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ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

Sports Hall Fame of

21st Annual

induction ceremony andBanquet March 21, 2011


ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS HALL OF FAME Induction Ceremony and Banquet

March 23, 2009 ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa of At the Convention Center

Sports Hall Fame 21st Annual

induction ceremony andBanquet March 21, 2011 renaissance montgomery Hotel & Spa at the convention center


Steve SavareSe

alabama High school athletic association

Executive Director

Joe evanS Assoc. Exec. Director

www.ahsaa.com

Board MeMBers ed Lathan President UMS-Wright

March 21, 2011 Dear Friends,

Luke haLLmark Vice President Marengo County

BoBBy ParriSh Williamson

Lamar BrookS Dale County

dyneShia JoneS Charles Henderson

moSe JoneS A. L. Johnson

Leonard riLey Chambers County

terry CooPer Mountain Brook

CurtiS CoLeman Shades Valley

mike WeLSh Spring Garden

don Cox

Twelve of the most significant individuals in the history of interscholastic athletics in the State of Alabama have been selected for the 2011 induction into the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame. These individuals stand for what is right in athletics and in our nation. Their dedication and example for the children of this state are standards we all should try to emulate. Their legacy of dedication and sportsmanship are chief reasons athletics is such a wonderful tool of learning. We owe them a great debt of gratitude for helping make high school athletics in Alabama what it is today. They have helped mold the leaders of our communities, cities and state. Thanks to men and women like these, interscholastic athletics provides an arena in which values such as sportsmanship, dedication, teamwork, honesty, loyalty and self-discipline are learned and practiced. Interscholastic athletics is a master teacher of values so essential to the education of our youth. Thanks again to example of character that these 12 possess. The dedication of coaches, administrators, officials and media personnel makes possible the continued growth of high school athletics and the values derived from participation. Interscholastic athletics is truly indebted to these giving individuals who have touched the lives of so many through high school sports. On behalf of the AHSAA, we salute the members of this year’s class for their years of service and the many sacrifices made for the youth of our state. The Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame is featured at the Alabama High School Athletic Association state office building in Montgomery. Special plaques of the 2011 inductees are currently on display. The AHSAA takes this opportunity to thank al.com, Alfa, Coca-Cola, Encore Rehabilitation, Edmondson Screen Printing, Russell, SouthPoint Bank and Wilson as the corporate sponsors for the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame. Without such support this event would not be possible. Also, the support of contributing sponsors Alabama Power, Musco Lighting and the Marines is greatly appreciated. Also, thanks to Balfour for providing rings for the inductees. We hope that all supporters of interscholastic athletics will value and share in the spirit of the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame, which stands as a memorial to an American tradition.

Russellville City

CLyde Goode

Sincerely yours,

Lawrence County

Larry morriS Scottsboro City

Janet Latham Athens

Steven P. Savarese Executive Director SPS/cjd

CraiG PounCey SDE, Montgomery

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P.o. Box 242367 • 7325 halcyon Summit dr. • montgomery, aL 36124-2367 • Phone: 334.263.6994 • Fax: 334.387.0075

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alaBaMa HiGH ScHool atHletic DirectorS & coacHeS aSSociatioN www.ahsaa.com

Steve f. Bailey Director

officerS

March 21, 2011 Dear Friends,

Kevin Collins

President Enterprise High School

On behalf of the Alabama High School Athletic Directors & Coaches Association, we would like to welcome you to the 21st annual Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony and Banquet. It is indeed an honor for me to extend our congratulations to the inductees for 2011. While serving as outstanding role models, these individuals have had a tremendous influence on the lives of thousands of youth in our state.

Jim Hunter, Jr.

To be selected by one’s colleagues to the Hall of Fame is the highest honor a member of our profession can achieve. This class exhibits all of the characteristics that make our profession so important in the lives of our young people.

1st Vice President Calhoun High School

JoHn Grass

2nd Vice President Oxford High School

myra miles

Co-2nd Vice President Hoover High School

We express sincere appreciation to the Alabama corporations that serve as sponsors of the Alabama High School Athletic Directors and Coaches Association. They are major sponsors al.com, Alfa, Coca-Cola, Encore Rehabilitation, Edmondson Screen Printing, Russell, SouthPoint Bank and Wilson and contributing sponsors Alabama Power, Musco Lighting and the Marines. Thanks also to Balfour, which furnishes rings. These sponsors recognize the importance of high school athletics and graciously support this event. The officers and members of the AHSADCA thank you for your presence here tonight in support of these inductees and the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame. Sincerely,

DaviD WofforD

3rd Vice President Baldwin County High School

steve savarese Secretary/Treasurer AHSAA

 Steve F. Bailey Director

SFB:egm

P. o. Box 242367 • 7325 Halcyon summit Dr. • montgomery, al 36124-2367 • Phone: 334.263.6994 • fax: 334.387.0076

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PROGRAM Renaissance Montgomery Hotel & Spa at the convention center March 21, 2011 • 6:30 p.m.

Music ..................................................................... Wilburn Ingram Welcome .................................................................... Kevin Collins Master Of Ceremonies ..................................................Jeff Shearer Spotlight Parade of Inductees Presentation of the Colors.............................. Marine Color Guard National Anthem .............................................................. Mike Vest Invocation ...................................................................... Jim Hunter Dinner Dinner Music ........................................................ Wilburn Ingram Introductions Guests ............................. ...................,,,‌.Steve Savarese Corporate Partners ........................................ Joe Evans Former Inductees .........................................Steve Bailey Induction Ceremony .....................................................Jeff Shearer Steve Savarese Kevin Collins Steve Bailey Response for Inductees .........................................Wanda Gilliland Special Salute to Inductees ...............................Video Presentation Closing Remarks ...........................................................Jeff Shearer

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ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

Sports Hall Fame of

2011 Inductees Tony Baggiano Doug Barfield Joe Belyeu Wanda R. Gilliland George Hatchett Bill Murrell Johnny Patrick Lester Smith Jim Tate Waldon Tucker Lyle Underwood Jerry Weems

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2011 Inductee

Tony Baggiano

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ony Baggiano’s officiating career has involved such lofty circles as the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Pan American Games, but nothing shows his dedication like his commitment to high school sports. “He is the only official that I have ever known who would fly back home from Washington, D.C. in order to work the high school assignment he had accepted for that night,” wrote former AHSAA Executive Director Herman L. “Bubba” Scott. Current Executive Director Steve Savarese said Baggiano’s loyalty to the AHSAA was shown clearly by the fact that “Tony gave rules clinics all over our state without ever charging the Association a fee.” “During his service to the AHSAA as a coordinator or clinician, he never once accepted payment for any of those services,” wrote Greg Brewer, the Association’s director of officials. “I have known Tony even before moving to Montgomery in 1985,” Brewer continued. “He officiated in and later helped coordinate the contest officials at the state basketball tournament. Tony is a person that pays attention to detail. He was an excellent training officer in respective associations. He officiated in multiple sports. He carried over his teaching skills while serving as a state rules clinician for us. While serving a lengthy term in this position, he helped us develop guidelines for officials that are still being used today…he truly represented the term ‘Giving Back to the Sport.’ ” Douglas P. Ruth, a long-time fellow official with Baggiano, wrote that he had worked with few as dedicated as Baggiano. “We worked regular season and playoff games across South Alabama. He was one of the most dedicated officials I ever knew and worked with. Prior to games we often met to discuss game situations and rules interpretation to include a complete refresher knowledge of the latest rules changes and points of emphasis. “While traveling to the game site the discussion was always focused on getting ready for that game: any special field or court conditions, a review of officiating positions to be in the best possible position to call the game, and any special team or player situations concerning the game. “Tony’s game mechanics always kept the players, coaches and fans knowing exactly what had happened and what was going to happen. I knew of no one who knew the rules and how to apply them better than Tony Baggiano. That is why all the coaches respected him. To sum it up, Tony was the consummate official for everyone associated with the game.” 8

Baggiano initiated the first Montgomery coaches’ clinic for basketball, bringing in top college coaches to give their perspective. That was followed by an intensive rules clinic. Selma Mayor George Evans, himself a long-time official, said Baggiano gave officials “an honest and fair evaluation” after every state tournament and even developed a critique form which the officials could take home and review. A native of Jamestown, NY, Baggiano graduated from Jamestown High School in 1957 and The Citadel in 1961. He also holds a master’s degree from Texas A&M. With degrees in mathematics he has taught at the U. S. Air Force Academy and Auburn University in Montgomery. A Vietnam veteran, he spent 20 years in the Air Force, retiring as a full colonel. From 1981-85 he was assistant director of the Data Systems Management Division of the State of Alabama. He was employed by Robbins-GIOIS LLC from 1985-2003, rising to the rank of president of the company. His officiating career has covered decades and multiple sports. He was a member and officer of the Central Alabama Football Officials Association for nearly 20 years and was named Official of the Year five times. He was a member and officer of the Central Alabama Basketball Officials Association for nearly 20 years and a member of the Mid-State Basketball Officials Association for four years. He devoted 17 years of service to the AHSAA as both a football and basketball clinician, working more than 150 clinics in each sport. From 1980-92 he coordinated state basketball tournament officials. He has also been an Alabama junior college and Southern States Conference basketball official. He was involved with the United State Olympic Committee from 1900-2003, serving seven years on the board of directors and seven years as an affiliated sport representative. He chaired the Pan American Sports Council from 1997-2003. In 1995, 1999 and 2003 he was captain of the USA water ski team for the Pan American Games. Other contributions to water skiing include: • President of USA Water Ski, 1987-90; chairman of the board, 1990-93. • Manger of USA Water Ski Team at the world championships in 1985, 1987, 1989 and 1991. • Chief Judge, National Water Ski Championships, 1987; U.S. Open Water Ski Championships, 1988; and World Junior Water Ski Championships, 1988. • Board of Directors, American Water Ski Educational Foundation and Hall of Fame, 1984-92, 2002-present. A l a b a m a H i g h S c h o o l S p o rt s H a l l

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2011 Inductee

Doug Barfield

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o many football fans, Doug Barfield is the man who, in 1976, received the prestigious – but some say thankless--job of succeeding legendary Auburn football coach Ralph “Shug” Jordan. He served for five years, compiling a record of 29-25-1 and is credited with being one of the early promoters of the tradition now known as the Tiger Walk. Although his coaching career also includes stops at Southern Mississippi, Clemson and Mississippi State, Barfield’s role in athletics includes significant contributions to high school sports in Alabama. A native of Castleberry, Ala., Barfield graduated from Clarke County High School in 1953 and the University of Southern Mississippi in 1957. He also holds a master’s degree in education administration from Troy State University at Phenix City. At Clarke County he earned 11 letters in three sports and served as quarterback on the South All-Star team his senior year. He would later return to coach the South All-Star team. In college he quarterbacked the Southern Mississippi team in the 1956 Tangerine Bowl. That same team tied the University of Alabama 13-13. He started his coaching career at Clarke County High School as assistant football and head basketball coach under Hannis “Red” Prim, one of the early inductees in the AHSAA Hall of Fame. After two years in the Army, he accepted the position of head football coach at University Military School in Mobile. His record was 25-5. Former player Bert Milling recalled: “He taught us that there were more important matters in life besides winning football games, such as honesty and character. Play hard but fairly, well within the rules. Cheap shots were not tolerated. His faith and belief in God were very important to him, demonstrated not so much by what he said but by the way he acted….” From UMS he went to Andalusia for two years, compiling a record of 15-4-1 and was named South Alabama Coach of the year. His success at UMS and Andalusia took him to a job as offensive coordinator at Southern Mississippi, his alma mater. It also launched an 18-year career in college sports before he turned to business for a few years and then returned to his high school roots. In 1989 he came out of coaching and teaching retirement to become the first football coach at the new Hillcrest High School in Evergreen, created through the consolidation of Evergreen and Conecuh County high schools. Although he had been out of coaching for several years, the skills were 21 s t A n n u a l I n d u c t i o n C e r e m o n y

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still there. He took the young team to an 8-1 record in its first campaign. The following year he went to Opelika where he compiled a 40-19 record, taking the Bulldogs to the playoffs all five years. He posted two 10-win seasons at Opelika and was named Class 6A Coach of the Year in 1991. Former OHS Principal Don Roberts was involved in the decision to hire Barfield at Opelika and he said “it was a great day for everyone at our school and our community” when Barfield arrived. In a letter regarding those days, Roberts wrote: “He brought a level of expertise, wisdom and class that was absolutely incredible. His amazing record of 40-19 and five consecutive playoff appearances is just the tip of the iceberg as to what he really achieved during his five years with us. He brought immediate integrity to our program. His very presence raised the bar of expectation for our entire school. He made all of us want to be better. He became a powerful force in our community and it was a sad day indeed when he decided to leave us to purse yet another challenge. “The highest praise I can give Coach Barfield comes not from my role as his principal but from my role as father of a son who played for him for three years. If I could have created the type person I would have wanted to coach my son, I could not have envisioned a better coach than Doug Barfield. His leadership and encouragement made a huge, positive impact on my son and the impact far exceeded the football field. I believe that he helped make my son a better person as he did for countless other young men during his career.” In 1995 he left Opelika to become athletic director at the University of Mobile, serving there for two years. During his tenure the basketball team finished fourth in the nation in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) tournament. From 1997-2001 he was athletic director at UMS-Wright, the scene of his first head coaching job. The school won two consecutive AHSAA all-sports championships. From 2001-04, he worked in the AHSAA offices in Montgomery, serving as marketing director. In 2004-08 he became executive vice president for sports medicine at Encore Rehabilitation. In 2009-10 he returned to the AHSAA, again serving in public relations and marketing. Other career highlights included being inducted into the UMS-Wright and Southern Miss halls of fame and coaching in both the Hula Bowl and the Blue-Gray game.

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2011 Inductee

Joe Belyeu

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native of Tallapoosa County, Joe Belyeu has spent his entire 34-year education career in neighboring Coosa County. He attended J. D. Thompson High school in Cottage Grove until 1969 when integration came to Coosa County schools. He then moved over to Coosa County High School in Rockford where he was a basketball starter for three years. He was graduated in 1972. He received a scholarship to Athens State University. He was twice named to the all-conference team in the Southern States Conference and led the team in scoring and free throw percentage. He received a bachelor of science degree in health and physical education in 1976. After graduation from Athens State, he returned to the Cottage Grove community as director of the Day Care Center for a year. He then was hired at Goodwater High School as an assistant coach and physical education teacher in 1977. In 1983–84 he became head basketball coach, taking his first team to the state tournament. The team lost in the quarterfinals but finished the season with a 26-5 record. His 1986-87 team made it to the semifinals of the state tournament and two other squads were among what is called the Sweet 16 in the NCAA. When Goodwater High and Coosa County High were consolidated in 1988-89, he was named head basketball coach at the new Central Coosa High School. From that first season through 2009-10 he won more than 400 games, compiling more than a dozen seasons of 20-plus wins. He carried nine teams to the quarterfinals, five of them to championship game. Four of those teams—1995, 2000, 2001 and 2004—won state championships. The 2008 team was runner-up. Those five finalist teams produced 13 alltournament players, including four MVP recipients. In 2009 he and his Central Coosa fellow coaches shared an experience accorded very few. Two of his former forwards lined up against each other in Super Bowl XLII: linebacker Adalius Thomas of the New England Patriots and defensive end Justin Tuck of the New York Giants. Thomas, who played collegiately at Southern Mississippi, made the all-tournament team on Belyeu’s first state championship squad in 1995. Tuck, who went on to Notre Dame, was all-tournament on back-to-back state championship teams in 2000 and 2001. He was MVP in 2000. Coach Belyeu has also coached football, track and volleyball at various times at Central Coosa. He has been athletic director for the past 10 years. “I have known Coach Belyeu for more than 25 years and have had the opportunity to work with him as a coach for 10

15 years and as his principal for 10 years. Coach Belyeu has been a tremendous influence on many of our students and our community in general by providing great leadership in the classroom, in athletics and in our community. Most importantly, Coach Belyeu is a man of high moral and ethical character,” wrote Principal Keith Bullard. Calvin McKinney, career tech director at Coosa County Science & Technology Center, has worked with Belyeu over the years as an administrator and fellow coach. He wrote: “Coach has a sincere interest in the students of Coosa County, the total education process and the community. He consistently strives to make each student all that he/ she can be. “He consistently gets the absolute best from each individual player. He is innovative, enthusiastic and thoroughly competent. He is very conscientious in his preparation and demanding in his coaching. Players respond in a positive manner because they know he cares about them as players and individuals. He molds his players into an excellent team each year. He is very passionate about his work, and demonstrates the highest level of professional commitment and competence in his coaching and with student athletes. His caring attitude and superior knowledge of the game make him effective with players at all levels in different abilities. Coach has always shown that he is willing to do whatever it takes to get the job done (drives the buses for other sports, cleans the gym after games, and assists other coaches’ work on different school and community projects). “Coach Belyeu has been an excellent role model for the Coosa County School System, athletics, the community and his church.” Coaching at Central Coosa has been a family affair for the Belyeus. He has coached two sons, Joey and Jarvis, with the former later joining him on the bench as assistant coach. Belyeu’s wife of 34 years, Jackie, has long been team mom, leading the boys in prayer before each game. Among the honors Belyeu has received are Class 4A Coach of the Year in 1995 and 2004, Cap Brown Coach of the Year in 2001 and Southeast Region Boys Coach of the Year in 2001. He was South coach in the state all-star game and an assistant coach in the Alabama-Mississippi All-Star game . He is a member of the county, state and national education associations, the Alabama High School Athletic Directors & Coaches Association and the National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association. He is a deacon at Mt. Sinai Baptist Church.

