Stikorn’, featuring an image of MALI. Photo courtesy of Sitatunga Sriprasom.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Beeblebrox Franco Janes – Odd-eyed Bi-color Lykoi. Breeder: Desiree Bobby. Owner: Tricia Janes. Texas, USA Bred and photographed by Desiree Bobby.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Ozborn Thumbelina – Odd-eyed White Munchkin. Breeder/Owner: Karen Osborne, New Zealand. Bred and photographed by Karen Osborne.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Beeblebrox Nanika – Odd-eyed White Sphynx. Breeder/Owner: Desiree Bobby, Michigan, USA. Photographed by Jamie Paakanen.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

BareGenetics Phantom of Beeblebrox. Odd-eyed White Sphynx, with kittens. Bred by Vanessa Thomas. Owned and photographed by Desiree Bobby


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Above: Lindsaylover Divinity. Odd-eyed Dilute Calico Persian, bred and owned by Michael Izquierdo. Tenerife. Below: Lindsaylover Casimiro of Yummy Meow. Odd-eyed Blue Bi-Colour, owned by Ksenia Mironova. Russia. Photos: Michael Izquierdo.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Pinkpawpal Thanatos. Odd-eyed Black Bi-colour Persian, bred and owned by Pattama Weeranon/Chate Ruengruglikit. Photo: Pattama Weeranon.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

GC, RW Calicats Gemini, - Odd-eyed Tabby & White Maine Coon, bred and owned by Mary Thorsness., California, USA Photo by Helmi Flick Cat Photography.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

GC, RW, BW. Kurisumasu Yasu-Niko, Odd-eyed Mike (Calico) Japanese Bobtail Longhair, Oregon, USA Breeder/Owner/Photographer: Marianne Clark.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Above: Odd-eyed Indonesian street cat who frequented a restaurant. Photo: Karen Lawrence. Below: ‘Koch’ an Odd-eyed Red Van kitten of a street cat, Photo/Owner: Don Alex Kizhakkayil, Palai, India.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Above: PL* Jantar Scarlett O’Hara -Cream Classic Tabby & White Exotic, bred by A. Rogowski/P. Pardo Owned by A. Rogowski/P. Pardo/F. Gaspard. Poland Below: Oddeyesee Dare To Dream. Cream Tabby Van. Breeder/Owner/Photo: Tricia Simpson, Queensland, Australia.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Above: Ch. PL* Jantar Bee My Sexy Toy of D’Eden Lover. Bred by P. Pardo & A. Rogowski, Owned by F. Gaspard. Below: PL*Jantar Te Amo Mi Jelly, bred and owned by Piotr Pardo & Adam Rogowski. Photos: courtesy of Piotr Pardo & Adam Rogowski.


GALLERY OF ODD-EYED CATS

Above: Ch. PL* Jantar Miss Cattee. Bred by Piotr Pardo & Adam Rogowski. Below: PL*Jantar Hades of D’Eden Lover, bred by Piotr Pardo & Adam Rogowski. Owned by Frederic Gaspard. Photos: courtesy of Piotr Pardo & Adam Rogowski.


CHAMPION BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION Red Classic Tabby English Shorthair male, born August 22, 1894; owned Lady Alexander of Ballochmyle Photo: Russell & Sons, Crystal Palace, 1904. Image courtesy of The Harrison Weir Collection Backgrounds © www.gographic.com

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


AN HISTORICAL PORTRAIT OF

‘Early English Shorthair Red Classic Tabby’ BY

JOHN G. SMITHSON

Adapted from the author’s text written for ‘The History Project’ at www.cat-o-pedia.org

FACTFILE

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND In the Tabby Shorthair classes, which were dominated by Silver and Brown Classic Tabbies, the Red Tabbies often had a hard time of it. And even when successful, they also had to compete for Best Shorthair, against the classic Blues and Solid Whites (often Blue-eyed), which were often seen as the ‘glamour cats’. But one or two did stand out and during the period from 1895 through to 1905, ‘Ch.Ballochmyle Perfection’ was one such cat. Like his great grandfather, the celebrated brown tabby ‘Ch. Xenophon’, he lived long, and had a successful show career within his own colour class, running up an impressive record of two Gold Medals, over 100 firsts, numerous championships, (as of 1903) and still winning First and Specials for Best of Colour at the Crystal Palace at 11 plus years of age! There had Of course been predecessors in this colour variety on the show bench, a notable early example being Mr. Enoch Welburn’s red classic tabby male ‘Orange King’ who had been born appro

Name:

BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION

DOB:

August 22, 1894

Regn:

NCC: 3324

Sire:

ORANGE BOY

Dam:

TORTOISESHELL

Breeder:

Mr. R. Betts

Owners:

Mr. George Towlerton/ Lady Alexander

Breed:

English Shorthair

Col/Pattern: Red Classic Tabby Alt.Name:

Champion Perfection

approximately 5 years earlier, and had very successfully competed to gain no less than ten firsts and specials. But comparing images of the two cats, it is clear that ‘Perfection’ has a more rounded head, in keeping with what breeders of the era were seeking, particularly to differentiate their ‘English ‘ or ‘British’ style cats from those which

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


Mr. Enoch Welburn’s ‘ORANGE KING’ born circa 1889. Cover page image from ‘Fur and Feather’ October 8, 1891. © The Harrison Weir Collection

seeking, particularly to differentiate their own ‘English’ or ‘British’ style cats, from those which

they considered to be developed from a more foreign style or extraction. That difference can easily

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘CHAMPION BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION’ Photo: ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson.

easily be seen in these two images, with Mr. Welburn’s cat (at left) having a more elongated head when compared to the preferred roundness of the skull on Champion Perfection (above). Frances Simpson, in ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) had the following to say about Red Tabbies and of Ch. Ballochmyle Perfection in particular: “Red Tabbies again, are one of the difficult varieties to obtain. The dense, dark red tabby markings against the light red ground is only the result of judicious mating and breeding. Among the many notable males ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’, the property of Lady Alexander, winner of some 100 first prizes, championships and specials, the sire of Ch. Ballochmyle Goldfinder and Ballochmyle No Fool, (the mother of Ballochmyle Red Prince), stands out very prominently. Despite his ten years, has still the grand

grand dense colour and markings of old. In ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’, we have a chip off the old block.” By her reference to the ‘chip off the old block’ we can only surmise that she may be referring to his paternal great grandsire, ‘Ch. Fulmer Xenophon’, quite possibly the most celebrated Classic Tabby shorthaired cat of all time. Likewise, Charles Lane, in his book, ‘Rabbits, Cats & Cavies’ published the same year, remarks as follows: “A really well-marked Red Tabby, in good form, is a very handsome animal, and worthy of admiration. The illustrations to this sketch are Champion Ballochmyle Perfection, the property of Lady Alexander, and probably one of the best ever exhibited; the other, Lord Rufus, a great winner, was first exhibited at a small show in Wiltshire

mother of Ballochmyle Red Prince), stands out very prominently. Despite his ten years, has still the grand dense colour and markings of old. In 'Ballochmyle Perfection', we All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc. have a chip off the old block".¹


A watercolour of ‘Ch. Ballochmyle Perfection’ by Rosa Bebb, clearly based on the same photograph as that which appeared in ‘The Book of The Cat’ but commissioned for ‘Rabbits, Cats and Cavies’ (1903) by Charles H. Lane. Image courtesy of The Harrison Weir Collection

Wiltshire, where he was claimed by the Rev. D.G. Truss, and some time afterwards came into the possession of the writer, who had him for some years.”

