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SELECTIONS VII

B RO C K & C O .


SELECTIONS VII

B RO C K & C O . 84A COMMON W E A LT H AV ENU E CONCOR D, M A SSACHUSET TS 01742 tel ⁽ 978 ⁾ 369-1358 fa x ⁽ 978 ⁾ 369-1359 ma rk @brock a ndco.com w w w.brock a ndco.com


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B RO C K & C O .


Foreword I am pleased to present Selections VII, my seventh annual catalogue. I have selected 22 exceptional works from current inventory that illustrate a sampling from each of the gallery’s areas of specialization. Whether the works are landscapes, still lifes or figurative, whether the artists are impressionists, modernists or expatriates, this selection underscores the richness, diversity and growth of American art between 1880 and 1950. These works have quality and visual impact, and these factors are the ones which attract me to a work of art. While there is a cache attached to famous names, there must be more than just a signature to brand it a truly great work of art. Frank Duveneck’s Basilica di San Marco, Venice, is such a work. It was painted during a vital period in his career, and given to his close friend and fellow artist Ralph Curtis. Duveneck was one of the most important artists associated with Cincinnati, and his works of this subject are exceedingly difficult to locate and rarely appear on the marketplace. I also believe Elizabeth Nourse’s Étude, Fleurs, is an extremely fine work of art. Nourse also had a strong Cincinnati connection, and this work shows her capabilities as a master of impressionism. While she never studied directly with Duveneck, it is a pleasure to have the opportunity to handle these two major works. Interestingly, both Nourse and Duveneck evolved into highly accomplished artists working in the impressionist style. George de Forest Brush’s Mother and Child is the artist’s only sculpture. This work is the three dimensional version of his most important oil of the same title (coll. The Metropolitan Museum of Art). It is a theme that Brush visited throughout his career, but only once in this medium. He spent 30 years crafting this sculpture, which shows how important Brush felt it was to perfect it. Any successful catalogue depends on the collaboration of many. I am especially grateful to the many scholars who provided insights and contributions to this effort: Mary Lublin (George de Forest Brush); Frederick Moffatt (Arthur Wesley Dow); Michael Quick (Frank Duveneck); Mark Cole (Jared French); Deborah White (William Robinson Leigh); Michael Sanderson (William Sanderson); and Dewey F. Mosby (Henry Ossawa Tanner). I am also indebted to Anne Hargrave, for researching and writing the essays for this publication. Emily Mazzola researched and wrote the entry on Arthur Wesley Dow. Pure Imaging’s Phil Lajoie, Marianne Litty, Johanna McBrien and John Smiroldo provided considerable guidance, editing and production support. In addition to buying and selling art, Brock & Company also provides a broad range of services to collectors of American and European art. We freely share our expertise on conservation, framing and installation of existing works, and advise collectors seeking to upgrade, sell, or add to their collections. We also provide appraisals for estate, tax, or insurance purposes, particularly important in the current environment of intense competition for prime works of art. For a full list of artists in inventory and images of works for sale, updated monthly, please visit our website: www.brockandco.com. Member

Mark L. Brock Concord, Massachusetts Omnia Vincit Veritas


Mauritz Frederick Hendrick de Haas (Dutch/American, 1832 – 1895) The Morning Catch, Long Island c. 1880 14½ x 23 inches Oil on canvas Signed at lower left: MFH de Haas, NA Period fluted cove frame Provenance Private Collection, New York Marine painter Mauritz Frederick Hendrick de Haas was born in Rotterdam, Holland, in 1832. De Haas studied painting at the Rotterdam Academy and the Hague where he studied under the noted marine painter Louis Meyer (1809–1866). De Haas was tapped to be the official artist of the Dutch Navy after 1856, when he caught the attention of the Queen of Holland. This royal attention led to more commissions and commendations. Eventually de Haas was persuaded to come to New York City to paint by the American minister at The Hague, August Belmont. By 1859, de Haas was painting in Manhattan, where he cemented his reputation by painting the sea and ships in all their various moods. De Haas continued to receive positive notice in the United Sates and began to exhibit at the National Academy of Design in New York City. He was elected an Associate of the Academy in 1863. De Haas was a founder of the American Watercolor Society and contributed regularly to their exhibitions. He also exhibited at the Boston Art Club and the Brooklyn Art Association, as well as the Paris Exposition of 1889 and the Chicago Columbian Exhibition of 1893. De Haas had already been elected an academician when he executed the present work, The Morning Catch, as indicated by the letters NA after the artist’s signature. Here de Haas depicts a fisherman in a small boat pulling up nets, the scene bathed in the soft glow of morning light. A sailing ship, pulling a dingy, centers the composition, the whites of the sails in subtle contrast to both the faintly pink sky and the pure white crest of a wave in the foreground. De Haas was highly skilled at layering pigments and glazes in order to best convey the play of light and atmosphere on sea and sky, as indicated by this lovely painting. While de Haas was based in Brooklyn, he travelled up and down the eastern seaboard to find appealing marine subjects. The Morning Catch was likely painted on Long Island Sound, as suggested by the relatively narrow distance between the two shores. The present work also bears comparison with de Haas’ painting Long Island Sound illustrated in Ronald Pisano, Long Island Landscape Painting, vol. 1 (1985), 77. In both works, de Haas depicted a fleet of sailing ships on gray blue seas, a corner of sandy shore anchoring the foreground, and hazy atmosphere defining the horizon.