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2011 Inductee

Wanda R. Gilliland

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hen Wanda R. Gilliland was growing up there were no girls’ athletic programs, but there was no shortage of athletics in her life. “It was just the background in my family,” she recalled. “My brothers all played in high school and I was a cheerleader in high school for one year. My dad would let us go to sporting events. He thought that was the greatest thing in the world.” A native of Guin, Gilliland graduated from Marion County High School in Guin in 1968. When she went to Athens State a few years later there was a fledgling women’s athletic program underway, but by that time she had a family to look after was well as going to school. Still, she said she had always loved kids and felt teaching and coaching was what she wanted to do with her life. She got that opportunity when she finished at Athens in 1979. She started her career at Hamilton High School teaching government, Alabama history and physical education. There was also coaching.  “The first year I worked under a gentleman and then I took over the program. We just had basketball and track at first. Softball was added later and somebody else did the volleyball while I was there,” she said. Her basketball teams excelled in an area that was known for successful programs. She compiled a record of 301-96, winning the Class 5A state championship with a final record of 31-2 in 1990.  The following year her girls made it to the finals once again. Overall, there were four state tournament appearances, seven Marion County championships and 10 area championships. Gilliland was named Marion County Coach of the Year 10 times and state coach of the Year in 1990. She also earned Coach of the Year honors in track, golf and softball. She was inducted into the Marion County Sports Hall of Fame in 2001. In 1996 she left Hamilton to accept a position as assistant director with the Alabama High School Athletic Association. She works daily with 700 middle and senior high schools in the state.  Her work has included eligibility, school audits, investigations, foreign exchange students and conduct and ejection issues. “Ms. Gilliland has been an outstanding advocate and spokesperson for the AHSAA and its member schools for the

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last 4 years,” wrote former AHSAA Executive Director Dan Washburn. “As a part of her duties …Wanda has taken great pride in the Association’s championship programs. She has worked with all programs, boys and girls alike, but has taken great pride in promoting the volleyball and softball programs to new heights.” She has also been involved in a number of state and national programs such as the Alabama Department of Education’s Drug Safety for Schools and Crisis Management Plan. She has served on National Federation rules committees in basketball, spirit and softball. She has always been known as a team player. Bravell D. Jackson, retired Marion County superintendent, wrote: “Wanda has always been a tireless worker and a team player in her professional life. She has never faced a job that she was afraid to tackle. I served as her superintendent when she worked at Hamilton High School. When Wanda left Hamilton, it created a void in our school and coaching staff as well as in our community at large. Even though Wanda was the only female coach on staff, she always went far beyond her job description. She was always helping the male coaches in their assigned duties. It didn’t matter if it was cleaning the locker room or doing the laundry, Wanda always did her part. She was a total team player.” A former player, Danita Ballard, wrote: “She has truly inspired my life. She coached me for four years in basketball, volleyball, softball and track. She not only instilled in her players to give 110 percent all the time, but she also believed in her girls. She knew what we were capable of doing and pushed us to achieve our goals. She instilled moral values and good sportsmanship in her players, on and off the court. She absolutely loved sports, but she also cared about every student she came in contact with, whether it was on the court or in a classroom….She gave unselfishly of her time to coach for many years. She seemed to find time to coach all sports and attend every football and basketball game and care for a family with two children. “I cannot say enough wonderful things about Wanda. However, I can honestly say that I have never known anyone like here. No matter what she is doing she is always giving 100 percent of herself. She is truly an inspiration to me, her family and anyone who has had the privilege to meet her.”  Coach Gilliland has a master’s degree from the University of North Alabama.

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2011 Inductee

George Hatchett

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native of Birmingham, George Hatchett graduated from Ramsay High School in 1965 and the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1972. He holds a master’s degree from UAB. In 1973 he coached the club baseball team at UAB as that program was just beginning to develop. Then he went to Fairfield High School from 1973-75, serving as an assistant football and basketball coach. From 1975-77 he was assistant football and basketball coach at Mortimer Jordan High School and from 1977-80 he coached at Pizitz Middle School. In 1981 he moved to Vestavia Hills High School where he has remained, coaching freshman football and varsity boys basketball. Principal Cas McWaters said sometimes Hatchett’s coaching style didn’t meet with fan approval: “I remember years ago when fans complained that Coach Hatchett ran a manto-man defense instead of a zone defense. I remember them saying he was outdated. Actually, George was ahead of his time, as now it seems like everyone runs man-toman. It takes discipline and commitment to stand behind your beliefs when others are pointing fingers at you. Coach Hatchett’s kids believe in their coach and his disciplined approach.” That defense was probably never more evident than it was in the first half of the 1992 Class 6A championship game. Vestavia Hills limited Robert E. Lee to just five points, taking a 31-5 lead at intermission en route to 68-56 victory. Other highlights of Hatchett’s career: • An overall record of 506-345 • Two state championships, 1992 and 2009, plus another semifinals team. • In those three final four appearances, Vestavia Hills had eight all-tournament players, including two Most Valuable Player selections. • Two Regional champions, two Regional runners-up and six Area championships. • More than a dozen seasons with 20 or more wins. • Birmingham Tipoff Club Coach of the Year in 1992 and 2009. Vestavia Hills teacher W. Gregory Smith, who played for Hatchett in the early 1980s, had this to say about his former coach: “Professionally, Coach Hatchett has enjoyed immense success as a classroom teacher. His tremendous sense of humor and love of teaching have enabled him to generate a large, diverse and loyal following of former students that all respect and admire him….As a disciple of Thompson Reynolds, 12

Coach Hatchett has always maintained his perspective and mission of coaching—developing young boys into men of character and confidence. A brief survey of his former players more than acquits Coach Hatchett’s attainment of success in this regard. Most notably, his former athletes include doctors, lawyers, engineers, accountants, teachers and other distinguished professionals. “Personally, I was blessed to have the winds of providence blow this extraordinary man into my life. I have known Coach Hatchett for more than 30 years. During this time, few people have had the degree of positive influence on my life as has Coach Hatchett.” McWaters said that Coach Hatchett’s emphasis on character and personal growth over wins and losses is reflected in the steady stream of former players and students who come back to visit him. A couple of them wrote letters supporting his hall of fame nomination. Jeff Kaufman wrote: “While Coach Hatchett’s accomplishments have been outstanding on the court, his qualities off the basketball court have been just as exceptional. He always displays and exhibits great character and is very ethical. He truly cares about his players and that is very evident as many of them return after they graduate and continue to support our program. Coach just has a way of letting you know that he loves you, but also pushes you to do your very best. “Because of this type of leadership as well as being very internally driven, he has the respect of our players and has let our basketball teams accomplish unprecedented levels of success…In today’s times, multisport athletes are becoming a thing of the past. Coach Hatchett has a history of encouraging his basketball players not only to play in other sports, but also participate in students activities such as student government. He does this to help his players become more rounded as well as preparing them for life beyond high school.” Joseph Corona added: “Coach Hatchett often used the phrase ‘the greatest potential in me is WE.’ Players do not respond well to hollow slogans and mottos; however, Coach Hatchett builds his teams with this philosophy until it becomes woven within them. The collective hard work he put us through created an environment of fellowship, trust, and togetherness that still resonates with his former players after graduation. While some truly gifted players have passed through Vestavia Hills, Coach Hatchett has never let the talents of those overshadow the team and its goals.” Hatchett has served the AHSAA on the Hall of Fame Selection Committee and as Fifth District Basketball Committee representative. He is a member of the Mountain Chapel United Methodist Church. A l a b a m a H i g h S c h o o l S p o rt s H a l l

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2011 Inductee

Bill Murrell

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ill Murrell has been coaching baseball at Athens Bible for 37 years, the last 34 as head coach. When his team won the Class A state championship in 2008, it was his first state title but only a small reflection of the success of his program. Athens Bible was runner-up five times – 1980, 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2009. His teams were semifinalists in 1987, 1989 and 2007. They made it to the quarterfinals five other times. In addition: • 2 4 Area championships, including 12 straight (19992010). • Six Area runners-up. • Six Limestone County championships and five runnersup. • 26 appearances in the state playoffs, including 21 appearances in the past 24 years. • A record of 658-351 through the 2010 season. Coach Murrell was named state Coach of the Year in 2002 and 2008. He has been local Coach of the Year, as named by The Decatur Daily and the Athens News Courier, 15 times. He has also coached both boys and girls cross country at Athens Bible for 34 years. His boys teams won four consecutive Class 1A-2A state championships from 1977-80 and were runners-up twice. They have also been runners-up in Class 1A-4A once and Class 1A-3A twice. His girls teams have been 1A-2A runners-up twice. He has had 36 All-State runners, including five individual champions. He was named state Coach of the Year four times. He has also coached outdoor track and field and basketball. In 1986 his girls team was state 1A-2A runner-up in outdoor track and field. In the 1970s he led Athens Bible to three Alabama Bible School basketball tournament championships. A native of Montgomery, Bill Murrell was the son of a minister who traveled widely, exposing his family to life in many states and even England. He graduated from Ben Davis High School in Indianapolis in 1965. He returned to Alabama to earn his bachelor’s degree from Athens State College. He subsequently earned a master’s degree at the University of North Alabama and received AA Certification from Florida College. He joined the faculty of Athens Bible School as a teacher and coach in 1970 and has spent his entire career there. From 1970-82 he taught physical education to all students, K-12. He has also taught trigonometry, geometry and algebra

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as well as served as assistant principal, guidance counselor, athletic director and student council advisor. Murrell is not only known for his extraordinary success as a coach, but also for the way he coaches, displaying a calm demeanor and impeccable sportsmanship no matter how tense or exciting the circumstances. A parent, writing on the ABS website, said, “I don’t know many of the ABS coaches as well as I would like, but I have known Coach Bill Murrell for a long time, and I couldn’t respect him more. I can’t imagine a player on Coach Murrell’s team ever being allowed to act in a way that would bring shame to our school.” Billy Hall, a former player and current assistant baseball coach, commented on Murrell’s personality and deep knowledge of rules: “Baseball umpires dread discussing rules applications with Coach Murrell because they know he knows the rules inside out. They all know, though, that if Coach Murrell brings a rule book at all to the discussion, it will be tucked discreetly inside his extended baseball cap to avoid detection by the fans. There will be no shouting, stomping or disrespectful gestures, just a civilized discussion of the rules. “ Recalling a 2002 playoff game and a controversy over whether a batter was in or out of the box when he hit a long ball to right field, Hall said, “As the fans and players screamed, shouted, ranted and raved, Coach Murrell calmly walked to the plate and asked the umpire to show him where the batter was standing. After the footprint was revealed, Coach Murrell asked the umpire for a conference with the field umpires to discuss the rules. The correct call was agreed upon by the umpires, largely due to Coach Murrell’s calm respectful demeanor while protesting the call. In his written report to the state explaining the controversial mistake, the umpire specifically mentioned Coach Murrell’s sportsmanship during the volatile incident. “I’m 48 years old and have spent about 20 years with Coach Murrell, either as a player or an assistant, and can honestly say that he’s one of the most respected coaches in North Alabama. His influence on thousands of players, students, opponents, fans and me is a great blessing that will endure long after he is gone.” Murrell is an elder at Eastside Church of Christ and has been involved in the Boy Scouts, the Babe Ruth summer baseball league, and the state coaches association. He has also served on the board of directors of the Tennessee Valley Rehabilitation Center.

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2011 Inductee

Johnny Patrick

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hen Johnny Patrick was a senior at Kinterbish High School, the tiny rural Sumter County school had upset Fairfield Industrial High School to advance to the Class 1A finals against McIntosh in the Alabama Interscholastic Athletic Association state basketball tournament. “I had the ball and was going to throw it to a teammate. They intercepted it and scored at the buzzer to beat us by two points,” Patrick recalled. “Coach didn’t say one word to me about losing the game. I remember that today and use it today. It had a big affect on how I try to treat kids. I don’t blame one player for a loss. I was the best offensive player on the team. Coach said later, ‘If you hadn’t scored other points in other games, we would never have been in that game.’ That helped me as a young man in the way I deal with kids today and coach basketball today.” Patrick’s philosophy of coaching has served him well. When he left Sumter County High School in 2004, he had won nearly 500 games and had five state championships. A native of Whitfield, Ala., Patrick graduated from Kinterbish High School in 1968 where he played baseball and basketball, the only sports at the school. He was offered a basketball scholarship at Alabama State University, but that fell apart. “I was supposed to have a scholarship. Ben Jobe was the coach. He ended up leaving in August and went to Kentucky State, I think. They never hired a basketball coach. Some of the guys practiced in parks on their own, but there was nothing organized. After the football season was over, the football coach and another man started basketball practice,” he said. But the scholarship was gone and he could not get a loan. “I don’t know how I made it that first year. I got a little job at the A&P, but I couldn’t get a loan. The second year I was able to get a student loan from the bank,” he said. “I think it really helped me. If it had been an easier path and more funds, I probably wouldn’t be as appreciative of being able to get that education back in ’68. It gives me perspective in helping young people in dealing with life, making decisions and choices.” Raised by a grandmother who wanted him to go to college, Patrick persevered. In 1972 he graduated from Alabama State with a bachelor of science degree in physical education and health education, the first member of his family to receive a college degree. In 1976 he added a master of science degree. His first job was as a teacher at York West End Junior High School from 1972-74. In 1974 he moved to Sumter County High School as a teacher and coach, a position he held for the next 30 years. His first coaching job was head football 14

coach, which he did for five years. Although the program was down, he produced back-to-back winning seasons in 1979 and 1980. In the 1981-82 school year he gave up football and became head basketball coach. Over the next 22 years he would compile a record of 497-124. They were state champions in 1988, 1994, 1998, 1999 and 2004. The 1995 team was Class 4A runner-up team and two other teams made it to the semifinals. Altogether, Patrick’s Sumter County teams were in the state tournament 10 times. He had 18 all-tournament players, including five MVPs. He was named Class 4A State Coach of the Year four times. He coached in the Alabama-Mississippi Basketball Classic three times and coached the South team in the 1996 North-South All-Star game. Greene County High School basketball Coach Rodney Wesley, who faced Patrick’s teams a number of times, wrote: “I had an opportunity as a high school player to compete against teams coached by him and as a young coach I’ve had to the opportunity to coach against him. Coach Patrick’s teams were always well disciplined, good and played the game for the entire 32 minutes. He was well known throughout all of West Alabama as the coach that could win without a big man. “Many young coaches grow up wanting to win at least one state championship during their coaching careers. Coach Patrick has won five titles and has made the tournament 10 times. Coach Patrick has inspired many of his players and other young men to become high school coaches. He has been a mentor to me and a good role model for all the young coaches in West Alabama.” Sumter County Principal Ellis C. Levy Jr. wrote: “Coach Patrick has given more than 30 years of service and dedication to the boys and girls of Sumter County. Coach Patrick was an excellent teacher in the classroom and was very loyal as an assistant principal.…Coach Patrick’s discipline, determination, dedication and desire for the game of basketball have elevated him to an elite class in our great state among high school basketball coaches….Although Coach Patrick won many championships and honors as a coach at Sumter County High School, he is highly respected as a Christian man. I have observed him as a teacher and coach but others know him as a loving husband, father, community leader, friend and role model in our community.” After his last championship in 2004, he left Sumter County to coach at Southeast Lauderdale High School in Meridian, Miss. He plans to retired at the end of the current school A l a b a m a H i g h S c h o o l S p o rt s H a l l

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Lester Smith

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native of Foley, Lester Smith attended Foley High School where he quarterbacked the 1962 team to a 10-0 record and a state championship in a newspaper poll. There were no playoffs in those days. After his graduation, he attended East Mississippi Junior College in Scooba, Miss., playing under the legendary Bob “Bull” Sullivan. He then went on to Southeastern Louisiana College where he graduated with honors in 1967. He also holds a master’s degree from Troy State University where he was an honor graduate in education administration. Coach Smith began his career in 1967 at Hammond High School (La.) as a teacher, baseball coach and assistant football coach. After a year he returned to Foley to continue a nearly life-long association with his alma mater. He started out as an English teacher and assistant coach, serving for two years under the legendary Ivan Jones. In 1969 he was named head football coach, a position he would hold for the next 17 years. During that time his teams won 118 games while losing only 51 and tying two. He had 14 winning seasons in 17 years. Among them was the 1977 team which went 10-0 in the regular season as the first undefeated team at Foley in 15 years. The 1981 squad also won 10 games, advancing to the second round of the state playoffs. For the 10-year period of 1974-83 he had the best football record in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Ed Lathan, who coached against Smith while at B. C. Rain, was quoted as saying of Smith’s teams: “They are so thorough that you can’t beat them unless you show them something (a formation or a play) that they haven’t seen…and it’s probably something new for you to learn.” In 1986 he left coaching to become assistant principal, then principal, serving until 1993. He then went into business for two years, working with Gulf Telephone Company as human resources manager. In 1995 rejoined the Baldwin County School System as athletic director. In 2001, with the football program having fallen on hard times, he returned to Foley High School as head football coach. It was a difficult time for the program, but over the next three years he built a foundation for future success and then returned to the school system as athletic director. Principal Kenneth Dinges explained those difficult years:

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“Lester came back to Foley High School, after serving as the Baldwin County athletic director, at my request to try and turn the school program around. Victory-wise that did not happen, but program-wise he succeeded in bringing back the values to the students that they had not had in years. His teams always played hard in every contest and were winners in other ways besides the scoreboard. Lester left Foley to take the director of personnel job for the Baldwin County School System. He has excelled in that position as well as he did as head football coach of Foley High School and athletic director of all Baldwin County.” Those winning ways were shared by attorney J. Russell Pigott, who played for Smith in the early 1980s: “I have so many positive memories from having known Coach Smith. I still have a letter that he wrote to me in the summer of 1982 before my senior year. It was a letter that was written to all players and included the following, which I believe exemplifies the attitude and example that Coach Smith set for all of his players: ‘We expect every player to be a class person both on and off the field. Be a credit to your family, your school, your community, your teammates and yourself. Don’t do anything to reflect poorly on any of the above mentioned people. ‘We want to have players who are gentlemen, don’t use profanity, don’t drink, don’t smoke or use drugs. We want players who are courteous, respectful, work hard, lead, don’t complain, don’t make excuses, hustle and have a burning desire to excel. ‘The only place where success comes before work is in the dictionary.’ Also included in that letter was a particular note addressed directly to me. I still find myself reading this note from time to time and it is as energizing and motivating to me now as when I first read it: ‘We are expecting a great year from you and expect you to lead others in the right direction. Push yourself academically and athletically to the limit of your abilities. To succeed, you must pay the price.’ “Coach Smith has been a tremendous credit, not only to the coaching profession, but to the lives of all the young men and women who he has come in contact with over the years. His guidance and the example that he set has definitely made me a better person.”

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2011 Inductee

Jim Tate

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or the past three decades Jim Tate has coached track and cross country at St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Mobile with phenomenal results. He has produced 88 varsity state championship teams and 37 runner-up teams. The breakdown: • 18 girls cross country championships including 16 consecutive from 1983-98. This is the current national high school record. • 11 boys indoor track championships. • 17 girls indoor track championships. • 13 boys track and field championships. • 20 girls track and field championships. • Two junior high championships, one in girls cross country and one in boys track and field. Also, three junior high runner-up teams in girls cross country, indoor track and track & field.

In 2010 he was named National High School Coaches Association Coach of the Year after his girls team won a fifth straight AHSAA championship. As Tommy Hicks wrote in the Mobile Press-register, that’s not a bad record for a basketball coach. When Headmaster Rufus Bethea brought him to St. Paul’s in 1978, it was as boys basketball coach. St. Paul’s did not have any teams in cross country or track. A native of Atlanta, Jim Tate graduated from University Military School in Mobile in 1959 and The Citadel in 1963 with a bachelor of science degree. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Alabama and has done graduate work at Azusa Pacific College in California. After college he served four years as a regular officer in the U. S Army Field Artillery (Airborne). He received four service medals for the Vietnam War, also the Air Medal and a Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster. He started his teaching and coaching career at Christ Church Episcopal School in Greenville, SC in 1970. He was head basketball and track coach and assisted in football and baseball. In 1976 he went to The Lovett School in Atlanta where he coached cross country, track and boys basketball. He was at the Lovett School when Bethea asked him to return home to Mobile. Because of his work with cross country and track & field in South Carolina and Georgia, Tate sought to establish similar programs at St. Paul’s. School officials have never regretted giving him the okay to do so.