This transfer to Lady Alexander appears to have taken place in all probability around 1898; as from early 1899, she starts registering ‘Ballochmyle’ progeny sired by him.

PARENTAGE & OWNERSHIP

SIBLINGS & SHOWS

“Perfection” was born on the 22nd August, 1894, bred Mr R.Betts, from Mr Down’s Red Tabby male, ‘Orange Boy’ and out of Mr Bett’s ‘Tortoiseshell’, a dam of whom we know little, except that she was a daughter of a Red Tabby female, named ‘Red Poppy’.³

At this point in time, we have found no siblings of ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’.

He appears then to have become the property of Mr George Towlerton, during which time he sired a female named “Goldfinder”, bred by Mr R Kuhnel, (famous for his line of Red Tabbies), before he was finally on-sold to Lady Alexander. This transfer to Lady Alexander appears to have taken place in all probability around 1898, as from early 1899, she starts registering ‘Ballochmyle’ progeny sired by him.

In the National Cat Club Register, his wins, as of 1899 were recorded as: Thirty-three firsts, including 1st Crystal Palace ,1896; 1st Crystal Palace, 1897; 3rd Crystal Palace, 1898; 2nd Botanic, 1899; 1st, Cup and Championship, Westminster, 1899.³ However, by the time Charles Lane’s book arrived on the scene in 1903, that tally had climbed to two gold medals, 100 prizes etc…²

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


A rare image of ‘Champion Ballochmyle Perfection’ taken in 1904, after his win taking out Best Short-Hair Cat at the Crystal Palace, aged 10 years. Photo: ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, December 17, 1904. Image © The Harrison Weir Collection.

BREEDING & PROGENY Of progeny from ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’, we can find the following cats notated in the registers: Bred by Mr & Mrs Kuhnel and born on 2nd March 1897: - (very possibly from a Granddam to Grandson mating) ‘‘Goldfinder’ – Shorthair Red Tabby Female by

‘Perfection’, out of ‘Red Poppy’. NCC Regn: 3328.

‘Princess Pearl’ – Shorthair Female Cream (Tabby), dilute litter sister. NCC Regn: 3362. No Fool’ – Shorthair Red Tabby Female, (no date of birth) but likely litter sister. NCC Regn: 3330. Goldfinder appears to have gone to Mr T. Wilkinson, who bred her back to ‘Perfection’, and then she and her progeny both become the property of Lady Alexander.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


The Welburn Memorial Vase. At the Crystal Palace ‘Ch. Ballochmyle Perfection’ was awarded Best Short-Haired Cat in Show at the age of 10 years, winning the Welburn and Rotherham Challenge Bowls. Image: Courtesy of the National Cat Club.

Then bred by Mr George Towlerton, and born on 29th March 1899: - from the same parentage;

Eagle’ was neutered and transferred to Lady Alexander as ‘Ballochmyle Red Eagle’.

‘Perfection Junior’ – Shorthair Red Tabby Male by ‘Perfection’, out of ‘Red Poppy’. (CCR)

Lastly a litter bred by Mr T.Wilkinson, born 14th December, 1899:

‘Red Eagle’ – Shorthair Red Tabby Neuter, litter brother. (CCR)

‘Ballochmyle Perfect Still’ - Shorthair Red Tabby Female by ‘Perfection’ and out of ‘Goldfinder’. The result of this Father/Daughter breeding returning to the stud owner, Lady Alexander.

Then born on 5th July, 1899, by ‘Ballochmyle Perfection’ and out of Towerton’s ‘Floss’: ‘Golden Poppy’ – Shorthair Red Tabby Female. Appears to have been retained by Mr. Towerton. ‘Perfection Junior’ appears to have been retained as a stud for breeding by Mr. Towlerton, while ‘Red Eagle’ was neutered and transferred to Lady Alexander as ‘Ballochmyle Red Eagle’.

‘No Fool’, listed in the first litter above, is later found as “Ballochmyle No Fool”, and appears in time as the dam of the next generation, namely a Grandson of Perfection, named “Ballochmyle Red Prince”, sired by Mr Kuhnel’s ‘Wharfedale Sam’. ‘Red Prince’; is alluded to in Frances Simpson’s references to the progeny and grandprogeny of ‘Perfection’ in “The Book of The Cat” (1903).

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘CHAMPION BALLOCHMYLE PERFECTION’ when winning Best Short-Haired Cat at the Crystal Palace, 1904. Photo: Russell & Sons, Crystal Palace, London. ⁷ Image: © The Harrison Weir Collection

Sam’. ‘Red Prince’; is alluded to in Frances Simpson’s references to the progeny and grand - progeny of ‘Perfection’ in “The Book of The Cat” (1903). ‘Champion Ballochmyle Perfection’s’ last known win, was at the Crystal Palace in 1905, where he once again took out the Red Tabby Shorthair class at the age of over 11 years.

References: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson. ‘Rabbits, Cats & Cavies’ (1903) by Charles Lane. ‘The National Cat Club Stud Book and Register’ ‘The Cat Club Register’ Vols 1 & 11’ ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, Dec.17, 1904. ‘Fur and Feather’, Oct. 8, 1891. ‘The Tatler’, Nov.9, 1904. All photos as per Sources and Credits given.

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A-CAT-EMY CONCEPTS is proud to present A NEW PUBLICATION FROM ‘THE ALCHEMY OF CAT BREEDS’ SERIES

‘The Descendants of Bastet’ gives a complete overview of the first century of the Abyssinian breed, from the first mention of the breed in the early 1870s through until circa 1970. Additionally, chapters on the later development of the colors red, blue, and fawn ar included – plus the longhair version of the breed is discussed in a chapter on the origins of the Somali. The book is 8 1/2 x 11. Pre-index, it is 265 pages chock full of historical information for Abyssinian lovers! It includes a great deal of registration information, pedigrees, progeny reports and photos of cats important to the breed history. Preview of the introductory pages here – http://bit.ly/3aBqFys Contact Karen (catfanrep@gmail.com) for pre-order form. No payment is due at this time; you will be contacted when the book is available for mailing.


