Page 1

Monthly Newsletter INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

  JUNE 2017

JOIN THE CONVERSATION @ONTTENDERFRUIT

Cost of Production

1

Minimum Wage Announcement

1-2

AgriInvest Program News

2

Lincence Fee Schedules

3-4

Minimum Sizing

5

Dealer/Shipper Agents 2017

6-7

Minimum Wage Announcement

Grad Student wins Top Prize at National Contest

8

2017 Regional Jobs Inventory

9

Workplace Safety: Prepare for the Heat

10-11

The announcement on May 31st that the province is intending to raise the minimum wage to $14 per hour January 1, 2018 and then to $15 per hour January 1, 2019 certainly came as a shock to everyone. In addition to this, recommendations from the Changing Workplace Review are also being considered and, if adopted, would make significant changes to the current exemptions that agriculture has under the Employment Standards Act.

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

Cost of Production Report Now Available The Ontario Tender Fruit Growers, in partnership with OMAFRA, recently produced a Cost of Production report thanks to funding support through Growing Forward 2.

Please keep in mind that the proposed legislation has only reached first reading at legislature and must complete a several step process before it can become law. Across the province over the next few weeks, the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs will be getting feedback from the public during open sessions (see links). Since this announcement OFVGA and LICC have been holding conference calls with all horticultural commodity organizations as well as other sectors in agriculture. Partnering on the issues, OFVGA and LICC have hired Dwight Duncan, a former liberal member of the legislature who held positions of Finance Minister and Minister of Energy during his tenure. His goal is to help develop a solid business case that OFVGA/LICC will be able to present to the

The full report can be found by visiting www. ontariotenderfruit.ca and signing into the Growers Section with your grower number and then clicking on Resources.

Premier for a transitional program to offset the increase gradually over a few years. As further details are available on their lobbying efforts we will keep you informed. For your information, dates for public hearings related to the Fair Workplaces and Better Wages Act can be found at the following links: • Committee Meetings Monthly Calendar • Information posted so far on meeting dates Check the links again in the coming weeks for more specific meeting logistics. What is known so far is the following: • July 10th – 14th, public hearings will be held in Thunder Bay, North Bay, Ottawa, Kingston and Windsor-Essex • July 17th – 21st, public hearings will be held in London, Kitchener-Waterloo, Niagara, Hamilton and Toronto There are two ways to share your views, you can submit written comments or apply to make an oral presentation. Minimum Wage continued pg. 2


JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Page   2

Minimum Wage cont’d... For comments, send a written submission to the contact below by 5:30 p.m. on Friday, July 21st, 2017. To be considered to make an oral presentation, provide your contact information to same by 10:00 am on Tuesday, July 4th, 2017 for the hearings scheduled during the week of July 10-14; or by 10:00 am on Monday, July 10th, 2017, for the hearings scheduled during the week of July 17-21.

Contact: Mr. Eric Rennie, Clerk of the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs, Room 1405, Whitney Block, Queen’s Park, Toronto, Ontario M7A 1A2 E: erennie@ ola.org T: (416) 325-3506; F: (416) 325-3505; or TTY: (416) 325-3538 (collect calls will be accepted)

AgriInvest: Use It or Risk Losing It! The purpose of the AgriInvest Program is to provide farmers with the first level of support for downward fluctuations in income. Under Growing Forward 2, the AgriInvest Program

matching contribution rates were reduced from 1.5% and a maximum annual contribution of $22,500 to 1% with a maximum annual contribution of $15,000. The government has noted that there is approximately $2.1 billion in farmers’ accounts and questions the need to increase the level of support when growers are not accessing the full amounts available to them. By not maximizing the funds in their accounts, farmers are insufficiently demonstrating the need for the program and are at risk of losing the program entirely. This was the case with the old Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA) Program. Because farmers had accumulated $3 billion in their accounts, the government questioned the need for the NISA Program and subsequently discontinued it. CHC strongly encourages all Canadian farmers to fully use the funds in their AgriInvest accounts. This will send a strong message to government about the importance of the program, and the importance of restoring matching contribution rates to previous levels. -30PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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Page   3

JUNE 2017 ISSUE

SCHEDULE 3 2017 LICENCE FEES

Crop by Container Peaches

4x3 L 6x3/8x2/10x1.5 L & 6x3.3 Lb. 3x5 L 3x7 L 5L 7 L/6 Quart 25 Lb. 15 Lb. 10 Lb. 5.5 Lb.