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The first three years at St. Paul’s he coached basketball and helped with football, developing the track and cross country programs on the side. As the interest in the new sports grew, he was named full-time coach for both sports, boys and girls teams. “During those years we had no track, so we lined off what was basically a circle around the football practice field. Three or four times a year we’d have meets there,” he recalled in a 2008 interview. They used the football practice field until a new facility for track & field was completed in 1992. More than 40 of his student athletes have gone on to college competition, 27 of them at Division I schools. Coach Tate holds Level II track certification in endurance training. He was named National Federation of Interscholastic Coaches Association’s boys cross country Coach of the Year in 1998. He has been inducted into both the Mobile Sports Hall of Fame and the Christ Church Episcopal School Athletic Hall of Fame. Like all great coaches, his success is measured in more ways than wins and losses. “The real story of Jim Tate is that of a gentle leader, who, in turn, makes leaders of young men and young women,” wrote St. Paul’s Headmaster F. Martin Lester, Jr. “ He does so not through a harsh win-at-all costs approach, but through positive encouragement, a sense of humor, a sense of duty, and humbling personification of the Golden Rule. You will not find a coach more deserving than Jim Tate for induction into the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame. He has set state and national records with a smile and sense of humility and decency. He is a dynamic leader who makes things happen and is growing tomorrow’s leaders today.” St. Paul’s Athletic Director Gerry Strang added: “I have had the privilege and honor to know and to work with Jim at St. Paul’s School since 1978. He has been one of the most dedicated and professional people in the coaching and teaching profession that I have ever met. His character, integrity and work ethic have been a constant for all of us to strive toward at our school. His achievements are nothing short of amazing, but more importantly, the positive influence he and his program have had on hundreds of students would be his greatest accomplishment.” The St. Paul’s field house was named in Coach Tate’s honor last fall.

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Waldon Tucker

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aldon Tucker grew up winning. He played high school football at Linden where Pete Henders produced three undefeated teams and seven consecutive bowl teams in the 1950s and 1960s. Tucker’s senior year included a 46-7 walloping of Clarke County in the 1965 Paper Bowl. Last fall, some 45 years after that senior year, Tucker coached Fayette County High School to a 35-7 win over Hamilton. The win gave Tucker an overall record of 303-1233, making him the winningest coach in the Alabama high school football history. A native of Half Acre, AL, Tucker is a graduate of Linden High School in 1966 and Livingston State College (now the University of West Alabama) in 1972 with a bachelor’s degree in health, physical education and general social science. He played football at Livingston and was named to the All-Alabama Collegiate Conference team in 1969. In 1971 he was a graduate assistant when Livingston won the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) national championship. He was inducted into the Livingston Hall of Fame in 1988. He began his teaching and coaching career as an assistant at Sweetwater High School in 1972. The following year he took the head football coach position at Demopolis Academy, remaining there for five years. In 1978 he returned to public schools, accepting the head football coach and athletic director’s position at Gordo High School. Over the next six years he compiled a record of 8415, placing four teams in the playoffs. The 1980 squad was 14-0 and the Class 2A state champs. He was named Class 2A state Coach of the Year. The 1982 team made it to the semifinals. In 1984 he moved to Fayette County High School where he would win his second state championship in 1996. The Tigers went 15-0 to take the Class 4A crown. In 27 years at Fayette County he has 25 winning seasons. Only five of his teams failed to make the state playoffs. Among his coaching honors: • State Coach of the Year in 1989 (Class 5A) and 1996 (Class 4A) • Numerous West Alabama, Mid-State Athletic Conference and West Alabama Conference Coach of the Year selections. • West Alabama Coach of the Decade (1989). • Head coach 1980 North-South All-Star game.

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• Fayette County Superintendent Reba Anderson, who served as both counselor and principal at Fayette County High, wrote of her work with Tucker: “The coach who at times appears to be rough and reckless is sensitive and caring. The coach who wears championship rings and now holds the title of winningest coach in the state is the same person who takes his and his sons’ unwrapped Christmas gifts to a young man who is in need. He is the same person who sits all night with a friend who is dying of cancer. He is the first person to deliver food and clothing to the family whose home burned the night before. He is the one parents call on for help when their children will not listen to reason. He is the coach who will not run up a score on another team because he knows his team might be the underdog the next year. “It would be impossible for me to tell you how Waldon Tucker is able to field winning teams year after year. It would also be impossible for me to tell you which formations and plays are most effective. I know very little about the game of football, but I do know about personality and influence. Every player and every assistant coach or volunteer knows that Waldon Tucker cares about him. That makes the difference.” Fayette High Principal Radford Hester wrote: “Coach Waldon Tucker is one of the finest men and role models I have ever known. He has been married to his high school sweetheart, Sue Whitcomb, for over 41 years. They are the parents of two sons, Lance and Luke, both of whom signed scholarships and played football at the University of Alabama. Both sons are now high school football coaches. Waldon and Sue have three grandchildren who bring them great joy. “Coach Tucker has always been supportive of all aspects of the total school program, including academics and all other sports besides football. He attends all sporting events and other activities at our school. He encourages his former players to be their best at whatever vocation they choose in life. His former players continually return each season to see his teams play. They call him at home. Many of them even show up at his house to visit and eat meals with him. It is not uncommon to see former players show up at practice and at the field house before home games. “It is my great honor to recommend Waldon Tucker for the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame. I know of no one who better exemplifies by his life’s work what the Hall of Fame stands for.”

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2011 Inductee

Lyle Underwood

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native of Foley, Lyle Underwood was a 1951 graduate of Foley High School. After graduation he entered the U.S. Navy and served for four years. When he left military service he enrolled at Florence State (now the University of North Alabama) where he received his bachelor’s degree in 1960. He also holds a master’s degree from Troy State University. He began his teaching and coaching career as an assistant coach Fairhope High School in 1960. In 1964 he went to East Mississippi Junior College for two years as football coach and assistant dean. In 1966 he returned to Baldwin County, taking the head football coach position at Baldwin County High School in Bay Minette. Baldwin County’s program was down, having suffered through four consecutive losing seasons. Underwood reestablished winning ways immediately, posting a record of 8-2 his first season. Over the next 14 years his teams would compile a record of 102-38-3 as one of the all-time great coaches on the Alabama Gulf Coast. Among the honors his teams achieved: • Seven state playoff appearances. • Three undefeated teams (9-0 in 1969, 10-0 in 1973 and 1976). • Five seasons with at least 10 wins. Former Murphy High School Coach Robert Shaw said Coach Underwood “had an instinctive gift for football strategy” and demonstrated it every Friday night. “A full 20 years before it came into widespread popularity, Baldwin County High School football players were running the ‘run and shoot’ offense. Underwood was truly an early innovator, especially in the passing component of football. His players learned strategies far more complex (and successful!) than just snapping to the quarterback and hoping for the best while the quarterback plowed through the defensive line. “Although he didn’t know it at the time, Lyle Underwood became quite a mentor to me. I learned early that after a game between our schools, I could count on a new strategy to adapt on Monday for my Murphy team. I really anticipated successes for Underwood’s teams, because the better his team played, the more Murphy benefitted. Over the years as I learned from him, we became friends as well as rival coaches. I grew to have even more respect and admiration for him as I got to know him better.” Coach Underwood was named Baldwin County Coach of the Year four times. He was a coach in the 1970 AHSAA North-South All-Star game. In 1980 Underwood left coaching to become principal at 18

Fairhope Middle School, a position he held until his retirement in 1991. Another inductee in the Class of 2011 attributes his success to Lyle Underwood, who recommended him to legendary Coach Bob “Bull” Sullivan at East Mississippi Junior College. “Coach Sullivan had enough confidence in him that he signed me to a scholarship without ever having seen me play or without ever having seen me on film as far as I know. That says something about the honesty and integrity that Coach Underwood has. “Without that scholarship, I do not know what turn my life would have taken – especially when one considers that my family was poor and unable to send me to college. But as a result of that scholarship, I was able to get an education and have now been a teacher, coach, assistant principal, principal and supervisor of athletics in Baldwin County for 29 years. And this happened because Coach Underwood believed in me and took the time to tell another coach about me and sold him on me. That’s the kind of man he is. I will be forever grateful to him for what he did for me,” wrote Lester Smith. Baldwin County Circuit Judge Robert Wilters attributed his success to Underwood, also: “Coach Underwood’s greatest achievement with his players was not what he got out of us on the playing field but what he taught us about life after football and how he prepared us for the future. His lessons on commitment, dedication and preparation have helped many of us reach the highest levels of our professions. “Coach Underwood still keeps up with us and is always there when we need him. Playing football for Coach Underwood was tough and at times I hated him, but I know the experience of those years will always be a cherished memory for me. I thank Coach Underwood for helping make me the person I am today.” Principal John Cabaniss wrote: “I have personally known Coach Underwood for over 40 years. We have had relationships as a player/coach, student/teacher, assistant coach/head coach, and as opposing coaches. Coach Underwood had been a mentor to the youth and a role model to the youth as well as adults. Coach Underwood has always been the epitome of class and character.” Coach Underwood has been inducted into the Baldwin County High School Athletic Hall of Fame, the Foley High School Athletic Hall of Fame, and the Baldwin County Varsity Coaches Hall of Fame.

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Jerry Weems

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portswriter Brian Strickland of The Anniston Star wrote that not only did Gerald (Jerry) Weems have impeccable credentials to go into the hall of fame as a basketball coach, but also had pretty strong credentials as a football coach, too. “When I first started, my primary goal was basketball,” Weems told Strickland. “Anybody in this state—in small schools in particular—you find out that you’re going to coach football, too. Actually, I wanted to. It wasn’t something I was forced to do. But I never dreamed I would end up being in a situation like we were in Clay County as far as football was concerned.” That “situation” was six state championships. Weems was defensive coordinator for all of them. “Defense was a focal point of those squads, setting the tone for the run in 1994 when they allowed just 22 points all season,” wrote Strickland. “In the next two seasons, they allowed just 42 points as they went on to win state titles in those seasons. The 1996 squad recorded a then state record 11 shutouts.” But Weems set out to be a basketball coach and he became one of the best in the state. A native of Anniston, Weems graduated from Walter Wellborn High School in 1966 and Jacksonville State University in 1970. He also holds a master’s degree and AA Certification from Auburn University. His first job after graduation was at Jacksonville Junior High School. In 1971-72 he got his first head coaching position at Cleburne County High School in Heflin. His first team struggled, finishing 7-15, but his second year saw a winning record at 16-14. He then went to Dadeville High School for three years. He won 17 games in1973-74, advancing to the state tournament semifinals. In 1976-77 he moved to Clay County High School where he has remained, compiling one of the best records in state high school basketball history. Over the past 33 years his teams have compiled a 586-442 record. As a small rural school Clay County frequently had to play above class to fill out its schedule. Among Weems’ hallmarks: • Back to-back state championships in 1991 and 1992. The 1988 team was runner-up to Francis Marion that was in the middle of taking four straight championships. The

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1989 team was in the semifinals. Three other teams reached what is called in the NCAA today the Sweet 16. • On those four semifinal teams, he had eight all-tournament players including three Most Valuable Player selections, Billy Ross in 1988 and son Lance Weems in both 1991 and 1992. Clay County players were also the leading scorers in three of those tournaments. Ross and Weems both remain as two of the top three scorers in state prep history. Weems finished his career with 3,660 points and Ross with 3,383 points. • He has had more than 20 winning seasons, including 10 with 20 or more wins. The 1992 state championship squad won 32 games. • Head basketball coach in the 1992 Alabama-Mississippi All-Star game. • In 2006 the playing floor at the Clay County High School gymnasium was named the Jerry Weems Court in his honor. Coach Weems also coached baseball for 19 years, compiling a record of 139-102. His teams made 10 state playoff appearances. “His focus is athletics and working with kids. I’ve never heard Coach Weems say what he would do if he wasn’t coaching, but I would have heard him say the only thing he enjoys as much as coaching is cutting grass,” said Clay County Principal Billy Walker. “If he has a hobby, it is going to be following Auburn sports. He goes to Auburn football and basketball games when he can and I’ve seen him down there at baseball games. He’s been here so long he was coaching when I was in high school here and this wasn’t the first place he coached. He was my baseball coach. He’s always helped with the summer youth baseball league and still does today. He umpires games every season.” Former Clay County Principal Anthony Wilkinson wrote: “What many people do not know is that Coach Weems has served 20-plus years as an umpire in Ashland’s youth baseball league and life guard for the city youth swimming pool. He also serves aa a deacon at his local church. “As a teacher, Coach Weems is the first to work and the last to leave. He is proactive in fighting obesity in schools. He is a Christian man who is a role model to the students of Clay County High School and fellow faculty members.”

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ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

Sports Hall Fame of

PURPOSE The purpose of the Alabama High School Sports Hall of Fame is to recognize the excellence of individuals who make outstanding contributions to the schools of Alabama through their extraordinary efforts as coaches, administrators, officials and news media personnel. Because of their extra efforts, dedication and desire have enabled them to excel in achievement, this excellence stands out as shining examples for others to emulate. Guidelines For Selection 1. A worthy candidate exhibits good moral and ethical character as judged by acceptable societal standards. 2. A worthy candidate demonstrates outstanding leadership abilities. 3. A worthy candidate demonstrates a high quality of school, community and American citizenship. 4. A  worthy candidate demonstrates a level of achievement or service which stands out from the ordinary or the slightly above ordinary. 5. A  worthy candidate achieves honor and recognition which are a credit to him/her in addition to his/her family, community and to the AHSAA. 6. A  worthy candidate accomplishes achievements in, or provides service to, an Alabama High School Athletic Association member school. 7. Race, sex, religion, creed, national origin or political affiliation shall not be considered in evaluating a nominee. COMMITTEE • Kevin Collins, Enterprise (Chairperson)

• Dana Austin, Spring Garden

• Jim Hunter, Calhoun

• John Hardin, Hackleburg

• John Grass, Oxford

• Kevin Wiesman, Huntsville

• Myra Miles, Hoover

• Jeff Hilyer, Opelika, Official

• Ed Lathan, Mobile

• Mike Easterling, Media

• David Wofford, Bay Minette

• Jon Holder, Anniston, Media

• Luke Hallmark, Demopolis

• Steve Bailey, AHSADCA

• Richard Brown, Opelika

• Steve Savarese, AHSAA • Joe Evans, AHSAA

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1991 Sports Hall Fame of

C.D. “LEFTY” ANDERSON

GLENN DANIEL

Coached football at Frisco City and Murphy where he compiled a 95-38-5 career record in 14 years. He served Murphy 10 more years as assistant principal and principal and then was the Mobile County Athletic Director eight years. He served 13 years on the AHSAA Central Board, two as president. A graduate of Jackson High and Livingston State.

Is the current winningest football coach in the state with a career record of 281-161-16 in 37 years at Luverne and eight years at Pine Hill. In a career spanning parts of six decades, he has been named conference football Coach of the Year six times and the same honor in baseball one year. A graduate of A.G. Parrish (Selma) High School and Livingston University.

D.F. ANDERSON During his 31-year tenure at Thomasville, his football teams compiled a 182-81-25 record, and he also coached basketball and football for more than 20 years. He retired in 198 after 45 years of coaching, teaching math and serving as assistant principal. A graduate of Thomasville High and Howard College.  (Deceased)

BECKY DICKINSON She is the winningest high school volleyball coach in the nation with a career record of 796-62. Her McGill-Toolen teams have finished in the top three in the state 17 of 18 years and have won 11 state titles. She also has a 235-81 basketball record with three state titles and two boys tennis crowns. A graduate of Russellville High and Florence State.

NOLAN ATKINS

CLIFF HARPER

During 30 years as a football coach, all but six at Sweet Water, the four-time Class A Coach of the Year has won four state titles with an overall 229-53-5 record. In seven years as baseball coach he won six state championships and was runner-up the other year while posting a 130-40 overall record. A graduate of S.D. Lee (Miss.) High and Mississippi State

Served for 18 years as the first full-time AHSAA Executive Director where he introduced the first complete organization of prep athletics statewide. He coached 10 years at Spring Garden, Georgiana, Evergreen and Sardis where his team won a state title in 1936. He developed illustrated football and basketball rules books which are still used nationally. A graduate of Moore Academy (Pine Apple) and Birmingham-Southern. (Deceased)

W.H. “CAP” BROWN

ESTES HUDSON

After 31 years as basketball coach at Parker of Birmingham, he was the second winningest coach in the nation with more than 700 wins at the time of his induction. His teams won four state basketball championships and a national title in 1964. He was twice been voted “Coach of the Year.” A graduate of Fairfield Industrial High and Tuskegee Institute. (Deceased)

Of his 21 years in coaching, 18 were spent at Winfield where he compiled outstanding records in football (128-52-18), basketball (458-170) and baseball (181-54). His 1952 basketball team was state champion and he had 14 county champions and seven district winners. He also had fine teams in three years at Brilliant, Marion County and Perry County. A graduate of Hackleburg High and Jacksonville State.  (Deceased)

JOE JONES

TOM CALVIN Coached 33 years at Baldwin County, Sylacauga and Austin with a 204-129-11 career record and earned three state “Coach of the Year” Awards. He won a state championship at Sylacauga where his teams had 15 straight winning seasons. He also posted a 9215 record in 14 years as tennis coach at Sylacauga. A graduate of Athens High and the University of Alabama.

E.D. “CHINK” LOTT

JOHN COX Coached football 33 years at Childersburg where he compiled a 204-109-15 record. His team won a state title and subsequent state Coach of the Year and All-Star Coach awards. He also coached basketball 13 years with only one losing season and six winning seasons of baseball. A graduate of Marshall County High and the University of Alabama.  (Deceased)

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Compiled a superb record of 606-197-in 31 years of basketball coaching in four Morgan County schools ñ Danville, Austinville, Decatur and Austin. His teams won state championships in three different classifications ñ Class A Austinville in 1953, Class 3A Austin in 1969 and Class 4A Austin in 1973. Coached in the first All-Star Game. A graduate of Austinville High and Florence State.  (Deceased)

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One of the stateís outstanding coaches during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, he posted an overall football record of 177-37-23 in 14 years at Anniston and 11 years at Demopolis. His teams played major schools in Georgia and Tennessee as well as in Alabama. He served as athletic director and coached all sports. A graduate of Simpson High (Birmingham) and Birmingham-Southern.  (Deceased)

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C.T. MANLEY

H.L. “BUBBA” SCOTT

He spent 24 of his 28 years in coaching at Colbert County, where he compiled a football record of 171-78-7 with a state championship in 1972. His team was runner-up in the first year of the state Class 3A football playoffs in 1967. He also coached at Red Bay and Muscle Shoals. A graduate of Hazlewood High and Southeastern Louisiana. (Deceased)

Served for 25 years with distinction as the second full-time Executive Director of the AHSAA until his retirement Dec. 31, 1990. He successfully merged Alabamaís black and white high school athletic programs, organized and conducted the first state football championship program and initiated a total girls athletic program. He coached 14 years at Haleyville, the last 10 as head football coach with a 76-21-3 record and three state championships. A graduate of Autauga County High and Troy State.