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Arthur Wesley Dow (1857 – 1922) Ipswich, Massachusetts c. 1881–1883 Oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches Unsigned Gilded oak Watts style frame Provenance Mrs. Arthur Wesley Dow, by inheritance Mr. & Mrs. Dana Dow, the artist’s brother and his wife Mrs. Ethelwyn Humphrey Putnam, La Mesa, California Harvey Short, La Mesa and Escondido, California Mr. & Mrs. Byron Short Tim Mason, Pacific Grove, California, by 1990 Private Collection, Massachusetts, until present A Letter of Authenticity from Frederick Moffatt accompanies the painting. A native of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Arthur Wesley Dow received a traditional arts education in accordance with the standards of the French Academy. A student of both the Ecole Nationale Des Arts Decratifs as well as the more progressive Academie Julian, Dow supplemented his education in 1886 with an extended stay in Brittany where Gaugin and Emil Bernard were also working. Upon his return to the United States Dow grew increasingly disillusioned by the Academy’s primary pedagogical method that demanded the faithful reproduction of canonical works from antiquity. Unable to accept pure imitation as his own artistic truth, Dow immersed himself in the study of non-western arts in search of the beauty he believed could be unveiled through design and form alone. Dow discovered a book of Hokusai prints that became the source of the artistic enlightenment he could not find in Paris. Dow is best known for his theories that fused Japanese aesthetic principles of “harmonious spacing” with a conscious rejection of the French Academy’s values regarding compositional design. A dedicated educator, Dow imbued his beliefs in his students who worked in a broad range of mediums. With a fervent belief that the future of American society depended on a greater appreciation of the beauty that can be found in everyday life, Dow opened an art school of his own in Ipswich. Discussing the inception of the school Dow asserted that “The day is dawning when America will have an art of her own founded upon her own history and character…we are developing art as enthusiastically as we developed science…it will surely end in a powerful, distinctly American school” (Frederick C. Moffatt, “Arthur Wesley Dow and the Ipswich School,” The New England Quarterly [1976]: 344.). Dow’s own works “exude a serenity in keeping with his larger philosophical agenda” (Leah Ollman, “Arthur Wesley Dow: Democratizing Art,” Art in America [2000]: 65). His notions on the aesthetics of harmonious spacing and compositional design have led art historians to consider Dow’s work as the theoretical foundation for American Modernism. 6


Frank Duveneck (1848 – 1919) Basilica di San Marco, Venice 1882 Oil on panel 11⅜ x 9⅛ inches Unsigned Inscribed on reverse: To my friend Ralph Curtis / FDuveneck Venice 1882 Period frame with aesthetic frieze Provenance The artist Ralph Curtis, by gift of the artist Private Collection, Europe A Letter of Authenticity from Michael Quick accompanies the painting. Frank Duveneck was a highly influential painter and teacher who helped bring European painting sensibilities to a generation of American artists. Born to a German family in Covington, Kentucky, Duveneck began his artistic career as an apprentice painting altarpieces in Covington. He left American shores to study at the Royal Academy in Munich in 1869. There, Duveneck was particularly swayed by the expressive brushwork, the effective use of light and dark, as well as the essentially realist manner of the Spanish and Dutch old masters, Frans Hals, Diego Velazquez, and Rembrandt van Rijn in particular. Back in Cincinatti in 1873, Duveneck began exhibiting his paintings both locally and at the Boston Art Club, where his work met with immediate success. By 1875, Duveneck returned to Munich, accompanied by a roving band of American artists. The group was dubbed the “Duveneck Boys,” and the artists painted and travelled together throughout Europe, with Polling, Germany, as a base. Duveneck and his students relocated to Florence in 1879, with summers spent in Venice. Here, the brilliant local light led Duveneck to experiment with a brighter palette and a naturalistic use of light. Basilica di San Marco, Venice was painted during this vital period in Duveneck’s career. According to Michael Quick, this work can be related to the numerous Venetian etchings that Duveneck created in 1883, both in the architectural subject matter and the deftly indicated figures in the foreground (Letter, June 1, 2009). Here, Duveneck has painted the elegant minarets and domes of the façade set against the dove grays of the sky and piazza. The jewel tones of the famous mosaics seem even more vibrant set against the hazy sky. Duveneck presented this painting to the socially prominent fellow artist Ralph Curtis (1854–1922). As noted by Michael Quick, Curtis joined Duveneck’s painting classes in Florence in 1880–81, and the two men developed a close friendship that continued when both were living in Venice in late 1882 (Letter, June 1, 2009). After a long European sojourn and the death of his wife Elizabeth Boott, Duveneck eventually returned to Cincinatti in 1890. There, he began teaching at the Cincinatti Art Academy, a post he maintained for the remainder of his career. Duveneck continued to exhibit widely and to great acclaim, and was given a one-man room at the 1915 San Francisco Exposition. 8


Alfred Thompson Bricher (1837 – 1908) On the Merrimac, Newburyport c. 1890 Oil on canvas 23¾ x 40 inches Signed at lower right with conjoined first initials: ATBRICHER Inscribed on verso: On the Merrimac, Newburyport Period fluted cove frame Provenance Private collection, California Lepore Fine Arts, Newburyport, Massachusetts by 1995 Private collection, West Newburyport, Massachusetts until present Exhibited Gill’s Art Galleries, Springfield, Massachusetts, 1891, no.13. Lepore Fine Arts, Newburyport, Massachusetts, Mirror of the Times: Newburyport Painters Around the Turn of the Century, November 1995, no. 3. Alfred Thompson Bricher was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and spent his career capturing and interpreting nature’s moods in paint. Bricher is considered one of the last of the Luminist painters, that uniquely American group of artists devoted to capturing atmospheric effects of light and weather infused with an almost spiritual calm. Bricher grew up in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and was a largely self-taught artist, though he may have studied at the Lowell Institute for fine art in Boston. By 1858, Bricher was painting full-time along coastal Massachusetts and Maine, and had established a studio on Tremont Street in Boston. He was surrounded by other Luminist painters in Boston, as Martin Johnson Heade had a studio in the same building, and Fitz Henry Lane exhibited his serene works at the Boston Athenæum. Bricher shared their sensibility of painting from direct observation with a realist’s attention to picturesque detail. In 1868, Bricher moved from Boston to New York and, from 1890, lived on Staten Island. However, Bricher continued to focus on his native New England as a subject, and went on frequent sketching trips around the Northeast. The present work of his native Newburyport harbor represents the artist at the peak of his abilities in depicting atmospheric conditions. The surface of the water fairly shimmers with golden light, hints of pink clouds and blue sky, as well as with the reflections of the masts and sails of passing ships. This treatment of the water and boats has much in common with Bricher’s painting Oyster Boats on the Creek, Patchogue, Long Island, from 1885, which was also exhibited at Gill’s Art Galleries.