Nectarines

4x3 L 6x3/8x2/10x1.5 L & 6x3.3 Lb. 25 Lb.

Apricots

10x1.5 L 10x1 L 18 Lb.

Yellow Plums

6x3/8x2/10x1.5 L & 6x4 Lb. 25 Lb.

Blue Plums

6x3/8x2/10x1.5 L & 6x4 Lb. 25 Lb.

Red Plums

6x3/8x2/10x1.5 L & 6x4 Lb. 25 Lb.

Administration $

Promotion $

Research & Food Safety

Bosc Pears

6x3/8x2 L Carton - 36 lb. 6x4 Lb.

Cold Snap Pears *

6x3/8x2 L Bag - 12 x 2 Lb. Carton - 36 lb.

2016 Total

$

$

0.04 0.06 0.07 0.08 0.02 0.03 0.06 0.04 0.03 0.01

0.03 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.01 0.02 0.04 0.02 0.02 0.01

0.46 0.60 0.66 0.61 0.22 0.30 0.68 0.41 0.27 0.15

0.66 0.86 0.97 0.97 0.31 0.43 0.97 0.58 0.40 0.21

0.72 0.93 0.98 0.98 0.34 0.47 0.96 0.72 0.44 0.23

0.13 0.17 0.19

0.04 0.06 0.06

0.03 0.03 0.04

0.46 0.60 0.68

0.66 0.86 0.97

0.57 0.73 0.83

0.18 0.17 0.14

0.06 0.06 0.05

0.04 0.03 0.03

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.28 0.26 0.22

0.30 0.28 0.23

0.18 0.19

0.06 0.06

0.04 0.04

0.34 0.35

0.62 0.64

0.30 0.32

0.18 0.19

0.06 0.06

0.04 0.04

0.38 0.40

0.66 0.69

0.45 0.48

0.18 0.19

0.06 0.06

0.04 0.04

0.00 0.00

0.28 0.29

0.30 0.32

0.07 0.09 0.06

0.04 0.05 0.04

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.32 0.41 0.28

0.35 0.45 0.30

0.17 0.21 0.27 0.18

0.06 0.07 0.09 0.06

0.03 0.04 0.05 0.04

0.35 0.45 0.58 0.39

0.61 0.77 0.99 0.67

0.64 0.81 1.04 0.69

0.21 0.27 0.18

0.07 0.09 0.06

0.04 0.05 0.04

0.47 0.61 0.41

0.79 1.02 0.69

0.97 1.25 0.83

0.21 0.18 0.27

0.57 0.56 0.59

0.04 0.04 0.05

0.00 0.00 0.00

0.82 0.78 0.91

0.85 0.80 0.95

0.21 0.27 0.18

French & Standard Bartlett Pears & Harrow Varieties

4x3 L 6x3/8x2 L Carton - 36 lb. 6x4 Lb.

$

2017 Total

0.13 0.17 0.20 0.23 0.06 0.08 0.19 0.11 0.08 0.04

Pears (other than Bartlett, Bosc, Harrow Varieties and Cold Snap)

6x3/8x2 L Carton - 36 lb. 6x4 Lb.

$

Incentives

* Cold Snap pear promotion fee includes $.50 for GF2 Marketing Project with Vineland Growers.


JUNE 2017 ISSUE

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License Fee Schedules cont’d...