J.E. “HOT” O’BRIEN Enjoyed an outstanding 16-year football coaching career at Tallassee where he compiled an overall record of 120-28-17 with a wide-open offense. His teams posted a streak of 57 games without a loss from 1941-47. He also took 12 of his basketball teams to the state tournament. A graduate of Tallapoosa County High and Birmingham-Southern.  (Deceased)

MICKEY O’BRIEN Has an unsurpassed record of winning five state basketball championships in a brief 14-year coaching career at Geraldine, Jackson County and Gadsden where he posted an overall record of 427-47, a winning percentage of 90. Before his untimely death in 1944 at age 39, he won two state titles at Geraldine and three at Jackson County. A graduate of Tallapoosa County High and Auburn University. (Deceased)

H.L. “SHORTY” OGLE Spent 38 of his 42 years of coaching at Decatur, compiling overall records of 253-73-9 in football, 232-42 in basketball, 128-29 in baseball and 147-31 in track meets. He coached four undefeated teams which won state championships and was a member of the first All-Star game staff. A member of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame. A graduate of Albertville High and Birmingham-Southern. (Deceased)

SNITZ SNIDER Coached all but one of his 32 years at Bessemer where seven of his teams won state football championships. As a basketball coach, one of his teams was a state runner-up and two were district runners-up. During his one-year at Dora, his teams were county champions in football, basketball and track. A graduate of Oak Grove High and Auburn University. (Deceased)

RONALD WEATHERS Was a sportswriter for almost four decades for The Birmingham News with his primary responsibility to cover prep sports. He became known as “Mr. Prep Sports” to high school fans and participants in Birmingham and throughout the state. Still the model that sportswriters look to in covering events, he made his biggest contribution to prep athletics with his writing ability and fairness. A graduate of Woodlawn High and Howard College.  (Deceased)

HOOVER WHITE Coached 15 years at Courtland where his football teams posted an 86-22-3 overall record which included a 28-game winning streak. His teams were conference champions seven times and he was NAHSAA Coach of the Year in 1960. He also coached track and won six conference titles. Her served four more years as principal. A graduate of Courtland and Alabama State.  (Deceased)

HAYWOOD SCISSUM Was head football coach at East Highland (Sylacauga) for 18 years where his teams won two state championships and finished runner-up once while compiling an overall record of 135-29-11. His teams, noted for their explosive offense, often averaged over 40 points per game. He is known for instilling a burning desire to achieve in his players. A graduate of Carver (Gadsden) and Tuskegee Institute. (Deceased)

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MAJOR BROWN

J.P. CAIN

Coached football at Parker High School in Birmingham for 22 years and never had a losing season. He served the Birmingham City Board of Education for 11 years as an assistant physical education supervisor. The Major Brown Foundation, a provider of scholarships for athletes, has been established in his honor. A graduate of State Teachers College Institute and Alabama State.  (Deceased)

Made countless contributions to public education at Hartselle as a teacher, football coach and school administrator. During his 12 years as head coach, his teams posted a 66-51-3 record. A booster club scholarship is named in his honor along with the football stadium. A graduate of Hartselle High and Jacksonville State, where he is also a member of the JSU Athletic Hall of Fame.

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LENETTE CALVIN

JAMES E. GLOVER

Enjoyed an unusually successful career coaching gymnastics and cheerleading for 33 years at Sylacauga and Decatur where she won numerous honors and championships, both national and state. During her 11 years in Decatur she coached four teams at the same time and kept the level of competition high. A graduate of Woodlawn High and the University of Alabama.

Coached for 31 years at Etowah – 24 years as head coach – where his teams posted a 194-96-15 overall record with six undefeated teams and a state championship. Received several Coach of the Year awards and was named to the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame in 1985. A graduate of Hale County High and Delta State.  (Deceased)

JAMES CHAFIN

BILL HARRIS

Coached football for 17 years at Robert E. Lee High School, the last six as head coach with a record of 51-12-3 which included two state championships, a 32-game winning streak and two State Coach of the Year awards. After serving seven years as Montgomery County athletic supervisor, he served Trinity Presbyterian as athletic director. A graduate of Albertville High and Jacksonville State.

Coached for 13 years at Pell City, Sylacauga and Ensley before serving the Birmingham City Schools as athletic director for 22 years where he led the athletic program in Birmingham to the highest level in its history. He is also given much of the credit for the smoothness of integration of Birmingham’s athletic program. A graduate of Ensley High and Auburn University.  (Deceased)

BILL DOTY

NELSON HUGHES

Coached football for 30 years, 12 of those at Russellville, with five state championships and numerous awards and honors to his credit. His 28-year record as a head coach is 173-104-6. His Russellville teams enjoyed a 41-game unbeaten string. He coached in two all-star games and served as president of the high school coaches association. A graduate of Hamilton High and North Alabama. (Deceased)

Coached basketball for 29 years at Sumter County Training and Livingston where his teams compiled an overall record of 621156 with one state championship and numerous state tournament appearances. He coached in the all-star game twice and has served on the District Board and the AHSAA Central Board of Control. A graduate of Linden Academy and Alabama State.

TOM JONES

BOB FINLEY Coached 27 of his 30 years at W.A. Berry. His 23 football teams compiled a 179-79-5 record with two state championships and two second place finishes in 12 playoff appearances. Twice he was named State Coach of the Year. Also, he coached the girls basketball team to four Final Four appearances in eight years. A graduate of Fayette County High and the University of Tennessee.  (Deceased)

Gained recognition as Robert E. Lee’s first football coach as his 11 teams posted an outstanding winning percentage of 84 with a 93-12-5 record and five state championships. His overall prep coaching record is 149-36-10 at Lee and Hayneville. He also coached at Auburn University and Troy State. A graduate of Tallassee High and Troy State.

DOUG LOCKRIDGE SEVERNE A. FRAZIER Has been a teacher, coach and principal in Alabama high schools and served as an official for more than 20 years. Perhaps his most important contribution came as executive secretary of the Alabama Interscholastic Athletic Association when he was instrumental in bringing about a successful merger of the old black and white high school athletic associations in 1968. A graduate of State Normal High and Alabama State. (Deceased)

Served as athletic director and football coach for 31 years at Valley where his teams posted an overall record of 16087-9 while winning four state championships. He had an immeasurable impact upon the community, school and his players by the consistent application of his belief that dedication and discipline are essential in any endeavor. A graduate of Walker County High and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

CHUCK MILLER BEN GLOVER Worked in public schools of Alabama for 30 years – 15 at B.C. Rain – as a teacher, coach, athletic director and administrator. His influence is still being felt in athletic programs in Mobile county where six of the 25 current head football coaches either played under him or served with him as an assistant coach. He served on the District Board of the AHSAA Central Board of Control. A graduate of Leroy High and Mississippi State.

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Coached for 32 years – 26 of them at Talladega – with a career basketball record of 680-238, 11 trips to the state tournament and 16 county championships. The school gymnasium has been named in his honor. He served 10 years on the District Board and two terms on the AHSAA Central Board of Control. A graduate of Oxford High and Jacksonville State.

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J.L. NOLEN

JACK. M. POWELL

Served the Opp school system for 40 years as a teacher, coach, athletic director, principal and superintendent. His greatest contributions to prep athletics in Alabama came during his 23 years of invaluable service as a member of the AHSAA Central Board of Control and five additional years on the District Board. A graduate of Handley High and Jacksonville State. (Deceased)

After beginning his career at Covington County, he spent 18 of his 20 years in high school coaching at Eufaula where his teams compiled a 364-178 record, went to the state tournament nine times and won a state championship. He also coached at Livingston State. In recognition of his many years of service to the City of Eufaula, the old high school gym named in his honor serves as home of the Jack Powell Youth Basketball League. A graduate of Pleasant Home High School and Auburn University.

HUGH O’SHIELDS Coached for 29 years at Cleveland and Oneonta where his football teams compiled an overall record of 243-74-13 with two state championships. He was named Coach of the Year three times and also coached basketball, track and baseball. He served on the Eighth District Board and the AHSAA Central Board of Control. A graduate of Geraldine High and Jacksonville State.  (Deceased)

JAMES R. PORCH Is known most for his successful nine years of coaching at Verbena where his football teams posted an overall 79-11 record, including five consecutive undefeated seasons and a winning streak of 49 games. A monument has been built in his honor and former players and friends gather every June for a reunion. A graduate of Arab High and Jacksonville State.  (Deceased)

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

MUTT REYNOLDS Worked in the teaching/coaching profession for 40 years but is known for his 28 years of coaching at Ramsay where his teams won a state championship in 1953 and participated in 14 Crippled Children’s Clinic games. The Vestavia Hills stadium is named in his honor. He served on the District Five Athletic Board and the AHSAA Central Board of Control. A graduate of Phillips High and Auburn University. (Deceased)

TOM TARLETON Coached 17 years at Tuscaloosa where his basketball teams compiled a phenomenal 86.2 winning percentage (431-69), won two state championships and reeled off a 58-game winning streak in 1961-62. His golf teams won four state titles and he also coached baseball and football. He served as president of the coaches association. A graduate of Thomasville High and Livingston State.

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IOLA B. BAYLOR

DAN GAYLORD

Coached basketball, track and volleyball at Brighton for 15 years where she became one of the state’s first female athletic directors. She also was a cheerleader sponsor, coach and teacher for 21 years at five other schools. She was named the state girls basketball Coach of Year in 1989 and received a similar honor in Birmingham six times. A graduate of Dunbar High and Talladega College.  (Deceased)

Served for 60 years as executive secretary of the Birmingham Football Officials Association, during which time he was an active official for 26 years. He also was an official in the Southern Conference and umpire-in-chief of the Alabama Umpires Association for eight years. He was inducted into the National Federation Hall of Fame in 1988 and served on the Birmingham Parks and Recreation Board. A graduate of Central High (Phillips) and Howard College (Samford). (Deceased)

DUSTY CARTER

LEVAUGHN HANKS

Coached basketball for 38 years—24 at Scottsboro and 14 at Paint Rock Valley—where he posted an outstanding winning percentage of 71 with an overall 714-303 record. His fastbreak style of play produced seven state tournament teams with Scottsboro winning the title in 1967. He retired in 1975 but has served as assistant coach at Geraldine and Skyline for the last eight years. A graduate of Calhoun County High and Jacksonville State.

Coached basketball for 28 years, 13 of those at Murphy, and carried 10 teams to the state tournament with a career record of 785-210. He coached football for 16 years with a winning record, coached in the 1954 all-star basketball game and served as president of the state coaches association. Although retiring in 1977, he has served as director of the state high school golf tournament for the last 10 years. A graduate of Frisco City High and Troy State.  (Deceased)

WOODY CLEMENTS

AUBREY HICKS

In 38 of his 40 years at Holt he was athletic director and coach where he compiled a football record of 218-148-6, His basketball record was 264-167 over 18 seasons. He was named Coach of the Year several times in the West Alabama and Warrior conferences. The Holt Stadium was named in his honor. A graduate of Holt High and the University of Alabama.(Deceased)

Spent more than 30 years—all but four at Addison—in the education field as a coach and administrator. His 18-year career record in football was 143-47-7. He received numerous honors, including Coach of the Year, and served on the AHSAA Central Board of Control and the District Athletic Board and was president of the coaches association. A graduate of Central High (Phenix City) and Troy State. (Deceased)

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MORRIS HIGGINBOTHAM

EARL MORRIS

Coached 27 years in high school football with an overall record of 190-73-8 at Walnut Grove, West Blocton, B.B. Comer, Enterprise, Hueytown, Scottsboro and Hewitt-Trussville. He won five state championships—three at West Blocton, one at Walnut Grove and one at Enterprise. Named coach of the year twice, he had 24 players who went on to play in college. A graduate of Phillips High and the University of Alabama.

He became a household word in Morgan County basketball for 26 years. His teams compiled a 535-204 record with three consecutive state championships at Austinville and one at Decatur. His teams, known for their disciplined, fundamentallysound, team concept, won numerous county, district and region titles while averaging 20.5 wins per year. He received state, national and international recognition for his coaching skills. A graduate of Union High and Jacksonville State.

SAM JONES Spent 39 years in education—34 at Sumter County High—as a teacher, coach, principal and superintendent. In 19 years as football coach his teams posted a 112-51-10 record with two state championships. His 1954 track team also won a state title. He was a member of the AHSAA Central Board of Control for 16 years, serving two terms as president. A graduate of Moore Academy (Pine Apple) and Auburn University. (Deceased)

NOONA KENNARD Of her 37 years in education, she spent 21 at Bradshaw High where she was a true pioneer in Alabama girls athletics. A coach of all girls sports at Bradshaw, she produced seven championships along with six runner-up finishes in volleyball, two titles in track, five in archery, three each in bowling and badminton and an overall basketball record of 150-82. A graduate of Starkville High (Miss.) and Mississippi State University.

HANNIS “RED” PRIM He spent 25 of his 33 years in education at Clarke County where he served as coach, teacher and principal. His 17-year football record of 110-58-10 at Clarke County put his overall career record at 148-75-12. He also coached basketball and baseball and compiled winning records in both. Highly respected as a gentleman and role model, the school stadium was named in his honor. A graduate of Jackson High and Auburn University.

CREIGH PURNELL Coaching basketball at Kinston for 23 years, he compiled a remarkable 502-168 overall record against many of the state’s largest schools. Two of his six state tournament teams (1966 and 1968) won championships in the largest of two classes. From 1953 to 1963, Class A Kinston was the only school in the state that played in Class 2A by request. He coached in the all-star game and his 1968 team won a national record 37 games for that year. A graduate of Red Level High and the University of Alabama.

J.B. MCCLENDON Known for his basketball teams, he taught and coached 22 of his 35 years in the prep ranks at nine Alabama schools. He won a state championship at Fayette County in 1958 and had a career record of 749-228. His football teams compiled a 108-72 record, and he coached in both the all-star basketball and football games. His honors include induction into the Birmingham-Southern Hall of Fame in 1990. A graduate of Jackson County (Scottsboro) and Birmingham-Southern College.  (Deceased)

JOHN MEADOWS Coaching football in Alabama schools for 24 of his 34 years, he compiled record of 185-47-7 and won a state championship at Scottsboro in 1965. He also won a state title during 11 years of coaching in Tennessee. His teams won over 75 percent of their games giving him an overall career coaching record of 271-767. He was state coach of the year in Alabama three years and in Tennessee two. A graduate of Falkville High and Jacksonville State.

WILLIAM SHELTON He is known as “Mr. High School Sports” in Cullman County because of his 30 years of dedication to area schools as Sports Editor of the Cullman Times despite physical limitations after a childhood battle with polio. He won the state’s top columnist award in 1990 for one he wrote from his hospital bed, where he has been confined for the last six years. The Cullman High baseball field and several individual awards have been named in his honor. A graduate of West Point High and the University of North Alabama.

SAM SHORT Called a true professional, he is known primarily for his 42 years of officiating football, basketball and baseball in Alabama, but he was in education for 39 years as a coach and administrator. Since 1963 he has made invaluable contributions as an AHSAA rules clinician and interpreter for football and basketball and has served on national rules committees. A graduate of West End High (Birmingham) and Western Kentucky.

BUD MILLS

EARNEST WASHINGTON

He gave 41 years of service to Alabama schools as a coach, teacher and administrator. His greatest success came at Cherokee where his teams posted a 139-72-3 record in 20 years. His overall record is 152-80-3. He also had a basketball team in the state finals and a baseball team in the playoff. He was head coach in the all-star football game, received “Coach of the Year” honors several times and was honored by a special day in 1974. A graduate of Washington County High and Livingston University.

He has coached basketball for 30 years—25 at Tuskegee Institute High—with a career record of 534-218 and state championships in 1985 and 1991. He has produced 12 all-state players along with 75 who received college scholarships. He has coached in the state all-star game and was state Coach of the Year in 1991. A graduate of Cobb Avenue High and Alabama State.

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EARL WEBB

JOHN WHATLEY

Coached football 29 years and his teams compiled an overall record of 203-80-14 with one state championship at Lanett and one at Decatur. He was twice the all-star game head coach and was state coach of the year. Also he served as president of the state coaches association and served on the AHSAA Central Board of Control for five years. A graduate of Hanceville High and Florence State. (Deceased)

He coached for 13 years at Midland City, Anniston, Phenix City, Holtville, Elmore County and Tallassee before serving the Elmore County schools as a principal and superintendent. He exhibited his leadership skills on the AHSAA District Board and Central Board of Control, which he served as president. He was the president-elect of the state superintendents association before his untimely death in 1987. A graduate of Eufaula High and Auburn University.  (Deceased)

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

of 1994 Sports Hall Fame L.D. BRUCE

IVAN JONES

Coached 20 years at Cedar Bluff High School where his football teams posted a 155-47-5 record, including a string of 58 wins without a loss and two state championships. His 1960 basketball team was the first team to represent Cherokee County in the state tournament. He also was principal at Cedar Bluff for 20 years and served on the AHSAA Central Board. A graduate of Crossville High and Jacksonville State. (Deceased)

Spent 35 years as a teacher, coach and administrator in the Foley school system. All 14 of his football teams had winning seasons, compiling a 108-28-3 overall record and winning two state championships. During one stretch, 1960-64, his teams won 47 of 50 games. He was Coach of the Year twice, coached in the all-star game and served as president of the state coaches association. A graduate of Jackson High and Troy State University.

EDWARD DANIEL Coached basketball for 28 years – 18 at Francis Marion and 10 at Lincoln – and posted a career record of 547-137 with a state championship at Francis Marion in 1988. He also coached football and baseball and has served the school as athletic director since 1973. He was recreation director at Marion for 14 years and now serves as City County president. A graduate of Parker High and Kentucky State University

PHIL ENGLISH Coached baseball for 28 years at Ensley, Banks, Huffman and Hewitt-Trussville and compiled a career record of 566-217, with two state championships. Only three of his teams since 1971 have failed to reach the state playoffs and 12 of his players signed professional contracts. He was active on the AHSAA Baseball Committee. A graduate of Ensley High and Birmingham-Southern College.

MOSES FINCH Coached basketball for 15 years at West End in York where his teams won more than 600 games, made nine trips to the state tournament and won two state championships. His coaching career spanned 36 years in Sumter County, including 14 at Sumter County High School and nine as an assistant at North Sumter Middle School. A graduate of Eutaw High and Alabama A&M University. (Deceased)

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BILL LEGG Coached football and basketball at Shades Valley for 11 years, served Jefferson County as athletic director for 10 years. He was the director of the state wrestling tournament for several years and was the only chairman since when the Birmingham Quarterback Club began hosting the Class 6A state championship football game. As director of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame, he was instrumental in creating the Bryant-Jordan Scholar Athlete Program. A graduate of Woodlawn High and BirminghamSouthern College.

