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IMMERSE IN MIAMI'S MULTICULTURAL GRIT

March/April 2017

EasternHomeAndTravel.com

EXPLORE HARRIET TUBMAN'S LIFE AND LEGACY

TAKE A HAMMER TO NATURE


Indulge all Senses HARFORD COUNT N I Y

Touch

Hear

From breathtaking vistas and mouth-watering local produce to the crack of a bat and a bouquet of aromas, from shores to fields, Harford County has countless ways to spoil all your senses. Visit www.visitharford.com to plan your next trip.


Taste

Smell See

L a r r y H o g a n g ov e r n o r


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Fuel Creativity & Productivity The culinary team of The Carriage House will motivate your group with customized menus for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Our highly trained, dedicated event planners work with you to create the perfect retreat generating the outcome you envisioned. The overnight rooms at The Lodges offer superior amenities combined with a serene atmosphere to ensure a great nights sleep, bringing out the best in your group.

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Genuine Smithďƒželd exudes the charm and graciousness of bygone eras. Long known for its hams, the town also boasts a rich history, picturesque Main Street, and a vibrant arts scene.

Historic Downtown Smithfield


contents features 14 VIBRANT, ECLECTIC, EXOTIC MIAMI

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30 TRAVEL INSPIRED DESIGN 38 60

38 CALVERT COUNTY:

MARYLAND’S ECO-DESTINATION

52 EXPLORING HARRIET TUBMAN’S ROOTS & ROUTE

60 HANG OUT IN HAMPTON

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contents departments 24 OUTDOORS

THE PIZZAZZ OF THE DAHLIA

36 EAST COAST FINDS

CARRYING A MANTORCH

24 48

48 CURIOSITIES

VISIT RINGING ROCKS PARK,

AND DON’T FORGET YOUR HAMMER

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VIRGINIA

ARTSFESTIVAL

Enjoy world-class performances in historic, recreation-rich Coastal Virginia! CANADA’S ROYAL WINNIPEG BALLET SWAN LAKE MARCH 31 - APRIL 2

JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA with Wynton Marsalis

MAY 5

With the lush Tchaikovsky score performed live by the Virginia Symphony Orchestra!

Great jazz to start a weekend of sunny skies, museums, and more!

VIRGINIA INTERNATIONAL TATTOO

BERLIOZ REQUIEM

Over There: 100 Years of America and Our Allies

with Virginia Symphony Orchestra JoAnn Falletta, conductor

APRIL 27-30

MAY 20

Grand orchestra and a chorus of 140…a once-in-a-lifetime musical experience!

The grandest celebration of music and might in the U.S.!

Choose from dozens of performances in the historic cities of Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Williamsburg, Newport News and Portsmouth! Visit our website for inspired weekend “show-and-see” ideas including history tours, museums, restaurants, shopping, hotels and more!

TICKETS: VAFEST.ORG OR CALL 757-282-2822 FESTIVAL BOX OFFICE: 440 BANK STREET, NORFOLK GROUPS OF 15+ SAVE 15%! CALL 757-282-2819 FOR DETAILS.


FEATURED CONTRIBUTORS SHUAN BUTCHER An Army veteran, Shuan has spent most of his life working in the nonprofit sector on issues such as arts and culture, heritage tourism, civic engagement, and community development. He is a member of the National Press Club. He published “Inspiration to Serve: 101 Quotes about Kindness, Caring, and Giving,” co-authored “Making Change for the Better: The Importance of Youth Giving,” and contributes to a variety of local, regional, and national publications. CHARITY BETH LONG is the domestic diva behind VintageKitty.com, a home and garden journal that celebrates a fun, hands-on approach to homemaking. Follow Charity as she chronicles her pursuit to mix up the old and the new in her Victorian home in the beautiful eastern panhandle of West Virginia. Domestic bliss isnot just wearing pearls while you vacuum!

EASTERN

Volume 5, ISSUE 3

&

Donna Elbert, Publisher donna@pulsepublishing.net

EDITORIAL

Melissa Howes-Vitek, Executive Editor melissa@pulsepublishing.net

Molly Fellin Spence, Managing Editor molly@pulsepublishing.net

Hailey Sarno, Copy Editor hailey@pulsepublishing.net

MELINDA MYERS has written more than 20 gardening books, including “Small Space Gardening.” She hosts The Great Courses “How to Grow Anything: Food Gardening For Everyone” DVD set and the nationally syndicated “Melinda’s Garden Moment” TV & radio program. Myers is a columnist and contributing editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. MelindaMyers.com

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

Erin Tinney, Creative Director and Graphic Designer erin@pulsepublishing.net

DISTRIBUTION PEGGY SIJSWERDA mfa , lives in Virginia Beach and edits and publishes two regional magazines: Tidewater Women and Tidewater Family. She’s also a freelance travel writer and covers destinations along the East Coast and beyond. Peggy often travels with her Dutch husband, Peter, and their three sons, but she loves traveling solo, too. In 2005 Peggy’s memoir was published. “Still Life with Sierra” follows her family’s journey through Europe, trying to find where they fit in after a tragic loss.

distribution@pulsepublishing.net

ACCOUNTING

Joanne Baum, Accountant

bookkeeper@pulsepublishing.net

ADMINISTRATION TY UNGLEBOWER is a freelance writer, fiction author, sometime stage actor and unabashed introvert. He lives in Knoxville, Md. You can follow him on Twitter @TyUnglebower, or read his blog at TyUnglebower.com.

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Barb Campbell Troy Campbell Todd Ploski, Jr.

Eastern Home & Travel magazine is a bi-monthly publication of Pulse Publishing, LLC. Customer inquiries should be directed to Pulse Publishing, LLC, 12 S. Market Street, Suite 101, Frederick, MD 21701. All contents of this publication are protected by copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or in part for any reason without prior consent of the publisher. Please direct written requests to info@easternhomeandtravel.com. For advertising information, comments, or questions, please call 301-662-6050 or email Donna Elbert at donna@pulsepublishing.net.

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EASTERN HOME & TRAVEL

301-662-6050

PUBLISHING

Pulse Publishing, LLC 12 South Market Street, Suite 101 Frederick, MD 21701 TEL 301-662-6050 FAX 301-662-5102

WEBSITE

EasternHomeAndTravel.com

Subscriptions: 1-year/6 issues $18.00 2-years/12 issues $29.95 To subscribe, email: Subscribe@EasternHomeAndTravel.com or call 301-662-6050.