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George de Forest Brush (1855 – 1941) Mother and Child c. 1894; cast 1913 Bronze 34 x 14 x 15 inches Inscribed George de Forest Brush Sc along base Gorham Foundry mark on back Provenance Mrs. W.S. Coates (Jane Brush, daughter of George de Forest Brush) Reese Alsop (husband of Elise Coates, daughter of Jane Coates) L i t e r at u r e “Sculpture by George de Forest Brush and Others,” The New York Times, June 29, 1919. Berry-Hill Galleries, New York, New York, George de Forest Brush: Master of the American Renaissance (1985–1986), 77. The authenticity of this work has been confirmed by Mary Lublin. George de Forest Brush explored the theme of mother and child throughout his career, a subject he imbued with reverence and a natural spirituality. While he composed numerous paintings on this theme, he created only one sculpture, the present Mother and Child. According to an article in The New York Times on June 29, 1919, Brush worked on the sculpture over some thirty years, and was able to achieve a “quality of apparent ease, of inevitableness, that can only be the result of fully ripened thought.” This sculpture is directly related to the iconic full-length oil painting on wood, also titled Mother and Child and dated 1894, which is in the permanent collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. In both the present sculpture and the related painting, Brush skillfully updated a pose and subject familiar from canonical Madonna and Child paintings created during the Italian Renaissance. The contemporary critic Royal Cortissoz made comments on Brush’s mother and child paintings than can be equally applied to the sculpture: “the figures were…pensive, serene, simple in costume and attitude, not so posed as to suggest the Madonna type, but with an atmosphere of sacredness hanging about them.” (Quoted in Joan Morgan, George de Forest Brush [1985–1986], 26.) Only two bronzes of Mother and Child were cast from the plaster model; it is believed his son Gerome Brush (1888– 1954) carved a marble example as well. The other casting of this sculpture was exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Annual Spring Exhibition of 1920.

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William Robinson Leigh (1866 – 1955) A Horse-Fair Pilgrimage c. 1901 Oil on paper mounted on canvas 15⅞ x 15⅛ inches Signed at lower right: W. R. Leigh Period Arts and Crafts frame Provenance Private Collection, Old Lyme, Connecticut [Cooley Gallery, Old Lyme, Connecticut] Private Collection, New York, New York, until 2008 I l l u s t r at e d E. S. Nadal, “A Horse-Fair Pilgrimage,” Scribner’s Magazine 30, no. 4 (October 1901): ill. 389. William Robinson Leigh was born into an impoverished yet aristocratic family in West Virginia. He first studied art under Hugh Newell at the Maryland Institute in Baltimore from 1880 to 1883. Leigh then went on to study at the Raupp-Royal Academy in Munich starting in 1883, where he developed a refined, realist style of painting. Leigh remained in Munich for some twelve years, and painted six cycloram nas between 1891 and 1896. Back in New York City in 1896, Leigh turned his precise draftsmanship towards illustrations for Scribner’s and Collier’s. In 1906 Leigh made a savvy deal with the Santa Fe Railroad and exchanged a painting of the Grand Canyon for train fare out West. This led to more commissions of Western subjects, which became a central focus for Leigh. He painted all aspects of the American West, from bucking broncos to canyons, deserts, and Native American Indian life. Leigh was especially skilled at capturing the vigor and musculature of animals and livestock. Leigh’s compositions tend to be illuminated by a crisp, clear light, a precision extended to the representation of space and form. According to Deborah White, the present work appears to be the original oil for an illustration that W. R. Leigh did for Scribner’s Magazine in October 1901 (vol. 30, no. 4) for a story entitled “A Horse-Fair Pilgrimage” by E. S. Nadal, pages 387–399. It is illustrated on page 389 to accompany the following passage: “The horses contend around the track, and the big, handsome bulls doze and chew the cud before the grand stand, while the judges walk around them; the parachute man goes up, and the trained elks plunge thirty feet into water, and the man and woman in tights and spangles perform on the trapeze.” (E-mail from Deborah White, May 26, 2009.)

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Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859 – 1937) Virgin Mary in Meditation c. 1905 Oil on board 12 x 9½ inches Signed at lower right: H. O. Tanner Period Foster Brothers frame Provenance Private Collection, Paris Private Dealer, New York, New York A Letter of Authenticity from Dewey F. Mosby, Ph.D. accompanies the painting. Henry Ossawa Tanner is recognized not only as an American artist of the first rank, but also as one of the first African American artists to achieve international renown. An artist of enormous skill and sensitivity, his paintings were exhibited at the highly competitive Paris Salons and earned critical praise. Tanner famously said that he could “not fight prejudice [in America] and paint at the same time,” and so spent the majority of his professional career in France. Nevertheless, he continued to exhibit works in America, and ultimately earned recognition on both shores of the Atlantic. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tanner grew up in an educated and culturally active family. His father was a distinguished Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. The young man had an early interest in becoming a painter, and began his studies independently. Tanner surely had great resolve to be a painter, as he had the discouraging experience of being turned away from a number of established artist’s studios solely because of his skin color (Dewey Mosby, Henry Ossawa Tanner, 57). From 1880 to 1882 he enrolled in the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts where he studied with Thomas Eakins and gained a firm foundation of anatomy and the tenets of realism. After a period when Tanner had his own studio in Philadelphia, he relocated to Atlanta, Georgia, and opened a photography studio. More importantly, Tanner gained the support and patronage of Bishop Joseph Hartzell. Hartzell essentially financed an exhibition of Tanner’s paintings in Cincinnati, which gave the artist the financial freedom to go abroad. Tanner left the United States for Paris in 1891, where he finally found a supportive artistic milieu. Early on, Tanner began to exhibit at the Paris Salons, which led to steady patronage and recognition. In 1897, his painting The Resurrection of Lazarus was purchased for the Musee du Luxembourg. This single purchase gave the artist international renown and lead to a steady exhibition schedule and loyal patronage. A trip to Jerusalem in 1897 led to a turning point in terms of subject matter as Tanner began to focus on religious and spiritual themes. Virgin Mary in Meditation belongs to this group of spiritual works painted around 1905 at the height of Tanner’s career. While Tanner harkens back to a rich tradition of small-scaled devotional works in this painting, the fluid brushwork and restricted palette introduce a more modern sensibility. Dewey Mosby has suggested that the sitter may be Louise Curtis, wife of the art connoisseur and major Tanner patron Atherton Curtis (letter, August 7, 2007).

