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A L S O M A R I A D U TO I T R E L E A S E S N E W C D | P E AC E Q U A R T E T T R U S T R E C O G N I S E S C P Y O M U S I C I A N S | S U S TA I N I N G YO U R O R C H E S T R A | N E W Y E A R ' S E V E W I T H L I R A | VO LU N T E E R S N E E D E D | C O N C E R T FO R O N E

I S S U E

Sergei Nakariakov The man with the golden trumpet

Martin Panteleev His life is ďŹ lled with classical music

8th Cape Town International Summer Music Festival The

New Year’s Eve with Lira A night with a songbird

100 YEARS

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CPO HISTORY

TA K E N OT E

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F E AT U R E : S E R G E I NAKARIAKOV

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CONCERT FO R O N E

Welcome The year 2014 marks a significant milestone for the CPO. In February, Cape Town becomes the first city on the continent of Africa to boast a symphony orchestra for a full century. As you can imagine, this calls for a year-long celebration! And we are very proud to offer you some special celebratory concerts in the year. We are also publishing a book to mark this momentous event in Cape Town’s history.

the arts, and it says much about the quality of our lives. The plea for support to education and social welfare is important, but our cause, too.

There have been many highlights over the past hundred years and I cannot imagine how culturally poor Cape Town would have been without a proud symphonic tradition. However, it has not been a smooth or easy road and keeping an orchestra alive in the future is going to be a major challenge. We will need your support like never before.

There are always good reasons not to give. The argument that we are elitist is no longer valid. Classical music can be for everybody and is used for social change in many parts of the world. The CPO’s success in the townships with its teaching projects and youth orchestras, has changed many disadvantaged young musicians' lives, especially in the past decade.

The lack of financial support from the City of Cape Town is a shame and rare for a worldclass city. In our centenary year, we will have to pull out all the stops to keep the CPO alive and sustainable. Under the guidance of Ton Vosloo (a former orchestra chairman and currently the chairman of the Cape Philharmonic Endowment Trust) and with help of board members of the CPO, we are trying to secure the future of the orchestra by approaching a hundred companies to each make an important financial contribution to the musical future of the city.

You might feel there are too many other important charities and causes. Human beings cannot be denied of their creativity. That is one of the most meaningful purposes of life on Earth. In a modern world where digital technology and instant electronically generated entertainment rule, live music is one of the things that make us more human.

But why should you, the music lovers of Cape Town, donate to the CPO? There are so many good reasons: music is the most uplifting of

PUBLIC & CORPORATE FUNDERS

A civilisation is judged on a nation’s ability to understand and incorporate arts and culture in daily life. To quote a former president: “We simply cannot be a nation of taps and houses only.”

Let’s make 2014 a musical year to remember.

MARTIN PA N T E L E E V

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GIVE & GAIN

CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF LOUIS HEYNEMAN louis@cpo.org.za MANAGING EDITOR SHIRLEY DE KOCK GUELLER shirley@gueller.com EDITORIAL AND CREATIVE TEAM

BOOKINGS

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR DAVE STRAUSS dave@purepublishing.co.za DESIGNER TESS GREEN tess@purepublishing.co.za PRODUCTION MANAGER MARIANNE BURKE marianne@purepublishing.co.za

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR ANDREW BURKE andrew@purepublishing.co.za

DISTRIBUTION Concerto is distributed by the CPO biannually and is available on request (email info@cpo.org.za) or online at www.cpo.org.za

EDITOR MICHELLE MARAIS michelle@purepublishing.co.za

Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is strictly prohibited.

Concerto is designed and published by PURE PUBLISHING & DESIGN A full service creative agency which offer publishing, design, branding, web design and advertising. For business enquiries, visit www.purepublishing.co.za, call (021) 424 6918 or email hello@purepublishing.co.za All information was correct at the time of going to press, but subject to change.

Louis Heyneman CHIEF EXECUTIVE, CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

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CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Take Note

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The last issue of Concerto got a host of congratulatory letters, and a couple from people who didn’t like the turquoise ink, because it was illegible. In case it worried you, please know that that particular colour won’t be used again and we are sure you will find the contents of this issue clean and clear. We want your comments, good or bad, because we want to know what you think about Concerto, the CPO and even the state of funding for classical music in South Africa. Keep the letters

coming … there’ll be a prize for the best to reach us by the end of March. In the meantime, here’s what people on Facebook thought about the Cirque de la Symphonie:

“Doen dit asseblief weer en weer en weer...” “It is spectacular!” “Unbelievable” “Awesome” “A SENSATIONAL EVENING! Now that’s entertainment!”

AND THIS ONE FROM THOMAS RAJNA: “I have just come home after attending the Cirque de la Symphonie performance and I felt I had to tell you that we were entranced, transported and uplifted by the beauty and the excitement of the show. The impeccable playing of the CPO enhanced the worldclass acrobatic and aerial acts and in turn these wonderfully choreographed spectacles gave the music a strange new glow. The two entities worked in perfect synchrony and as it were nurtured each other. It was a delightful and utterly new experience.

“We are still in the afterglow of that incredible fusion of music and the supreme feats of superbly trained bodies. The essence of body and soul what more can one wish for?” - thoughts on the cirque de la symphonie You and the orchestra continue against all odds to present lovely and memorable concerts to our community. But even in all the excellence provided by you, tonight’s performance stands out as something very special.