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from the

editor At this time of year cabin fever approaches maximum levels, as Old Man Winter hasn’t quite taken his final bow along the East Coast. Spring also hasn't quite launched into full blossom. It's a process that reveals its self over time, and transition seems to be the theme of the season. This is also the perfect time to explore! One of the many special things about the East Coast is that much of it experiences four distinct seasons. Travelers can potentially experience spring's awakening repeatedly as they travel up the coast. In this issue we explore the rich culture and the diverse neighborhoods that make Miami so vibrant. Sunshine and colorful landscapes are the norm here, and as spring takes hold you can chase the warmth northward through the Mid-Atlantic where beachside towns such as North Beach, Md., are awakening for the season.

On The Cover

We're thrilled to present this eclectic collection of travel experiences that will satisfy the beach bum and the history buff and everyone in between. Embrace the transition and indulge your wanderlust!

SUBSCRIBE TO EASTERN HOME & TRAVEL

Melissa Howes-Vitek, Executive Editor

The dining room of Miami private residence, Royal Plaza. Page 30

P H OTO G R A P H Y: B A R B C A M P B E L L

1-year/6 issues subscription $18.00 2-year/12 issues subscription $29.95 Subscribe online at EasternHomeAndTravel.com or call 301-662-6050.

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EASTERN HOME & TRAVEL


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VIBRANT, ECLECTIC, EXOTIC MIAMI B Y C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G


P H OTO G R A P H Y: C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G

Far from the Florida of Disney’s invention lies the authentic, multicultural grit of Miami. It’s a young city, but what it lacks in age, it makes up in diversity. Art Deco districts, every cuisine of food imaginable, modern art and even a reconstructed European monastery—this city and its environs have it all. Retro charm meets hipster cool in a locale where you are just as likely to get an old-fashioned swizzle stick in your cocktail as you are to see graffiti murals.


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First stop is Little Havana for a taste of the Cuban diaspora. My guide Ralph, from Miami Culinary Tours, explains that the neighborhood is much less Cuban in population now and much more of a Hispanic melting pot, although the “mom and pop” businesses are still representative of Little Havana’s namesake. Just a few short blocks in length, Little Havana’s Calle Ocho is embedded with stars commemorating the achievements of Cuban Americans. In contrast to the star-studded glamour, fiberglass statues of roosters, a popular symbol for the community, also line the street. Here, our guide Ralph, a Miami native, takes us to numerous restaurants to taste the flavors of Cuban America while also stopping at interesting shops along the way.

Our first food stop is El Pub, where we taste tostones, which are fried plantain cups stuffed with savory chicken. It’s a simple café filled with locals. We make quick stops in a number of businesses. Among the highlights are the Cuba Tobacco Cigar Company, where we watch masters roll cigars, the Los Pinarenos Fruteria that serves us freshly pressed sugarcane juice, and Domino Park, a local hangout where dominoes are king. Also along the way we sip mojitos at the Ball & Chain, a recently reopened 1930s music club, indulge in artisan ice cream at Azucar and eat Cuban sandwiches at El Exquisito’s street-side ventanita. But the most interesting thing on the menu is cafecito, a Miami coffee creation that is strong, sweet and served in a thimble-sized cup. Across town in Miami Beach, the Art Deco Historic District is a pillar of preservation. The landscape is lit by neon signs and curvy façades that are the

backdrop for a bustling crowd of tourists. Nightlife abounds as I take a self-guided tour with the help of the iTourMobile Miami Art Deco app and my trusty “National Traveler” book. Stops include the Lincoln Theatre, now home to retail shops; Haddon Hall, a newly refurbished boutique hotel; Colony Theatre; and the Breakwater Hotel. No two tours are alike because Art Deco is everywhere in Miami. No guide is required to spot the proliferation of 1920s and 1930s architecture, but if you want to learn from the experts, the Miami Design Preservation League offers tours every day. South Beach is host to a Miami Food Tour as well. With the help of my guide, Lisa, I discover more Latin fare, such as churros stuffed with dulce de leche at Manolo South Beach; ceviche with conch at Bolivar; empanadas at Naked Taco; and picadillo at Larios on the Beach, Gloria Estefan’s restaurant. Along this tour, Lisa points out terrazzo floors, the Versace home, and other notable history, such as the area’s rise to fame with the TV show “Miami Vice.” Oodles of eating requires sightseeing. A great place to stretch the legs is Vizcaya, the 1914

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G

The walk starts at the studio of artist Agustín Gainza whose signature works are the “Moninas,” a series of Afro-Cuban paintings inspired by Diego Velázquez. Here in exile since 1979, Gainza has made his living depicting memories of Cuba and the interpreting the world around him. It’s a colorful depiction that welcomes our tour group to this vintage neighborhood. Lively paintings line

the walls, but Gainza is not constrained by one medium. He prides himself in making accessible art, so there are painted bowls, T-shirts and a beautiful collection of painted glass light pendants.

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home of James Deering. This awe-inspiring Italian Renaissance villa features a limestone façade and lush formal gardens. As you wander through the outdoor paths overlooking the Biscayne Bay, you’ll see the connecting moat that is still open today. Here in the gardens, young girls in Quinceañera gowns pose for formal portraits. You’ll explore various outdoor rooms decorated with Italian sculptures that are true antiquities, as well as marvel at the numerous fountains and the surrounding mangrove forest. Inside, a central courtyard is flanked by 34 rooms adorned with tapestries, antiques and paintings. Every room had a purpose, from the Music Room to the Telephone Room. But as historic as this mansion appears, it features an electric switchboard, central vacuum system and a galley that was the epitome of 1920s “kitchen management.” Not to be missed, the adjacent Breakfast Room features a nautical mural and offers an impressive view of the gardens. In complete contrast to Vizcaya, the Wynwood neighborhood offers a trendy hipster vibe. Larger-than-life murals have become a draw for a neighborhood still reeling with homelessness and

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crime. On one hand, there are police signs stating “take your belongings from cars,” and on the other there are artists recreating the landscape with vibrant color. I ran into Angelov Franco painting a mural for BeautifyEarth.org. As he hung over a scissor lift painting a swirling composition, he said of the area, “There’s something stronger than the sun here. Very vibrant.” I left the artist to his work and headed into the small business district of Wynwood. Although the warehouse style buildings are old, a sense of newness pervades. The young crowd gathers in cafes that surround artist studios, galleries and boutiques such as Plant the Future which sells terrariums that offer a green alternative to cut arrangements. The streets are packed, and no place more than The Salty Donut, which had just opened a pop-up restaurant when I visited. Like no other doughnut shop, the lines are super long and the baked goods and coffee are artisanal. On the menu are selections such as Guava and Cheese, Brown Butter

Salt and Key Lime Pie. An actual storefront is on the horizon. But mostly the crowd comes for the art, which in this Miami neighborhood is more ephemeral than sacred. Works are tagged with graffiti in a scene that is both meta and ebullient. Just north lies another district brimming with juxtaposition. Little Haiti is an enclave of Caribbean immigrants and like Wynwood, its emphasis on public art and culture is helping to revive the neighborhood. If you can overlook the hardships evident in this community, you will find residents excited to share local pride. For dance and performing arts, visit the Little Haiti Cultural Center or for a taste of Haitian cuisine visit Naomi’s Garden. Here, authentic dishes, such as legume and jerk chicken, are mouth-wateringly delicious while also giving a bang for your buck. If exotic food is your thing, take a drive south to Homestead, where the Fruit and Spice Park will teach you about its eclectic variety of plants. Here on 35 acres, tropical and subtropical fruits, vegetables, spices, herbs and nuts grow. Many of


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P H OTO G R A P H Y: C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G


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which are unknown to those of us living in nontropical environments. This foodie was introduced to the mamey, an orange-fleshed fruit that is technically a berry but resembles a small melon. Also of note was the moringa tree which is used in herbal medicine in addition to culinary uses. But the most interesting fact I learned was that banana plants only bear fruit once. Who knew?