W.C. MAJORS Coached football at Fairhope for 13 years with a 110-30-1 record and 10 playoff appearances and also at Excel and Frisco City, posting a 153-46-3 career record. His basketball teams at Excel and Frisco City, during a nine-year stretch, compiled a 151-41 overall record. He was state Coach of the Year in 1972 and served on the AHSAA committee which set up the first state football playoff. A graduate of Frisco City High and Auburn University.  (Deceased)

MAL MORGAN Spent 12 of his 15 years in coaching at Lanett where his football teams posted an overall record of 80-30-3 with three state championships and three unbeaten seasons. His basketball teams in 11 years compiled a 216-93 record with five district championships. He was Coach of the Year in 1958 and coach in the all-star football game in 1950. A graduate of Lanett High and Auburn University. (Deceased)

BILLY HENDERSON

LOU SCALES

Coached at Tuscaloosa High for 20 years in football, basketball, baseball and track and logged 50 years as an official in football, basketball and baseball. His basketball team won a state championship in 1955, his football team won the title in 1964 and he coached in the all-star football and baseball games. He officiated football and basketball in the Southeastern Conference for 31 years. A graduate of Tuscaloosa High and the University of Alabama.

Coached football for 38 years—all but one at Alexandria— and compiled a career record of 224-145-15 with a state championship and Coach of the Year honor in 1985. He served as president of the state coaches association and his 1966 basketball team was runner-up in the state tournament. A graduate of Glencoe High and the University of Alabama.  (Deceased)

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JOHN SIMPKINS

VERNON WELLS

Coached football, baseball and basketball for 35 years—31 at Jackson where his football teams compiled a 116-100-16 over 25 years. His 31-year baseball record was 310-124 while his basketball teams posted a 120-90 mark in 18 seasons. He was vice-president of the state coaches association and coached in the all-star game. He also coached four years at Leroy. A graduate of Jackson High and Auburn University. (Deceased)

Coached football for 37 years at Albertville, Butler, Fort Payne and Plainview with an overall record of 214-138-11 and a state championship at Fort Payne in 1964. One of a few Alabama coaches to post over 200 career wins, he was selected Coach of the Year twice and coached in the all-star game. A graduate of Moss Point High (Miss.) and Southern Mississippi College.  (Deceased)

DUANE WEBSTER

WALTON WRIGHT

Coached football for 26 of his 30 years at Reeltown and his teams posted a career record of 218-93-9 and a state championship in 1987. His first four years was at Tallassee. He coached in three all-star games and was coach of the year twice. He also led his basketball teams to three area titles and one state tournament appearance. A graduate of Tallassee High and Auburn University.

Coached football for 28 of his 31 years at Sheffield where his teams compliled a record of 155-90-12. He initiated Sheffield’s first baseball team in 1946 and posted an 80-11 record over 11 years. He coached in the first state all-star game in 1948 and the Sheffield stadium is named in his honor. He is a member of the Birmingham-Southern Hall of Fame. A graduate of Russellville High and Birmingham-Southern College. (Deceased)

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

of 1995 Sports Hall Fame EDWARD BALZLI

PAUL COOLEY

Is a legend in South Alabama as a baseball and football official. He began his officiating career in 1940 and has served as president of the Mobile Football Officicials Association and the Metro Mobile Baseball Umpires Association since 1948. He called football for 53 years and baseball for 50 years. A graduate of McGill High School. (Deceased)

Coached basketball for 23 years—17 at Pisgah and 6 at Scottsboro. His Pisgah teams compiled an overall record of 410103 and won three state championships. With a career record of 536-150, he was named tri-state coach of the year twice. Twenty-eight of his Pisgah players and seven at Scottsboro went on to play college ball. He is currently a member of the Jackson County Board of Education. A graduate of Arab High School and Jacksonville State University. (Deceased)

TERRY BURT

LYLE DARNELL

Coached football for 27 years at Elmore County and compiled a career record of 187-115-4 with three state championships. He has served as athletic director since 1963. Also, he was assistant coach at Phenix City for two years and at Livingston High School one year. He was state coach of the year three times and was selected by his peers as one of the Top 20 coaches in the state in 1985. A graduate of Greenville High School and Livingston University.

Coached football for 33 years at Glencoe, Ashland, Hanceville, Thompson, Emma Sansom, Scottsboro, Etowah and Pell City and compiled a overall record of 204-90-4. His longest headcoaching stint came at Glencoe where his 12 teams posted a 99-26-2 record and won a state championship. He was named state coach of the year three times and national coach of the year in 1973. A graduate of Arab High School and Jacksonville State University.

HOWARD CHAPPELL

VAN BUREN DEERMAN

Coached at Deshler for 17 years where his football teams compiled a record of 110-50-2, including undefeated seasons in 1934, 1935 and 1938. After leaving coaching , he was principal at R.E. Thompson for 15 years and served as Tuscumbia City Commissioner for 10 years. One of the organizers of the Tennessee Valley Conference, he introduced track to North Alabama schools. A graduate of Sylacauga High School and the University of Alabama.

Coached basketball for 25 of his 33 years at Jacksonville where he compiled a record of 545-283, including twenty 20-win seasons, in establishing himself as one of the premier coaches in the state. He also coached at Locust Fork and at two junior highs—Webb and Wellborn. In his career, all his teams averaged 17 victories per season. The high school gym was renovated and renamed in his honor. A graduate of Jackson County High School and Jacksonville State University. (Deceased)

HAROLD CLARK

JERRY DUGAN

Spent 32 of his 37 years in coaching at Vigor where his 20 football teams posted an overall record of 161-72-1 with two state champion-ships. The unbeaten 1988 team also was named national champion by USA Today and ESPN. Also serving as athletic director for 20 years, he was named state coach of the year twice. He rejuvenated a football program that had an 0-10 record the previous year. A graduate of Beat 4 High School (Miss.) and the University of Southern Mississippi. (Deceased)

Coached basketball for 34 years – 28 at Lee of Huntsville and six at Hazel Green – with a career record of 575-292, including twenty 20-win seasons, in establishing himself as one of the premier coaches in the state. He also coached at Locust Fork and at two junior highs, Webb and Wellborn. In his career, all his teams averaged 17 victories per season. The high school gym was renovated and renamed in his honor. A graduate of Jackson County High School and Jacksonville State University.

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CHARLES H. LEE

HOMER SMILES

Became known as the “Father of Alabama High School Wrestling” after installing the sport at Benjamin Russell in 1956 and proceeding to reel off 11 straight state championships, beginning in 1959. All but one of his 19 years in coaching were spent at Benjamin Russell where his football teams posted a 52-26-2 overall record and his wrestling teams won more than 150 dual matches while losing only five. He was principal at Lineville for 19 years. A graduate of Cliff High School and Auburn University. (Deceased)

Coached for 22 years, 15 at Leeds and three at Fairfield where his teams posted an overall record of 118-52-7 and won 10 Dental Clinic Championships in 13 appearances, both records. Also a coach for four years at West End, he never had a losing season in all his years of coaching. He served a term as president of the AHSAA Central Board during his nine-year tenure and was coach of the year twice. He was principal at Leeds Junior High for 10 years. A graduate of West End High School (Birmingham) and Howard College. (Deceased)

HAROLD “RED” LUTZ

JACK B. STEWART

Coached football for 15 years at Fairfield and 13 years at Tuscaloosa with an overall career record of 152-85-5. He was named coach of the year twice during his 13 years as head football coach at Fairfield where his wrestling teams won three state titles. His Tuscaloosa athletic program in the early 1970s was named the best in the county under his leadership as athletic director. He also coached wrestling at both schools. A graduate of Clinton High School (Iowa) and the University of Alabama.

Coaching success followed him for 23 years, 12 at Saks and seven at Lineville. At Lineville, his football teams compiled a 54-113 overall record with a state championship in 1961 while his basketball teams posted an overall 101-43 record and finished runner-up in the state tournament twice. His Saks football teams compiled a 77-32-5 overall mark with a state runner-up finish. He served on the AHSAA District Board for 11 years. A graduate of Lineville High School and Jacksonville State University.  (Deceased)

LOUISE MARBUT

JACK TUCKER

Spent 20 of her 28 years in education at The Donoho School where she coached for 15 years, winning five state volleyball championships and finishing runner-up six times while posting more than 600 wins. A promoter of girls athletics for more than three decades, she hosted three AHSAA state volleyball tournaments. A principal at Donoho since 1980, she also coached a short time at Anniston. A graduate of Jacksonville High School and Jacksonville State University.

Coached basketball at Russellville for 25 years where his teams compiled an overall record of 484-218 with a state championship (1982) and nine trips to the state tournament. His three-year stint at Hanceville put his overall career record at 533-242 and the number of 20-plus victory seasons at 16. He was state coach of the year twice and coached in the all-star game. He coached golf at Northwest Community College for five years. A graduate of Cullman High School and the University of Alabama.

ROBERT F. MOSBY

HOWARD WALDREP

Coached for 26 of his 43 years in education, serving as head football coach at Cobb Avenue for 18 years and four years at Escambia County Training School where he earned coach of the year honors. His overall football coaching record is 157-44-13. He served as assistant principal at Cobb Avenue Junior High and Anniston Middle School for 17 years. A graduate of Simmons High School and Tennessee State University. (Deceased)

Has been a strong advocate of high school athletics for 38 years, as a coach and administrator. His 12 basketball teams at Piedmont posted a 192-92 record, but he distinguished himself as an administrator during his 24-year tenure at Walter Wellborn. He served a term as president during his 12 years as a member of the AHSAA Central Board where his opinion and judgment were highly regarded. A graduate of Anniston and Jacksonville State University.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

of 1996 Sports Hall Fame PAUL CHRISTOPHER

FERMAN ELMORE

Has provided services to high schools for the past 32 years—25 years as a football official and seven years as a key committee member of the Alabama-Mississippi All-Star Classic football game. He served two terms as president of the Metro-Mobile officials association and was dedicated to the training of young officials. He worked numerous playoff games and ended his officiating career in the inaugural All-Star Classic in 1987. He is currently manager of Ladd Stadium. A graduate of Murphy High School.

Spent 17 of his 30 years in education at Athens where he served as coach, principal and vocational counselor. He coached football there for 11 years and compiled a 67-29-7 record. Interrupting those years was a six-year stint at Dothan where his football teams were 32-22-5. He also served seven years as athletic director and assistant principal at Butler. He was instrumental in the organization of the Tennessee Valley Conference and president of the coaches association. A graduate of Pickens County and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

FRANK COTTEN Contributed to T. R. Miller High School athletics for the last 30 years as a coach and administrator. Coached basketball for seven years with a 128-42 record and led seven football teams to a 65-19 record and three playoff appearances. Served in administrative capacities for 14 years, including six years as the high school principal. Served 14 years on the AHSAA District Board and six on the AHSAA Central Board which he now serves as president. A graduate of Coffeeville High School and Livingston University.

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JAMES KEY Coached football for four years at Brilliant with a 22-9-5 record and 14 years at Greensboro with a 99-22 slate. As a basketball coach, he guided the first state tournament teams from both schools. Also, he coached in the 1954 all-star game and even served three years as volunteer coach at Brilliant in the early 1990s. After leaving coaching, he continued to serve in educational capacities, including seven years as Greensboro principal. A graduate of Evergreen High School and Troy State University. (Deceased)

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WILLIAM McGEE

COMER SIMS

Spent all 31 years in coaching at Carrollton, the last 28 in leading his football teams to an overall record of 202-113-2 with state championships in 1974 and 1994. His teams finished in the final eight in 13 of 17 playoff appearances, including a runner-up spot in 1979. He was named state Coach of the Year twice and his teams won 10 or more games in nine separate seasons. A graduate of Carrollton High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

His A. G. Parrish (Selma) basketball teams established a record unparalleled in many sports—winning 88 consecutive regular season games during a three year period, including state championships in 1945 and 1946. His seven Selma teams produced six district titles and 16 all-state players. Also he coached at Abbeville, Butler County and Albertville. The late coach served as Selma Parks and Recreation Director for 26 years. A graduate of Dadeville High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

O. P. “Piggy” MITCHELL Spent 31 of his 37 years in coaching at Jefferson County Schools where his Shades Cahaba, Hewitt-Trussville and Shades Valley teams compiled an overall record of 182-118-19 as he introduced the T-formation in the county. He had short coaching stints at Bankhead and Valley Head. Also, he introduced county schools to dirt court basketball and wrestling. Now deceased, he served as president of the AHSAA Fifth District Board for 25 years. A graduate of Simpson High School and Valparaiso University.  (Deceased)

KENNY MORGAN

Coached 14 years at Woodlawn where his football teams won two state championships (1955 and 1956) and four city championships while posting a 78-48-6 overall record, including a 27-game winning streak in the mid-1950s and nine appearances in the Crippled Children’s Clinic. His baseball teams won three state championships in 1947, 1956 and 1959. The late coach served as athletic director of the Birmingham City Schools for five years. A graduate of Emma Sansom High School and Howard College (now Samford University). (Deceased)

RICHARD ROBERTSON Served the Andalusia City Schools for 31 years – 21 of those as head basketball coach whose teams have compiled an overall record of 375-180. His teams have made the state tournament seven times, including the 1995 Final Four appearance. He also undertook the task of rebuilding the football program and guided the 1995 team to a 4-6 record after a winless slate the previous year. He also serves on the AHSAA District Board. A graduate of Ralph Bunch High School and Alabama State University.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

WAYNE TRAWICK Coached football for 33 years—22 of those at Central of Phenix City where his teams have compiled a 170-79-1 overall record with the school’s first state championship in 1993. He also coached at Cottonwood, Dale County and Andalusia and has a career record of 241-118-9. A former president of the state coaches association, he served as head coach in the AlabamaMississippi all-star game and coached twice in the state all-star game. A graduate of Abbeville High School and Troy State University.

MACK WOOD Molding Elba’s football program into one of the winningest in the state during 18 years at the helm, his teams posted a 150-59 overall record and won state championships in 1989 and 1992. He also coached for 10 years at Geraldine, T. R. Miller and Charles Henderson and has a career record of 214-89-4. His 1969 T. R. Miller team was also state champion. He coached in the state and the Alabama-Mississippi all-star games. A graduate of Greenville High School and Troy State University. (Deceased)

BRYAN YATES Coached basketball for 24 years at New Site and two years at Daviston where his teams won 503 games and five county championships, two area titles and reached the semi-finals in all four state tournament appearances. His teams won 20 or more games on 12 occasions, seven of them in a row during one stretch, and he coached in the all-star game. The school gymnasium is named in his honor. A graduate of Daviston High School and Jacksonville State University.

1997 Sports Hall Fame of

SUSIE DeMENT

JAMES HARDY

Has been an institution in the athletic department at Montevallo High School for 50 years where she has made numerous contributions to all facets of the program as a faculty member. A sports journalist who serves as sponsor for the student newspaper, she attends every football, basketball and baseball game and keeps the official statistics. The school gym is named in her honor. A graduate of Montevallo High School and Alabama College (now the University of Montevallo).

Was a respected coach and teacher in the Lanett City school system for 30 years. His 15 football teams at Lanier High School compiled a 92-42-1 record with six district championships. He also coached basketball and track and received a Coach of the Year honor in 1964. After the school’s merger with Lanett High School, two of his seven baseball teams made the state playoffs. He was a key assistant football coach for seven teams which went 47-25-2. A graduate of Southern Normal High School and Alabama State University.

GLENDON GIBBS

ELIZABETH HATCH

Contributed to Brilliant High School athletics for 35 years as a coach and administrator. Coached basketball for 33 years with 500 wins, carried three teams to the state tournament and coached in the all-star game. He led 17 football teams to a 124-55-11 overall record. He served as school principal for two years and has been a member of the Marion County Board of Education for six years. A graduate of Brilliant High School and the University of North Alabama.

Known throughout the South for the high standards she set for her cheerleading squads during a 12-year stint at Banks High School where she also taught physical education and coached tennis and swimming. She served 19 years as girls’ athletic director and physical education supervisor for Birmingham City Schools. For 25 summers was co-director of the AHSAA cheerleading clinics and coordinated the state basketball and volleyball tournaments. A graduate of Tuscaloosa County High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

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RONNIE HAUSHALTER

MAX RAY

Spent 25 of 34 years in coaching at Fyffe High School where his football teams compiled a 162-109 record. His 55-33-3 record at Valley Head High School put his career total over the 200-victory mark. He was named Coach of the Year several times. The street leading to the Fyffe football stadium was named in his honor. A graduate of McKees Rocks High School (Pa.) and the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga.

Served Hackleburg High School for 33 years, 10 as coach and 23 as administrator. His football teams posted a 69-28-3 overall record and he coached track, baseball and basketball. He served 14 years on the AHSAA District Board and 12 on the Central Board which he served one term as president. The Hackleburg stadium is named in honor of the Ray family. A graduate of Hackleburg High School and the University of North Alabama.

JOHN JARMON

THOMAS “COTTON” ROGERS

Coached track and cross country for 21 years at Mountain Brook High School where his teams won 26 varsity state championships and five junior high state titles. His teams finished in the top five in 102 meets and won 26 outdoor track section titles. A member of the AHSAA state track committee, he directed the state cross country meet 11 years and the state indoor meet three years. He organized the statewide track coaches association in 1982. A graduate of Etowah High School and the University of Alabama.

Coached basketball at Butler High School (Huntsville) for 18 years and compiled a 376-122 overall record with four state tournament appearances. His 1966 team was the first integrated state championship team in AHSAA history. He coached at Southern Union Junior College for two years and is a member of the Huntsville/Madison County Athletic Hall of Fame. A graduate of Pisgah High School and the University of Alabama.(Deceased)

ADRIAN MCKINZEY

ELLIOTT SPEED

Coached basketball at Tuscaloosa County High School for 38 years with a 492-335 overall record and a state championship in 1960. His 16 football teams compiled an 87-57-7 record and went undefeated in 1946. “Coach Mac” was honored at the 1976 homecoming for his years of faithful service and the gym was named in his honor. A graduate of Oxford High School and Howard College (now Samford University). (Deceased)

He served 18 years as basketball, football and baseball coach and also administrator at A. G. Parrish High School (Selma), his alma mater. Nine of his 14 basketball teams went to the state tournament where they were runner-up twice. He coached in two all-star basketball games and was very instrumental in the administration of the AHSAA outdoor track meet in Selma as well as the state indoor meet. A graduate of A. G. Parrish High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

LARRY PATTERSON

LEO SUMNER

Coached for 21 years at Susan Moore High School with an overall football record of 168-71-2 and 12 playoff appearances. He also coached six years at Arab High School with a 41-22 record and the schoolís first-ever state playoff appearances. The successful first season snapped a string of 11 straight losing seasons. He served as president of the AHSAA coaches association and coached in the all-star game. A graduate of Cleveland High School and Jacksonville State University.

He served Hale County High School for 18 years, 11 as a coach and seven as principal. Five of his 11 basketball teams reached the state tournament, one finishing runner-up. His football teams posted a 70-37-3 record and his baseball teams enjoyed 10 winning seasons. He coached in the all-star basketball game in 1965. He had a two-year coaching stint at Gorgas (Tuscaloosa County). A graduate of Hale County High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

ED BRUCE

DON CREASY

Contributed to Jefferson County athletics for 35 years as a coach and administrator. Coached football for 12 years at Phillips, Jones Valley and Gardendale with an overall record of 93-37-1. His 1971 Phillips team enjoyed the school’s first winning season in 10 years. He also coached track and started the wrestling program at Phillips and the soccer programs at Jones Valley and Gardendale. He spent the last 15 years in administration. A graduate of Hewitt-Trussville High School and the University of Alabama. (Deceased)

Spent 23 of his 30 years in coaching as the head football coach at Central (Florence), Colbert County, Coffee and Mountain Brook with an overall record of 185-77-2. His longest tenure was at Colbert County, his alma mater, where 11 of his 12 teams made the playoffs with a 101-16-0 record, two state championships and two runner-up finishes. He coached in two state all-star games and one Alabama-Mississippi all-star game. A graduate of Colbert County High School and the University of North Alabama.