The capacity audience’s response certainly expressed this feeling.” Stand a chance to win a prize by sharing your opinion. Please email us at info.cpo.org.za

Another new CPO recording MARIA DU TOIT RECORDS ALL FOUR SPOHR CLARINET CONCERTI FOR WELL-KNOWN DUTCH LABEL Having musical rapport is one thing; having collegiate rapport another. Add to that the personal intimacy that comes from an engaged couple and you will hear that the four Clarinet Concertos by Louis Spohr, recorded by Maria du Toit and maestro ArjanTien with the CPO are in a league of their own. This double CD album on the Brilliant Classics label is the CPO’s latest edition and is due in December 2013. Arjan and Maria have played together often since their first collaboration in 2011, when they played Weber’s second clarinet concerto together in Bloemfontein. Since then, they have toured The Netherlands with the Netherlands Student Chamber Orchestra and the Royal Conservatoire Orchestra of the Hague, and they have also performed together with the CPO and KZNPO. Both have enormous admiration for each other’s abilities, so it

wasn’t a question of whether to make a recording but rather of what repertoire. Spohr came to mind at once. “These concerti are technically very demanding, and I knew Maria could do them. There is a deeply romantic depth to them that Maria brings out beautifully,” says Arjan. The first two were written around 1810, the second two a decade later. Arjan and Maria have the same approach to music, kindred spirits when it comes to instinctively knowing how they wanted to approach the recordings. Both came up with the same name, independently, when it came to choosing a music producer: Brandon Phillips. For Maria, Brandon was the obvious choice. “As principal bassoonist in the CPO, he understands the needs of a wind player. Spohr, being a violinist, wrote the concerti as if they were intended for the violin, with not much consideration for breathing,” she says. “In fact, the dedicatee of

the first concerto, J.S. Hermstedt, added another eight keys to the clarinet, expanding the range of the instrument, just to be able to play it. Brandon also knows the CPO intimately, as a player and as a conductor. He was able to give us feedback at all times, and helped enormously. He had to study the scores and even played a movement of one of the concerti in a schools’ concert to get the feel.” Maria was, of course, the soloist. Once the CD was recorded here by Marek Pinski, it went to Switzerland for mastering. The result was worth all the effort according to Pieter van Winkel, artistic executive of Brilliant Classics, who said, when the recordings arrived on his desk: “I listened to the masters

of the Spohr Clarinet concerti; great music, wonderfully played, congratulations.” Arjan approached the CPO a year ago, and Louis Heyneman was quick to commit the orchestra. This double CD takes the CPO’s collection of CDs up to six over the last 12 years, excluding several video recordings for television broadcast. Artscape was also generous in its sponsorship, and Brilliant Classics bought into the project at once. The recordings took four days – one per concerto – and half a day to make the corrections, that in itself is remarkable. Maria went through 20 reeds but the result is worthwhile, she says.

SPOHR Complete Clarinet Concertos The release date is December 2013 and it will be available from Dynamite Music at all City Hall and Artscape Concerts. 03


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Centenary 1914 – JUL/AUG

1924

1925

1935

1939 – 1945

The orchestra embarks on its first national tour

The 10th anniversary is celebrated with a music festival; 50 recordings are made for the Edison Bell Gramophone Company; Leslie Heward becomes orchestra director

The orchestra plays at Buckingham Palace during the British Exhibition

21st birthday celebrations last a fortnight

Troop concerts increase the orchestra’s popularity; celebrity artists include Noel Coward

PHOTOGRAPH: WWW.FOTOSEARCH.COM

1914 – FEB 28 The Cape Town Municipal Orchestra, under the direction of Theo Wendt, gives its inaugural concert with 14 members

CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Celebrating a Century of Orchestral Music Arguably one of the most versatile and active orchestras on the African continent, Cape Town’s orchestra proudly celebrates 100 years of symphonic music in 2014 WORDS SHIRLEY DE KOCK - GUELLER

DAVID TIDBOALD REHEARSES THE ORCHESTRA IN THE EARLY SIXTIES

1975

1978

1979

1984

1986

1988

1997

Vladimir Ashekenazy’s performance causes national interest

First television appearance by the CTSO

The CTSO Development Committee is formed to raise sponsorships

First board formed, under the chairmanship of Alderman David Bloomberg

The CTSO is privatized as a Section 21 company

The CTSO undertakes a 75th anniversary of the Taiwan; outreach and education concerts become an important facet of operations

The CTSO and the CAPAB Orchestra merge to form the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra with 85 musicians. Bernhard Gueller is appointed principal conductor

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1947

1950

1960

1962

1969

1973

1974

The orchestra plays during the Royal Visit; Enrique Jorda becomes orchestra director; the orchestra’s complement is 56

Sir Thomas Beecham conducts the orchestra

David Tidboald becomes orchestra director

Igor Stravinsky conducts the orchestra

The orchestra is renamed the Cape Town Symphony Orchestra (CTSO) and enlarged to 72

The complement is now 80; the CT Symphony Choir formed

The Diamond Jubilee year welcomes visits by Geza Anda and Ferdinand Leitner.

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hey paid one shilling (two and sixpence for a reserved seat in the balcony, bays or front area), those 1 000 plus people including Jan Smuts who attended the very first concert of the Cape Town Municipal Orchestra 100 years ago on Saturday, 28 February 1914.

In those days, concerts began at 8.15 and the programmes were far more eclectic: that first concert began with the Overture to 'Die Meistersinger' by Wagner, and ended with a march, 'Lorraine', by L Ganne. In between, there was Schubert’s 'Unfinished Symphony', a 'Welsh Rhapsody' by E German, the overture to 'The Merry Wives of Windsor' by Nicolai, two movements from Grieg’s Lyric Suite, 'Praeludium' by Järnefelt, 'Valse Triste' by Sibelius, two hungarian dances by Brahms, a selection from 'The Arcadians' by Monkton and Talbot, and a waltz by Waldteufel. Theo Wendt was on the podium, and he stayed there for 10 years, until his salary was arbitrarily cut by 20 per cent by the city council. The newspaper advertisement for the concert was squashed between an advertisement for electro-vibro face and head massages at the Opera House Toilet Club in Darling Street and one for a demonstration of the latest gas stoves. It was an auspicious time – two years before the South African College of Music had opened, with WH Bell as the first head. Some months later, the orchestra went on its first tour of the Union of South Africa. That same year, Paderewski came to town and performed with some players of the Philharmonia Society – Paderewski’s fellow countryman Penderecki came to Cape Town in 2007 to perform with the CTMO’s successor, the Cape Philharmonic. The cost that first year for a conductor, six violinists including the leader – Ellie Marx – one viola, two celli, one bass, two clarinets, one oboe, one bassoon, two trumpets, one trombone and one drum was less than 5 000 pounds, including 500 pounds for the conductor, a far cry from the 50 000 pounds 50 years on and today’s annual budget for 47 full-time musicians and many more ad hoc players of more than R20 million. Some things, however, don’t change.