Now this ancient monastery is once again home to a church named the Church of St. Bernard de Clairvaux, after the building’s original namesake. Visitors will find the cloisters serene and the gardens a welcome respite from the hustle and bustle of Miami.

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G

My last stop offered a quiet place to reflect on my journey. The Ancient Spanish Monastery originates to 1133 AD in Sacramenia, Spain. Fast forward to 1925 when newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst purchased the monastery and shipped it piece by piece in hay-lined wooden crates to

Brooklyn. In an odd series of events, an outbreak of hoof-and-mouth disease led the shipment to be quarantined. After the pieces were jumbled in an effort to burn the hay and a change to Hearst’s financial circumstances, the building lay in ruins in a warehouse until it was reassembled in North Miami Beach in 1964.

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GEORGIA

FLORIDA

95 75

TO V I S I T A L O N G C A L L E O C H O I N L I T T L E H AVA N A AGUSTÍN GAINZA ARTS & TAVERN 1652 SW 8th St 305-644-5855 AgustinGainza.com

TO V I S I T I N S O U T H B E A C H MANOLO SOUTH BEACH 685 Washington Ave 305-674-7444 ManoloMiamiBeach.com

TO V I S I T I N L I T T L E H A I T I LITTLE HAITI CULTURAL CENTER 212 NE 59th Terrace 305-960-2969 LittleHaitiCulturalCenter.com

BOLIVAR 841 Washington Ave 305-305-0801 BolivarMiamiBeach.com

NAOMI’S GARDEN RESTAURANT & LOUNGE 650 NW 71st St 305-456-4715 NaomisMiami.com

EL PUB RESTAURANT 1548 SW 8th St 305-642-9942 ElPubRestaurant.com

NAKED TACO 111 Collins Ave 305-534-8455 NakedTacoMiami.com

CUBA TOBACCO CIGAR CO. 1528 SW 8th St 305-649-2717 CubaTobaccoCigarco.com

LARIOS ON THE BEACH 820 Ocean Drive 305-532-9577 LariosOnTheBeach.com

LOS PINARENOS FRUTERIA 1334 SW 8th St 305-285-1135 BALL & CHAIN MIAMI 1513 SW 8th St 305-643-7820 BallAndChainMiami.com AZUCAR ICE CREAM COMPANY 1503 SW 8th St 305-643-7820 AzucarIceCream.com EL EXQUISITO RESTAURANT 1510 SW 8th St 305-643-0227 ElExquisitoMiami.com

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TO VISIT IN THE WYNWOOD DISTRICT PLANT THE FUTURE 2511 NW 2nd Ave 305-571-7177 PlantTheFuture.com THE SALTY DONUT 50 NW 23rd St 305-925-8126 TheSaltyDonut.com

OTHER NEARBY SPOTS MIAMI CULINARY TOURS 1000 5th St #200 786-942-8856 MiamiCulinaryTours.com FRUIT & SPICE PARK 24801 SW 187th Ave, Homestead 305-247-5727 RedlandFruitAndSpice.com VIZCAYA MUSEUM & GARDENS 3251 S Miami Ave, Miami Vizcaya.org THE ANCIENT SPANISH MONASTERY 16711 West Dixie Highway, North Miami Beach 305-945-1461 SpanishMonastery.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C H A R I T Y B E T H LO N G

RESOURCES

*


P H OTO G R A P H Y: i S TO C K . C O M / A S P E N R O C K

OUTDOORS


OUTDOORS

THE PIZZAZZ OF THE DAHLIA BY MELINDA MYERS

Plan now for a memorable grand finale in this year’s garden. Dahlias are spring-planted bulbs with big, colorful flowers that bloom continuously from midsummer to the first fall frost.


P H OTO G R A P H Y: i S TO C K . C O M / S C H N U D D E L

OUTDOORS

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Early in the season, the foliage of these easy-care plants provides a lush green backdrop for nearby annuals and perennials. Then, as many other plants are waning from the summer heat, dahlias burst into bloom, filling the garden with their impressive flowers for months to come. There are many types of dahlias and many ways to use them. Shorter border dahlias like the Gallery or Melody series are perfect for planting along walkways, in the front of a flower border, or in pots next to the patio. The compact plants support full size flowers for a dazzling display. Plant taller varieties in the middle of the flower border, and boost their ornamental appeal by including varieties like Fascination and HS Flame with burgundy foliage. The darker leaves combine nicely with the greens of their neighbors and are the perfect backdrop for the rose-pink and bright red blossoms. Dahlias dazzle with their many unique flower shapes and sizes. The brilliant color and rolled petals of the cactus dahlia Karma Red Corona are sure to make you stop and take a second look. Or consider the powder puff blooms of Myrtles Folly, with petals that capture the colors of a sunrise. Dinnerplate dahlias, like deep purple Thomas Edison, grow 4 feet tall and have enormous, 8-inch flowers. Suppliers like Longfield Gardens offer dozens of dahlia varieties as well as attractive mixes based on color themes and flower styles. A combination such as the Soft Orange mix, works great in the garden and combines nicely in an arrangement.

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C O U RT E S Y LO N G F I E L D - G A R D E N S . C O M

Don’t be afraid to cut your dahlias. Picking encourages more blooms for you to enjoy. With as few as three to six plants you’ll have plenty of flowers to enjoy yourself and share with friends. Since dahlias thrive in the same great soil as vegetables, consider adding a few plants to your food garden as well. You’ll be able to cut fresh flowers for the dinner table when harvesting the vegetables for your next meal. In northern areas where dahlias are not winter hardy, the tubers can be dug and stored indoors for the winter. Or make it easy and just treat your dahlias like other annuals. With so many wonderful varieties to choose from, it’s fun to try different ones each year. Review your garden plans to identify places that could benefit from a burst of late season color. Order your dahlias early for the best selection, plant them in the spring and enjoy a spectacular show. Longfield-Gardens.com

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Don’t Let This Moment

PASS YOU BY Antietam Battlefield • C&O Canal Harpers Ferry • Appalachian Trail Potomac Heritage National Scenic Trail

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888-257-2600 • visithagerstown.com

CONNECT WITH US! ACCESSIBLE LUXURY… THAT SAYS IT ALL. DESTINATIONS AND INSPIRATION FOR THE WAY YOU LIVE.