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Edward Middleton Manigault (1887 – 1922) New York City Sreet Scene 1908 Oil on academy board 6 x 8 inches Signed at lower left: Manigault Dated at lower right: 08 Period Thulin frame Provenance [Art Market, New York, New York] Private dealer, Massachusetts Edward Middleton Manigault defies categorization as an artist. He was constantly exploring different modes of painting during his all too brief lifetime, though all were in the Modernist mode. At various points in his career, Manigault explored Realism, post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Cubism. An intensely creative soul, Manigault also executed etchings, vividly colored ceramics, wood frames, furniture, and interior decorations. Manigault was born in London, Ontario, Canada, into a prominent, culturally aware family. An accomplished draftsman at an early age, he was asked to do line drawings of local buildings by the city of London, Ontario, when he was 18 years old. Soon after, in 1905, Manigault moved to New York City to seriously pursue his artistic career. He enrolled in the New York School of Art, where he took classes with legendary teachers Robert Henri and Kenneth Hayes Miller. Reflecting the influence of Robert Henri’s Ashcan School of painting, Manigault’s earliest subjects were New York’s urban streets and structures, painted in a dark, tennebrist palette. Manigault already had practice in rendering buildings and perspective from his first commission in London, Ontario, though from Henri he learned to handle paint in a looser, more expressive manner. The present work, a New York City street scene dated 1908, definitely reflects Manigault’s early teachings and proclivities. It is clearly related to a painting illustrated in Middleton Manigault: Visionary Modernist (2001, fig. 6). Though two years separate the two works, in both cases Manigault depicts the same wide avenue at a raking angle, with multistoried buildings forming a syncopated skyline. The streets are lined with bare trees, carriages, and pedestrians with umbrellas. The evocation of a chilly winter’s day in New York is complete. In 1909, Manigault shifted away from a realist manner of painting, and began exploring a more personally expressive manner. As suggested by the wide range of styles and medium in which he worked, change became the norm for Manigault. This kind of artistic exploration was accompanied by a fragile psychological nature. Manigault suffered his first nervous breakdown while serving under British forces during the First World War. He eventually wanted to attain higher mental states, starving himself like the ascetics in the hopes of achieving greater artistic clarity. Sadly, he went too far, and ended up dying of starvation in 1922 at the age of 35. His legacy, however, is secure in the remarkable range of paintings and crafts he left behind.

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Elizabeth Nourse (1859 – 1938) Étude, Fleurs c. 1911 Oil on canvas 25½ x 25½ inches Signed at lower right: Elizabeth Nourse Period Whistler frame Provenance Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ryan, Cincinnati, Ohio Private Dealer, New York, New York Exhibited New Salon, Paris, 1911, as Étude, Fleurs, no. 1015. National Museum of American Art and the Cincinnati Art Museum, Elizabeth Nourse: A Salon Career (1983), cat. no. 42. L i t e r at u r e Mary Alice Burke, Elizabeth Nourse: A Salon Career (Washington, D.C.: Published for the National Museum of American Art by the Smithsonian Institution Press, 1983), 241. Elizabeth Nourse was born into a large family in Mount Healthy, Ohio, in 1859. She and her twin sister, Adelaide, studied at the McMicken School of Design in Cincinnati, where they took classes in painting, wood carving, china painting, and engraving. While she did not directly take classes with the highly influential Frank Duveneck, her earliest paintings have the bravura brushwork and inherent realism associated with the noted artist and teacher. Nourse went to New York and studied briefly with William Sartain (1843–1924). In the summer of 1887, she went to Paris and enrolled in the Academie Julian’s school for women; she exhibited for the first time at the Paris Salon the following year. Nourse was given the distinction of having her entry hung at eye level in a room of paintings hung floor to ceiling. Nourse tended towards a more realist style, though she was clearly also influenced by Impressionism and experimented with effects of light and pattern. Nourse’s most strongly Impressionist works were done around 1911, at what may be considered the apex of her career. At this point, Nourse was fully established in Paris, had been exhibiting regularly in the Paris exhibition venues, and was actively selling her work, including an important purchase by the Musée du Luxembourg in 1910. Étude, Fleurs was executed in 1911 and reveals Nourse at her most daring. A fishbowl is set on a polished table, the two small goldfish painted in motion as depicted by rushing daubs of paint. An ostensibly quiet still life is given great vigor by her expressive brushwork and bold handling of paint. This work was done in concert with a figurative scene of a woman lost in thought standing by a fishbowl, titled La Rêverie, and a study focused on the goldfish itself. Étude, Fleurs has been described as one of Nourse’s “most determined efforts thus far to depict the complex reflecting properties of glass and water.” (Burke, Elizabeth Nourse: A Salon Career, 71.) 20


William Baxter Palmer Closson (1848 – 1926) Preparing for the Pageant c. 1915 Oil on board 20 x 16 inches Signed at lower right: Wm Baxter Closson Inscribed verso: Preparing for the Pageant / by W B Closson Original Carrig-Rohane frame Provenance Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, inventory number 38.1841 L i t e r at u r e Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, American Paintings in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: An Illustrated Summary Catalogue (1997), 47. Born in Thetford, Vermont, William Closson studied painting at the Thetford Academy and the Lowell Institute in Boston. Closson went on to study the art of engraving and went to Europe from 1881 to 1883 to engrave works for Harpers. While in Europe, Closson exhibited at the Paris Salon and was awarded a third class medal for his engravings in 1882. Back in the United States, Closson had studios in Newton and Magnolia, Massachusetts. He lived and painted in Washington, D.C., from 1907 to 1917, and was part of a group of artists working in a Symbolist mode (Gerdts, Art Across America, vol 1, p. 357). Closson exhibited regularly at the Boston Arts Club, as well as at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Corcoran Biennials, amongst other venues. He also was a member of numerous art societies, including the Boston Arts Club, the Copley Society, Allied Artists of America, and the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts. Closson painted with a typically vibrant, high keyed palette, and focused on effects of light and texture over precise detail. His paintings often feature fashionable women in outdoor settings, as in the present work. Preparing for the Pageant depicts a group of lithe women in colorful dresses seemingly floating down a grassy hill. The ethereal qualities of the scene can be connected to Closson’s interest in Symbolism. Closson’s Impressionist brushwork captures the dappled sunlight, bright colors, and festive air of the scene. Closson created a similar mood and airy effect in his painting Tree-Day Guests at Wellesley College, also formerly in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boson.