Then, as now, the orchestra had four days of rehearsal for the first concert, but one isn’t sure how many hours it rehearsed a day. The municipal orchestra gave two concerts a week, on Thursday and Sunday in the City Hall, and numerous others on the Pier, at the new Sea Point Pavilion and other outdoor venues. There were sacred concerts, popular concerts, children’s concerts, concerts devoted to composers, a Plebiscite concert where the audience was allowed to choose the music, afternoon tea concerts. Later came the lunch-hour concerts in the United Tobacco factory and the railway workshops. Riding high on its reception in the city – 70 000 people heard the first 80 concerts and one drew a South African record of 7 000 people – the orchestra took off on its first national tour, just as the war clouds began to loom in Europe. War aside, the tour got the orchestra a national reputation. As overseas soloists dried up during the war, so local musicians like Adolph Hallis got their chance to shine. The next decades were to see fights in the Council about salaries and costs to the city, arguments that would continue until the 1980s when David Bloomberg suggested that the renamed Cape Town Symphony Orchestra be privatised and that the council would fund it for just another 10 years, a decision that was to prove wise. With the changing political landscape, no city council would fully fund an orchestra when the realities of life for so many were basic food, clothing and housing. Sadly, the city for whom the orchestra is an internationally recognised cultural icon, has given very little over the past 15 years to its jewel.

“One thing is for sure: no matter the name, orchestral music has been around 100 years and it is here to stay” Cape Town by merging the CTSO and the CAPAB Orchestra. The first music festival was held to mark the 10th anniversary, and the first recordings were made soon after by Bell-Edison. After Wendt’s departure, Leslie Heward was appointed and the next year, 1925, he took the Springbok musicians on their first tour to the UK. Heward was succeeded by William Pickerill in 1927 who left the orchestra 20 years later to Enrique Jorda. In 1947, just before Jorda arrived, Albert Coates was on the podium for the concerts during the Royal Visit; subscribers now numbered about 1 000; the end of 1948 saw a waiting list. The orchestra in Cape Town has always been a portent of things to come, and many of the greatest musicians came to the city on their way up. Others came at the peak of their powers, and some names of note to walk into the gracious Edwardian City Hall are Jascha Heifitz, Sir Henry Wood, Noel Coward, Richard Tauber, Claudio Arrau, Julius Katchen, Yehudi Menuhin, Pierre Fournier, Charles Mackerras, Gina Bachauer, Henryk Szerying, the Suk Trio, Alicia de Larrocha and, in 1962, Igor Stravinsky. Alfred Brendel’s fee in 1969 was a mere R800. South Africans who made their mark included Lionel Bowman, Elsie Hall and Cecilia Wessels, Laura Searle, Yonty Solomon and Helena van Heerden.

Times were often tough, financially. The first danger came about 10 years after the orchestra was formed and a campaign was started to save it, a foreboding of the 1996/7 campaign to save orchestral music for

After David Tidboald and Derek Hudson were orchestral directors, the appointment of businessman and amateur conductor Benito Moni in 1971 split the role and more and more guest conductors came. Carlo Zecchi was one whose impact was enormous, along with Charles du Toit,

Hugo Rignold, Louis Fremaux and Enrique Garcia Asensio. The introduction of guest conductors saw attendances soar, doubling in fact. More internationally renowned conductors and soloists came, including Vladimir Ashkenazy, Erich Bergel and Nina Beilina. Omri Hadari was music director at the time of the CTSO’s 75th anniversary, which was marked in part by a tour of Taiwan, conducted by David de Villiers, with soloists Steven de Groote and François du Toit. The next international tour was to take place in 2000, when the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of principal conductor Bernhard Gueller went to the International Festival of Music in the Canary Islands. The last international tour was in 2011 when Martin Panteleev, soon to be appointed music director of the CPO, took that orchestra on a tour of 18 east coast cities in America. The orchestras have made a tremendous contribution in setting up Cape Town as an international tourism hub. They have also taken music education and skills transfer seriously. The first outreach began under the CTSO, leading to the CPO’s huge outreach projects which reach thousands of people a year, from teaching in the townships, to concerts is under-privileged communities, to the CP Youth Orchestra and Youth Wind Ensemble, which also give concerts all over the Western Cape. One thing is for sure: no matter the name, orchestral music has been around 100 years and it is here to stay. With thanks to Eric Rosenthal's Fifty years of the Cape Town Orchestra (Howard Timmins).

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT CARLO ZECCHI ; HUGH MASEKELA ; TONY GROGAN , CAPE TIMES 1996

2000

2002

2004

2009

2011

The CTPO participates in the 16th International Festival of Music in the Canary Islands; financial pressures cause the CTPO to close and the Cape Philharmonic, with a smaller ensemble, is born

The Cape Philharmonic Youth Orchestra and Youth Wind Ensemble are formed

The CPO widens its musical scope and performs for the first time with artists like Hugh Masekela and Yvonne Chaka Chaka

The first Len van Zyl Conductors’ competition is held. It is won by Brandon Phillips

The CPO tours 18 cities on the east coast of America

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Feature

Sensational, that’s one word to sum up the extraordinary trumpeter Sergei Nakariakov. Breaking the boundaries of trumpet playing, the young Russian will be dazzling Cape Town audiences for one night only.

The

Paganini trumpet of the


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Feature

“His repertoire includes transcriptions for the trumpet and flügelhorn that nobody thought could be played on the instruments”

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ergei Nakariakov has broken through more than a few of the perceived boundaries framing the world of the trumpet in classical music. Dubbed “The Paganini of the trumpet”, the young Russian has developed a unique musical voice, which is much more than a vehicle for astonishing virtuosity. And now, the wunderkind has been signed and sealed to deliver just one concert in South Africa, with the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra. Still in his thirties, Nakariakov came serendipitously to the instrument. A spinal injury when he was six put paid to the piano as his first choice and he was playing with orchestras in the major Soviet concert halls from the age of 10. The family moved to Israel and soon after international recognition came – at the Ivo Pogorelich Festival in Bad Wörishofen and with the Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra at the Salzburg Festival, both in 1991. Prizes soon followed, and invitations to play around the world from the Hollywood Bowl, to the Lincoln Center, the Royal Festival Hall and the Royal Albert Hall. The astonishing trumpeter whose playing is as gloriously songful as it is flamboyant will perform ‘Arutunyan Trumpet Concerto’, a gripping, virtuosic piece with an Armenian touch, in the International Summer Classical Music Festival on 6 February at the Cape Town City Hall.