EasternHomeTravel

EHTmag

EasternHomeAndTravel.com


8 RICH HISTORY Eclectic Architecture

DIVERSE WEST VIRGINIA CULTURE

Winding Country Roads

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Quaint Towns Unique Shops & Restaurants

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8 Arts, Entertainment & Family Fun

Easy access on I-81. 90 minutes from DC and Baltimore. Convention & Visitors Bureau 126 E. Race St., Martinsburg, WV 25401 304.364.8801 | 801.4WVA.FUN | Travel WV.com

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State Capitol Complex, Charleston

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P H OTO G R A P H Y: T R OY C A M P B E L L


TRAVEL INSPIRED DESIGN Dubbed “The Destination Designer,� Denise LaVey has traveled the globe and is notorious for drawing inspiration from her vast explorations and travels. By discovering unique design elements, cultivating a deeper understanding of faraway places, and uncovering talented artisans yet untapped by the world at large, this talented interior designer creates one-of-a-kind spaces that tell a story.

LaVey's skill is masterfully shown in her stunning project, Royal Plaza, located in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. She encourages clients to draw upon personal adventures to create spaces that reflect their unique sense of self and style. In turn, she has broadened her own soulful horizons. The Royal Plaza project was a complete facelift for the home of a couple with three young children. Beyond improving basic functionality, LaVey focused on creating an overall aesthetic that was less South Florida and more classically chic, while still presenting as warm and family-friendly.


With the concept of designing with a destination in mind, LeVay incorporated some African accents in the master suite. Sharing similar travel experiences with the homeowners inspired LeVay. “The homeowners had spent time in Africa and loved it. I have traveled throughout Botswana, Zambia and Namibia, which was an incredible experience, so getting to collaborate on that aspect together was a big highlight.” LeVay combined a traditional style with contemporary accents through use of modern textiles in the window treatments and pillows, and the space finally reflected the true spirit of the family. From the African decor of the master bedroom, to the countryside beauty of the backyard, LeVay exquisitely mixed cultures to create a one-of-a-kind home. Prior to establishing her own design firm in 2002, LaVey was a principal interior designer with Tutt Interiors, Inc. of Miami Beach. Working alongside Wallace Tutt III, one of Miami’s most respected celebrity designers, she collaborated closely on high-profile projects in Miami and the Bahamas.

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Since establishing her eponymous interior design practice, LaVey’s projects include homes in Florida, New York City, the Hamptons, Cabo San Lucas, and Los Angeles. Her fresh global perspective has given her the ability to capture each client’s unique taste, while incorporating her own worldly style. Additionally, her work is showcased in the coffee table book, Spectacular Homes of South Florida. DeniseLaVey.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y: T R OY C A M P B E L L

–Melissa Howes-Vitek

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P H OTO G R A P H Y: TO D D P LO S K I , J R .

EAST COAST

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CARRYING A MANTORCH The Twindles Candle Company offers a variety of products that feature all natural, hand-poured, small batch soy wax highly scented with phthalate-free fragrances and natural cotton wicks. Though they are presented in the expected glass tumblers, metal travel tins and as tarts/melts, there is nothing typical about the actual fragrances. It turns out that owner Lori Cullen has quite the sense of humor about scents! Hand-poured in historic and bucolic Frederick County, Md., Twindles' cheeky ManTorch line is aimed at the man's world. Fragrances such as Bacon, Man-illa, Beer and Cinn-a-man are a huge hit. (What exactly does Man Cave smell like, you may wonder.) These and other equally delightful products, as well as special order items are available at retail and craft show locations in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Washington, D.C., Delaware and online. Twindles.com

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P H OTO G R A P H Y: i S TO C K . C O M / F LO W N A K S A L A


CALVERT COUNTY:

MARYLAND’S ECO-DESTINATION BY PEGGY SIJSWERDA

The past is present in Calvert County, Md., where 15-million-year-old Miocene cliffs rise above the banks of the Chesapeake Bay. The ebb and flow of the tides reveal fossils—if you’re lucky enough to find them—dating from 5 million to 24 million years ago. More than 600 fossil species have been found: shark teeth, shells, coral and barnacles among them.


On a warm fall afternoon, I walked along the shore at Calvert Cliffs State Park, stooped over, scanning multicolored shell bits, hoping to find a fossil myself. All of a sudden, a shiny shark tooth appears out of nowhere. I look up at Mike Mannion, a volunteer who’s showing me and my husband around, and say, “You put that there, didn’t you?” Mike grins sheepishly and admits to planting the fossil so I could find it. I pick it up and cradle the tooth in my palm. Never mind that I didn’t really find it; the tiny relic connects me to another era, a time before industry and pollution, a time when nature was pristine and humans were nowhere to be found.

paleontology, marine history and estuarian life. The museum’s new director, Sherrod Sturrock, shows us around the galleries, starting with the familyoriented Discovery Room, a “microcosm of the museum,” she explains. A touch tank with horseshoe crabs, diamondback terrapins, sea stars and prickly sea urchins invites curious visitors to have a sensory experience, as volunteers stand by to assist.

Calvert County is Maryland’s smallest county, at 30 miles long and 9 miles wide. It celebrates its connection to nature and to the past. Here visitors can explore history, archaeology, marine heritage and beautiful preserves of forests and wetlands. An emphasis on eco-tourism fits in perfectly with the county’s preservation efforts. And don’t forget the bounty of seafood brought to shore by local watermen, continuing a tradition that’s lasted for centuries.

Get to know the county by visiting local museums. In North Beach, exhibits at Bayside History Museum give an overview of the resorts that developed along Chesapeake Bay beaches. A few miles away the Chesapeake Beach Railway Museum, housed in the original depot, also displays memorabilia from the region’s resort heyday. From the late 1890s to 1935, trains filled with passengers from Washington, D.C., would chug into town, and visitors would flood the beaches, boardwalk, amusement park and casino. The Great Depression ended the resort era, and today North Beach and Chesapeake Beach retain a peaceful small-town vibe. Calvert Marine Museum in Solomons is home to an extensive collection focusing on three themes:

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SENSORY EXPERIENCE


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We chat with a member of the museum’s fossil club, who’s busy extracting ancient sand dollars from cement-like sediment. You can see it’s a labor of love. Other clubs at the museum include a canoe/kayak club and a boatbuilding club. We meet a gentleman putting the finishing touches on a small pleasure boat he built, rigged with batteries to make it eco-friendly. He can’t wait to take his grandkids out on the Bay.