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Charles Herbert Woodbury (1864 – 1940) The Blue Cliff 1916 Oil on canvas 36½ x 48 inches Signed and dated lower right: Chas. H. Woodbury 1916 Inscribed and dated verso: The Blue Cliff, 1916 Carrig-Rohane style frame Provenance The artist Duncan Phillips, Washington, D.C., by July 27, 1920 Family of the artist On loan to the Boston Public School System [Vose Galleries, Boston, Massachusetts, 1978] Private Collection, Massachusetts, until present Exhibited Portland, Maine, Portland Society of Art: L.D.M. Sweat Memorial Art Museum, Exhibition of Oil Paintings by American Artists Loaned by Phillips Memorial Art Gallery, Washington, D.C., February 4–15, 1922, no. 10. Gloucester, Massachusetts, North Shore Arts Association, Masterworks: The Early Founding Members of the North Shore Arts Association, August 2–31, 1997. Charles Woodbury was a highly influential teacher and exponent of painting en plein air to generations of students. He founded the Ogunquit School of painting, which largely established the area as a preeminent artist’s colony. Woodbury was born in Lynn, Massachusetts, and began sketching and painting as a boy. His first intention was to be an engineer, however, and he studied at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating in 1886. While at MIT, Woodbury was asked to join the Boston Art Club and began teaching to a handful of students. He took informal classes in watercolor with Ross Turner, who was also teaching in the architecture program at MIT, an interaction which convinced Woodbury to pursue a professional career in the arts. Woodbury went to Europe for the first time in 1890, and took his first (and only) formal art classes at the Academie Julian in Paris. Woodbury proclaimed nature to be his first and best teacher, however, noting that “all my best pictures have been painted out-of-doors. I might say that all my knowledge has been gained in the open air” (Boston Journal, March 20, 1890, as quoted in Earth, Sea and Sky: Charles H. Woodbury, 31.) Woodbury’s most important contribution to American art began when he started offering outdoor summer painting classes in Ogunquit, Maine, in 1898. Woodbury painted as he taught, emphasizing the natural grace, harmony, and energy of the natural world. The rocky coast of Maine, the surging water, and strong summer light were all natural subjects, as were the bathers and beachgoers. The Blue Cliff was painted in this mode, in a bold palette and with broad, active brushwork. 24


Agnes Millen Richmond (1870 – 1964) Woman with a Parasol, Gloucester, Massachusetts c. 1920 Oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches Signed at lower right: Agnes M. Richmond Inscribed on stretcher on reverse: 120 East 59th, New York Period Arts & Crafts frame Provenance Private collection, Rhode Island Agnes Richmond was born in Alton, Illinois, and studied painting at the St. Louis School of Fine Arts. By 1888 she had moved to New York and was taking classes at the Art Students League. There she studied with the American Impressionist masters John Henry Twachtman in 1901 and with Walter Appleton Clark and Kenyon Cox in 1902 and 1903. Richmond began teaching classes herself from 1910 to 1914 and was known for both her assured draftsmanship and her painterly brushwork in a heightened palette. While Richmond was able to suggest the dissolution of form with her brushwork, the forms always had a solid physical presence. Richmond and her husband Winthrop Tunney spent many summers in the artist’s colony in Gloucester, Massachusetts. There, they were part of a close-knit circle of artists including John Sloan, Stuart Davis, and Charles and Alice Winter known as the Red Cottage Group (Judith Curtis, Rocky Neck Art Colony 1850–1950 (2008), 81). Richmond and her colleagues often went on paintings jaunts together, painting local scenes in a palette that deliberately contrasted vibrant elements with tonal notes (ibid, 73). Woman with a Parasol exemplifies this coloristic approach, as the bright emerald green trim of the woman’s parasol and the turquoise waters beyond are balanced by the neutral grays and brown of the rocks in the foreground. The figure’s modern attire of a loose white top and jaunty knotted shawl are suggestive of the liberating woman’s fashions of the 1920s. The address of 120 East 59th Street written on the stretcher of the painting also helps date the present painting. Richmond is recorded as having lived there until 1924, when she moved across the bridge to Brooklyn. Richmond had a significant exhibition record and won numerous prizes, including the Watrous Figure Prize in 1911. Richmond served on the selection and award jury committees alongside Bessie Potter Vonnoh and Cecilia Beaux. She exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery biennials in 1914 and 1919, at the Pan-Pacific Exposition in San Francisco in 1915, and exhibited frequently with the National Association of Women Artists. She also exhibited over a span of years at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and at the Society of Independent Artists, amongst many other national exhibition venues. Her work was the subject of an exhibition at the Jeffrey Alan Gallery in New York in 1981.

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Walt Kuhn (1877 – 1949) Ogunquit Beach 1924 Oil on canvas 12 x 16⅛ inches Signed at lower right: Walt Kuhn Titled and dated on reverse: Ogunquit Beach / Aug. 1924 Heydenryk frame Provenance Estate of the artist [Salander-O’Reilly Gallery, New York, NY, 1982] Private collection, New York, 2003 Private collection, Massachusetts Walt Kuhn had significant effect on the history of American art as both a painter and as an organizer of the landmark 1913 Armory Show in New York City, though he began his artistic career in a more commercial fashion as a cartoonist and magazine illustrator. Kuhn also had intense interest in theatrical productions and was a successful producer of arts and entertainment, notably with the Penguin Club for artists in New York. Kuhn was a man of great vision and capacity, and he continued to paint serious pictures all while tending to his productions and shows. Kuhn had a great, knowing eye for modern art, and he and fellow organizer Arthur B. Davies went to Europe in order to choose works to be included in the Armory Show. Kuhn was also an art advisor for private collectors seeking to build modern art collections, with major clients including John Quinn, the Averell Harrimans, and Lillie Bliss, all of whom significantly supported Kuhn as an artist, and whose collections are now dispersed throughout major museums. Kuhn was always fascinated with the circus as a theme, and was able to convey the dignity and pathos of these often marginalized figures. Stylistically Kuhn was influenced by the planar qualities of Paul Cézanne, and his portraits have an unflinching, direct quality that is thoroughly modern. Ogunquit Beach reveals Kuhn in a more playful mode. The artist and his family spent most summers in Ogunquit, Maine, and purchased a house there in 1920. Kuhn apparently did not feel the need to paint typical seascapes and had a running joke with his dealer Marie Harriman: “Each summer…she would remind him that he had yet to paint the sea. Each summer he would promise her to paint that picture and each fall he would return to the city without it” (Frank Getlein, Walt Kuhn (1967), n.p.). His beach is full of energy and style: a central pair of bathers stride across the composition, a fringed beach towel blowing behind them, while another seated woman flips her blond hair forward. The sky, sand, and sea are all composed of jaunty lines that contribute to the breezy atmosphere.