A word from the Author… The origins of the Abyssinian breed are unknown, and are likely to stay that way. While anecdotal stories tell of cats being imported from Abyssinia (now Somalia), geneticists have expounded theories that the breed originated in countries bordering on the Indian Ocean. Records relate the early importation of cats, but from where is never specified. Breeders have told stories of cats resembling the Abyssinian being found in Abyssinia, but they are hearsay and cannot be positively confirmed. So while origins will remain guesswork, and are explored in-depth herein, the unknown bits are most likely to remain guesswork forever.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Descendants of Bastet weaves together what we do know and what can be confirmed regarding the history of the breed growth, in intimate detail, using pedigrees, progeny reports and historical records, starting with that first mention of Zula, on to Queen Jumbo who was the first registered Abyssinian. While we don’t know Queen Jumbo’s birthdate, we do know that she died in 1893. Other Abys of her era included Sedgemere Peaty and Sedgemere Bottle, both produced from unknown heritage; both, however, important to the early development of the breed and pedigrees.

This book is the exciting culmination of years of research, studying of pedigrees, scanning of photos and scrupulous reading of many old magazines in search of tidbits to include and expand upon. The first print run was limited to 175 copies, and there are a small number of copies still available for purchase. If you are interested, please contact Karen Lawrence at catfanrep@gmail.com.


A-CAT-EMY CONCEPTS is proud to present A NEW PUBLICATION FROM ‘THE ALCHEMY OF CAT BREEDS’ SERIES

‘A Persian Rhapsody in Blue’ – Volume 1, provides a rare look into the pre-history and establishment of the Blue Persian Cat, from the first recorded importations direct from the Khorasan province, into Europe in the 1620’s; to a detailed development in 19th and 20th century Britain. Includes many new images of Blue Persian cats, not published in well over 100 years. In depth coverage, of Foundation bloodlines and famous strains. In A4 format, Pre-index, this book comprises of 546 pages of detailed information and rare images of key progenitors of the Persian cat, and their breeders.

Preview of the introductory pages is found at – http://bit.ly/3gOMM8b Contact John (nutrenz57@yahoo.com.au) for pre-order booking form.


A word from the Author… What a long and amazing journey it has been, to collate, collect, curate and document the amazingly complex journey of the Blue Persian cat, from its genetic ancestral home in the mountainous regions of Khorasan province, to its establishment in Western Europe, and in particular, its strong foothold in the British Isles – a journey that took the best part of 260 years before it was finally recognised by a dedicated handful of English and Scottish breeders, as unique and full of beauty. From relative obscurity in the mid 1880’s a small but growing band of faithful adherents to its cause, did the faithful groundwork behind this colour variety, which would see it rise to prominence in the world of cats, the formation of the largest specialty club in the world for a time, and an absolutely phenomenal period of expansion of its influence that mirrored the expansion of influence of the then British Empire. The Blue Persian became the recognised ‘Prince’ of the Persian breed, the pinnacle of what could be achieved by any colour, if the same level of love and dedication was poured into new programs as the founders of the colour-bred Blue had poured into what had become, the cornerstone colour of the modern breed. This writing of this first volume of the history of the Blue Persian has likewise allowed me to develop those necessary skills to tackle similar feline histories with a dedication that is all pervading. It is a privilege and a joy to embrace the detective work and pedigree research involved. I recognise the unique opportunity it has afforded me to meet and work with some amazingly talented and special like-minded individuals around the world, who share a similar or same passion. For that I am especially grateful.


MISS GERTRUDE JAY Image: ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, August 11, 1900. ©2021, ‘A Persian Rhapsody In Blue’- The Harrison Weir Collection Backgrounds © www.gographic.com

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AN HISTORICAL REVIEW OF

Iconic early Breeder and Judge of Blue Persians and her ‘HOLMWOOD’ Blue Persian Cattery BY

JOHN G. SMITHSON

Adapted from the author’s text for written for ‘A Persian Rhapsody in Blue’ Published by A-CAT-EMY CONCEPTS.

INTRODUCTION There can be little doubt about the grand reputation that Miss Gertrude Jay built for herself and her blue Persian cats in the decade that she so lovingly devoted her time to this hobby. The results of her achievements in that short time speak volumes about her personally, including but not limited to her ability to recognise the qualities inherent in bloodlines; how to weave them to her cats pedigrees, all the time taking into account, the layering of phenotypical and genotypical advantages by always having a ‘longer term view’. These are qualities rare in breeders even today. In addition to this, her care and concern for the presentation of her valued pets was paramount, and in her even-handed dealings with other breeders, she retained a wide popularity, standing apart and away from controversy during periods of considerable political strife within the fancy. As a judge of Blues, she was woman of untainted, exemplary repute.

Closer to the end of her involvement in cats and other fancies, the portrait of Miss Jay given on the opposite page was published in ‘Our Cats’ magazine, August 11, 1900, accompanied by this snippet about her and her cats, which endorses our statements made of her: “One of the most popular appointments to the newly-organised committee of the N.C.C. has been that of Miss Jay, a young lady whose enthusiasm and sympathy for cats is only equal to her capacity in managing them. The Holmwood cats are always well to the fore in the Prize Lists of the principal shows, and although we cannot go to the lengths of an American contemporary and inform our readers that on account of their excellence her cats are debarred from competition, we can safely say that some of Miss Jay’s Blues are very near perfection.” Such is how she and her cats were viewed at the turn of the nineteenth to the twentieth century. Accordingly, it behoves us to check for references to Miss Jay in the historical writings of

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MISS GERTRUDE JAY’S CATTERY, BIRTHPLACE OF THE ‘HOLMWOOD’ BLUES Photo: W. Field, Putney. ‘The Book of The Cat’ (1903) by Frances Simpson.

of Miss Simpson, the first overview of which provides an excellent overall historical context as well as a selection of relevant details of about cats and her abilities. “Miss Gertrude Jay started cats in 1891 and her name will always be connected with blues. Nothing has ever been exhibited to compare with her wonderful female ‘The Mighty Atom’ as regards beauty and shape of head. This cat, now, alas! no more, swept the board wherever it was shown. Twice she carried of the highest honours for best cat in show at the Crystal Palace. It is true that this grand specimen lacked the orange eyes, but no judge could pass over such a perfect type of cat, despite her one fault, and thus, ‘The Mighty Atom’ reigned supreme. ‘Trixie’ and ‘Doris,’ two of Miss Jay’s noted blues, have also both won specials for the best cat in the show at the Crystal Palace.