at Computicket on www.computicket.co.za or Artscape Dial-a-Seat on (021) 421 7695

PHOTOGRAPHER: THIERRY COHEN

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Strong complimentary words have dripped off the lips of critics and concertgoers since this smooth trumpeter glided onto the world’s stages which included “the Caruso of the trumpet” and the usual “unique”, “amazing” and more. Thanks to his “svelte”, “sweet” tone combined with “ jaw-dropping technical fireworks”, his repertoire includes transcriptions for the trumpet that nobody thought could be played on the instrument. His recordings, including trumpet and flügelhorn transcriptions of violin and cello concerti, have made him the world’s first superstar of the trumpet and the CPO can’t be more proud to host him for this once-in-a-lifetime performance. Sergei Nakariakov will perform in the International Classic Summer Music Festival on Thursday, 6 February at Cape Town City Hall. 07


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Concert for One THE ORCHESTRA // PART 1

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Concert for One CONSISTING OF AN ENSEMBLE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, AN ORCHESTRA IS DIVIDED IN FOUR SECTIONS – STRINGS, WOODWIND, BRASS AND PERCUSSION – AND HAS A GENERAL STANDARD SEATING ARRANGEMENT. THE PERFORMERS SIT IN A SEMICIRCLE FACING A CONDUCTOR, WITH THE STRINGS RIGHT IN FRONT, THE WOODWINDS IN THE MIDDLE BEHIND THE STRINGS, FOLLOWED BY THE BRASS SECTION AND THE PERCUSSION RIGHT AT THE EDGE OF THE SEMICIRCLE. IN PART 1 OF THIS TWO-PART FEATURE, WE WILL TAKE A CLOSER LOOK AT THE INSTRUMENTS FEATURED IN THE STRINGS, PERCUSSION AND WOODWIND SECTIONS.

CONDUCTOR Martin Panteleev, Principal Guest Conductor Since a conductor’s role is to interpret the music beyond the notes on the paper and ensure that everyone comes in on time, only a taut and well-oiled ensemble experienced in playing together can generally do without one.

Strings are usually made of steel (you may still find gut strings on the violin) and as with all stringed instruments, rosin is used to make the strings vibrate. The bass is also often used as continuo in baroque music.

PERCUSSION BATON Thin, tapered, anchored in cork and made of light wood, carbon fibre or, in the old days, ivory, the baton is something a conductor can choose to use. For smaller orchestras, some conductors find the hands more direct. Batons are there to help the conductor indicate the tempi or cue the musicians and many a time they have been used to chastise a late entry. Some conductors have their own specifications, but few batons are longer than 60 cm.

STRINGS VIOLINS Patrick Goodwin, Associate Concertmaster Michelle Williams, Principal Second Violin With (usually) four strings, tuned in perfect fifths or five tones between each string, the violin is the highest pitched of the string instruments. It’s made of wood, perhaps four different kinds, and some violins are extremely valuable. There are a couple of wonderful luthiers in Cape Town who make and repair violins. In addition, there are specialists who make the bows of horse hair. The first and second violins are two individual sections in the orchestra and each plays a different part in the score. VIOLA Paula Fourie, Principal Viola The butt of many jokes, the viola is actually the heart of the orchestra. It is the middle voice, tuned lower than the violin and an octave higher than the cello. Because it is larger than a violin, the violist requires different fingerings because the notes are spread further down the fingerboard. Strings are a little less responsive, which means the bowing technique is different, requiring a heavier bow as well. CELLO Kristiyan Chernev, Principal Cello The cello was derived from other smaller bowed instruments such as the viola da gamba in the 16th century and 200 years later it had replaced them. The cello's sound is said to be closest to the human voice, and it’s certainly one of the closest instruments to its owner when it travels. Airlines have always demanded that cellists buy a second seat for their instruments. DOUBLE BASS Christian de Haan, Principal Double Bass The largest of the stringed instruments, the double bass is as equally at home on the classical concert platform as in a jazz concert, where the strings may be plucked (pizzicato). About 1.8 metres from scroll to endpin, its size means that the bass player needs to stand or sit on a high stool, with the instrument against the body. Its very size means it goes in the hold when travelling by plane.

TIMPANI Christoph Müller, Principal Timpanist Power as well as musicality is what’s needed to play timpani. Also known as kettledrums, a standard set is usually four, each measuring from 58 to 81 cm. Piccolo timpani, measuring 51 cm, are sometimes required, as well. Kettledrums date back to the Hebrews, and there’s a large one in Bali over 2 000 years old. Lully was probably the first to introduce them into the orchestra, but it was Beethoven who not only revolutionized the symphony but the use of timpani in the symphony, and his Violin Concerto opens with four solo timpani strokes. PERCUSSION Eugene Trofimczyk, Principal Percussion The player of the percussion probably has the most fun, since he/she has a choice of dozens of instruments to shake, scrape, strike or even play, depending on what the composer demands. Percussion instruments add rhythm, and they also add harmony (marimba, wind chimes, for instance). Think castanets, handbells, glass harp along with the bass drum and tam-tam and you will see the variety of instruments. Shotguns are among today’s new percussion, along with air-raid sirens and the more conventional electronic sounds or wind machines. Concerti have been written for many of them, from tabla to marimba and more.