W I N D S W E P T WAV E S

People are friendly in Calvert County, happy to share their stories. During warmer months visitors can join a Watermen Heritage Tour, which typically includes a ride in a workboat, and a chance to try your hand at using tools and gear—think longhandled oyster rakes. The best part is hearing stories from watermen (and women) who have spent their lives scudding along the windswept waves of the bay and nearby Patuxent River. In a remote fishing village called Broomes Island on the Patuxent, we meet Jill Buck, owner of Island Girl Oysters, whose aqua-cultured oysters grow on leased land under the river. She also harvests wild oysters and lets me taste test each in a small shop where she sells her gifts from the sea. The farmed oysters, which can’t reproduce, are larger and creamier looking. “They use all that energy they would spend on reproducing into getting fatter and fatter,” she explains. Both are tasty, but the brinier, wild oyster is my favorite.

P H OTO G R A P H Y: P E G G Y S I J S W E R D A

Oyster aquaculture operations are multiplying along Maryland’s shores, we discover at PEARL (Patuxent Environmental and Aquatic Research Laboratory), an educational facility located at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum. PEARL’s mission is to help the oyster industry grow, says Rebekah Borgert, hatchery operator. She and her assistant, Amber DeMarr, research best practices for ensuring healthy life cycles of oysters, beginning with tiny oyster larvae, which turn into seed and then spat, finally growing into mature oysters, ready for shucking. As a bonus, oysters are good for the Bay since, as filter feeders, they constantly clean the water of impurities. That’s what I call eco-friendly. THINK GREEN

A beautiful oasis called Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center near Solomons celebrates art and nature on its 30-acre campus. A quarter-mile nature trail winds through the woods, where visitors can

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view art installations that encourage reflection. The children’s area, called Fairy Lolly, brings out the child in everyone with gaily painted buildings and decorations. Inside the soaring arts center, programs, art classes and changing exhibits keep visitors entertained year-round. The arts center uses recycled materials for kids’ art programs and also hosts Calvert Green Living, an annual event with demos designed to encourage residents and visitors to think green.

Back in Calvert Cliffs State Park, Mike takes us to a dense wooded area that smells of ancient times. “You almost expect to see a dinosaur come walking up,” he says. “It feels primeval.” His love for the forest is palpable. Everyone I meet is proud of Calvert County’s commitment to preserving and enjoying nature. It’s an ideal destination for eco-minded travelers, especially if you look beneath the surface, where little bits of history wait to tell their story.

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RESOURCES V I S I TO R I N F O R M AT I O N For more information, visit ChooseCalvert.com TOWN OF NORTH BEACH ci.North-Beach.md.us TO S TAY CHESAPEAKE BEACH RESORT ChesapeakeBeachResortSpa.com COVE POINT LIGHTHOUSE CalvertMarineMuseum.com/200/ Cove-Point-Lighthouse HILTON GARDEN INN SOLOMONS HiltonGardenInn3.Hilton.com HYATT REGENCY CHESAPEAKE ChesapeakeBay.Regency.Hyatt.com TO E AT & D R I N K BOOMERANGS, SOLOMONS LoveRibs.com

E-Z THAI, PRINCE FREDERICK EZThaiRestaurant.net FRIDAY’S CREEK WINERY FridaysCreek.com SCORPION BREWERY ScorpionBrewery.com THE PIER, SOLOMONS ThePierSolomons.com TRADERS SEAFOOD STEAK & ALE, CHESAPEAKE BEACH Traders-Eagle.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y: M E L I S S A H O W E S - V I T E K

CHARLES STREET BRASSERIE, SOLOMONS CharlesStreetBrass.com


H E R R I N G T O N H A R B O U R : A N E C O - H AV E N

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C O U RT E S Y H A R R I N G TO N H A R B O U R

HerringtonHarbour.com Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries has become a mission for Steuart Chaney, owner of Herrington Harbor, an Eco-Lifestyle Marina Resort located just north of Calvert County. After buying the property in the late 1970s, Chaney began building a luxury resort with two marinas and a picturesque inn overlooking Herring Bay. More importantly, over the years Chaney has incorporated green initiatives on his property, ensuring the local environment stays pristine and healthy. For example, he created marshes and living shoreline buffers to filter stormwater runoff, set up recycling programs and installed pervious pavement. Eco-trails invite guests to wander through some of the resort’s 550 acres of preserved land, home to migrating birds and waterfowl. The Inn, which also incorporates eco-friendly practices, recently completed an expansion and now offers eight tastefully decorated suites as well as guestrooms, some with screened porches, overlooking the Bay. Resort activities include paddle boarding, kayaking and swimming. It’s an ideal place to savor quality time with family and friends. The best part is knowing the pioneering owner of Herrington Harbour has created an eco-haven for you, and the local wildlife, to enjoy.

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Jacob Sanchez Diagnosed with autism

Lack of speech is a sign of autism. Learn the others at autismspeaks.org/signs.


Experience

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CURIOSITIES

Visit Ringing Rocks Park, AND DON’T FORGET YOUR HAMMER BY TY UNGLEBOWER

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CURIOSITIES

Ringing Rocks Park is a state park in Upper Black Eddy, Pa. The park’s name, fanciful as it sounds, is not a metaphor of some kind; the rocks in the park actually do ring. Well, at least the ones within a field of boulders on a 7-acre stretch of land inside the park.

Even there, one can only hear about a third of the rocks actually ring. The park’s boulder field is filled with rocks that, when struck (most effectively by a hammer), produce not a thud, but a tone similar to that of striking on a bell. Visitors call those that ring in this fashion the “live” stones. As you may guess, the stones that do not ring when struck are the “dead” stones. One of the earliest known references to these live stones goes back to 1890. A man named J.J. Ott supposedly gave a small concert featuring the tintinnabulation of some of the stones he procured from the field. Neither he nor his audience understood why the rocks produced this sound, but they, as generations since have been, were fascinated.

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Perhaps more fascinating than the sound of the rocks, is the fact that despite advances in science and technology, the cause of the phenomena remains unknown. It’s not for lack of trying that science has come up empty. A geologist by the name of Richard Faas from local Lafayette College conducted a series of tests on the rocks in 1965. He determined that there are, in fact, no “dead” rocks from the boulder field, only certain rocks that ring at frequencies so low as to render them inaudible to the human ear. Some of the stones, it is now theorized, that would otherwise be dead are live when struck, due to the interaction with other rocks in the vicinity. Why does this happen? Faas came up with no definitive answer, and neither have scientists since that time, though many speculate now that stresses within the rocks themselves contribute to their sonorous quality. EASTERN HOME & TRAVEL

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Scientists have revealed that most of the rocks are made up of a type of volcanic basalt known as diabase. In fact, the boulder field in Ring Rocks Park is in one of the largest homes to diabase in the country. The composition of the rocks, however, is still no explanation for the ringing, as not all rocks in the world with such a composition are “musical.” You may not be able to explain the rocks, but you can “play” them yourself. Visitors to the park often bring their own hammers and other blunt objects with which to strike on the stones to make the much-talked-about tones. Unconventional concerts have been played at the field on the rocks numerous times over the years as well. Fields such as this, (and a few others on Earth that also have such ringing rocks) may force us to one day retire the metaphor “cold as stone.” At least when one visits Upper Black Eddy.