EUGENE COOPER

FRANK RAY GARNER

Started the football program at Ardmore in 1947 where he coached for all but one of his 31 years in Limestone County. His football teams posted an overall record of 151-49 with three state championships and four undefeated seasons. His basketball teams were 297-203 and he also coached baseball and track. The school football stadium is named in his honor. A graduate of Union Hill High School (Ind.) and Indiana State University. (Deceased)

Is a basketball legend in South Alabama. He was a coach and teacher for 36 years at Pleasant Home, 23 as head basketball coach with an overall 414-207 record. His teams played in state tournaments nine times and won the state championship in 1966, a first for a Covington County school. He coached in the 1968 state all-star game. The school gym is named in his honor. A graduate of Pleasant Home High School and the Delta State University (Miss.). (Deceased)

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CONNIE McGUIRE

E. C. “BALDY” WILSON

Has been a pioneer in promoting girls’ athletics in North Alabama during her 20-year coaching career at Lexington. She organized the first volleyball and track teams at her school and was instrumental in getting coaching supplements for girls’ sports. Her volleyball teams won five state championships and compiled a 441-97 overall record during 20 straight winning seasons. She had a 210-128 career record in basketball. A graduate of Lexington High School and the University of North Alabama.

Served the Etowah County schools for 36 years, 18 as a coach at Glencoe and 18 in administration, including eight years as superintendent. He was even called back into service as interim superintendent 10 years after his retirement in 1984. His football teams compiled a 90-75-10 overall record while his basketball team won five county titles. He coached in the state all-star football game in 1959. The Glencoe city park is named in his honor. A graduate of Oxford High School and Jacksonville State University.

“SCOTTY” SAUERS

OLIVER WOODARD

Is a living legend in officiating circles in the State of Alabama. He has officiated in several sports for over 60 years and given his life to athletics. He was a Southeastern Conference basketball official for 25 years but has always had a keen interest in high school athletics, helping younger officials and recruiting new ones. For years he conducted rules clinics for the AHSAA all over the state. He founded the South Central Officials Association in 1965. A graduate of Ashland High School (Pa.) and the Penn State University. (Deceased)

Coached football for 26 years, produced state championship teams at three different high schools – Winston County in 1953, Roanoke in 1955 and Cullman in 1962 – and compiled a career coaching record of 179-65-8. His longest tenure was 15 years at Cullman where his teams went 106-40-6 and he was state Class 4A coach of the year in 1962. He served as president of the AHSAA coaches association. A graduate of Morgan County High School and Jacksonville State University. (Deceased)

ERNEST TUCKER

PAUL WOOLLEY

Came to Phillips (Birmingham) in 1925 and served for 45 years, 38 as a coach of all sports. He is most remembered for his track teams that won five state titles and his basketball teams that went to the state tournament 13 times. His 1937 basketball team lost in the finals and his 1926 baseball team won a state crown. He is credited with introducing the one-handed shot to Alabama prep basketball and initiated B-teams. A graduate of Erwin High School and the Carson-Newman College (Tenn.). (Deceased)

Reached the elite group of football coaches with 200 career wins during his 33-year career at eight schools – Tuscaloosa County, Thompson, Hokes Bluff, Montevallo, Handley, Brantley, Monroe County and Opp. He rejuvenated several school programs en route to an overall record of 202-94-4 and 12 playoff appearances. He guided two teams (Handley and Brantley) to the state finals. A graduate of Montevallo High School and Howard College (now Samford University).

MALCOLM STREET, SR. For 51 years this living legend was THE radio “voice” of high school sports in Northeast Alabama, 47 of those at WHMA in Anniston where he devoted countless hours of radio time to the promotion and growth of prep athletics. With his own “bringingthe-game-to-life” style, he broadcast Anniston football games for nearly half a century and covered almost every school in the area through several radio shows he established. A graduate of Glencoe High School and Jacksonville State University.(Deceased)

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

1999 Sports Hall Fame of

SHERRY AMMONS

BILL FARRELL

A pioneer for girls athletics in Huntsville City schools for 31 years as a coach and teacher. She was a catalyst in rejuvenating girls athletics at Huntsville High School where she coached volleyball for 23 years with an overall record of 802-211, including a state championship in 1994 and seven other top four finishes. She was instrumental in the reinstatement of the girls state basketball tournament. She served on the AHSAA volleyball and basketball committees. A graduate of Vigor High School and the University of Montevallo.

is a legend in Calhoun County football. After successful coaching stints at Ohatchee and Piedmont high schools and 10 years in administration, he returned to coaching and restored the winning and tradition at Anniston High School with a 62-28-2 record, including the first undefeated regular season (1973) in 19 years and a runner-up state finish (1974). His overall record in 22 seasons was 137-67-6. He won several coach of the year honors. A graduate of Jacksonville High School and Jacksonville State University.

BILL BACON

JOE HUBBERT

Spent 25 of his 34 years in coaching football at Enterprise High School with a record of 202-74-1, state championships in 1979 and 1982 and 16 playoff appearances. He has the longest coaching stint and the most wins in school history and was named state coach of the year twice. His five-year tenure at B. C. Rain put his career record at 232-87-5 with only one losing season. He served as president of the coaches association. A graduate of Aberdeen High School (Miss.) and Mississippi State University.

Coached football for 28 years, 20 of those at Winfield High School where his teams posted a record of 132-81-1. He also coached at Marion County, Eufaula, Deshler and Cochran (Ga.) high schools and compiled a career record of 201-123-6. He was a member of the first class of the Marion County Hall of Fame. Known as a hard-nosed, no-nonsense coach, he was always committed to the growth and development of the youth at school and in the community. A graduate of Winfield High School and the University of Chattanooga.

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BOBBY JOE JOHNSON

ROBERT SHAW

Reached the elite group of football coaches with 200 career wins during his 30-year career—26 of those at Cherokee County High School where his teams posted a 198-80-3 record and made the state finals in 1984. He climaxed his career by rebuilding the Saks program from an 0-10 record the previous season to the state finals (1996) in four years. He was the state coach of the year twice and coached in the state all-star game. A graduate of Cherokee County High School and Jacksonville State University.

Served Mobile County schools for 31 years – 21 as a coach at Murphy and Mobile County high schools and 10 in administration, the last three as athletic director. He headed the Murphy football team for 13 years, compiling a 111-34-2 record without a losing season, and advanced to the playoffs 10 times, including the finals in 1976. He was the county coach of the year nine straight years and coached in the state all-star game twice. A graduate of Magnolia High School (Miss.) and Mississippi State University.

LARRY McCOY His name is synonymous with football at Athens High School where he was head coach for 10 years with a 70-31-3 record, a state championship in 1975, and the only undefeated regular season in school history (1972). His track team won a state title in 1973. He also coached at Dothan and Huntsville during his 16 years in coaching. Now president of Shoals Community College, he serves as chairman of the Alabama-Mississippi high school allstar games committee, a concept he helped initiate. A graduate of Tuscaloosa High School and the University of Alabama.

JOE MOOTY Built the basketball and baseball programs at Montgomery Academy during his 28 years of service as athletic director, coach and teacher. He started the basketball program from scratch, even without a gym. His 18 teams posted a 275-161 record and the 1981 teams reached the state semi-finals when he was state Coach of the Year. He also started baseball and compiled a 13-year record of 127-72 with a state championship in 1981. A graduate of Perry County High School and Centenary College (La.).  (Deceased)

SHANNON SLOAN This legendary basketball coach at Albertville High School for 35 years compiled a 564-349 record for a winning percentage of .618. His 1960 team had the best record, 30-6, and finished third in the state. His teams won 10 Marshall County tournaments and he received numerous coach of the year honors. The school’s Thanksgiving tournament is named in his honor. He also coached football, track and golf. A graduate of Waynesburg High School (Ky.) and Union College (Ky.)

C.B. “RED” STRICKLAND Coached basketball for 34 years at Skyline, Section, Geraldine and North Sand Mountain high schools with a career record of 705-264 and seven Sand Mountain championships. During his 20 years at Section he won a state championship in 1969 and reached the finals another year. He also guided two other teams to the state tournament. He coached in the state all-star game and received many coach of the year awards. A graduate of Pisgah High School and Jacksonville State University.

WILLIE SCOGGINS Is the state’s winningest active basketball coach with over 800 victories during his 38 years of service to the Birmingham City schools. He coached 13 years at Hayes High School where he won a state championship in 1974. He has had only two losing seasons during his 25 years at Ramsay High School. He served on the first integrated AHSAA Central Board in 1968 and later served as president of Fifth District Board. A graduate of Parker High School and Miles College. (Deceased)

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GLORIA BIRMINGHAM

JIMMY FOSHEE

Influential in developing the girls’ athletic programs at Grissom High School for 24 years, she built the volleyball program into a state powerhouse that won four state championships, was runnerup four times and made 13 consecutive appearances in the state final four. Her 848 career wins makes her the sixth winningest girls high school volleyball coach in the nation. She is a member of the Huntsville-Madison County Hall of Fame. A graduate of Butler High School and the University of Montevallo.

Coached football for 34 years, 25 of those at Stanhope Elmore where his teams compiled a 212-81-1 record and never had a losing season. Three teams went undefeated and all but five made the playoffs, including the last 16 in a row. His teams advanced to the semi-finals four times, losing each time to the eventual state champion. Named coach of the year in 1998, he coached in four all-star games, once as head coach. The Millbrook stadium is named in his honor. A graduate of Dadeville High School and Auburn University.

L. D. DOBBINS

L. C. FOWLER

Spent 29 of his 31 years in coaching basketball at Collinsville High School with a career record of 511-311, a state championship in 1975 and five county titles. He coached two years at Southside High School (Gadsden). He was state coach of the year twice and a nominee for national coach of the year. The Collinsville gym is named in his honor and he is a charter member of the DeKalb County Sports Hall of Fame in 1997. A graduate of DeKalb County High School and Jacksonville State University.

Is a legend in Marion County where he spent 29 of 34 years in coaching – 24 at Hamilton and one at Marion County. He also coached at Reform and Carbon Hill. With a career football record of 206-131-23, he was named conference coach of the year four times and coached in two all-star games. He also was conference coach of the year after his only season as girls basketball coach. He is a member of the Marion and Lamar counties’ halls of fame. A graduate of Sulligent High School and Florence State Teachers College.

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GERALD GANN

BILL SPARKS

Enjoyed a successful, 34-year coaching career at Gordo, Berry, Homewood and Hoover. His 12 baseball teams at Berry won over 250 games with a state championship in 1972. His 14 basketball teams, 5 girls squads at Berry and nine at Homewood, also logged over 250 wins. During his 16 years at Homewood and four at Hoover he compiled a 130-97-2 overall record in football. He served on the AHSAA Central Board and Legislative Council. A graduate of Winfield High School and the University of Alabama.

Made countless contributions to public education for 39 years as a teacher, coach and administrator. Spent 21 years at Midfield High School where his football teams posted a 136-73-2 record. He helped implement the nation’s first mandatory drug testing program. He coached baseball for 15 years at Ensley and Phillips with a 327-120 record. He served two terms as AHSAA Central Board president and also as Shelby County school superintendent. A graduate of Jones Valley High School and Samford University.

BUSTER GROSS Coached football for 30 years, 19 at Emma Sansom High School where his teams compiled a 127-73-4 record, won a state championship in 1984 and finished second in 1983. Posting a 200-104-10 career record, He also coached at SouthsideGadsden, Arab and won a state championship at Walnut Grove in 1964. He coached in two all-star games and was state coach of the year twice. He is a member of the Etowah County Hall of Fame. A graduate of Emma Sansom High School and Auburn University.

PERCY VINES This legendary basketball coach at Corner High School for 44 years compiled a 614-253 record, a winning percentage of .708 and an average of 19.8 wins per season. His teams were state champions in 1949 and 1954, second four times and third once. His 1926 team won the prestigious Boys Club championship in Birmingham. He used shot charts, the shuffle, a one-hand jump shot and a zone press long before other teams. His untimely death came months after his retirement in 1969. A graduate of Birmingham-Southern College. (Deceased)

CHARLES LEE

DAN WASHBURN

His name is synonymous with athletics at Jeff Davis High School where he joined the staff when it opened in 1968 and served as head coach in five sports and also athletic director during a 30-year career. His 18 football teams compiled a 141-59-2 record and won the state championship in 1996, the second straight year in the finals. He was cited as one of the most highly-regarded coaches in America. A graduate of Sidney Lanier High School and Huntingdon College.

Has served nine years with distinction as the third full-time Executive Director of the AHSAA. Several revitalized AHSAA events have flourished under his leadership, including The Super Six (football), State Finals (basketball) and Elite Eight (volleyball) championships and the All-Star Sports Week. He coached 15 years at Lanett with a 109-45-4 record. He served on the AHSAA Board and Council and was Superintendent at Lanett. A graduate of LaFayette High School and the University of Chattanooga.

HARLEN ROBINSON Coached football at Ranburne High School for 37 years with an overall record of 244-115-6 and state championships in 1966 and 1975. Posting a 29-game unbeaten streak during the mid1960s, he guided his teams to 18 playoffs and enjoyed eight undefeated regular seasons. He also coached basketball for 21 years, finishing as state runner-up in 1966. He was named coach of the year in both basketball and football. A graduate of Ranburne High School and the University of West Alabama.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

GLENDA WRIGHT Spent 31 of 34 years in coaching at Hazel Green where she built one of the most successful volleyball programs in the state with six state championships and a final four finish for 16 years. Her career record of 1060-433 makes her the second winningest volleyball coach nationally. She never had a losing season in any sport she coached. She initiated some of the first girls teams in Madison County and was instrumental in getting supplements for women coaches. A graduate of East Tallahatchie High School (Miss.) and Delta State University.

of 2001 Sports Hall Fame T. C. BRITTON

RICHARD burleson

Made countless contributions in Lee County for 34 years as a teacher, coach and administrator. He coached 13 years at Smiths Station where his football teams posted a 99-25-1 record and won the 1958 state championship. His 13 basketball teams had a 177-58 record and his 10 baseball teams posted a 148-31 mark. He was Class 1A coach of the year in 1959 and coached in the 1963 all-star game. He taught history and physical education and served as assistant principal. His final 24 years of service came as superintendent. A graduate of Millry High School and Livingston University.(Deceased)

Officiated prep football for 15 years as a member of the Birmingham Football Officials Association that he served as president and board member. He worked in the 1970 all-star game and called in the state playoffs from their inception in 1966 until his retirement from the association in 1977. An annual BFOA award is given in his honor. He officiated in the Southeastern Conference for over 25 years. A graduate of J. B. Pennington High School and Georgia Tech.

ORMOND BROWN

ROSE FIORELLA

Officiated prep football and basketball in Alabama for 41 years, including 30 state basketball tournament finals and numerous state playoff and all-star games. He also umpired baseball for 10 years and has held every office in his local officials association. He has served the AHSAA as a clinician and camp instructor and now is a basketball district director. Also, he officiated basketball on the college level for 32 years, including 17 in the Southeastern Conference. A graduate of Emma Sansom High School.

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A pioneer for volleyball in the Birmingham City School system, she coached 30 of the last 31 years at Ramsay where her teams won five state championships in six years—including four straight in 1985-88óand finished runner-up twice. With her work ethic and competitive drive, she earned the respect of coaches statewide and became a legend as an outstanding teacher and coach. She helped organize summer training camps for girls. A graduate of John Carroll High School and Auburn University.

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EDDIE FROST

WILLIAM JESSIE

Helped start the athletic program at Bradshaw where he enjoyed a successful 18-year coaching career. His teams compiled a 253-180 record and won a state championship in 1976. The first basketball coach to serve as president of the coaches association, he also coached five years at Appleby Junior High. Since 1984 he has served as Mayor of Florence where he helped found the Alabama-Mississippi all-star basketball games. A graduate of Sheffield High School and Florence State College.  (Deceased)

Has been involved with high school athletics in Mobile for 38 years as a coach, official and administrator. He was head football coach/athletic director for 23 years at Toulminville/LeFlore where he had three straight undefeated seasons, 145 career wins and coached in the 1972 all-star game. He officiated basketball for 36 years worked in numerous state tournaments. He also served on the AHSAA District and Central boards for the last 16 years. A graduate of Central High School and Alabama State University. (Deceased)

ALFRED HALL

ROOSEVELT SANDERS

Spent 29 of his 32 years in coaching at Brighton where he guided the football, basketball, baseball and track teams. Compiling a football record of 130-84-11, his teams lost only six games during one nine-year period. The Brighton program became known for its character building during the struggling 1970s when many of its students transferred to other schools during integration efforts. A graduate of Dunbar High School and Alabama A&M University. (Deceased)

Coached basketball for 31 years and guided four schools to the state tournament with a career record of 699-159. He spent 22 years at Central-Tuscaloosa where his teams won state championships in 1990 and 1991 and reached the final four four times. His R. R. Moton team won the 1969 state title and he also coached at Bullock County and Druid. He was selected state coach of the year four times, coached in the all-star game and served as administrative coach for the state all-star team. A graduate of Carver High School (Montgomery) and Alabama State University.

ROBERT HERRING Of his 32 years in the coaching profession, his finest hour came during his 14 years at Oxford where his teams posted a 119-43 record and won three state championships. He was named coach of the year in 1993 and Southeastern athletic director of the year in 1995. He also coached at Jones Valley and Oneonta and in the Alabama-Mississippi all-star football game. He also won three Mississippi state titles and has a career record of 222-95. A graduate of Louisville High School (Miss.) and Mississippi State University.

PAT HICKS She was instrumental in starting girls’ athletics in Mobile County where she coached at Satsuma for 31 years. Her softball career record was 504-78 with three state slow pitch state championships, including the first sanctioned by the AHSAA in 1987. With her volleyball teams compiling a 476-165 record and reaching the playoffs 13 times in 16 years, she was named coach of the year twice. She currently coaches at UMS-Wright. A graduate of Satsuma High School and William Carey College.

JIMMY SMOTHERS One of the most influential sports personalities in the state, he has covered Alabama high school events for over 50 years, the last 40 for the Gadsden Times. He has written countless hundreds of articles about prep coaches and athletes. His coverage has included over 25 state basketball tournaments, the Super Six and numerous other state playoff games. He has won many writing awards and is a member of the Etowah County, DeKalb County and Alabama Sports Writers halls of fame. A graduate of Geraldine High School.

ALLEN STEPHENSON Has an outstanding record as a coach, teacher and administrator at Addison for 33 years. He coached football for 17 years with a 131-62 record and an undefeated, state championship team in 1976. His 1972 basketball squad, the only Addison team ever to reach the state tournament, finished fourth. He served as a state track meet official, assisted with the management of all-star games and served a term as president of the coaches association. A graduate of T. W. Martin High School and Jacksonville State University.