WOODWIND FLUTE Gabriele von Dürckheim, Principal Flute Bridget Wilson, Principal Piccolo The flute is the only wind instrument where the mouth is not in direct contact. The flautist blows across the holes to create the high sound so loved. Flutes are the earliest known instrument, the voice aside, and today’s concert flute comes down from the pan flute, where the length of the tubes governed the pitch. Once made of mammoth tusk, bone or even bamboo, modern flutes are made of metal like silver and gold. The flute is hard to play well because it is transverse and requires a lot of air and deeper breathing. The piccolo has most of the same fingerings as its larger sibling, but the sound it produces is an octave higher than written making it the highest instrument you hear in a symphony.

when, in his lonely old days in the film Amadeus, he tells us, a little enviously, of the high soaring sound in the Grand Partita. Its somewhat penetrating voice comes through, courtesy of two reeds often made of cane and blown into by the oboist, vibrating air. It made its first appearance nearly 400 years ago as the hautbois. The oboe, made most often of very rare granadilla and now rose wood, does not stand alone. Its closest or certainly most often played relative, the cor anglais or English horn, is longer and lower. You will know this tenor member of the family from Dvorák’s Symphony no. 9, From the New World. CLARINET Maria du Toit, Principal Clarinet The clarinet has the largest pitch range and probably the largest family but, apart from the four-octave B-flat soprano clarinet to which we are most accustomed, only the bass clarinet is often heard in an orchestra. With a single reed and also made out of wood, the clarinet is a recent newcomer. It was invented in Germany at the turn of the 18th century when a register key was added to earlier incarnations. Mozart may have made some use of it, but he only wrote one symphony – the 'Jupiter' – using all four woodwinds. Once made of materials such as plastic, metal, resin and even ivory, it is now usually made of wood, though inexpensive clarinets made of plastic are becoming common. BASSOON Brandon Phillips, Principal Bassoon Simon Ball, Principal Contra Bassoon Another double-reeded instrument, the bassoon needs support as it is held in a diagonal position across the player’s body. Its five pieces plus reed make it the longest wind instrument and its range is wide. It was used to reinforce the bass line in the orchestra and came to prominence when Vivaldi wrote it into nearly 40 concerti. From Haydn on, the bassoon was used for more than continuo, and began to have a life of its own. An agile instrument, it is also a good support to the rest of the woodwinds and its plaintive voice is clearly heard. Maple seems to be the wood of choice. The contrabassoon is also part of the modern symphony orchestra, offering a deeper range of sound. The bassoon has grown in popularity and today you can even find pieces specifically for a bassoon quartet.

OBOE Sergei Burdukov, Guest Principal Olga Burdukova, Principal Cor Anglais The signal for tuning thanks to its clear and secure A, the oboe is one of the most important instruments in the orchestra. Salieri comes to mind 09


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Martin Panteleev

IN LOVE WITH OUR CITY he first thing Martin Panteleev, principal guest conductor of the CPO, says on a Skype call to his home in Germany is, “How is my beloved Cape Town?” Panteleev didn’t stop there – he immediately asked about the orchestra, the musicians and the management. He is back in Cape Town in February 2014 for the next International Classical Music Festival. Panteleev’s career is on a roll. He made his debut with the National Orchestra of Argentina in 2013 and was immediately invited back. Other orchestras he conducts include the English Chamber Orchestra, North West German Philharmonie, the Berlin Symphoniker, Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra, Bucharest Radio Symphony and the Macedonian National Philharmonic Orchestra.

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He initially came to the CPO in 2010 to make its acquaintance since he was invited to take the orchestra on tour to the United States the following year. Not only was he impressed with the CPO and the scenery, but with the red wine.

Born in Bulgaria, he grew up listening to his brother Vesko Eschkenazy, six years older, playing the violin and by the age of four, when he mastered the melodies of Vesko’s concertoes so well by singing along, his parents enrolled him in music school. When he was nine he was playing his first concertos on tour in Europe.

“Music is the intangible mirror of life; it shows one’s emotions and I am delighted to learn more and more about this” This original closeness with Vesko has led to collaborations which, he says, have been profoundly moving and successful on many levels. He played with Vesko in Durban in 2012 to stunning acclaim and performs with him here in Cape Town at the Cape Philharmonic’s International Summer Music Festival.

In 1995, Panteleev moved to Germany and later on to Frickingen on Lake Konstanz where his future wife, Lida, had a job teaching in the Salem College International School and he had concerts with the Philharmonia of the Nations as its concertmaster. Their two children, Moana (8), and Martin (5), have little choice in whether they make music or not. Their grandparents are musicians (Panteleev’s father is solo clarinet in the Sofia Philharmonic; his mother is principal viola in the Sofia State Opera). With father Martin a violinist and mother Lida a pianist, it was no surprise that Moana wanted her own violin when she became four. Moana won the Youth Makes Music competition in Friedrichshafen in 2012, but Martin is not pushing her – he knows that being a musician is not an easy life. “Music is the intangible mirror of life; it shows one’s emotions and I am delighted to learn more and more about this.” He also loves the fusion of music

and new cultures and so enjoys South Africa and Argentina, in particular. The first time he conducted stays in his memory. This was in 1996 and he was commenting during a rehearsal of 'Carmina Burana' with the Philharmonia of the Nations. Maestro Justus Frantz overheard and challenged him to stand up and do what he was saying should be done. “It went so well that the orchestra and choir applauded. Frantz then told the musicians that this guy will never stop conducting. He was so right.” He goes back to Bulgaria often. As chief conductor of the Sofia Philharmonic, he is only too happy to make a contribution to a country which, like South Africa, has seen a great reduction in the funding for the arts. “I love the city where I was born and go there with absolute pleasure and it is an honour to be part of an 85-yearold orchestra with such a prestigious past. He was named Musician of the Year in Sofia in 2013.

Peace Quartet Trust recognises two CPYO musicians DANE COETZEE AND SHAHEEMA LAKAY, TWO MUSICIANS OF OUR YOUTH ORCHESTRA, HAVE RECEIVED SPECIAL SCHOLARSHIPS FROM THE SOUTH AFRICAN PEACE QUARTET TRUST In addition, the trust was formed to provide financial assistance to young people talented in musical performance or instrument-making/repair and in need of financial assistance.

Formed in 2012, the trust was formed to promote, through music, reconciliation, mutual respect and tolerance among South Africans, in line with the ideals symbolised by the lives of the four South African Nobel Peace Laureates.