‘Doris,’ two of Miss Jay’s noted blues, have also both won specials for the best cat in the show at the Crystal Palace. Miss Jay is fortunate in having some descendants of these precious cats in the luxurious catteries at Holmwood (of which an illustration is given). Many lovely blues may be seen revelling in the well-appointed houses set apart at the end of the long terrace for their special use. Miss Jay about a year ago retired from the cat fancy, and withdrew her name from the two clubs; (ED: National Bodies, ie. NCC and TCC); but she is still a vice-president of the Blue Persian Cat Society, and often as a judge. “Her name always draws a good entry, and, as a well-known fancier once remarked to me, ‘You can always get your money’s worth when Miss Jay has the handling of the classes.’ The following few remarks from Miss Jay on her method of judging will be read with interest: -

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MISS GERTRUDE JAY’S ‘CHAMPION HOLMWOOD TRIXIE’ Illustration from ‘The Graphic’, October 21st, 1893

‘You can always get your money’s worth when Miss Jay has the handling of the classes.’ The following few remarks from Miss Jay on her method of judging will be read with interest: “I fear my way of judging is most unlike other people’s, because I do not judge by points unless it comes to a close fight between two cats. Of course, I consider shape and colour first, and then I mark all those unworthy to be in any prize list; next get to work with the remainder, and this I do, as I say, unlike most other judges, for I pick out the cat I would soonest have given to me that day, with the object of showing it again at once. The point to be decided is the best cat that day. It is no use beginning to think which cat will be the best in a month’s time or which cat might have been best a month ago; it is there that day – which is best?

which cat might have been best a month ago; it is there that day – which is best? And, to my mind, if I award first to the cat I would rather have, with the one object of continuing to show it, that surely must be the best cat in my opinion, and to that cat the first card goes. And so on through the class, only giving one V.H.C., one H.C., and one C., unless the class is a very large one. I know some judges who say commended cards are very cheap, and they please the exhibitors. True; but are you not pleasing them in a wrong way by making them think their cat is better than it is?” Miss Jay’s first major win with a home-bred cat was with her blue female. ‘Holmwood Trixie’ who took top honours in Longhairs at the Crystal Palace at show in 1893. The photograph on the previous page and the illustration above are taken from published reports of

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silver medals, first prize in its class, and four special prizes.“ The following are a selection of excerpts from the report in ‘The Graphic’: “CATS AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE – The twentyfifth of the Crystal Palace Company’s National Cat Shows was held this week. It proved to be as successful as any of its predecessors, there being nearly 600 entries. The fixture appears to be becoming exceedingly popular, and it promises too, to become a useful institution, as it has already led to the establishment and formation of a cat stud-book. According to Mr. L. Wain, the President of the National Cat Club, the careful breeding of cats in the future will not only tend to the elimination of weakness of constitution, but will also produce a greater certainty of temperament in our feline domestic pets...” CHAMPION HOLMWOOD TRIXIE ON THE OCCASION OF HER WIN AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE, IN OCTOBER 1893 Photo: W. Field, Putney. The Illustrated London News

Crystal Palace at show in 1893. The photograph above and the illustration and the illustration on the previous page are taken from published reports of that show from ‘The Illustrated London News’ and ‘The Graphic’ respectively. The first paragraph of the report in ‘The Illustrated London News’ read as follows: “CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW - At the twentyfifth annual cat show, opened at the Crystal Palace on Oct.17, the highest honours were gained by a beautiful blue Persian named ‘Trixie,’ belonging to Miss Jay, Holmwood, Putney Hill, which gained the Cat Club’s gold medal, two silver medals, first prize in its class, and four special prizes.“

“The present fashionable colour for cats is blue, and long-haired cats are preferred to short... “We append the names of a few prizewinners, and we may say that the honours of the show were borne off by a beautiful blue Persian named ‘Trixie,’ belonging to Miss Jay, Holmwood, Putney Hill, which gained the Cat Club’s gold medal, two silver medals, first prize in its class, and four special prizes.” ‘Trixie’ was in fact bred by Mrs. Foote, born September 1, 1892; and sired by ‘Lindfield Bootles’ who was a TIER 2 male descended down from Mr. Clarke’s foundation male ‘Turko’. She was clearly presented in tip top show condition by Miss Jay, in order to successfully compete at this level. Miss Jay, it is clear, listened carefully and learned rapidly. Early in 1894, she chose as a mate for her ‘Trixie’ the beautiful ‘Blue Boy The Great of Islington’,

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THE MEDAL JOINTLY WON BY CHAMPION TRIXIE’S DAIGHTERS ‘DORIS’ AND ‘TRIXIE II’ AT THE CRUFTS SHOW OF 1895. Images: ©2021 Original Medal in the Archives of The Harrison Weir Collection.

Early in 1894, she chose as a mate for her ‘Trixie’ the beautiful ‘Blue Boy The Great of Islington’, whose pedigree was largely based on a close doubling back on ‘Old Jumbo’, which she had clearly judged as the strength behind ‘Bootles’ the sire of her ‘Trixie’. This combination also brought into the mix, ‘Lady Bloo’ behind ‘Jumbo II’ and the foundation blue lines of ‘Mater’ which say behind the dam of ‘Blue Boy the Great’ through ‘Farnham Royal Silver’. It was an astute move, and from this breeding came an exceptionally even litter of quality, born March 18, 1894; containing as it did, the females ‘Holmwood Doris’ (NCC:1694) and ‘Holmwood Trixie II’ (NCC:1693); and the males ‘Holmwood Yorkshire Lad’ (NCC:1695); ‘Tovil Boy’ (CCR: v1) and ‘Birkdale Boy’ (NCC:1715). ‘Birkdale Boy’ was placed with Miss E. Southam, of Birkdale, Lancashire; ‘Tovil Boy’ became the property of Mrs C. Hill, of Tovil House, Maidstone.

‘Yorkshire Lad’ was retained by Miss Jay and successfully exhibited winning 2nd at Cleckheaton, 1st at Malton, 1st at Pickering, 3rd at Halifax, and 1st and Special at Woodstock in 1894. Miss Jay also retained both females, which were shown as a brace at the Crufts Show in 1894, winning the first in that class and the medal shown above, which bears the year and both their names. ‘Doris’ would ultimately prove herself to be invaluable, firstly as a brood queen, and as dam of the blue male ‘Holmwood Kerr’ (CCR: v2) by ‘Patrick Blue’ and the blue female ‘Holmwood Minnie’ (NCC:3055), by ‘Don Juan II; but additionally, as a successful show exhibit. Her son ‘Kerr’ in his time, would ultimately sire a fourth generation ‘Holmwood’ male, named ‘Lionel’. ‘Doris’ in the meantime went on to duplicate her dam’s success by taking out best cat in show at the Crystal Palace, cementing her breeder’s growing reputation! But more was yet to come.