SCHEDULE 3 2017 LICENCE FEES

Crop by Container

FRESH GRAPES

Administration

Promotion

Research & Food Safety

Incentives

2017 Total

2016 Total

$

$

$

$

$

$

10x1.5 L

0.23

0.07

0.05

0.32

0.67

0.66

8x2 L

0.23

0.07

0.05

0.32

0.67

0.66

12x1 Lb.

0.16

0.05

0.04

0.23

0.48

0.48

6x3 Lb.

0.24

0.07

0.05

0.34

0.70

0.69

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Page   5

JUNE 2017 ISSUE

ONTARIO TENDER FRUIT GROWERS’ 2017 MINIMUM SIZES AND CONTAINERS ONTARIO FRESH FRUIT AND GRAPES

COMMODITY

SIZES

CONTAINER TYPE AND MINIMUM NET WEIGHTS

PEACHES

2 1/4” to Aug 8 2 3/8” Aug 9th on By count By count 2 ½”

6x3L,8x2L and 10x1.5L 6x3L,8x2L and 10x1.5L 15lb premium tray 5lb premium tray 25/30lb Bulk Carton

NECTARINES

PLUMS AND PRUNES Early Golden - #1 Early Golden – Large Early Golden – Premium Shiro - #1 Shiro – Premium

2 1/8” to August 31 2 1/4” Sept. 1 2 1/4” 2 1/2”

1.5, 8x2 & 6x3 litre 1.5, 8x2 & 6x3 litre 25 Lb. Carton 25 Lb. Carton

1 3/8” 1 5/8” 1 3/4” 1 1/2” 1 3/4”

10X1.5L

Blue Plums - #1 Blue Plums – Large Blue Plums – Premium Prunes

1 3/8” 1 5/8” 1 3/4” 1 1/8”

25 Lb. Bulk Carton

2 1/4” 2 1/4” To Sept 8th 2 3/8 Sept 9th on 2 1/2" 2 3/4” 2 1/2" 2 3/4" 2 3/8”

8x2 & 6x3 Litre 8x2 & 6x3 Litre 8x2 & 6x3 Litre 36 Lb. Carton 36 Lb. Carton 36 Lb. Carton 36 Lb. Carton 8x2 litre

PEARS Clapps Favourite Bartlett -

Bosc

CORONATION GRAPES Canada #1

8x2 litre clam 10x1.5L 10x2Lb bags

APRICOTS

10X1.5L, 10X1L 25LB, 20LB

Canada #1

CHILLED PITTED RED TART

5 KG pails 7 Lb. pails


JUNE 2017 ISSUE

 

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2017 Appointed Dealer‐Shipper Agents  Niagara Peninsula BARTKIW FARMS 4498 21st Street Vineland Station, Ontario, L0R 2E0 Contact: Jim Bartkiw Phone: (905) 562-3775 Fax: (905) 562-1804 Mobile: (905) 328-1982 Email: bartkiw@sympatico.ca LAKELEE ORCHARDS LTD. 4452-Thirteenth Street Jordan Station, Ontario, L0R 1S0 Contact: Ron Troup Phone: (905) 562-4850 Fax: (905) 562-3588 Mobile: (905) 933-0417 Email: lakelee@talkwireless.ca NIAGARA ORCHARD & VINEYARD CORP. 1550 Hwy. 55, Box 43 Virgil, Ontario, L0S 1T0 Fruit Sales: Contact: Joe Dutchyn Phone: (905) 468-3298 Toll Free: (888) 267-5551 Mobile: (905) 650-6157 – Joe Fax: (905) 468-2527 Email: jdutchyn@niagaraorchard.com Louth Division: Contact: Rob Fast Phone: (905) 468-3297 Toll Free: (888) 310-1158 Mobile: (905) 651-0392 – Rob Fax: (905) 468-2527 Email: rfast@niagaraorchard.com Niagara Division: Contact: Arnie Lepp Phone: (905) 646-5777 Mobile: (905) 984-0363 - Arnie Fax: (905) 646-5891 Email: alepp@niagaraorchard.com SEAWAY FARMS 175 Lakeshore Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, LOS 1J0 Contact: Eileen Pillitteri Phone: (905) 934-5066 Fax: (905) 938-0804 Email: eileen@seawayfarms.ca