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Harry Leslie Hoffman (1871 – 1964) Bea at the Loom c. 1930 Oil on canvas 30 x 32 inches Signed at lower center: Hoffman Estate stamped verso Arts & Crafts style frame Provenance Estate of the Artist Harry Leslie Hoffman was joined in his artistic interests by his wife Beatrice Pope. The couple met while at Florence Griswold’s famed artist’s colony in Old Lyme, Connecticut, and the newlyweds quickly purchased property in Old Lyme as a permanent residence. While Hoffman focused on Impressionist oils, his wife turned her creative energies towards exquisitely wrought handcrafts, weaving in particular. Beatrice made tapestries in the manner of the French royal tapestry houses, using the Goebelin weaving technique that allows for incredibly detailed scenes to emerge from weft and weave. She created a series of tapestries based on her husband’s fanciful underwater scenes, and both tapestries and paintings were exhibited at the Dayton Art Institute and the Milwaukee Art Institute in 1935. Bea at the Loom depicts Beatrice working at her loom on a design based on her husband’s paintings. A hand-painted screen of Hoffman’s underwater scenes forms a backdrop to the realist portrait. This painting is directly related to The Tapestry, illustrated in Harry L. Hoffman: A World of Color, plate 23. Both works feature Beatrice at work on her loom, wearing the same yellow sundress and emerald pendant necklace, though different decorative screens are featured. It seems likely that Bea at the Loom was executed first, as more weaving has been completed in The Tapestry. According to Jeffrey W. Anderson in Harry L. Hoffman: A World of Color, 38, “more than any other work, The Tapestry projects the kind of supportive personal relationship that the Hoffmans had with one another.”

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Jared French (1905 – 1987) Urban Beach Scene c. 1934 Oil pastel on paper 16 x 25⅜ inches Unsigned Ludins style frame Provenance The artist Roberto Giannotta, by inheritance Private collection, Vermont The enigmatic painter Jared French painted in a taut, highly realist style often with intense psychosexual undertones. French is often termed a magical realist, as were his close friends George Tooker and Paul Cadmus, though all three disliked the term. French was strongly influenced by the volumetric, linear, and static qualities of the art of the Italian Renaissance. His art often has a tableaux-like quality, as if figures were arrayed on a stage. French was born in Ossining, New York, in 1905. He received a BA from Amherst College, and went on to study painting and etching at the Art Student’s League in New York City beginning in 1925. While at the League, French met fellow artist Paul Cadmus, who was to become his lover and life-long friend. The two travelled extensively in Italy, and extensively studied the old masters. French was particularly influenced by the figurative boldness of Piero della Francesca, Andrea Mantegna, and Lucca Signorelli. Back in the United States, French began doing murals for the Public Works of Art Project under the New Deal, executed in an American Scene style of painting. French also exhibited in a number of major group exhibitions, including the Corcoran Gallery annual exhibitions, as well as at the annual exhibitions of the Art Institute of Chicago and the National Academy of Design. In 1937, he married fellow artist Margaret Hoening. That same year, French, his wife Margaret, and Paul Cadmus began exhibiting together as a group called “PAJAMA,” which was an acronym of their names. French soon began working in egg tempera, a medium favored by the old masters, and one which required precision of application and favored a meticulous approach. This shift in medium was accompanied by a stylistic shift, and French began to create symbolically packed compositions with often opaque meaning. His works focus on the human body, and specifically on an idealized image of youth and virility. The present work, Urban Beach Scene, has the panoramic qualities of a mural, all executed in a typically precise manner in pastel. Here, French has packed the composition with active figures, boys and girls flirting, diving into the water off a pier, and otherwise fooling around. City skyscrapers form the backdrop to this busy scene of the young, restless, and working class escaping the heat of the sidewalks to play by the water. The city is surely Manhattan, though French has exaggerated the proximity of the piers to tall buildings. Regardless, the image fairly hums with an urban, ebullient energy.

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Roy Hilton (1891 – 1963) Pittsburgh Mills c. 1935 Oil on board 12 x 16 inches Signed at lower left: ROY HILTON American Modernist frame Provenance Private collection, St. Louis, Missouri Thence by descent in the family Roy Hilton found rich subject matter in the mines, mills, and industry of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He painted in a crisp-edged manner with a sophisticated sense of pattern and design, an aesthetic well suited to his subjects. Hilton was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and graduated from Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. In 1909 he took art classes at the Eric Pape School, followed by two years at the Fenway School of Illustration. While Hilton’s style is hardly illustrational, the firm line and clarity of expression required in illustration art clearly influenced the artist’s mature style. In 1928, Hilton moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to work as an instructor in the Department of Painting and Design at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. He stressed the importance of design and draftsmanship in his classes, qualities he also brought to his own painting. In addition to his teaching duties, Hilton exhibited regularly with the Associated Artists of Pittsburgh, as well as at the Carnegie Institute, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum in New York City, amongst other exhibition venues. In 1943, Hilton was given a solo exhibition at the Carnegie Institute. Pittsburgh Mills is related to a work of the same subject and title at the Westmoreland Museum of Art in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. In both instances, Hilton depicted a steel mill at night with billows of smoke illuminating the inky sky. Here, carts of glowing ore and a sharply lit doorway also act as dramatic light sources. The angled roofs of long, low-slung buildings are defined by a softer reflected light, illustrating Hilton’s prodigious skill in capturing different effects of light. Small figures in the foreground humanize the industrial landscape. The present painting can also be related to a painting by Hilton titled Steel Works in Winter in the Steidle Collection in the Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum and Art Gallery at Penn State. Hilton effectively contrasts the almost domestic quality of the sharply angled roofs capping outbuildings with the rows of smoke stacks and the various silos and conveyor belts in both paintings. He also made effective use of a wintery landscape in both works, the drifting snow a match for the clouds of smoke issuing from the steel works, nature and industry blanketing the world in white.