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breeder’s growing reputation! But more was yet to come. In 1896, Miss Jay bred her foundation queen ‘Trixie’ to Mrs. C. Hill’s ‘Blue Ruin II’ and from this union, was born the blue female known as ‘Holmwood Mighty Atom’ (NCC:3040) a two time winner of best cat in show at the Crystal Palace and considered by many to be the best blue Persian bred to date. Miss Jay had successfully set the benchmark so high, notably with the conformation and presentation of her cats, that few could imagine ever matching it, or even getting close to it. ‘Holmwood Mighty Atom’ was one of those rare cats who was both top show cat and a brood queen. In due course, she gave birth to ‘Holmwood Lionel’ (CCR) born November 4, 1898; when bred to her half-sister’s son, ‘Holmwood Kerr’. This breeding doubled on Mis Jay’s foundation queen ‘Trixie’ while successfully bringing together, the lines of ‘Patrick Blue’, ‘Blue Boy the Great of Islington’ and ‘Blue Ruin II’ all into the one pedigree.

Miss Jay’s ‘Holmwood Lionel’ Later the property of Mrs. F. W. Western. Photo: ‘Our Cats’ Magazine, May 11, 1901. Image © 2021 The Harrison Weir Collection

“Holmwood Lionel’ was therefore in many respects the culmination of Miss Jay’s breeding career, a fourth generation ‘Holmwood’ of impeccable lineage, from a cattery with an unmatched show record for Blues. NATIONAL CAT CLUB AWARDS BY LOUIS WAIN Such intriguing and historically rare pieces such as these two pen and ink drawings by the famous cat caricaturist Louis Wain, who at the time was also Chairman of the Committee of the National Cat Club – are extremely notable, as they provide us One of two rare original Pen & Ink drawings by with a unique insight into how he supported all the Mr. Louis Wain, when Chairman of Committee of the ventures of the National Cat Club with available National Cat Club, for Award Presentations, in 1893. talents. Both of these two finely stylised drawings Images: ©2021 The Harrison Weir Collection appear to be generic images of the ever popular Blue Persians, and were both prepared for the express purpose of being presented to the winners of the highest honours at Historica, the twoThe largest All content © 2021 Felis Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc. shows held under the rules and auspices of the National Cat


A SIGNED DRAWING BY LOUIS WAIN, WON BY MISS JAY’S CHAMPION TRIXIE AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE, IN 1893.

appear to be generic images of the ever popular Blue Persians, and both were prepared for the express purpose of being presented to the winners of the highest honours at the two largest shows held under the rules and auspices of the National Cat Club in 1893. That they have survived to this day is, of itself somewhat miraculous! Both are duly signed by Mr. Wain, and it would seem likely that the coloured pencil presentation wording could also have been in Louis Wain’s own hand.

It is indeed fortunate this writing identifies the show and year at which they were presented, but also the names of both the cat’s owner and the name of the winning exhibit. Where someone else (probably the show secretary) has written the winning exhibits name in pencil under each portrait, this has significantly been crossed out to indicate that the images are not of the winning cats themselves. Both originals are now preserved in the Archives of The Harrison Weir Collection.

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The Harrison Weir Collection’s The Cat – Her Place in Society One of the not so obvious aims of The Harrison Weir Collection, is not only to preserve both the feline history of the ‘cat fancy’ and the contribution made to it by its founder Harrison Weir and all those who followed him; but to also record and preserve items of feline social history, in regard to the place and treatment of the domestic cat, in mankind’s world. This is very much a follow-on from the work written by Edith Carrington in 1896, in a little book entitled ‘THE CAT – Her Place in Society and Treatment’. In that book, illustrated by Harrison Weir; the writer examines the attitudes of mankind to the cat, both the good and the bad, and the changing attitudes and value placed on cats both in times past and during the reforming age of the Victorian era. It would be fair to say, that even after almost another 130 years, we still have a long way to go in appreciating the place of animals in what is perceived to be a human world, instead of a world occupied by a myriad of species all with the right to a happy life in a natural environment, prepared for them over millennia.

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recent finds… and treatment. Recent additions to the collection in this category over the past year have included the piece (bottom left opposite), which is a handcoloured copper-plate etching after a painting by Pieter Bruegel (c.1520-1569), published in Paris in 1770, in ‘Cabinet de Monsieur le Duc de Choiseul’ in which we see an orchestra and chorus composed of cats, in concert. Yet another is the cartoon below by the wellknown Georgian English caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson (1757-1827) from a series of drawings he published entitled ‘Rural Sports’. In this incidence he depicts the sport of placing a ‘cat in a bowl’ on a waterway, and then to watch and place bets, as it is carried off by the current! This one is dated 1811.

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CFA GC, NW. PINKPAWPAL VAYU Photo: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


FACTFILE Pet name:

‘POLAND’

Breed:

Persian

Colour:

Blue Tabby & White

Date of Birth: Sire:

March 1, 2019

GC NW Ericshaw First Kiss of Pinkpawpal

Dam: GC DW Pinkpawpal Hera DM Breeder: Pattama Weeranon/Chate Ruengruglikit Owners:

Pattama Weeranon/Chate Ruengruglikit

AWARDS & TITLES Highest Scoring Kitten, Terengganu, July 21, 2019. Highest Scoring Kitten, Thailand, July 28, 2019. Highest Scoring Kitten, Indonesia, August 4, 2019. 2nd Highest Scoring Kitten, Bangkok, Sept.15, 2019. Highest Scoring Kitten, Kentucky USA, Oct.5, 2019. 4th Highest Scoring Kitten, CFA Interntl, Oct, 12, 2019. Highest Scoring Kitten, Phoenix, AZ, Oct.19, 2019. 2nd Highest Scoring Cat, 1 show GC, Indonesia, Dec. 2019. CFA NW 2nd Best Kitten, International Division. 2019/20 CFA DW as a Kitten and Cat, 2019/20 Supreme Exhibit, Princess Cup, Bangkok, Feb. 2020

VAYU’S STORY As a breeder, life can certainly be a rollercoaster at times with a mix of both joy and disappointment. This tale of our journey, started on the night of the first day of March in 2019 when a blue tabby and white male was born. His father, was a gorgeous red tabby and white, bred by our Chinese friend Xiao Qingwen and campaigned for CFA National Winner award in 2017-2018 season. His mother, Hera, a homebred calico, was a CFA Divisional Winner in 2014-2015 season. Hera always delivered beautiful kittens, so we highly expected that a special litter was coming. A couple of misfortunes shattered our initial hopes; firstly there was only one kitten in this litter and secondly, the kitten was so tiny, almost hairless and weak. His limbs were long and looked unproportioned. At that point, his future was forecasted to stay at our home as a neutered pet. During the first two weeks after his birth were the most critical as we had to put alot of effort in to save his life, but he grew much stronger as time went by. When he fully opened his eyes, he looked like an alien with huge eyes. He loved to climb up and stared at humans with his innocent, big eyes. His hair was still growing sporadically. He was quick, so we named him “Vayu” meaning “God of Wind” following the theme of ideology at our cattery. All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


GC, NW ERICSHAW FIRST KISS OF PINKPAWPAL – Sire of GC, NW Pinkpawpal Vayu Bred by Xiao Qingwen and owned by Pattama Weeranon & Chate Ruengruglikit Photo: Courtesy of Amyworks and Pinkpawpal Cattery.