NIAGARA FRUIT & VEGETABLE GROWERS' LTD. 1579 Creek Road, Box 99 Virgil, Ontario, L0S 1T0 Contact: Dave Dionne/ Norman Hope Phone: (905) 468-3261 Fax: (905) 468-5414 Mobile: (905) 328-6345 – Dave Email: dave@niagarafruitvegetable.com Website: www.niagarafruitvegetable.com N.B.F. PRODUCE LTD. 3325 First Avenue Vineland Station, Ontario, L0R 2E0 Contact: Phil Short Phone: (905) 562-4857 or 7743 Fax: (905) 562-4291 Mobile: (905) 651-7151 Email: philshort@nbfproduce.com NIAGARA SEASONAL SALES INC. 63 Scott Street East Niagara-on-the-Lake, L0S 1J0 Fruit Sales : Contact: Jamie Mastronardi Jamie Mobile: (519) 796-2970 Office: (905) 938-2363 Contact: Eleanor Siemens Email: niagaraseasonalsales@gmail.com VINELAND GROWERS' COOPERATIVE LTD. Box 700, 4150 Jordan Rd. Jordan Station, Ontario, L0R 1S0 Contact: Michael Ecker Phone: (905) 562-4133 – Ext. 117 Direct: (905) 228-7759 Toll Free: (800) 481-9921 Fax: (905) 562-7997 Mobile: (905) 651-4386 Email: mike@vinelandgrowers.com Website: www.vinelandgrowers.com


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2017 Appointed Dealer‐Shipper Agents   Outside Niagara Peninsula ERIE-JAMES LIMITED Box 457, 102 Queen Street, N. Leamington, Ontario, N8H 3W5 Contact: Mark Slater, Tim Iles, Stephanie Lariviere Phone: (519) 326-4417 Fax: (519) 326-7461 Email: mark@erieJames.com Website: www.eriejames.com MANITREE FRUIT FARMS 8445 Talbot Trail, R.R. #1, Blenheim, Ontario, N0P 1A0 Contact: Russell Smith Phone: (519) 676-5428 Cell: (519) 359-3804 Fax: (519) 676-1797 Email: manitreefruitfarm@hotmail.com NORFOLK FRUIT GROWERS' ASSOCIATION Box 279, 99 Queensway E. Simcoe, Ontario, N3Y 4L1 Contact: Tom O'Neill or Don Werden Phone: (519) 426-0640 Cell: (519) 427-8500 Fax: (519) 426-2012 Email: toneill@nfga.ca Website: www.norfolkfruitgrowers.com GEORGE WHALEY & SONS LTD. 1903 Road 5 East, R.R. #2 Ruthven, Ontario, N0P 2G0 Contact: Doug Whaley Phone: (519) 326-9330 Fax: (519) 326-3083 Email: gwfarm@on.aibn.com THE GARDEN PRODUCE 321 Lakeshore Road West, P.O. 59536, Mississauga, ON, L5H 1G9 Contact : Alex Harb Phone : 647-401-8621 Email : gardenproduce.alex@gmail.com