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James Meikle Guy (1909 – 1983) On the Waterfront 1937 Oil on masonite 11⅜ x 18 inches Signed and dated at lower right: Guy 37 Signed and titled on reverse: James Guy / On the Waterfront American Modernist frame Provenance Private collection, Missouri James Meikle Guy was an artist and a political activist, and used his art to reflect his strongly held beliefs. He painted in a Social Surrealist style during the 1930s, creating a rather unique manner that combined the manipulations of pure Surrealism with social commentary and criticism. Born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1908, Guy studied at the Hartford Art School with Albertus E. Jones (1882–1957). Guy began exhibiting paintings at the Wadsworth Athaneum in the late 1920s. In 1931, the Wadsworth happened to hold the exhibition “Newer Super-Realism,” which was the first showing of Surrealism in the United States. Here, Guy would have encountered the work of Salvador Dali, Giorgio de Chirico, and Max Ernst, an exposure that clearly had profound effect on his artistic sensibility. By the time Guy moved to New York City to continue his studies at the Arts Student League in 1932, he was already politically active and helped produce a labor play titled “Strike” in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Once in Manhattan he joined several political organizations, including the John Reed Club, a organization founded by staff members of The New Masses to support leftist and Marxist activity. While Guy agreed with the political sentiments of his fellow members, he admitted to having “trouble in the Club over the ambiguity of [my] images.” (Quoted in Isabelle Dervaux, Surrealism USA [2005], 25). Guy simply wasn’t going to paint realist pictures of raised fists or stony portraits. On the Waterfront represents a potent combination of Guy’s political sensibilities and artistic finesse. A lone clear-eyed and stalwart young man walks with purpose across the foreground, a strikers billboard around his neck. The hero of this image is set in direct contrast to the avarice and cowardice taking place in the background. A corpulent policeman guards the scene, and strike breakers or scabs with their wobbly gaits, red noses, and generally shifty appearance loiter in the background. A storm brews over a background scene of a sinking ship while blue skies shine on the other side of the composition, a dichotomy typical of Guy’s interest in the power of contrast. Guy’s paintings of the 1930s were focused on “national problems: unemployment, worker’s rights and bureaucratic control (Ilene S. Fort, James Guy [1983], n.p.). Another work of this period, Public Education #1 from 1937 (illustrated ibid ) also features a brave young worker set in contrast against corruption, avarice and greed, a favored theme in the troubling years of the Great Depression.

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Virginia Berresford (1903 – 1995) Shells c. 1940 Oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches Signed at lower right: Virginia Berresford American Modernist frame Provenance Private dealer, Massachusetts The American modernist Virginia Berresford painted the natural world in a crisply edged, Precisionist style. While the angles and order of the industrial world provided inspiration, Berresford applied this aesthetic to more rural subjects. She detailed shells, shoals, farms, and fields in flat panes and sharply rendered forms. In this, her work is close to Charles Demuth and Georgia O’Keeffe, who also took inspiration from their natural surroundings. Berresford’s autobiography, Virginia’s Journal, details her training as an artist and offers anecdotes of her decidedly bohemian life. She took art classes at Wellesley College, but transferred to the Teacher’s College at Columbia University where she studied with Charles Martin. Her greatest influence, however, were the private classes she took in Paris at the Académie Moderne with Amédée Ozenfant (1886–1966) from 1925 to 1930. Ozenfant founded the school of Purism, which Berresford described as “the power of pure form, using flat areas only without any shading. The forms were like cut-outs of colored paper.” (Virginia Berresford, Virginia’s Journal [1989], 19.) Back in the United States, Berresford spent time in New York City taking classes with Ozenfant at his newly opened school. She also became familiar with the works of Demuth, O’Keeffe, and Charles Sheeler, (Diana Murphy, Precisionism in America 1915–1941 [1994], 29) exposure that only strengthened her Precisionist inclinations. Eventually Berresford established a school of her own on Martha’s Vineyard in Massachusetts. She also had the first commercial gallery on the Vineyard, first in Edgartown and later in Menemsha, where she exhibited both her own work and that of other artists. According to a list of painting periods in her autobiography, Berresford painted “shell abstracts, 1 large, 5 small” after 1938 (p. 181). Surely part of this group, Shells is a coolly elegant still life of three shells arrayed against a steel gray background. Berresford transformed the familiar gentle spiral of a conch shell into a mechanical form. The edges are sharp and regular, and the shell itself is painted as if it were made of glinting stainless steel. The outer edge of familiar lavender and purple is an almost startling reminder that the image on the canvas is a shell, not a man-made piece. In keeping with the Precisionist mode, Berresford did not modulate her colors, using instead distinct bands of color to indicate shifts in tone.

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Hananiah Harari (1912 – 2000) Into the Past 1941 Oil on canvas 15¼ x 13 inches Signed at lower left: Harari Signed and inscribed verso: Into the Past. 1941 / Hananiah Harari Dutch style frame Provenance The artist Richard York Gallery, New York, New York, until 2003 Private Collection, Massachusetts Exhibited The National Academy of Design, New York, Annual Exhibition, 1941, no. 67. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, American Realists and Magic Realists, 1943, no. 119. The Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ, The Art of Hananiah Harari: a Personal Synthesis, 1997, no. 30. Hananiah Harari was an artist of great whit and whimsy, and alternated between abstraction and trompe l’oeil realism in his unusual career. A part of the Works Progress Administration projects, he also joined the vanguard group, the Abstract American Artists. Yet despite Harari’s interest in Abstraction, he also felt an equal but opposite pull towards realism. Harari became drawn to the trompe l’oeil paintings by the 19th century American artist William Harnett (1848– 1892), a style of painting that had been largely forgotten or undervalued by the 1930s. He began to paint carefully composed still-lifes twice, once in his abstract mode, and once in the trompe l’oeil mode, an unusual binary system of painting. Defending his use of two seemingly opposite styles, Harari said “working in two styles is refreshing—for the artist, if perhaps not for the critic. It is an aid in preserving the artist’s sense of humor.” (Quoted in Gail Stavitsky, The Art of Hananiah Harari [1997], 13.) According to Harari’s artist statement in the catalogue for American Realists and Magic Realists (1943) at the Museum of Modern Art, “…employing the close-up view reveals the delights inherent in flyspecks, dust, cracks…I like best to paint early Americana, because they mean so much to me in every way.” Into the Past was included in that landmark exhibition, and offers a witty collection of objects to pique the viewer’s memory and delight. A frame within a frame, branches of bittersweet, a daguerreotype, old postcards, and peppermint candy evoke another era that was already in the past when Harari painted it in 1941.