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BucksCounty.org/government/ParksandRecreation/Parks/RingingRocks

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B Y S H U A N B U TC H E R

Harriet Tubman has been getting a lot of attention lately. The abolitionist will replace Andrew Jackson on the U.S. $20 bill and will lend her name to a new national park in New York and a state park on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

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EXPLORING HARRIET TUBMAN’S ROOTS & ROUTE


P H OTO G R A P H Y: C O U RT E S Y N AT I O N A L PA R K S E R V I C E


Railroad Byway. There are 35 stops along the byway and you can visit many during the course of one weekend. The City of Cambridge, Md., is a great place to center your activities, as there are plenty of places to stay, shop, eat and enjoy while exploring these historic sites. Be sure to start your drive at the Dorchester County Visitor Center in the heart of the Chesapeake. There you will find an overview exhibit and staff to assist you with questions. In addition, I highly suggest the audio tour either on CD or via a smartphone app. There are other sites in Downtown Cambridge that help interpret the Tubman story, including Long Wharf, which witnessed ships full of Africans and others arriving or departing as part of the slave trade, and the Dorchester County Courthouse, which was once the site of slave auctions. More on Cambridge later, when we highlight the dining and other amenities you may want to consider as part of your trip. But let’s head south of the city and explore some of the other unique places tied to Harriet Tubman and the struggle for freedom.

This attention is well deserved, as she is one of the most famous Underground Railroad agents in our country’s history. She was born a slave near the marshes, waterways and woodlands of the Chesapeake Bay and the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway provides an opportunity to explore a landscape that hasn’t changed much in the nearly 200 years since she traversed those same lands. You can transport yourself back to those days by traveling along the Harriet Tubman Underground

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One not-to-be-missed site is Joseph Stewart’s Canal at Parson Creek. For a period of 20 years starting in 1810, this 7-mile canal was built through the marsh by free and enslaved black men so that timber and other products could easily be floated to nearby ships for pickup. The brand-new Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park and Visitor Center opened to the public on March 10. This 10,000 square-foot facility contains an exhibit hall, theater, gift shop and research library, all dedicated to helping us understand Tubman’s life as a slave, suffragist, civil

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Just outside Cambridge sits a one-room schoolhouse named the Stanley Institute, after the Rev. Ezekiel Stanley. The school was moved here in 1867 and stands as a testament to the African-American community’s desire to educate their children. Visit Malone’s Church, in the town of Madison, Tubman may have attended services.


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THERE ARE 35 STOPS ALONG THE HARRIET TUBMAN UNDERGROUND RAILROAD BYWAY AND YOU CAN VISIT MANY DURING THE COURSE OF ONE WEEKEND.

rights worker and humanitarian. This place alone is worth the trip. Tubman’s early years were spent near Bucktown on the Brodess Farm, until she escaped in 1849, but she made frequent trips back to the area to help others secure their freedom as well. Although you cannot go onto the farm, as it is privately owned, there is a historic marker and a safe place to pull off the road and look around. It is powerful to pause for a moment and imagine what it could have been like two centuries prior.

Just down the road is the Bucktown Village Store, also worth a stop. Walking into the store is like walking back in time. It is not open all the time, so be sure to inquire into its hours. The owners do a fantastic job of sharing the tragic accident that happened to Harriet at the store in Bucktown that had lasting implications on her health and her life. Before calling it a day, you must visit the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge. It is worth a trip all by itself; you can easily spend an entire day here.

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One-third of Maryland’s coastal wetlands can be found at the refuge, which was established in 1933. About 28,000 acres of tidal marsh and forest, which serve as a popular destination for migratory birds, have been preserved. Bald eagles are often spotted, as well as geese, hawks, swans, ospreys, heron and more than 20 species of ducks. In addition to the array of birds that can be seen, this is a place where you can spot other unique critters, including mammals such as muskrats and Sika Deer.

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Journey along the 4-mile Wildlife Drive, which can be accessed by automobile, bicycle or on foot. Any way you choose to explore it, be sure to pick up the brochure at the visitor center that will provide great insights. Also grab a copy of the bird checklist to help you determine which birds are typically viewable during the season you are visiting. Next, head back into Cambridge to enjoy the amenities this beautiful town has to offer. The first


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P H OTO G R A P H Y: S H U A N B U TC H E R

place I stopped was RAR Brewery. It opened 3 years ago and is the fastest-growing brewery in Maryland, producing about 220,000 gallons annually. Distribution is focused on Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. Two varieties are available by can, with two more coming soon. But many others are on tap. When I stopped in they had Maryland Roast and Imperial Cream Ale, Goodnight Apollo (a Russian Imperial Stout), Reaper (an IPA), Imperial Bucktown Brown (an Imperial Brown Ale), Minto 10 Layers (a Dessert Stout) and others available to try. On Friday and Saturday nights, you can catch live music on site. You can grab a light bite at the brewery, but I would recommend going across the street to Rock Lobstah, a lobster bar owned by executive chef Patrick Fanning. The colorful dĂŠcor and atmosphere is inviting and you can tell a number of regulars as well as visitors come through the doors. You can choose from a variety of lobster rolls or something from their raw bar and steamer selection, including oysters that are only locally sourced, among other delightful items. If you are looking for a place to stay, there are several options, including some quaint bed and breakfasts in town, a highly touted (and expensive) Hyatt, or one of the chain hotels. I ended up at the Comfort Inn, nothing fancy, but relatively affordable. The following morning I continued to explore Cambridge before continuing north to enjoy more of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway. The downtown has several boutique shops and galleries, including the Dorchester Center for the Arts, where you can see visual art exhibits in the gallery or catch other literary, music or performing arts activities. Make sure you drive along historic High Street to Long Wharf. There, you can see the Choptank River Lighthouse as well as the Skipjack Nathan of Dorchester. The Skipjack Nathan was the last boat built for oyster dredging. Public sails are available on select weekends during the season.