GC, DW PINKPAWPAL HERA DM – Dam of GC, NW Pinkpawpal Vayu. Bred and owned by Pattama Weeranon & Chate Ruengruglikit Photo: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘Vayu’ in stages of his kitten development… Photos this page courtesy Pinkpawpal Cattery.

In reality we always called him with his Thai nickname “Err” meaning “freak” in English. At two months old, Vayu was fully healthy. His coat was completely full and long. His limbs gradually looked proportional to his cobby body. Fortune was on his side and he was blessed with his continued development into a show quality kitten. The first CFA show in Southeast Asia in 2019-2020 season started on July 20-21, 2019, at Kuala Terengganu, in Terengganu State of Malaysia. This show was special because it was very first CFA show in this state. All foreign exhibitors had to transit at Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia and took a local short flight to Kuala Terengganu. Vayu was only 4 months old at that time but he had already developed into top quality kitten. Therefore, we decided to give him a try in the kitten class at this show and we also brought 2 cats to try their luck in the championship class. The quarantine process in Malaysia was always quick and cooperative. The venue was airconditioned indoor stadium, about half an hour drive from the hotel. At the end of the 2-day show, Vayu was the Highest Scoring Kitten. He won the Best Kitten from 6 out of 10 rings. For us, this is the first glimmer of hope that perhaps something bigger was indeed possible for Best Kitten under Donna Rothermel and Gary Veach. Vayu in the near future. All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


Highest Scoring Kitten at the Thailand Show, July 28, 2019. Left: with Pattinee Tangkawattanakul, Judge Chloe Chung, Pattama Weeranon, and Sunan Sowprasertsuk, President of CFCT, Thailand. Right: with Miss Aranya Biaodong. Photos this page courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery.

To further prove his quality, Vayu was entered into the local CFA show in Thailand on July 28, 2019. He was Supreme a second time, winning the Best Kitten from 5 out of 6 rings and became the Highest Scoring Kitten in a back-to-back show. We decided to put him in a more difficult contest a week later in Indonesia. It was always challenging for foreigners to compete with their local cats because of the dragging quarantine process at the airport. Vayu, together with Cassiopeia, his sister from the championship class arrived Indonesia on Thursday, 2 days before the show. Both stayed in the quarantine unit at Jakarta Soekarno Hatta International Airport for a night and were released on Friday morning. It took a whole day to bath, dry and groom them at the hotel. Then we had to maintain their conditions until the show day. The hard work proved fruitful however, as after 2 days of the show, both Vayu and Cassiopeia were the Highest Scoring Kitten and the Highest Scoring Cat in Championship, respectively.

‘Vayu’ winning Best Kitten at his first show under Allan Davies and Allan Raymond.

At this point, Vayu was the Highest Scoring Kitten from 3 shows consecutively. We had to think elaborately on the next move. We decided to enter him in the biggest show of the year, the CFA International Cat Show 2019 at Cleveland, Ohio.

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Vayu had been rested except for one local show in Bangkok, Thailand on September 15, 2019. He even hurt his eyes 3 days before the local show, but he still managed to finish as the 2nd Highest Scoring Kitten. One of our strategies to maximize their potential for the world show was to make Vayu and Cassiopeia get used to the temperature and humidity before the big show. We contacted our friend in Ohio, Susan MacArthur and asked her to enter our cats in the show at Louisville, Kentucky a week before the big show.

We were completely thrilled after the show when Vayu was the Highest Scoring Kitten in this show also. It was the best night after the show that all of us living in the hotel room could take a long, deserved rest until the next journey on the Monday. Photos: Clockwise from top left: Chate resting with Vayu during the journey. Cassiopeia and Vayu in carriers. Pattama resting with Vayu. Below: ‘Vayu’ victorious at the Kentucky Show.

The long journey to USA began in the early morning of October 4, 2019. We carried 2 cats along with a pile of cat essentials for staying for a month in USA. It was a long flight with 3 transits at Incheon (South Korea), JFK (NYC) and Atlanta, GA. We reached the final destination late at night on October 4, 2019. We had no time to bath both cats as we and our cats were so exhausted. After only a few hours of rest, we had to get up to groom them for the show on October 5, 2019. We knew both cats were still tired, but that the show must go on. All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


Vayu winning Best Kitten in Thailand under judge Pam DelaBar

On October 7, 2019, we all moved to the next destination, Cleveland, OH via Detroit, IL. The weather in Cleveland was so nice that Vayu and Cassiopeia looked ever so much livelier and happier than the time at our home in Thailand.

Pattama with Vayu at the CFA International Show in Cleveland, Ohio. Photos this page: Pinkpawpal Cattery

After bathing, drying and grooming them on Friday, one day before the biggest show of the year, we knew they were in excellent condition and ready for the big contest.

After 2 days of the CFA International Cat show, Cassiopeia was the Highest Scoring Cat in Championship of the Teal Show and finally got the Best in Show award!

Vayu was in the Purple Show and Cassiopeia was in the Teal Show. On Saturday Vayu was the Best of Breed in all rings and he was in the first final of the day that he was Best Kitten.

Vayu was the 4th Highest Scoring Kitten of Purple Show and just missed the final ceremony.

Then, a misfortune hit hard on Vayu as we missed the announcement calling Vayu for judging in a ring while Vayu was in one other final. The judge decided to put down Vayu’s number. When we found out, nothing could be changed. We cried and felt disappointed in ourselves, but we had to go on.

Vayu bagged Best Kitten rosettes from 3 rings and we were still very proud of him. At least he garnered so many NW points that he was now qualified for a National Winner award as a kitten. Two days after the show, we left Cleveland and drove to NYC. We stayed there one night and flew on to Phoenix, AZ to join the next show there on October 19, 2019.

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Four of Vayu’s Best Kitten wins. One with Judge Ellyn Honey at Phoenix, AZ, (top left); and three at the CFA International Show, in Cleveland, Ohio, October, 2019, with Judges, Wain Harding (above); and below: with Kenny Currle, and Brian Pearson. All photos this page: Pinkpawpal Cattery. All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


PINKPAWPAL VAYU with Pattama Weeranon at the CFA International Show, in Cleveland, Ohio. October 2019. Photo: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery. All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


Pattama Weeranon with Vayu at his last kitten show - the Mesquite Show in Dallas, Texas, October 26-27, 2019. Photo: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery.