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Paul Starrett Sample (1896 – 1974) Shadow Boxing at Stillmans 1945 Watercolor on paper 12½ x 18½ inches Signed at lower right: PAUL SAMPLE Titled on reverse: Shadow Boxing at Stillmans William Thon style frame Provenance [Associated American Artists Galleries, New York, New York, as of 1948] Estate of Governor John W. King, New Hampshire [Private Dealer, Massachusetts, as agent, 2008] Exhibited The Currier Gallery of Art, Manchester, New Hampshire, Paul Sample: Retrospective Exhibition, July 15 to September 15, 1948, no. 77. Paul Starrett Sample was born in Louisville, Kentucky, in 1894, and went to Dartmouth College, where he is said to have slept through art appreciation courses, in preference for the sporting life, boxing in particular. Sample served in the Merchant Marine during World War I. Though he suffered from tuberculosis after he returned home, Sample devoted himself to painting during his recuperation and studied with Jonas Lie. After painting briefly in New York, Sample headed to California. There he studied at the Otis Institute and the Los Angeles Art Students League with Stanton MacDonald-Wright and Frank Tolles Chamberlain. By 1926, Sample began teaching painting at the University of Southern California. In December 1934, Time magazine recognized him as one of the dozen foremost painters in America, a group that included Thomas Hart Benton (1889– 1975), Grant Wood (1891–1942), and John Steuart Curry (1897–1946). He was the subject of a feature article in LIFE magazine in 1937. In 1938, Sample returned to his alma mater, Dartmouth College, as artist-in-residence, and remained there until his retirement in 1962. Sample painted with a robust, American Regionalist style, characterized by firmly defined figures and a no-nonsense sensibility. While Sample could no longer lead the sporting life of his youth, his paintings are often filled with sturdy, capable characters drawn with palpable strength. Shadow Boxing at Stillmans is a dynamic depiction of Sample’s favored sport. Here, four boxers are entered in the ring, though the men are at more than arm’s lengths from one another. A trainer with a towel draped over his shoulder watches from a corner and a prominent clock on the wall adds an element of specificity to the scene. While the men’s poses are full of action and ready for sparring, the distance between the figures lends an element of gravitas to the whole scene.

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Harry Paul Burlin (1886 – 1969) Deux Ex Machina 1949 Oil on canvas 32 x 25 inches Signed at lower right: Paul Burlin Original frame Provenance Private collection, Woodstock, New York Harry Paul Burlin grasped the possibilities of modernism early in his career, and continued to follow an experimental path throughout his professional life. As a young man in New York City, Burlin was drawn towards leftist politics, and towards the progressive arts. He was influenced by the Ashcan School, and by William Glackens (1870–1938) and Robert Henri (1865–1929) in particular. Frequent visits to Alfred Stieglitz’s legendary Gallery 291 put Burlin on a thoroughly modernist track. Burlin was one of the youngest artists to have his work included in the seminal 1913 Armory Show in New York City, where he was invited to exhibit by Glackens. That same year, Burlin went on a trip to Santa Fe, and was so absorbed by the otherworldly landscape that he moved there, though he continued to exhibit in New York through the Daniel Gallery. While in the Southwest, Burlin became fascinated with the dramatic palette and imagery of the American Indians, elements that strongly informed his own painting. After an extended period living in the artistic hothouse that was Paris in the 1920s, Burlin returned to the United States in 1932. During this period, he worked in styles as varied as Cubism and Social Realism, but began to forge a distinct artistic identity based on broad forms, gesture, and color. By the mid-1940s, Burlin was painting in an Expressionist mode, his mature style. He became increasingly interested in myths, a concept he expressed as abstracted signs and symbols. Burlin was also a colorist in his paintings, and bold blocks of pigment play defining roles in his compositions. As Burlin wrote in the brochure for his 1946 show at the Downtown Gallery, “primitive colors shape themselves into a reality of their own.” (Quoted in Irving Sandler, Paul Burlin [1962], 8.) Painted in 1949, Deux Ex Machina is a cacophony of line and color. Abstracted African masks and symbols hover over large shapes of color connected by a network of black lines. A cross in an oval centers the composition. This is abstraction with representation, all with strong, symbolic overtones.

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William Sanderson (1905 – 1990) Northern Harbor c. 1950 Oil on canvas 15 x 22 inches Signed at lower left: Sanderson American Modernist frame Provenance Private Collection, Lakewood, Colorado Exhibited Saks Galleries, New York, New York, Exhibition of Paintings by William Sanderson, March 9–19, 1956, no. 32. L i t e r at u r e Saks Galleries, Exhibition of Paintings by William Sanderson, 1956, cover illus. William Sanderson was born in Latvia, and came to the United States at the age of 18 in 1923. He studied painting at the National Academy of Design and at the Art Students League in New York City. He initially worked as a commercial artist and his drawings were published in The New Yorker magazine as well as in the worker’s newspaper New Masses. In 1931 Sanderson was given a one-man show at the Contemporary American Artist’s Gallery in New York City. After the Second World War, Sanderson moved to Denver, Colorado, where he taught advertising design at the University of Denver. During that time he also exhibited with a Denver-based group know as Fifteen Colorado Artists; fellow artists included Mina Conant, Paul K. Smith, and Frank Vavra. Sanderson exhibited in over 200 group shows throughout Colorado and the West between 1945 and 1985. Sanderson employed meticulous brushwork and large flat areas of color in his precisely arranged compositions. His sensibility of crisp edges and elegant patterning can be related to his sophisticated understanding of design and commercial imagery. Sanderson has given the present scene, of a lone figure in a dingy approaching a steamship, an industrial sensibility by emphasizing both the smokestacks of the ship and the surrounding landscape. Here, nature is limited to a few stylized waves in the water; all else relates to industry and machinery. The anonymous name of the ship, No. 271, is literally a central part of the composition, and can also be related to commercial design. According to Michael Sanderson, the artist’s son, Sanderson did a number of harbor scenes in a similar vein to this early work. (E-mail, June 25, 2009.) A solo exhibition on Sanderson was mounted at the Kirkland Museum in Denver, Colorado, in 2009.

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Index page

artist

38

Berresford, Virginia

10

Bricher, Alfred Thompson

12

Brush, George de Forest

44

Burlin, Harry Paul

22

Closson, William Baxter Palmer

4

de Haas, Mauritz Frederick Hendrick

6

Dow, Arthur Wesley

8

Duveneck, Frank

32

French, Jared

36

Guy, James Meikle

40

Harari, Hananiah

34

Hilton, Roy

30

Hoffman, Harry Leslie

28

Kuhn, Walt

14

Leigh, William Robinson

18

Manigault, Edward Middleton

20

Nourse, Elizabeth

26

Richmond, Agnes Millen

42

Sample, Paul Starrett

46

Sanderson, William

16

Tanner, Henry Ossawa

24

Woodbury, Charles Herbert

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B RO C K & C O . 84 A COM MON W E A LTH AV EN U E CONCOR D, M A SSACHUSET TS 01742 T EL (978) 369-1358 FA X (978) 369-1359


Brock & Co. Selections VII