JUNE 2017 ISSUE


JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Page   8

Grad Student Wins Top Prize in National 3MT Contest A University of Guelph graduate student has become the first competitor in the national 3-Minute Thesis contest to win both the annual competition’s top prize and its People’s Choice Award. Plant agriculture master’s student, Shan Krishnakumar was announced today as the winner of both categories by the Canadian Association of Graduate Studies (CAGS). He will speak at the CAGS annual conference in Quebec City in November, and will receive $1,500 for winning the top prize and $500 for taking the People’s Choice Award. The competition, now in its fifth year, requires students to explain their work and its relevance within three minutes using only one slide. Krishnakumar discussed how to lengthen the shelf life of fruit using hexanal — a natural plant-derived compound — sprayed on nectarines. He explained the process and its potential benefits for food security, particularly in developing countries. Presentations at earlier regional competitions were recorded and posted online. A three-member panel judged the presentations, while more than 6,000 votes were cast for the People’s Choice Award. “He was able to connect with his audience about why they should care and how his research will affect the lives of farmers and consumers around the world,” said contest judge Rob Baker, guitarist with the Canadian rock band The Tragically Hip. “Experiencing his enthusiasm encouraged the audience to follow him through the science.” Krishnakumar said that when he learned of his wins, “I almost couldn’t believe it; I called my family in India and my thesis supervisors to tell the news. “I had just entered the contest thinking it would be nice to win my college competition and make it to the U of G finals. I didn’t expect to win there and go to the provincial event, let alone make it to nationals.”

Photo: Shanthanu Krishnakumar

“He embraced the purpose of the exercise, which is to share research with the world in a way that is accessible and fun, and yet also impactful.” Krishnakumar said he’s grateful for the support of U of G community members. “I had so many people watch my presentation and provide feedback on how to improve it,” he said. “This research could help reduce food waste and also be beneficial to farmers and consumers. Farmers can have more time to sell their produce, while consumers get a better product. It’s a win-win situation.” Krishnakumar came to Guelph in January 2016 after completing undergraduate studies at Dalhousie University, and started working with hexanal, a shelf life-enhancing compound discovered by Prof. Gopi Paliyath. Krishnakumar said his thesis supervisors, Profs. Jay Subramanian and Al Sullivan, connected him with growers and enabled him to conduct field trials, quality analyses and subsequent molecular work. They also helped him with his presentation by providing useful suggestions. He had learned of the contest a year earlier but needed to further develop his thesis before entering.

The win demonstrates the quality of Krishnakumar’s research supervision and his passion for sharing his work, said Ben Bradshaw, assistant vice-president (graduate studies).

“You learn how to present your research in a way the general public can understand. I’ll be better prepared to discuss why my research can make a difference in the lives of farmers and consumers.”

“U of G is delighted but not surprised by Shanthanu’s double selection at the national 3MT,” said Bradshaw.

WATCH THE WINNING SUBMISSION HERE: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=TyibZdxfBDw


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JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Local fruit farms to be included in 2017 regional jobs inventory Plan to participate! Building on the success of its first inventory of local employers last year, Niagara Region will again be canvassing local employers to get a more complete picture of employment in the region. The initiative, based on similar surveys conducted in other parts of Ontario and the country, involves collecting information about the types and size of businesses in Niagara and how many people they employ. The data is used to support regional and local economic development and planning efforts related to growth management, investments in infrastructure, transportation and community and business services. This year, the inventory has been expanded to cover the agricultural areas within Niagara, providing a more complete picture of Niagara’s employment landscape. The Niagara North and South Federation of Agriculture have

teamed up with Niagara Region to share this important survey with their respective membership lists. The survey will be delivered to your mailbox in the coming weeks. Please take a few minutes to complete the survey and return it back to the Region as soon as possible (a selfaddressed stamped envelope has been provided). Given the importance of the agricultural sector within Niagara, we want to make sure your information is accurately captured. Alternatively, you can complete the online questionnaire by visiting: www.niagararegion.ca/employmentinventory Your feedback will help create a clearer picture of Niagara’s economic conditions. Your cooperation and participation is appreciated!