After the show both Vayu and Cassiopeia became the Highest Scoring Kitten and the Highest Scoring Cat in Championship, respectively.

plan wisely because our Cassiopeia still needed more points to qualify for National Winner award in championship.

After a few days of rest, we flew again to Dallas, TX to join the next show in Mesquite, TX on October 26-27, 2019. This show was very critical for Vayu because it was the last show for him as the kitten.

In our opinion, Vayu was at his peak in condition while Cassiopeia was gradually losing her condition as a whole female. Vayu may defeat Cassiopeia if we entered them together.

He missed one final and lost a shot to be the Best Kitten of the International Division by 7 NW points. It was heart-breaking but we had to swallow it and be just happy with Vayu’s National Winner title at the end of the season. We took a long flight back to Thailand a few days later.

In the end, we entered both Vayu and Cassiopeia for the show in Indonesia on December 7-8, 2019. Vayu became one-show Grand Champion and 2nd Highest Scoring Cat in Championship at the end of the show. With this Grand Champion title, his mother Hera also received her own new title of Distinguished Merit.

After November 1, 2019, Vayu became adult and a cat in championship. We knew we should push him for his Grand Champion title. However, we had to plan wisely because our Cassiopeia still needed more

However, Vayu almost ruined Cassiopeia’s mission, because some judges made him Best of Breed, defeating Cassiopeia who was a points to qualifyAll for National Winner award in grandchampion, but finally Cassiopeia was still the content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc. championship. In our opinion, Vayu was at his peak in

Highest Scoring Cat in Championship in this show.


Vayu becomes a one-show Grand Champion at a show in Indonesia. Exhibited here by Chate and Pattama, and with judges, Allan Davies, Irina Kharchenko, Amanda Cheng, and Etsuko Hamayasu. Photos: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal Cattery.

Breed, defeating Cassiopeia who was a Grand Champion, but finally Cassiopeia was still the Highest Scoring Cat in Championship in this show. As a result, we decided to rest Vayu indefinitely for the 2019-2020 season for the benefit of Cassiopeia, who still needed many more NW points at that time.

spreading, all local exhibitors were very excited. Everyone aimed for the same award, Princess Bajrakitiyabha Narendiradebyavati’s Cup. The Highest Scoring Kitten and Cat in Championship would be crowned with the Princess’s cups. Every local breeder would bring their best cat in their cattery to compete at this show.

When the news of CFA show at Kasetsart University on February 8, 2020 in Bangkok was spreading, all local exhibitors were very excited.

Undoubtedly, Vayu was in the best condition, so he was awoken from his retirement to compete in this show as a cat in championship. He didn’t All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison disappoint Weir Collectionus& as Thehe CFA Foundation, won by a mileInc.to possess the most prestigious award in Thailand.


GC, NW PINKPAWPAL VAYU, victorious, with the Princess Bajrakitiyabha Narendiradebyavati’s Cup. Photos on this page: Courtesy of Pinkpawpal cattery

this show as a cat in championship. He didn’t disappoint us as he won by a country mile to possess the most prestigious award in Thailand. At the end of 2019-2020 season, Vayu received 2 CFA Divisional Awards as Kitten and also Cat in Championship, and National Winner as 2nd Best Kitten of the International Division. Vayu will always be remembered as one of our finest Bi-color Persians bred at Pinkpawpal and we were so proud to be his breeders. Whatever disappointments we may encounter in competitions, we always remain ready to let it go and put up a good fight for the best, so that we have no regrets in giving it a try!

Vayu kittens – ‘Mulin’ and ‘Munich’

Vayu kittens – ‘Cochi’ and ‘Corico’

Vayu kittens – ‘Series’, ‘Season’ and ‘Seabar’ (front)

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‘PUSS’ by Harrison Weir, Pencil on Paper, heightened with white. © from an original drawing held in The Harrison Weir Collection Backgrounds © www. gographic.com

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BY

JOHN G. SMITHSON

THE VARIED USES AND REPRESENTATIONS OF THE ANIMAL ART OF HARRISON WILLIAM WEIR

For cat fanciers, the name Harrison Weir, is first and usually foremost recognised in his pivotal role as the ‘father of the Cat Fancy’ and as the key player behind the first Crystal Palace Cat Show. But in truth, in England at the time, he was better known for his remarkable career as animal illustrator, and for his work in promoting animal rights. As an animal illustrator he almost had no equal, and this was largely because of his widely acclaimed natural history expertise and his ever keen and skillful powers of observation. He was known in cat circles to be a champion of the good old English domestic tabby, which is why the drawing opposite is particularly significant from a historical point of view. It is not of course his earliest illustration of a cat, but it was the one most widely used between 1862 when he created it, and well past the point when he had helped to establish cat shows as a societal standard exposition. But like many of his drawings, it was adapted and reproduced in numerous other forms and a wide array of publications and is today, featured on the cover of this magazine in its original form.

A carte de viste portrait of Harrison Weir by Elliott & Fry © From an original in The Harrison Weir Collection

In this article, we will therefore look at a couple of examples of the adaptation and re-use of his images, and some of his other illustrations of cats preserved for posterity.

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A Brown Tortie Tabby English domestic cat lapping milk spilled from the pail. A small segment from a watercolour by Harrison Weir dated 1846. Image: © from an original painting held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

The earliest image of a cat by Harrison Weir that has been found to date, is the above small bottom corner segment of an outstanding watercolour by Harrison Weir, where the subject was the inside of a large Sussex barn, showing cattle with their feed and in the right-hand corner a brown tortie tabby English domestic cat crouched down on the cobbles, licking up milk spilt from the pail holding the morning takings from the cows. How appropriate it is, that on this occasion we see a glimpse into his familiarity with the English domestic cat of which he was clearly so fond, even at this early stage in his artistic career. Weir has used the pail to sign his name and date his work. At the time he was only 22 years old! The painting is masterful, and even now at 175 years old, it is as vibrant in colour now as it was when it was first painted. It is now held in the archives of The Harrison Weir Collection.

On the opposite page, we finally see the pencil drawing from our own cover page, adapted and first used in this cover page from the ‘Band of Hope Review’. The background has been adapted so that the step and cobbles on the original concept drawing, and replaced with a window ledge, and cross-hatched leading of the window behind. The signature and date remain as 1862, but the actual date of publication was September 1st, 1865.

concept

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‘Puss’ by Harrison Weir, adapted with a different background. Cover Page illustration from ‘The Band of Hope Review’, September 1, 1865. Image: © From a period original print held in The Harrison Weir Collection

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘Puss’ by Harrison Weir, as it appeared in colour on the hardbound Annual of ‘The Band of Hope Review’ Published by S.W. Partridge, The Strand, London, in 1865. Image © From the original copy held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


This version of ‘Pussy’ was published at least another 3 times. In ‘The Children’s Friend’ as ‘Pussy’s Lament’ (1864); Then in ‘My Pets Picture Book’ as ‘Our Bob’ in 1873; and then in ‘Our Dumb Companions’ as ‘Pretty Pussy’ in 1880. Image © From and original book plate in The Harrison Weir Collection.