EDDIE HOLMES

PAUL TERRY

Spent 30 of his 34 years of coaching at UMS-Wright where he has been successful in three sports. During his 28 years as a golf coach, his teams won 12 state championships, including nine in a row from 1987 until the present. He coached boys basketball for 20 years and compiled a 375-192 record. His girls basketball team has posted a 158-24 record over the last five years. He was named the district coach of the year in 1997. A graduate of UMSWright Prep School and Spring Hill College. (Deceased)

His coaching career spanned 35 years, 30 as a head football coach compiling a 198-113-4 overall record at three South Alabama schools he led into the playoffs for the first time. His 12 Enterprise teams posted an 86-31-3 record and he coached in the 1972 all-star game. He compiled a 40-14-1 mark in five years at Florala and a 72-68-0 record during 13 years at Carroll. He is member of the Wiregrass and Morgan County halls of fame. A graduate of Decatur High School and Auburn University.

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RONNIE BAYNES

MARY BIRDWELL

Coached for 32 years at Banks, Selma, Alabama School for the Deaf, Tallassee and Mountain Brook high schools and was also a successful administrator. His 17 baseball teams at Tallassee won five state championships (1986, 1987, 1989, 1990 and 1991) and he had a career baseball record of 419-179. He officiated football 12 years in the Southeastern Conference and 15 years in the National Football League. A graduate of Talladega High School and Auburn University.

Spent the last 15 of her 35 years in coaching at Hoover High School (formerly Berry) where her cross country and indoor track teams have won eight state championships. She guided two swimming teams and one gymnastics team to state titles. She also coached at DAR and Guntersville plus middle and elementary schools in Hoover. She has received numerous awards for her skills in teaching and coaching. A graduate of Oak Ridge High School (Tenn.) and the University of Tennessee.

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GEORGE EVANS

ED LATHAN

Was associated with the AHSAA officiating program for over 30 years. As a member of the Selma Basketball Officials Association, he officiated in numerous playoff and state tournament games. Since retiring as an active official in 1998, he has served as an AHSAA District Director. Serving Dallas County for 35 years as superintendent, principal, coach and teacher, he is presently president of the Selma City Council. A graduate of Hudson High School and St. Mary’s College (Kan.).

Has been involved with high school athletics in Mobile County for 33 years as a coach and administrator. He coached one year at Davidson and 18 years at B. C. Rain and remained highly involved in athletics for 14 years as principal at Alba, Alma Bryant and UMS-Wright high schools. A member of the AHSAA Legislative Council for nine years and the founding committee of the Alabama-Mississippi all-star football game, he is a graduate of Murphy High School and Mississippi State University.

LAMAR HARRIS

Wallace Sanders

Spent 24 of his 31 years in coaching at Hubbertville High School where he has been successful in four sports. During his 16 years as softball coach, his teams won three state championships and compiled a 403-135 record. He coached girls basketball for 23 years and captured two state titles with an overall record of 293-170. His 24 football teams compiled a 142-110 record with seven playoff appearances and his 24 boys basketball teams won four area crowns. A graduate of Lanett High School and Samford University.

Coached basketball for 30 years at Union Hill, Brewer and Decatur high schools and carried a team to the state tournament from each one. His 15 years at Decatur with thee state tournament appearances and a 217-192 record put his career mark at 427369. He was named District Coach of the Year in 1999 by the National Federation Coaches Association. Currently he is an instructor in the AHSAA Coaches Education Program. A graduate of Eva High School and Florence State College.

ROBERT HIGGINBOTHAM Coached football for 28 years at three schools with a career record of 206-105-3. One of his three Mountain Brook teams won a state championship in 1975 with a perfect season. He spent 22 years at Shades Valley with a 163-83-2 record. All three of his Tuscaloosa County teams made the playoffs. He was the first head coach in the Alabama-Mississippi all-star game in 1988. His father Morris was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1993. A graduate of Hueytown High School and the University of Alabama.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

LARRY SINYARD Enjoyed a very successful 20-year career as girls basketball coach at Lauderdale County High School where he compiled a phenomenal 477-88 career record with five state championships and two runner-up finishes in 10 state tournament appearances. A three-time coach in the Alabama-Mississippi all-star basketball games, he was the first one to guide the Alabama girls team to a win in the series. A graduate of Lauderdale County High School and Athens College.

of 2003 Sports Hall Fame DOVEY R. “Buddy” ANDERSON

SANDRA HUNTER

Has been involved with athletics at Vestavia Hills High School for 32 years, the last 26 as head football coach and athletic director. His football teams compiled a 205-89 overall record with state championships in 1980 and 1998. The school athletic program won 43 state titles during his tenure and ranked in the top 10 statewide for the last decade. The school’s football field is named in his honor. He joins his father, D. F. Anderson, a member of the inaugural Class of 1991. A graduate of Thomasville High School and Samford University.

Spent 20 of her 24 years in coaching at Pleasant Valley High School where her softball, volleyball and track teams won 13 state championships. She guided her 20 volleyball teams to a 798-160 overall record and five championships. Her 15 softball squads compiled a 546-93 mark with seven state titles. She coached three years at Weaver High School where her track team won a state crown in 1981. She also coached a year at Ohatchee. A graduate of Weaver High School and Jacksonville State University.

STOKELY BAZEMORE

WADE LIPSCOMB

This legendary figure at Wetumpka High School was an outstanding classroom teacher, coached basketball, baseball and football and served as athletic director during a 30-year career. His nine basketball teams compiled a 187-57 record and won state championships in 1979 and 1980. His 22 baseball squads posted a 284-157 mark and won a state title in 1982. He guided six football teams to the state playoffs. The school’s new baseball facility is named in his honor. A graduate of Wetumpka High School and Auburn University. (Deceased)

Enjoyed a distinguished career as an administrator in the Huntsville City School System. He coached three years at New Hope High School and three at Huntsville High before becoming athletic director. During his 19-year tenure, 41 Huntsville High teams won state championships. He was instrumental in hosting the first three girls state basketball tournaments, beginning in 1978, and the first state soccer tournament. He currently serves on the AHSAA Central Board and District Board. A graduate of Macon High School (Miss.) and Livingston University.

E. L. “Moose” GODWIN Was an outstanding coach and teacher at Millry, Flomaton and Smiths Station high schools for 26 years. Averaging 7.2 wins per season, his football teams compiled a 190-82-2 record with his 1988 and 1989 Smiths Station teams finishing runner-up. His baseball teams posted a 113-52 mark in 11 seasons and his basketball teams were 175-62 over 10 years. He was named state coach of the year three times and coached in the instate all-star game. A graduate of A. G. Parrish High School (Selma) and Mississippi Southern College.

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GEORGE H. “Prof” LOCKHART Spent more than 40 years as a teacher and coach of all sports at the Alabama State Lab School. His basketball teams won 7 of 9 Alabama Interscholastic Athletic Association championships during the 1940s. His 1932 football team was 9-0 and his teams set the standard for success throughout the state and region. The gymnasium at Alabama State is named in his honor. A graduate of Stillman Institute High School and Talladega College.(Deceased)

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BOBBY OVERTON

LOUIS WHITE

Gave 38 years of devoted service to B. B. Comer High School, the last 36 as head football coach and athletic director. His teams won 202 games, made the playoffs 14 times and reached the finals once. While serving as president of the Coaches Association, he helped push through the Super 6 concept for the football championships and the All-Star Sports Week. He served on the AHSAA District Board. A graduate of Childersburg High School and the University of Chattanooga.

Has been involved in high school athletics for 30 years, 24 years as head football and track coach at Courtland High School. His football teams compiled a 186-80 overall record with four state championships and his boys track team won five state titles. He was state coach of the year four times and coached in the Alabama-Mississippi all-star game twice. He served as president of the Coaches Association. A graduate of Central High School (Courtland) and Alcorn State University

RUSSELL L. TAYLOR

JACK WOOD

Became a coaching legend during 17 years at Coffee County High School (Enterprise) and seven years at Dothan High School during the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s. He guided the Coffee County football teams to a 101-42-10 record and two undefeated seasons. His efforts resulted in the area’s first night football game and modern gymnasium. At Dothan he carried six of his seven basketball teams to the state tournament and won Dothan’s only state title in 1954. A graduate of the University of Alabama.  (Deceased)

Spent 19 of his 29-year career as football coach and athletic director at Hewitt-Trussville High School. His football teams made the playoffs 15 times, averaged 7.5 wins a season. He was state coach of the year in 1992 and head coach in the AlabamaMississippi all-star game twice. He served on the AHSAA Central Board and as Coaches Association president. The school football stadium at Hewitt-Trussville is named in his honor. A graduate of Wetumpka High School and Auburn University.

DR. KENNITH S. BLANKENSHIP

JOHN FULGHAM

Has been involved in athletics for 43 years as a coach, a game official and an administrator. He initiated the All-Star Sports Week as the director of the Athletic Directors & Coaches Association and has served as director of Bryant-Jordan Student-Athlete Scholarship Program for 13 years. He coached at Shorter and Selma, then served in State Department of Education positions for 23 years. He was a basketball official and a track official. Upon retirement he worked with the establishment of the AHSAA Hall of Fame. A graduate of Wetumpka High School and Troy State University.

Spent all but two of his 35 years in education as a coach, teacher and administrator at Carver High School in Montgomery. After two years at Coffee County Training School, he served as head football coach and athletic director at Carver where his 22 teams posted a 133-73-11 record and won a state AIAA title in 1964. He was named coach of the year twice. He gave up his coaching duties in 1974 but continued as athletic director until his retirement 11 years later. A graduate of Tuscaloosa County Training School and Tuskegee University. (Deceased)

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SUSAN COOK

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EARL GRISHAM, SR.

This pioneer of girls sports in Alabama built the volleyball program along with the entire girls program at Homewood High School during her 32 years as a coach, teacher and girls athletic director. Her volleyball teams won over 700 games, including state championships in 1991 and 1992 and four runner-up finishes. She also coached basketball, softball, track, gymnastics and swimming. A graduate of Satsuma High School and the University of Montevallo.

Of his 33 years in high school athletics, he gave 25 years of dedicated service to Lauderdale County High School as coach and teacher. His football teams compiled a 156-106-3 record with a Class 2A state championship in 1974, six playoff appearances and 21 winning seasons. His overall career record was 198-139-5. He began his coaching at Falkville and at three Georgia schools-Osbourn, Sandy Springs and East Hall. A graduate of Lauderdale County High School and Florence State Teachers College (now North Alabama).

TERRY CURTIS

BILL JOINER

Spent 32 years coaching football in the Mobile area, the last 16 as head coach at Shaw, Murphy and UMS-Wright high schools with a 135-43 career record. His 2001 and 2002 UMS-Wright teams were Class 4A state champions and he was named 4A Coach of the Year both times. A certified athletic director and past president of the AHSAA athletic directors/coaches association, he has been active in the All-Star Sports Week Coaching School. A graduate of Murphy High School and Auburn University.

Became a legend during the 1960s when his Sidney Lanier teams dominated high school basketball with four titles and two runner-up finishes in a seven-year period. He produced state championship teams in 1962, 1963, 1965 and 1967. He was also involved in another Sidney Lanier state championship team as an all-state player in 1949. After retiring from his basketball duties with a career record of 235-43, he took over as head football coach for five years. A graduate of Sidney Lanier High School and Troy State University.

Sammy Dunn

Lavon Kelly

Has enjoyed an ultra-successful, 26-year career at Vestavia Hills where his baseball teams won nine state championships from 1991-2000, including a record seven straight. The 1998 team won the national high school title and he was named national coach of the year. He has received several state coach of the year honors and has a career record of 621-159. He is a member of the University of Montevallo Hall of Fame and a former president of the state baseball coaches association. A graduate of Fairfield High School and the University of Montevallo. (Deceased)

Has been involved with high school athletics for 36 years as a coach, administrator and an official. He coached football for 17 years at Wildwood, Fla., Newville, Louisville, Dale County, Houston Academy, Carroll and G. W. Long with an overall record of 110-65-4. He also directed seven basketball teams to a 102-42 record. He spent 13 years in administration at G. W. Long High School. He served on the AHSAA Legislative Council for 23 years and on the Central Board for nine. A graduate of Barbour County High School and Troy State University.

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Bobby Wilson

Has been associated with success during his entire 31-year coaching career, 25 as a head football coach with a 234-65-1 career record. His head-coaching success began during five years at Montgomery Academy where his teams posted a 33-20-1 record. Then in 1984 it was on to Robert E. Lee where his 11 teams were 118-25 with state championships in 1986, 1991 and 1992. His Opelika teams have posted an 83-20 mark. A graduate of Robert E. Lee High School and Auburn University.

Established a legacy of excellence at Sidney Lanier during a 13year span (1959-69) that will not soon be matched in Alabama high school football. His teams won six state championships, 1957, 1961, 1964, 1966, 1967 and 1968. The three in a row were Class 6A titles during the first three years of the AHSAA playoff system. The Lanier program also won several state titles in other sports during Wilson’s eight-year tenure as athletic director, including football, basketball and track in 1996-97. A graduate of Baldwin County High School and the University of Alabama.  (Deceased)

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

of 2005 Sports Hall Fame WILLIE AVERETT

BOBBY LOTT

Served 33 of his 35 years in Monroe County as a successful teacher, basketball coach and athletic director at J. F. Shields High School. He guided the 1972 team, led by John Drew, to its first-ever state championship. Drew was named state tournament MVP and went on to a successful career with the Atlanta Hawks of the NBA. The colorful Averett received coach-of-the-year honors three times. The school gym is named in his honor. A graduate of Georgiana Training School and Alabama State University.

Coached for over 20 years at Fayetteville, Hubbertville, Hamilton, Banks and Ensley. His 16 football teams compiled a 103-49-8 record, including undefeated Hubbertville teams in 1951 and 1952 with a 24-game winning streak. The 1952 team was a regional state champion. With a seven-year basketball record of 90-43, he guided two Hubbertville teams to the state tournament. His 10-year football record at Hamilton was 63-30-7. A graduate of Woodlawn High School and Howard College (now Samford).

JOHN BLANE

AMELIA RHOADES

This legendary coach spent 53 years at Woodlawn High School where his basketball teams won state championships in 1927, 1937, 1943, and 1957 and his track teams were state champions in 1932, 1944, 1945 and 1946. His basketball philosophy was tenacious defense and aggressive offense. His Woodlawn team played Phillips in the first football game at Legion Field in 1927. A graduate of Greenview High School (Ill.) and the University of Illinois. (Deceased)

Has been a pioneer for girls’ athletics in Southeast Alabama during her 32 years in coaching at Kinston and Elba. She brought volleyball to prominence during her 27 years at Kinston where her team won a state championship in 1997 and she earned state coach of the year honors. Her teams were runner-up five times and she coached in the all-star game. She also coached softball for 22 years, basketball for 12 yeaers and served as Kinston athletic director for nine years. A graduate of Kinston High School and Troy State University.

IDA CORBETT Was a pioneer in Barbour County girls’ athletics for 41 years as a teacher/coach at Rebecca Comer, Barbour County/Clio and Clayton high schools. She had a 471-107 career record as a basketball coach and an even more impressive record in volleyball with a 394-86 mark and two state championships and three runner-up finishes in 17 appearances. She received two coach-of-the-year honors and served on several girls’ sports committees. A graduate of Pearl High School (Tenn.) and Tennessee State University.

LARRY GINN Has enjoyed a successful, 30-year career at Alexandria High School where his basketball teams compiled a 568-126 record with three state championships. His football teams have won two state titles and placed second once while posting a 171-51 overall record. He has coached in the Alabama-Mississippi basketball and football all-star games and has received coach-of-the-year honors. The new Alexandria gym was named in his honor in 1995. A graduate of Alexandria High School and Jacksonville State University.(Deceased)

BUBBA LEWIS Was associated with success during his 25-year coaching career in baseball, football and basketball. As baseball coach at Sidney Lanier for 12 years and Jeff Davis for 11, he guided his teams to a 416-165 record and a state championship at Jeff Davis in 1987. His career record was 441-176. In football he was defensive coordinator at Jeff Davis, which won a state title in 1987, and was on the staffs of two Lanier state championship teams. A graduate of Holtville High School and the University of Alabama.

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DON SHARPE Coached in Alabama for 15 years with a seven-year tenure at Andalusia being his most successful stop. His teams played in the finals four of the seven years and won two state crowns, including the co-championship in 1976. During that run his teams ran off 58 straight regular season wins without a loss while posting an overall 78-7-2 mark. He also coached at Jeff Davis for four years where his track teams won state titles every year. A graduate of Andalusia High School and Troy State University.

MOE SMITH Has been involved in athletics as a coach and administrator for 34 years, 25 of those at Glencoe High School. During an eightyear span he guided the basketball team to two county titles leading to a coach of the year award. Moving to administration in 1985 and to principal in 1988, he has served on the AHSAA district board since 1993 and on the Central Board for 10 years, including a two-year term as president. He was a member of several key AHSAA committees. A graduate of Boaz High School and Jacksonville State University.

FRANK TOLBERT Established a legacy of excellence as a coach and educator at Auburn City Schools since 1969. A head basketball coach for 25 years – 22 of those of the Auburn high boys team, he has compiled a career record of 505-234 with seven final four appearances. How he has dealt in recent years with the debilitating physical effects of Guillain-Barre Syndrome has been an inspiration to everyone. A graduate of Chambers County Training School and Alabama State University.

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RANDY WHITE

Enjoyed a successful, 20-year coaching career at Athens High School. His 16 girls basketball teams won three state championships (1999, 2002 and 2003), finished runner-up twice while compiling a 412-98 overall record. His teams set a state record 69-game winning streak in 2001-03. In softball, his 15 fast and slow pitch teams were champions in 1989, 1990 and 1999. A graduate of Tanner High School and the University of Montevallo.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

of 2006 Sports Hall Fame George Cochran

JIM HUBBERT

George Cochran is a graduate of Russell County High School (Hurtsboro) and Auburn University. He enjoyed success everywhere he coached during a 32-year career. During 10 years at Eufaula High School his football teams won state titles in 1978 and 1981 while compiling an overall record of 92-18-1. His 23-year football record of 204-51-1 included coaching stints at Mosley, Fla., and Hooper Academy.  His only Eufaula basketball team won the state title in 1986. His 11-year basketball record was 193-98.  (Deceased)

Jim Hubbert is a graduate of Oxford High School and Jacksonville State University. He coached for 20 years at Ohatchee, Oxford, Bibb County, Lanett and Maplesville high schools. During his 10 years at Maplesville his teams won a state football championship in 1996. Named Coach of the Year in 1996, he served a term as president of the Alabama High School Athletic Directors & Coaches Association.

JACKIE FERGUSON

DAN LEWIS

Jackie Ferguson is a graduate of Hazlewood High School and Florence State University. He spent 24 years in coaching at West Morgan, Brooks, Hazlewood and Athens high schools. He was quite successful during nine years at Hazelwood where his football and track teams won state championships during the same school year on three occasions—1985-86, 1988-89 and 1989-90. His overall football record was 166-51-1.