The aim is to achieve an endowment of R10 million in order to achieve long-term sustainability. It awarded its first three bursaries in 2012, two of them to CPYO musicians, cellist Dane Coetzee and violinist Shaheema Lakay. Dane (24), a community role model, cellist in the CPYO and ad hoc cellist in the CPO, will take an advanced course at the University of Stellenbosch. Shaheema (19), a qualified Suzuki violin teacher and leader of the CPO’s Masidlale project in Atlantis, will study with CPO guest concertmaster Farida Bacharova and also through UNISA. The third award went

to cellist Thapelo Masita from Mangaung, to further his studies at the Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan, USA. The four Quartet of Peace instruments, now owned by the trust, were made in Cape Town in 2010 by master craftsman Brian Lisus. He dedicated each to one of South Africa’s four Nobel Peace Laureates and named them: Freedom – Albert Luthuli (violin), Peace – Desmond Tutu (violin), Reconciliation – FW de Klerk (viola) and Hope – Nelson Mandela (cello). The instruments took a year to make. Lisus looked at the grain and listened to the sound, even gouging it a little to feel the density. While carving the instruments, he listened deeply and extensively to chamber music. Balancing the instruments, Lisus

was able to have them sound like a unit when played together. The first concerts were held in South Africa, the UK, France and Germany before the present trust was formed. Since then, they have been widely played on occasions such as Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s eightieth birthday, a charity concert in London by the internationally renowned Brodsky Quartet, the Starlight Classics concerts in Johannesburg and Cape Town, and privately hosted fundraising events in Stellenbosch, Johannesburg and at Boughton House, Northamptonshire in England.

For further information, please go to the SAPQT ’s website www.qop.org.za or contact the chairman, Nick Segal, nsegal@xsinet.co.za


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Festival Calendar

Calendar 06

FEB 2014 THURSDAY

8

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL // FEBRUARY 2014

CONDUCTOR: MARTIN PANTELEEV SOLOIST: SERGEI NAKARIAKOV (TRUMPET)

8 PM | CITY HALL

B E RL I OZ RO MA N CA RN I VAL A RUT UN JA N T RUMP E T CONCER TO A RB A N N O RMA VA RI AT I O N S TCHA I KOVSK Y SY MP H O N Y NO. 5

Martin Panteleev

Sergei Nakariakov

The CPO’s principal guest conductor Martin Panteleev has scooped several prizes, including the 1995 Second Prize for Composition and the Special prize for his performance of a work by Schubert at the International competition in Sofia, Bulgaria. In 1999, he became associate conductor of the Philharmonia of the Nations. He is also artistic director of the Sofia Philharmonic Orchestra in Bulgaria. Panteleev has worked with over 30 different orchestras such as the English Chamber Orchestra, Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra, Berliner Symphoniker, Johannesburg Philharmonic Orchestra and more. He appeared in concert halls such as Amsterdam´s Royal Concertgebouw, Berliner Philharmonie and Grand Hall of the Moscow State Conservatory. Festival appearances include Rheingau Musikfestival, MDR Musiksommer and Schleswig-Holsten Musikfestival. Panteleev is also an acclaimed composer and violinist.

The Paganini and the Caruso of the trumpet, thanks to his virtuosity, his “svelte”, “sweet” tone combined with “jawdropping technical fireworks”, Nakariakov is in demand internationally as one of the most exciting musicians around. The family moved to Israel from Russia and soon after international recognition came – at the Ivo Pogorelich Festival in Bad Wörishofen and with the Lithuanian Chamber Orchestra at the Salzburg Festival, both in 1991. Prizes soon followed, and invitations to play around the world from the Hollywood Bowl, to the Lincoln Center, the Royal Festival Hall and the Royal Albert Hall. Today, he collaborates with the world's most fêted musicians, orchestras and conductors.

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CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Calendar

8

CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL // FEBRUARY 2014

APRIL-MAY 2014

13

20

THURSDAY 8 PM CITY HALL

THURSDAY 8 PM CITY HALL

FEB

FEB

CONDUCTOR: MARTIN PANTELEEV SOLOIST: ANTON NEL (PIANO) MOZART Magic Flute Overture MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K 491 MOZART Piano Concerto No. 21 in C minor, K 467 MOZART Symphony No. 41, ("Jupiter") ANTON NEL, prizewinner at the Leeds International Piano Competition in 1984 and the Naumberg International Piano Competition at Carnegie Hall in 1987, enjoys a remarkable international career, which began with his debut at the age of 12 in South Africa. Highlights include performances with the Cleveland Orchestra and the symphonies of Chicago, San Francisco, Seattle, Detroit and London. An acclaimed Beethoven interpreter, Anton Nel has performed the concerto cycle several times, most notably on two consecutive evenings with the Cape Philharmonic in 2005. He teaches at the University of Texas, is a visiting professor at the University of Stellenbosch, gives master classes worldwide and is a Steinway artist.

23 FEB

CONDUCTOR: MARTIN PANTELEEV SOLOIST: VESKO ESCHKENAZY (VIOLIN) BERLIOZ Benevenuto Cellini Overture LALO Symphonie espagnole SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 5 in D minor At 11 years of age, VESKO ESCHKENAZY became concertmaster of a youth Philharmonic Orchestra in Bulgaria, the first step in a career that has led to his appointment as concertmaster of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam. In 1990, Eschkenazy left Bulgaria for London and completed a two year master’s degree for solo performers at the Guildhall School of Music, and received a Solo Recital Diploma – 1992. He is a laureate of the Wieniawski, Beijing and Carl Flesch International Violin Competitions, and performs extensively as a concert soloist in concerts and festivals in Europe, the Americas, India and China. He has performed with many orchestras such as soloist with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra. He plays on a Guarneri del Gesu violin from 1738.

SUNDAY 5:30 PM KIRSTENBOSCH BOTANICAL GARDENS

ROSSINI Overture, The Barber of Seville BRUCH Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor

17 APR

THURSDAY 8 PM CITY HALL

CONDUCTOR: PIETER DANIEL SOLOISTS: MAGDA DE VRIES (VIBRAPHONE); FRANK MALLOWS (MARIMBA); PIETER DANIEL (VIOLIN) MOZART Violin Concerto, No. 5, K 219, ("Turkish") PETER KLATZOW Concerto for Marimba, Vibraphone and Strings BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 in C minor, op. 68

These concerts with PIETER DANIEL (violin and conductor) mark his return to the concert stage after a four-year creative sabbatical. Apart from appearing regularly with the CPO as both, Daniel performed in nationwide tours of the US and Germany and appearing with leading orchestras of the world, including the National Symphony Washington, the St Louis Symphony, Baltimore Symphony, German Radio Symphony Orchestras, the Royal Philharmonic and English Chamber Orchestra. He has performed in the Musikvereinssaal in Vienna, Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall in New York, Chicago Symphony Hall, the Salle Gaveau and Salle Pleyel in Paris, the Philharmonic Hall in Munich, the Old Opera Hall in Frankfurt, the Cologne Philharmonic Hall and the Tonhalle in Düsseldorf, many of those with worldrenowned soloists, including Nigel Kennedy and Mstislav Rostropovich. He play a Giuseppe Guarnerius violin from 1738.