When the publishers S.W. Partridge produced in the November 1864 edition of ‘The their Annual collection of ‘The Band of Hope Children’s Friend’ with the caption ‘Pussy’s Review’ editions for 1865, the cover image Lament’. In a book published circa 1873 chosen was a coloured version of the September entitled ‘My Pets Picture Book’ it appeared edition illustration, shown opposite. But another with the caption ‘Our Bob’; and then in ‘Our etching, that shown above, was to appear first, Dumb Companions’ in 1880’ as ‘Pretty Pussy’. inA letter from Darwin to Tegetmeier dated as In this letter he informs Tegetmeier that Weir early as March 15th 1856, includes a statement had already supplied Runts to a dealer in from Darwin that he had in fact visited Harrison London that were due to be sold on the Weir at his home day© before, to Tuesday, Tegetmeier All the content 2021 Felis presumably Historica, The Harrison Weir Collectionso& he The asks CFA Foundation, Inc. to purchase a enquire about obtaining additional bloodstock. pair, or at least one for a proposed fee range


An image named November and December by Harrison Weir, included in the London Almanack for 1862. Image © From a original Almanack coloured plate held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

During the 1850’s and 1860’s many of Weir’s images appeared in Children’s books, on exception was the above image that was published in the London Almanack for 1862, which featured many different scenes by various artists. On this occasion he chose to show domestic pets, both cats and dogs, and the coloured plate was simply named November and December, as it was the last of six coloured plates in this publicly available wall calendar. He nevertheless still took up as many opportunities as came to him to promote the better welfare of cats in general, one of the earliest

earliest being the book plate of four domestic cats in front of a hearth, (above left opposite) published in 1851, in a little book entitled ‘Domestic Pets’ by Mrs. Loudon. To the right of that is one book plate from an 1853 publication entitled ‘Tales from Catland’, known to be a book that Queen Victoria purchased as a Christmas gift for one of her ladies in waiting. Bottom left opposite is the cover page from Miss Corner’sa children’s play booklet, based on the story of ‘Puss in Boots’. Bottom right is an tabby English domestic cat published in Frederica Graham’s ‘Favourite Animals’ (1857).

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


DARWIN AT WORK IN HIS GREENHOUSE The Illustrated London News, Dec. 10, 1887. Image courtesy of The Harrison Weir Collection

The images on these pages date mostly from 1865 with only those from ‘Our Four-Footed Friends’ dating from 1867, both the book cover and the black and white illustrations. The above coloured book plates are taken from a Harrison Weir illustrated children’s book on the story of the Three White Kittens that lost their mittens! Coloured printing was still it its infancy, but alternate techniques were being experimented with by publishers who were introudi

more vibrancy whenever they could. This most apparent in the story of the ‘Three White Kittens’. On the opposite page, the first illustration is from a little known work entitled ‘Pictures of Animals and Birds’ (1865) and so we have chosen this image of a mother cat and kittens. The remaining images are from Mary Howitt’s ‘Our Four-Footed Friends’ showing a cat raising rats and kittens, and sharing food with birds.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


Illustrations by Harrison Weir for ‘THE CATS TEA PARTY’ (1871) Images: © The Harrison Weir Collection.

The year 1871 was an important one for cats. Not only did it herald the beginning of cat shows, but it also heralded a revitalised interest in cat illustrations. The above illustrations are from the story of ‘The Cat’s Tea Party’ which was illustrated by Harrison Weir, and published in multiple formats, some in hardback with a full section devoted to the story and its illustrations, and others, in a less expensive soft covered option

option. Then, between 1871 and the early 1880’s, a plethora of children’s books began featuring images of cats in various situations… the examples opposite (all by Weir) being taken from ‘The Children’s Friend (1871), a cat ringing a bell; The Infant’s Magazine (1873), a mother cat with kittens; ‘The Weekly Welcome’ (1878), a cat with kitten and duckling; and ‘Little Folks’ (1880), a cat with kitten and squirrels.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


THE PERSIAN CAT – Painted by Harrison Weir for ‘Pets of the family’ Published in ‘Harrison Weir’s Picture of Birds and Other Family Pets’ (1877)

Image: © Book plate held in The Harrison Weir Collection

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CAT AND KITTENS – Painted by Harrison Weir for ‘Frank and his pets’ Published in ‘Harrison Weir’s Picture of Birds and Other Family Pets’ (1877)

Image: © Book plate held in The Harrison Weir Collection

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‘The Dog that ran away with the brushes’ – drawn by Harrison Weir. Published in ‘Our Dumb Companions’ (1863) by Rev. T. Jackson. Image: © Book plate image held in The Harrison Weir Collection

ANOTHER VARIATION ON A THEME Another ‘variation’ subject, which spanned a period not less than 39 years was this drawing of a Newfoundland dog look-alike, that first appeared in ‘Our Dumb Companions’ a book by the Rev. T. Jackson, in 1863. The next variation of

Was published in ‘Harper’s Weekly’ in New York on March 9, 1867. A third full page variation then appeared in June edition of ‘The Animal World’ in 1902. Harrison Weir, also painted it again that year, either beforehand, or afterward.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘A DOGS HEAD’ – Drawn by Harrison Weir. Illustrating an article on Domestic Dogs Published in ‘Harper’s Weekly’ New York, on March 9, 1867 Image © Scanned from an original period newspaper, held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


‘The Queen’s favourite’. Published in ‘The Animal World’, June 1902. Was this engraving inspired by the painting opposite? Or the other way round? Image © Scanned from an original book print, held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

All content © 2021 Felis Historica, The Harrison Weir Collection & The CFA Foundation, Inc.


A rare original signed watercolour by Harrison Weir dated 1902, at age 78. Clearly styled as a match for the Illustration published in ‘The Animal World’ in June of 1902. Image © Scanned from the original painting, held in The Harrison Weir Collection.

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OUR FIRST YEAR

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COMING IN A FUTURE ISSUE… HISTORIC CATS & CAT FANCIERS THE BLUE- EYED WANDERER (BEW Persian) CHAMPION BONHAKI (Silver Tabby Manx) TOPICAL FEATURE ARTICLES ICONS OF THE CAT FANCY (Nikki Horner) CAT ART GOTTFRIED MIND – ‘The Raphael of Cats’

GENETICS A NEW ARTICLE IN THE SERIES BY DR. LYONS CAT BREEDS THE BENGAL

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