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First are nabiças, the shoots of young turnips that are harvested for their leaves; the turnip isn’t given a chance to develop. If a recipe requires them, you can safely reach for plain old American turnip greens. While not the same, they offer up a similar flavor and texture. Next are grelos de nabo, by far the most popular grelos, which are formed when the turnip matures and its energy is sent into the stalks, causing them to start to bud with tiny yellow owers. If a recipe calls for grelos de nabo, grab a bunch of broccoli rabe, which is more closely related to the turnip family than to the broccoli clan. It has the same mini heads, pleasant crunch, and slight bitterness of the Portuguese green. Last are grelos de couve. Grown in a few regions in Portugal, they’re the green shoots of particular cultivars of kale. Young collard greens are a suitable substitute.

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The new portuguese table david leite  

The new portuguese table david leite  

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