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JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Page   10

Prepare for the heat — You know it’s coming! Prepare for the heat — You know it’s coming! It’s just a matter of time before the cold, rainy spring turns into a blistering hot summer. In fact, a recent study has found [1] the number of extremely hot days has been increasing globally over the past 15 years. These heat waves may last only a week or two, but in farming this heat can be very hard to get away from. Workers can suffer debilitating effects and even death. A few simple steps taken now can keep your people thriving and productive even in the hottest weather. “Based on the internal responsibility system, everyone has a role to play,” says WSPS occupational hygienist Warren Clements. “Employers, supervisors and workers all can make a difference in their workplaces.” Here is a 10-step plan of action. Steps for employers 1. Put a policy and procedures in place, based on a risk assessment. Ask questions, such as have workers been affected by heat in the past? Is work done in direct sunlight? Are there heat producing processes or equipment in the workplace? How hot is it in the hay mow? This will help you get an idea of the magnitude of the issue. If heat stress may be a hazard, consider conducting heat stress measurements and developing a control plan. Include engineering controls, such as insulating hot surfaces. 2. Train all employees during orientation on the policy and procedures. Include heat stress symptoms, how to prevent it, and what to do if someone starts showing symptoms. Heat stress training is particularly critical for young and new workers, as well as all manual workers. Research conducted by the Institute for Work & Health shows that heat strokes, sunstrokes and other heat illnesses disproportionately affect those on the job less than two months. [2] Use our Agriculture Safety Topic on heat stress to learn how to identify symptoms of heat stroke and exhaustion and related emergency procedures. http://www.wsps.ca/WSPS/media/Site/Resources/Downloads/Agricultural-Safety-Topic-Heat-Stress.pdf?ext=.pdf Steps for supervisors 3. Acclimatize workers to hot conditions, and watch out for de-acclimatization. Workers can lose their tolerance in only four days. 4. Schedule work in the hottest locations for cooler times of day. Build cool-down breaks into work schedules. Adjust the frequency and duration of breaks as needed. “Taking a break means going to a cooler work area or providing workers with periodic rest breaks and rest facilities in cooler conditions,” says Warren. An example would be having lunch or a break in a shady area. 5. Get to know your workplace and your workers. “Are there certain jobs at elevated risk? Is anybody working outside today? Keep your eyes and ears open: ‘Is so-and-so looking a little different from how he normally looks? A little more flushed? Sitting down more?’” 6. Ensure ready access to cool water in convenient, visible locations. Workers need to replenish their fluids if they are becoming dehydrated. 7. Supply protective equipment and clothing as needed, such as water-dampened bandanas or other breathable, cooling clothing options, including a broad rimmed hat. 8. Monitor weather forecasts. “If it's Tuesday and you know superhot weather is coming on Thursday, ask yourself, ‘Who will be working then? What will they be doing? Who should I watch out for?’” 9. Be extra vigilant in extreme conditions. “Check on workers frequently. If you can't do this, then assign a temporary pair of eyes to do it for you.”


Page   11

JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Steps for workers 10. Watch out for each other and speak up. “People suffering from heat stress don’t always recognize their own symptoms. If anyone’s behaviour is ‘more than usual’ — more sweating, more flushed, hyperventilating — it could be a sign of heat stress.” Other signs could include rashes, muscle cramping, dizziness, fainting, and headaches. Our heat stress resources can help Everything you need to create a heat stress plan is available on our heat stress resource page http://www.wsps.ca/Information-Resources/Topics/Heat-Stress.aspx:    

humidex-based heat response plan heat stress poster heat stress awareness sessions conducted on site by WSPS safety experts more articles on heat stress

Check them out today.

“No pause in the increase of hot temperature extremes,” Nature Climate Change, 4, 161-163 (2014) http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v4/n3/full/nclimate2145.html, published online on February 26, 2014. 1.

The more inexperienced workers are, the study found, the more likely they'll need time off to recover from heat stroke, sun stroke, fainting and other forms of heat illnesses. Read more: Young men in manual occupations are most vulnerable to extreme heat http://www.iwh.on.ca/at-work/73/the-young-and-new-on-job-most-affected-byheat-stress-study. PAID ADVERTISEMENT 2.

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JUNE 2017 ISSUE

Page   12

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