Another great place to grab a meal is Stoked Wood Fired Eatery, also owned by Chef Fanning. I started out by ordering the Warm Apple Pie Classic Cocktail, made with warm house-made apple cider with Gifford Vanilla and Amaretto Vodka. I also tried the Rosemary Frites, which included matchstick fries with rosemary, parmesan, lemon oil and sea salt; and the Fall Pizza, topped with Emily’s Fairytale Pumpkin Squash, white sauce, caramelized onion and

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RESOURCES HARRIET TUBMAN UNDERGROUND RAILROAD BYWAY HarrietTubmanByway.com DORCHESTER COUNTY VISITOR CENTER 2 Rosehill Place, Cambridge 410-228-1000 VisitDorchester.org/about-dorchester/ visitor-center/ HARRIET TUBMAN UNDERGROUND RAILROAD VISITOR CENTER 4068 Golden Hill Road, Church Creek 410-221-2290 DNR2.Maryland.gov/publiclands/Pages/ eastern/tubman.aspx BLACKWATER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE VISITOR CENTER 2145 Key Wallace Drive, Cambridge 410-221-8156 FWS.gov/refuge/Blackwater/ SKIPJACK NATHAN OF DORCHESTER High Street at Long Wharf, Cambridge 410-228-7141 Skipjack-Nathan.org

Next, it was time to visit a few more Tubman sites before heading back home. First was the Linchester Mill, a hub for Underground Railroad activity thanks in part to the Quakers, abolitionists and free blacks in the community. Also check out Choptank Landing, where you can get the story of Tubman leading her brothers and others to freedom from a point nearby. Another place worth visiting is the Webb Cabin, which belonged to free African-American farmer James Webb and his enslaved wife and children. The cabin was built about 1852 from hand-hewn logs and sits on its original ballast-stone foundation. The final place I made it to was the Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House, a Quaker meeting house 58

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built in 1803 that serves as a reminder of the important role that Quakers played in ending slavery and supporting other important issues such as women’s equality. There are many other sites to explore along the byway all the way to the Delaware State Line and beyond if your schedule permits. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway is one of 150 roads in this country that has been designated a National Scenic Byway. The program was established 25 years ago by the U.S. Department of Transportation to recognize roads that have outstanding scenic, historic, cultural, natural, recreational and/or archaeological qualities. To find more National Scenic Byways across our nation, visit www.fhwa.dot.gov/byways.

RAR BREWERY 504 Poplar Street, Cambridge 443-225-5664 RARBrewing.com ROCK LOBSTAH 315 Gay Street, Cambridge 443-477-6261 RockLobstah.com STOKED WOOD FIRED EATERY 413 Muir Street, Cambridge 443-477-6040 StokedWoodFiredEatery.com CAMBRIDGE MAIN STREET 505 Poplar St. Apt 300, Cambridge 443-477-0843 CambridgeMainstreet.com

P H OTO G R A P H Y: S H U A N B U TC H E R

bacon. The bacon was brined and smoked inhouse, and truly made the dish.

COMFORT INN & SUITES 2936 Ocean Gateway, Cambridge 410-901-0926 ChoiceHotels.com/maryland/cambridge/ comfort-inn-hotels/md228


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An authentic Chesapeake Bay town in the heart of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. CELEBRATE WITH US!

Every second Saturday, join us for an art walk, shopping, dining & more! Downtown BeerFest Reflections on Pine Dorchester Arts Showcase Saturday • May 13, 2017

July 21–24, 2017

Sunday • September 24, 2017

Taste of Cambridge: Crab Cook Off

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Cambridge Schooner Rendezvous

Saturday • July 8, 2017

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October 20–22, 2017


HANG OUT IN HAMPTON B Y M O L LY F E L L I N S P E N C E

Let’s be honest: It’s been a while since you’ve spent some good, quality time with your dear, old dad. Now is the time to plan a special getaway where the two of you can eat good food, catch a show at the granddaddy venue of the concert circuit, check out the world’s largest naval installation, play around at the official visitor center for NASA Langley, and view by boat the location where the infamous pirate Blackbeard’s head was posted on a stake

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as a warning to other pirates in 1718.


The place where all of this is possible is Hampton, Va., where the Chesapeake Bay meets the James River and Atlantic Ocean, just north of Norfolk and Virginia Beach. There’s plenty to do year-round in Hampton, but a visit in the spring, summer or fall will allow you to better take advantage of the town’s oceanfront location. When planning your visit, first check the event schedule for the famous Hampton Coliseum, a favorite venue for the likes of R.E.M., Pearl Jam, Phish, James Taylor, Dave Matthews Band, and The Grateful Dead, among others. Aside from musical acts, the coliseum regularly hosts sporting events, family performances, and has been home for the last 50 years to the Hampton Jazz Festival (hamptonjazzfestival.com), to be held in late June. You’ll need a few days to take advantage of all the area has to offer. Start your trip at the Hampton History Museum, to give you the lay of the land. The museum has an educational focus and aims to show, in nine galleries arranged in chronological order, the 400 years of development of the city of Hampton and it surrounding areas, known as the oldest continuous English-speaking settlement in America. Here you’ll get an understanding for how the city developed from Native American settlement by the Kecoughtan tribe through modern times. Before you leave, make sure to purchase your tickets ($1 apiece) for a ride on the Hampton Carousel. Now housed in a glass pavilion on the downtown waterfront, the prancing horses and stately chariots were carved from fine-grained hardwood and painted by immigrant artisans. Its restoration occurred in 1920, and it is one of the few antique wooden merry-go-rounds still in existence in the country.

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Before you go for your joy ride, step out the back door of the museum and walk through the grounds of St. John’s Church, the oldest Anglican parish in continuous existence in America. Be sure to have a look at the stained-glass artwork depicting the baptism of Pocahontas. A short walk takes you to the carousel, which is conveniently located steps away from the entrance to the Virginia Air & Space Center, an impressive facility that serves as the visitor center for NASA Langley Research Center and Langley Air Force Base, but is so much more than just a visitor center. Save plenty of time to get interactive with the more than 100 hands-on exhibits. You’ll see the Apollo 12 Command Module, a Mars meteorite and a 3 billion-year-old moon rock. As you walk through the front doors, prepare to be awestruck at the dozens of full-size airplanes and space vehicles that dangle from the rafters. Included are a replica of the Wright Flyer as well as a full-size DC-9 passenger jet that is a sight to behold in person. A “Huey” military helicopter, commonly used for reconnaissance and security during the Vietnam War, and the “Starfighter” single-engine supersonic aircraft (nicknamed “the missile with a man in it”), developed by the U.S. Air Force by Lockheed, are among the impressive vehicles on display. Ask for a free docent-led tour when purchasing your entrance tickets. These museum volunteers are extremely knowledgeable and have a keen interest in aviation. The docents’ enthusiasm is infectious, and they help the exhibits come alive as they describe interesting facts and details about each of the items on display. While at the center, take a ride in MaxFlight, a simulator that allows riders complete control to 360-degree pitch, roll, loop, spin and spiral action


while viewing virtual flight combat on a 58-inch screen in the cockpit. Save time for an IMAX film, with documentaries and 3-D feature films shown during museum hours for an additional fee. After all that activity, you’re sure to build up an appetite. Luckily, several great eateries are located downtown, within walking distance of the waterfront. Head to Queens Way, where you’ll find Venture Kitchen and Bar, which serves weekend brunch as well as lunch and dinner. At Venture Kitchen, expect an eclectic menu of specialty pizzas (try the Hampton Hawaiian with pineapple, Virginia country ham, lump crab, mozzarella and tomato sauce), large salads and sandwiches (meatball banh-mi or the spicy eggplant grinder). Their award-winning house cocktail is made with jalapeño, cilantro, cucumber, lime and simple syrup muddled and served over ice.