Dan Lewis is a graduate of Carver High School (Montgomery) and Alabama State University. He spent 30 of his 39 years in coaching at Carver High School in Montgomery where his basketball teams won state championships in 1983 and 1984. His teams reached the regional finals eight other times. He also coached at A. L Martin where he was named Clarke County coach of the year four times and finished his career at St. Jude. His 39-year overall coaching record is 519-291.

PAT GALLE

EUGENE MASON

Pat Galle is a graduate of McGill Institute and the University of South Alabama. He has enjoyed an extremely successful, 34-year coaching career at UMS-Wright Prep School where his boys and girls track teams have won 30 separate state indoor and outdoor championships in addition to five state cross country titles. These teams were also state runners-up 32 times. He coached at  A member of the UMS-Wright Hall of Fame.

Eugene Mason is a graduate of Ullman High School and Florida A&M University. This living legend at R. C. Hatch High School is the winningest coach in Alabama prep basketball history with an amazing 919 victories on his record during his 40-year career in Perry County. He guided seven R.C. Hatch teams to state basketball championships, the most by any coach in state history to date. He coached in both the Alabama-Mississippi and North-South all-star games and received several coach of the year awards.

DON HACKNEY Don Hackney is a graduate of Belfry High School (Ky.) and Morehead State University (Ky.) He has been associated with success as a coach and administrator at the Alabama School for the Deaf for 28 years. The Silent Warriors’ most recent AHSAA successes were their 1997 and 1998 appearances in the state basketball semi-finals. ASD’s record of deaf school athletic accomplishments during his tenure is unprecedented in school history and includes 485 wins, six national championships and many national records.

GLENN HAWKINS

JACK RAY Jack Ray is a graduate of Wetumpka High School and Troy State Teachers College. He spent 13 of his 20 years in coaching at Wetumpka High School where he established the basic foundation for the school athletic program that still exists today. His 13 football teams compiled an 82-40-8 record with undefeated seasons in 1953, 1963 and 1964. He also coached at Millry, Central-Phenix City and Tallassee and served as Elmore County Superintendent of Schools.

Glenn Hawkins is a graduate of Alexandria High School and Jacksonville State University. He has been involved in high school officiating for over 50 years. A founding member of the East Alabama Football Officials Association, he also formed the East Alabama associations for basketball, baseball and volleyball and has spent countless hours recruiting and training officials. He received the National Federation Distinguished Service Award in 1998.

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Fran Braasch

Sam Mason

Fran Braasch is a graduate of Marshall County High School (Tenn.) and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. A pioneer for the growth of girls’ basketball in Birmingham as well as statewide, she spent 23 of her 32 years in coaching at Vestavia Hills where she guided her teams to a 511-170 record, a state championship in 1987 and five appearances in the final four. She started the athletic program at Pizitz Middle School and also started and coached the first women’s scholarship team at UAB. Her overall career record was 579-208.

Sam Mason is a graduate of Tallassee High School and Auburn University (API). A legendary coach in the Opelika school system for 28 years, he led Opelika High to its last undefeated football season in 1945 and posted an overall record of 75-37-3. He began his coaching career at Fairfax and Valley high schools and served as president of the coaches association before retiring in 1971. The high school track is named in his honor. (Deceased)

Bob Newton

Bill Burgess Bill Burgess is a graduate of Jones Valley High School and Auburn University. He left a legacy of a winning tradition during his 14 years at Oxford where his football teams compiled a 107-41-4 record and reached the state playoffs eight times, including the school’s first state championship game appearance in 1982. He had previously coached at Banks and Woodlawn where he was coach of the year in 1969.

Bob Newton is a graduate of Russellville High School and Samford University. He has given himself to Homewood athletics for the 31 years. As head football coach and athletic director for the last 11 years, his football teams compiled a phenomenal record of 124-24 with five state championships and a runner-up finish. Other Homewood sports teams won nine state titles during that same period.

Larry Striplin, Jr.

Terry Cooper Terry Cooper is a graduate of Emma Sansom High School and Birmingham-Southern College. He has been associated with success as a coach and administrator in the Mountain Brook school system for 31 years. He served as head basketball coach for nine of the first 16 years before becoming the full-time athletic director in 1992. During his tenure Mountain Brook has had 52 state champions, including two he coached He is a member of the AHSAA Central Board.

Larry Striplin, Jr. is a graduate of A. G. Parrish High School (Selma) and Birmingham-Southern College. A great supporter of athletics in Alabama for many years, he is the founder of the Bryant-Jordan Scholarship Program that has awarded over $3 million to student-athletes since 1986. He provided the leadership for its growth into the nation’s premier scholarship program and set an example for others through his generosity. He has raised over $8 million for the Foundation to assure the annual scholarship funding.

Edgar Welden

Betty Ham Betty Ham is a graduate of Sylvania High School and the University of Alabama. She laid the foundation for the girls’ athletic program at Andalusia High School where she served as coach and teacher for 34 years. She guided the girls’ basketball teams to countless victories, including the 1988 team that went 23-4 enroute to the final four in the school’s first state tournament appearance.  (Deceased)

Don Hand Don Hand is a graduate of Marbury High School and Auburn University. He spent 22 of his 38 years in education coaching football, baseball and basketball at Chilton County (18 years), Conecuh County (2 years) and Monroe County (2 years). His 22 football teams compiled a 147-86 record with eight playoff appearances. His baseball teams posted a 161-60 record with a state championship in 1973. He served eight years on the AHSAA Central Board and president of the coaches association.

Edgar Welden is a graduate of Wetumpka High School and the University of Alabama. One of the state’s staunchest supporters of high school athletics, he created and serves as president of the Birmingham Athletic Partnership (BAP) that has contributed over $400,000 to the athletic programs of nine Birmingham inner city public high schools. It was his vision to have the State Finals basketball tournament.

Steve Williams Steve Williams is a graduate of Bakerhill High School and Livingston University. He spent 38 years of leadership at Headland High School, the first 18 as head basketball coach and the remainder as principal. His basketball teams compiled an outstanding 455-122 record with a state championship in 1984 after a 34-2 season in eight trips to the state tournament. Headland athletic teams posted a combined 793 wins during his career as principal and coach.

Billy Livings Billy Livings is a graduate of Sidney Lanier High School and the University of Kentucky. He established an enviable record of success for 45 years as a high school coach in two states. In Alabama he spent eight years as baseball and wrestling coach at Sidney Lanier and 12 years as the first football coach at Jeff Davis where his teams posted a 10322-4 record with a state championship in 1978. His final 25 years in coaching were spent at Vero Beach, Fla., where his team won a state title in 1981.

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ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

2008 Sports Hall Fame of

Alan Baker

Rickey Johnson

T.R. Miller’s track coach from 1984-2005 developed the Tigers’ program into one of the best in the state. The Brewton school won the state outdoor track championship under Baker’s tutelage in 1991, 1992, 2003 and 2004. His track team also won the indoor state crown in 1992. He was defensive coordinator in football from 1989-2004. During that span, T.R. Miller won five state championships and finished second five times. He is a graduate of T.R. Miller and Auburn University.

After helping Hazlewood High School compile a 48-5 record from 1986-90 as an assistant coach, he took over the program and led the Golden Bears to even greater heights from 1990-2002. As head coach, his teams were 142-30 with state titles in 1990, 1991, 1992 and 2000. His overall coaching record, which included head-coaching stints at Mount Hope and Hatton, is 183-91-0. He was named Coach of the Year four times. A graduate of Hatton High School and the University of North Alabama.

Michael Cheatham The Brewton native, coached Conecuh County Training School to four AIAA state basketball championships (1952, 1954, 1956, 1957) and one unofficial girls state crown over Westfield (1958). His boys team was also runner-up in 1955.  His 1951-52 team finished 27-1 and his 1953-54 team was 39-0. He also coached football as an assistant and head coach. He graduated from Southern Normal High School and Alabama State University.  (Deceased)

Don Cox Has been a football coach or administrator for 37 years, including 14 seasons as head coach at Russellville High School. Cox compiled a 184-69-4 overall record, including stints at Gordo (8-2-0), Brilliant (19-8-3) and Dora (35-15-1). He also served as assistant principal and principal at Russellville and is currently administrative assistant for the Russellville City Board of Education. He has served on the AHSAA Central Board of Control since 1995, including a term as president.  He is a graduate of Hamilton High School and the University of Alabama.

Greg Echols One of the state’s most successful track coaches in AHSAA history, Echols has served as cross country and track coach at Mountain Brook High School since 1992.  His teams have amassed 31 state championships—17 in cross country, 12 in indoor track and 2 in outdoor track. His junior high and freshman teams won 22 state titles.  He has served on the AHSAA track committee since 1993 and as state meet director for indoor track since 1994, for cross country from 1992-1995 and for multi-events since 1999. A graduate of Mountain Brook and the University of South Alabama.

Bob Pannone A baseball and football player in high school at Baldwin County in 1954, the industrial engineering graduate of Auburn University began a long career in football officiating in 1966. He became an AHSAA observer of football officials in 1994 and the Southwest district director of officials in 1999. He has since been a fixture at AHSAA championship and all-star events, handling various administrative duties. He received the Distinguished Service Award for 42 years of service as an official.

Tammy Richardson A driving force behind volleyball in the AHSAA for the last 26 years, the Selma High School and University of Montevallo grad won more than 1,140 volleyball matches in her coaching career at Pelham High School. Two of her teams won 6A state titles and she guided Pelham to 17 state tournament appearances. She was named the state volleyball coach of the year in 1993, and National Federation Section 3 volleyball coach of the year in 1999.

Dale Welsh Began his basketball coaching career at his alma mater, Spring Garden, in 1974 where he coached the boys basketball team to 188 wins. He was 71-43 in four seasons as boys coach at Cherokee County and he also coached the girls to an 80-37 record with the 1992 team winning the Class 4A state championship. He also coached baseball and football at Spring Garden. In 2005, Spring Garden named its gymnasium in his honor. A graduate of Jacksonville State University.

James Findley The Calera High School and University of Montevallo graduate coached at Holtville High School from 1960-65 and again from 1984-97, compiling a 259-117 boys basketball record during that span. His team reached the state tournament five times and the State Finals on four occasions, including 1996 when his team won the Class 3A state championship. He was named Class 3A Coach of the Year in 1996 and won Metro honors six times. He also served as head coach in football, tennis, softball and track.  (Deceased)

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Larry Andrews

TOM DANNER

Larry Andrews is a graduate of Clarke County High School and the University of Mobile. Andrews coached baseball for 34 seasons at Baker High School in Mobile where his career record was 511-265 with state titles in 1974 (Class 2A), 1976 (Class 3A) and 1990 (Class 6A). Before he retired in 2002, his teams reached the state playoffs 20 times and sent 115 players into the college or professional ranks. He is a member of the Alabama Baseball Coaches Hall of Fame.  (Deceased)

Tom Danner is a graduate of Tuscaloosa High School and the University of Alabama. The Jackson, Miss., native became a teacher/coach in the Tuscaloosa City School System in 1956 where he served as head track coach for the next 15 years. His teams won the state championship in 1957 and finished second five times. He also was an assistant on a 1964 state championship football team. He later served as a volunteer track coach at Tuscaloosa Junior High School and Central High School from 1979-1982. (Deceased)

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JOE FRANK FOWLER

BARBARA SNIDER

Joe Frank Fowler is a graduate of Rogers High School. Fowler, who turned 72 last summer, has served as an AHSAA basketball official for 51 years. A native of Florence, he began officiating basketball in 1957. He officiated football for 34 years and umpired baseball for 29 years. A member of the Lauderdale County Board of Education for 28 years, he has served in several leadership roles in local associations and statewide.

Barbara Snider is a graduate of Colonial High School (NY) and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She coached volleyball for 17 of her 25 years at Erwin High School where her teams compiled a 409-233 record, won seven region titles and one county title. She started the Erwin tennis program and coached the boys and girls teams to a 166-63 record over a 23-year span. Her girls’ teams won the 1991 state crown. Her 1980 gymnastics squad won the state junior high compulsory title.

CLARENCE MARBLE Clarence Marble is a graduate of Booker T. Washington High School (Tenn.) and Rust College. The Memphis area native won over 500 games in his basketball coaching career at Talladega County Central High School. His teams went to the state tournament three straight years in the 1980s and won the 1984 state 1A title with a 30-3 record. He also coached three other sports and served as athletic director. The school gym is named in his honor.  (Deceased)

SIMPSON PEPPER Simpson Pepper is a graduate of Ensley High School and the Livingston State University (now West Alabama). He spent six decades (1950-2008) in education, beginning as a teacher/coach at B.B. Comer High School and later at Hueytown and Ensley. He spent 32 years as an administrator at Jones Valley schools and Central Park Christian School. Known as the “Voice of Legion Field,” he spent 44 years as the public address announcer at Legion Field.  (Deceased)

Larry Simmons

GEORGE ‘SHORTY’ WHITE ‘Shorty’ White is a graduate of Phillips High School and Jacksonville State University. In his 14 years as football coach at Banks High School in Birmingham, his teams compiled a 100-37-5 record, won state titles in 1965, 1972 and 1973, and posted a 35-game winning streak over three seasons. His 1974 team defeated Woodlawn 19-6 at Legion Field before a state-record crowd of 42,000-plus. Named national Coach of the Year in 1973, he played and coached in the North-South All-Star Game.

BAILEY YELDING Bailey Yelding is a graduate of Baldwin County Training School and Alabama State University. He left a legacy of winning basketball at Fairhope where his 16 boys teams racked up a 302-130 record, went to the state tournament four times and won the Baldwin County championship 10 times. He was instrumental in helping guide Fairhope through the early years of integration. Before going to Fairhope, he coached six Baldwin County football teams to a 49-16-1 record.

Larry Simmons is a graduate of Hayden High School and the Jacksonville State University. He spent 11 of his 13 years in coaching at Thompson High School where his football teams compiled a 100-29-1 record with a state championship in 1982 and six playoff appearances. He served in administration for nine years—seven as Thompson principal, and on the AHSAA district board. The Thompson football stadium is named in his honor.

ALABAMA HIGH SCHOOL

2010 Sports Hall Fame of

GEORGE BAKER

WOODIE JACKSON

George Baker is a graduate of Carver High School (Gadsden) and Alabama State University. The Gadsden native spent 29 of his 39 years in coaching at Emma Sansom High School where his basketball teams won 505 games with a state championship and 28-1 record in 1992 and undefeated regular seasons in 1977, 1979 and 1981. He also coached at his alma mater and helped guide the Gadsden City Schools through the early years of integration as the system’s first black head coach.

Woodie Jackson is a graduate of Choctaw High School and Talladega College. Jackson spent 19 of his 32 years as a basketball coach at Francis Marion High School where his teams won five state championships. He also guided Westside High School to the state title in 1978. His six titles have come in three different classifications (1A, 2A and 3A). His overall record is 617-272 entering the 2009-10 season.

JOHN ESSLINGER

DR. LARRY LEMAK

John Esslinger is a graduate of Lee High School (Huntsville) and Jacksonville State University. This legendary track and cross country coach at Scottsboro High School—24 years as head coach and 8 as assistant—has guided his teams to 41 state championships, including the 25th cross country crown in 2009. Three times his teams won cross country, indoor and outdoor state track titles during the same school year. Recipient of numerous coach of the year honors, he was selected NFHS Section Coach of the Year in 2000.

Dr. Larry Lemak is a graduate of St. Vincent’s Prep School (Pa.), the University Pittsburgh and the University of Alabama Medical School. Since 1985 the world-renowned orthopedic surgeon has given countless hours assisting high schools on the sidelines and serving on the AHSAA Medical Advisory Board, now as chairman. As founder of Lemak Sports Medicine, he pioneered a program providing free medical coverage and certified athletic trainers for 20 Birmingham area schools. He established the National Center for Sports Safety.

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JAMIE RIGGS

RUSSELL ‘GENE’ TAYLOR

Jamie Riggs is a graduate of T.R. Miller High School and Troy University. One of the state’s most successful football coaches during his 21 years at his alma mater, Riggs’ teams won four state championships (1991, 1994, 2000, 2002) with a 233-46 record. The 117 wins during the 1990s was the most by any school in the state. His overall career record is 245-65. During an earlier three-year stint at T.R. Miller, his track team won the state title.

Gene Taylor is a graduate of Rockdale High School (Ga.) and Jacksonville State University. He made his mark on a state and national scale as wrestling coach at Weaver High School where his 15 teams won nine state titles and 221 straight dual matches from 1991-1999, best in state history in any sport and second longest wrestling win streak in the nation. Compiling a 500-34 overall wrestling record during a 30-year career, he also coached at Lineville, Ohatchee, Cherokee County and Walter Wellborn after five years in Georgia.

STEVE SAVARESE

Steve Savarese is a graduate of Mellville High School (Kan.) and Southwestern College (Kan.). The Glencove, NY, native has been a coach, teacher and administrator in high school athletics for 36 years. He became the fourth full-time AHSAA executive director in 2007. His overall record coaching football was 281-98 in 33 years—26 in Alabama at Ensley, Benjamin Russell, McGill-Toolen and Daphne where his team was state champion in 2001. His Douglass (Kan.) team won a state title in 1978.

JUNE SEALS

RON WATTERS Ron Watters is a graduate of Sylacauga High School and Auburn University. He served as football coach at Randolph County High School where his 22 teams compiled a 152-96-0 record and made him the winningest coach in school history. His teams reached the state finals three times (1979, 1984, 1998) and made 12 playoff appearances. Also the Randolph County basketball coach for 11 years, he recorded 173 wins.

June Seals is a graduate of Winfield High School and the University of West Alabama. A pioneer in Alabama girls high school athletics, she has coached basketball 16 years at Clarke County, six at Bob Jones and eight at Sparkman with an overall record of 677-139 entering the 2009-10 season. Her Sparkman teams compiled a 50-game winning streak during one stretch with three state titles (2002, 2003 and 2007). Clark County was champion in 1991. Her track teams at Clarke County won 12 state titles.

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Sports Hall Fame of

Acknowledges the following for their special contributions to the Banquet: Sound – D. D. Black, Jackie Hammock Video – Joe Bryan Music – Wilburn Ingram, pianist

Video Presentations – Jeff Shearer, Rodney Mills

Photographer – Jay Sailors

Program Biographies – Bill Plott

Program, Banquet Details – Alan Mitchell

Printer – Walker360

Arrangement of Awards – Greg Brewer

Tickets, Seating, Inductees’ Arrangements – Charlotte Davies, Elvia Henderson

Table Decorations, AHSAA Open House – Sandy Logan, Charlotte Davies,

Elvia Henderson, Alaine Davis, Vanda Peppers, Eula Milner, Denise Ainsworth Head Table Decorations, Corsages, Boutonnieres – AHSAA Staff

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thanks Appreciation to

for furnishing rings to the new Hall of Fame Inductees.

contributing sponsors

event contributor


NOTES


NOTES


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Sports Program Sample  

A sample of a sports program I designed.

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