CONDUCTOR: MARTIN PANTELEEV SOLOIST: VESKO ESHKENAZI (VIOLIN)

12

Symphony Season

TCHAIKOVSKY Capricco Italien LISZT "Les Preludes" SMETANA Three Dances from The Bartered Bride

Each being master of their instrument, FRANK MALLOWS (vibraphone) and MAGDA DE VRIES (concert grand marimba) formed Duo FourIVTwo in 2003. Frank Mallows holds a MMus degree from the University of Cape Town; Magda obtained a postgraduate diploma cum laude from the Tokyo College of Music (Japan). She won most of the national music competitions in South Africa, and was winner of the Performing Australian International Competition in London (UK). The duo has performed in many festivals, such as the Grahamstown National Arts Festival, the Aardklop Festival in Potchefstroom and the Franschhoek Festival, and also in Baroque in the Bush in the Kruger National Park, for the Cape Town Concert Series, and at UNISA. They are featured on the CD Myths, Magic and Marimbas which celebrated Peter Klatzow’s 60th birthday. Over the last three years, they have commissioned and premièred 12 South African works and this year performed the world première of Klatzow’s double concerto for marimba and vibraphone, composed for them.


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Calendar

APR THURSDAY 8 PM CITY HALL

CONDUCTOR: PIETER DANIEL SOLOISTS: BEN SCHOEMAN (PIANO) TCHAIKOVSKY Romeo and Juliet SAINT-SAËNS Piano Concerto No. 5 in F major, op. 103, in F major (Egyptian) BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 5, OP. 67 in C minor

08

MAY

THURSDAY 8 PM CITY HALL

CONDUCTOR: THEODORE KUCHAR SOLOISTS: ANTONIO POMPABALDI (PIANO) MUSSORGSKY Introduction to Khovantchina RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No. 4 in G minor KALINNIKOV Symphony No. 1 in G minor RACHMANINOV Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini THEODORE KUCHAR is one of the most prolifically recorded conductors of the past decade and appears on over 100 compact discs. He presently also serves as music director and conductor of the Fresno Philharmonic Orchestra and the Reno Chamber Orchestra in the United States and is also artistic director and

14

MAY WEDNESDAY, 8 PM ARTSCAPE OPERA HOUSE CONDUCTOR: ARJAN TIEN SOLOISTS: MIDORI (VIOLIN) SMETANA Overture, The Bartered Bride TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto op. 35, D major DVORAK Symphony No. 9 in E minor (“From the New World”)

ARJAN TIEN, winner of the first prize 'Rotary-Faller' at the competition of the International Conducting Masterclass in Switzerland in 1997, was the artistic director and principal conductor of the Magogo Chamber Orchestra from 2006 – 2012. He is a frequently recorded artist in a vast variety of repertoire.

principal conductor of the Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra. He was appointed artistic director and principal conductor of the Orquesta Sinfonica de Venezuela in 2011. In recent years, guest-conducting engagements have taken him to many major musical centres around the world. He has collaborated with major artists such as James Galway, Jessye Norman, Lynn Harrell, Itzhak Perlman, Yo-Yo Ma, Mstislav Rostropovich and Joshua Bell. In 1999, ANTONIO POMPA-BALDI won the Cleveland International Piano Competition, embarking on a career that continues to extend across five continents. Already a top prize winner at the 1998 Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibaud Competition of Paris, France, he went on to win a silver medal at the 2001 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. Pompa-Baldi returns to Cape Town for the last two concerts in his Rachmaninov series.

18

MAY SUNDAY, 8 PM, ARTSCAPE OPERA HOUSE CAPE PHILHARMONIC YOUTH ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR: BRANDON PHILLIPS SOLOIST: MIDORI (VIOLIN)

He has been regularly invited to conduct internationally established orchestras such as the WDR Rundfunkorchester, the Netherlands Radio Philharmonic, the Netherlands Symphony Orchestra, the Residentie Orchestra, the Antalya Symphony Orchestra, L'Orchestre Symphonique de Bienne, the Belgrade Philharmonic Orchestra and all major South African orchestras, performing in Europe, South America, Africa and Asia.

PHOTOGRAPHER: TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS

24

With four national and international prizes to his name, BEN SCHOEMAN is justifiably regarded as one of South Africa’s foremost pianists. He has given solo, chamber music and concerto performances through Europe, Canada and South Africa and will make his debut in 2014 at Carnegie Hall. A Steinway artist, Schoeman’s debut solo album with works of Liszt was released in 2011 under the TwoPianists label; and he has released a DVD recording of concertos by Mozart and Tchaikovsky with the Chamber Orchestra of South Africa and Arjan Tien. He received the Laureate Award from the University of Pretoria for his contribution to music and is completing his doctorate at the City University London and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

Tien lectures at the Fontys Academy of Music and is principal conductor of the Athenaeum Chamber Orchestra of the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague. Born in Osaka, Japan, legendary violinist MIDORI moved to America after Zubin Mehta invited her to make her now legendary debut – at the age of 11 – at the New York Philharmonic's traditional New Year's Eve concert. Orchestras she plays with include Cleveland, Philharmonia, Philadelphia, Montreal, Bavarian Radio, and Israel Philharmonic, with conductors such as Jansons, Eschenbach, Alsop, Runnicles and Sir Andrew Davis. A world-renowned educator with the youth and a UN

Messenger of Peace, she is also Jascha Heifetz Chair and Chair of the Strings Department at the University of Southern California's Thornton School of Music and, among other appointments, a guest professor in Oxford. A prolific recording artist, Midori has nearly 20 CDs on sale.

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto in E minor BEETHOVEN, VERDI

tutoring for his master’s degree from Victor Yampolsky at the Northwestern University in Chicago.

BRANDON PHILLIPS is the artistic director and resident conductor of the Cape Philharmonic Youth Orchestra.