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The next day, head to the Fort Monroe and Phoebus areas of Hampton. If you’re visiting in the summertime, you could spend the entire day at Paradise Ocean Club, sunning yourself on its private beach. Treat yourself by renting a cabana for the day and allow the club’s servers to bring you food and drinks as you gaze at the shore. An Olympicsize pool, tiki bar, live music and restaurant provide food and fun for the whole family all summer long. But, if you’re looking for a bit more activity and some more educational fun, visit the Casemate Museum of Fort Monroe. The museum chronicles the military history of the fort, which was completed in 1834 as a protection from enemy attack for the Hampton Roads waterway. It is the largest stone fort in America and was decommissioned in 2011. That same year, President Obama designated portions of the site as a national monument. The Casemate Museum features the room where Confederate President Jefferson Davis was held

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briefly as prisoner following the American Civil War. Another highlight describes Major Gen. Benjamin Butler’s Contraband of War decision that granted refuge to three escaped slaves. The grounds of the fort are quite lovely, and a walking tour of its 565 acres with 170 historic buildings, 3.2 miles of beaches, and 8 miles of waterfront is advised.

On your way back to downtown Hampton, take a tour of St. George Brewing Company and enjoy a sample of the seven brews on tap in the tasting room. The brewing company, named for the patron saint England as well as chivalry creates 22 varieties including ales, lagers, IPAs, stouts and more. A highlight of the product line is Larry’s Lemonade. Though it is technically a malt beverage, the “lemonade” starts out the same as

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EASTERN HOME & TRAVEL

P H OTO G R A P H Y: C O U RT E S Y H A M P TO N C O N V E N T I O N & V I S I TO R B U R E A U

Grab lunch in Phoebus at Mango Mangeaux, a celebrated French/Creole/NeoSoul bistro whose owners gained fame by appearing on the television show “Shark Tank,” attempting to sell their mango preserves to investors. Though the show’s “sharks” did not bite, the trio have managed to sell thousands of their jars on the QVC home shopping network and opened their restaurant in the Phoebus neighborhood a short time later. The preserves contain mango, cane sugar, lime and vanilla and are sold through specialty food stores and in Mid-Atlantic Whole Foods markets. Dozens of the jars also line the shelves at the Phoebus bistro, where you can have a taste in and on a number of dishes offered. Whether mixed into fresh-brewed iced tea or spread atop homemade French toast, the preserves are a delight and so is a meal at this bright, sunny, beautifully decorated restaurant.


beer, with malted barley, water, hops and yeast. It tastes and looks like lemonade and is lightly sweet and amazingly refreshing. For the grand finale of your trip, treat Dad to a cruise on the Miss Hampton II. Its three-hour harbor tour departs from the downtown Hampton waterfront and proceeds out to the Hampton River, passing by Hampton University and Blackbeard’s Point, where the notorious pirate’s head was set on a pike after his capture and execution. The tour passes by Fort Monroe and the Old Point Comfort Lighthouse, the oldest continuously operating lighthouse in America. On good-weather days, the tour stops for a 30-minute guided walking tour of Fort Wool, important for its Civil War history. The highlight of the cruise is a close-up view of the massive warships parked at the Norfolk Naval Base, home to aircraft carriers, nuclear-powered submarines and support ships. The base takes up about 4 miles of waterfront and 7 miles of pier and wharf space in the Hampton Roads peninsula, known as Sewell’s Point. The world’s largest naval station houses the largest concentration of U.S. Navy forces, including 75 ships and 134 aircraft alongside 14 piers and 11 aircraft hangars. The ships are an impressive sight, so bring your camera and a jacket no matter the season—the swift bay breeze chills even on a hot summer day. Once your cruise is over and you return to the waterfront, your adventure in Hampton has come to an end. But you and your dear, old dad won’t soon forget all the adventure, food, and fun you shared while exploring this unique region.

RESOURCES V I S I TO R I N F O R M AT I O N HAMPTON TOURISM 1919 Commerce Dr #290 Hampton 757-722-1222 VisitHampton.com P L A C E S TO S TAY SPRINGHILL SUITES 1997 Power Plant Parkway, Hampton 757-310-6333 Marriott.com/hotels/travel/phfhc-springhillsuites-hampton/ CROWNE PLAZA HAMPTON MARINA HOTEL 700 Settlers Landing Road, Hampton, 757-727-9700 HamptonMarinaHotel.com P L A C E S TO V I S I T HAMPTON HISTORY MUSEUM 120 Old Hampton Lane, Hampton 757-727-1610 Hampton.gov/119/Hampton-History-Museum HAMPTON CAROUSEL 602 Settlers Landing Road, Hampton 757-727-1610 HamptonCarousel.com HAMPTON COLISEUM 1000 Coliseum Drive, Hampton 757-838-4203 HamptonColiseum.org VIRGINIA AIR & SPACE CENTER 600 Settlers Landing Road, Hampton 757-727-0900 VASC.org HAMPTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 100 E. Queen Street, Hampton 757-727-5308 Museum.HamptonU.edu CASEMATE MUSEUM OF FORT MONROE 20 Bernard Road, Hampton 757-788-3391 FMAuthority.com/visit/casemate-museum

MISS HAMPTON II CRUISES 710 Settlers Landing Road, Hampton 757-722-9102 MissHamptonCruises.com P L A C E S TO E AT & D R I N K ST. GEORGE BREWING COMPANY 204 Challenger Way, Hampton 757-865-7781 StGBeer.com MANGO MANGEAUX 33 E. Mellen Street, Hampton 757-224-9189 MangoMangeaux.com THE POINT AT PHOEBUS 30 E. Mellen Street, Hampton 757-224-9299 ThePointAtPhoebus.com THE DEADRISE 100 McNair Drive, Hampton 757-788-7190 Facebook.com/thedeadriseva VENTURE KITCHEN & BAR 9 E. Queens Way, Hampton 757-325-8868 VentureKitchenAndBar.com PARADISE OCEAN CLUB 509 Fenwick Road, Fort Monroe 757-224-0290 ParadiseOceanClub.com

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