He is currently the principal bassoonist in the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra and was one of the adjudicators at the Artscape National Youth Music Competition in 2011. Phillips regularly conducts the CPO’s outreach concerts.

In 2009, he was the winner of the very first Len van Zyl Conductors’ Competition. As part of his prize Phillips travelled to America, where he did an internship at the Philadelphia Orchestra, and received

13


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

A Year to Remember

A LOOK BACK AT THE CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA’S ACHIEVEMENTS AND HIGHLIGHTS OF 2013

KIRSTENBOSCH OUTDOOR CONCERT: JAM-PACKED PERFORMANCES IN ONE OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SETTINGS IN THE WORLD

CIRQUE DE LA SYMPHONIE: SOLD OUT PERFORMANCES DEMANDING A RETURN IN 2014

FAMILY FUN CONCERTS: A NEW APPROACH OF INTERACTIVE CONCERTS INVOLVING CHILDREN

THE FAMOUS SEXTET FROM LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR: OUR TRIUMPANT CONCERT PERFORMANCE WITH PRETTY YENDE AND COLIN LEE UNDER THE DIRECTION OF RICHARD BONYNGE


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

Give & Gain

FROM LEFT SARAH CHANG; DURING HER VISIT TO OUTREACH PROJECTS IN CAPE TOWN TOWNSHIPS

Sarah Chang making a difference OUTREACH AND TRANSFER OF SKILLS THE KEY TO GROWTH

O

utreach, education, development; these three words are so often bandied about that they have in some cases lost their meaning. But not for us. We truly believe in transformation, and that’s why we teach young musicians:

Saturday, where 74 young people come to learn from CPO and other teachers.

• At grassroots level to play the violin. About 85 youngsters between the ages of five and 15 are taught to play at four strings satellites in Langa, Nyanga, Gugulethu and often in preparation for a gig like making Atlantis, plus a satellite training centre for the DVD Mr Mandela with Trenton and woodwind and brass in Mamre the Free Radicals. The Cape Philharmonic • Archestral skills in the CP Youth Orchestra Youth Wind Ensemble is conducted by and CP Wind Ensemble. Each week some Prof Sean Kierman 53 get together with their conductor • Basic music at the Music Academy at the Brandon Phillips to play their hearts out, Good Hope Seminary High School each

Volunteers needed For decades, the Friends of Orchestral Music and its forerunners, the Friends of the CTPO and CTSO and the CTSO Club, have been a solid core of volunteerism in the orchestra. Volunteerism in America, for instance, is strong and well supported by retired business people, retired academics, and those with time and commitment on their hands. The CPO needs you. Budget constraints mean the management office is really understaffed and the staff will do absolutely everything from being part of technical meetings and stage production, proofreading programmes, to shuffling chairs and music stands.

The philosophy behind the programme is giving back, so those who are equipped to teach do. Five of the CPYO musicians already run Masidlale. Others have worked their way up from the youth orchestra to the CPO itself, a point that shows that the outreach and education project is working. The young musicians give concerts regularly – at least twice a term at Masidlale; the CPYO and CPYWE give at least 20 concerts a year. All the students get together once a year for a gala concert – the next one will take place at Artscape Opera on 8 February.

TO ENSURE THIS KEEPS ON HAPPENING, PLEASE SUPPORT THE CAPE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA. * We speak a universal and inspirational language * We reach out and help our youth fulfill their potential * We mentor a new generation of musicians * We represent excellence in orchestral skills

IT IS YOUR ORCHESTRA, BE PART OF THE ACTION

HOW CAN YOU HELP US? WE NEED FRIENDS TO * To be ambassadors for the orchestra on all levels * To keep in touch with subscribers and help them renew subscriptions

Assist us by 1 / Setting up a monthly debit order for your donation to the CPO 2 / Making an annual donation to the CPO 3 / Sponsoring a concert to the amount of R150 000 which will secure naming rights for the concert 4 / Becoming an Orchestra Angel by donating

* To help build a data base of keen orchestra supporters

R50 000 per annum for five years to the Endowment Trust 5 / Making a bequest to the CPO

* To help make all music lovers in Cape Town proud of their orchestra

“Support the CPO by being an ambassador on all levels”

6 / Sponsoring a musician For more information and the benefits attached to a sponsorship, call Karin Blumer at 082 414 4614 or email karin@cpo.org.za

www.cpo.org.za givengain

DONATE ONLINE: CLICK ON:

15


CONCERTO, ISSUE 03, 2013/14

More Magic

A Memorable Night With Lira South Africa’s multi-platinum artist Lira joins the Cape Philharmonic Orchestra for a spectacular New Year’s Eve Concert at Nederburg Wine Farm.

Don't miss Lira at the elegant Nederburg Wine Farm in Paarl on 31 December

The hauntingly beautiful 'I Will Always Love You', the magical atmosphere of the winelands at night, the splendour of Lira, South Africa’s queen of soul and the stylish Cape Philharmonic Orchestra with Richard Cock – what better way to bring in 2014? Come and experience Lira’s hits 'Rise Again', 'Dance for Life', 'Celebrating Life' and 'Hot Stuff' with the full symphonic sound of the CPO and enjoy popular songs and opera arias with other rising stars. The concert will take place on 31 December at Nederburg Wine Farm. Gates open at 18:00 allowing you to picnic before the show which will start at 21:30. Tickets are R250 for adults and R150 for children; free for those under 12. Tickets at Computicket. Bus packages will be available from the CPO at info@cpo.org.za or phone Luvuyo at (021) 410 9966

Back by popular demand! JOIN CIRQUE DE LA SYMPHONIE IN CAPE TOWN IN 2014 After the wonderful response we received from audiences, the spectacular Cirque de la Symphonie will return 21 and 22 June. Come and join us for a night of world-class production as we pair the excitement of circus with the enchantment of live orchestra.

Telephone Bookings (021) 421 7695 Credit card only

JOIN OUR DATABASE To receive a complimentary issue of Concerto magazine, regular newsletters and event information, simply email a request with your details to info@cpo.org.za or visit our website on www.cpo.org.za to read the online edition. Also follow us on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

SCAN this unique QR code with your mobile phone and you will be redirected to Concerto's online edition. Alternatively, visit our website at www.cpo.org.za


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