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DPD January 2012 Regulation 25 version

£10 including P&P

T EST VAL L E Y B O RO U G H

CORE STRATEGY AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT DPD


Foreword by the Portfolio Holder The Council has to plan for the future of the Borough to ensure that there are homes for its residents, places where they can work and opportunities to enjoy their leisure time. The Council also has a duty to protect and enhance the environment for present and future generations. The new Core Strategy document and Designations document for the Borough will, when adopted, provide a framework to 2031 for making decisions about where development should or should not go, and for ensuring that when change is necessary it is carried out in the most beneficial way. The preparation of such important policy documents takes time and this draft is the start of the process. The public have a key role to play in shaping the future of the Borough and I would invite you to read the contents of this document and let me have your comments on it. I can assure you that all comments will be carefully considered.

Councillor Martin Hatley

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

Deputy Leader and Portfolio Holder for Planning and Transport

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Commenting On This Document The statutory six week public consultation period runs from 6th January to 4.30pm on the 17th February 2012. Only representations made during this time will be taken into account. You will automatically be added to our database if you send us a response. Your correspondence will be available for public inspection and for copying in accordance with the provisions of the Access to Information Act. This document is available for inspection and purchase from the Council’s Andover and Romsey offices during normal office hours. This document and all background evidence are available on the Council’s website. Should you have any questions please contact the Policy Team. If you would like to comment on this document please send your views to the address below or the email address. You can also comment via the Council’s website.

T: F: W: E:

01794 527816 01794 527723 www.testvalley.gov.uk/LDF LDF@testvalley.gov.uk

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

Planning Policy Test Valley Borough Council Duttons Road Romsey Hampshire S051 8XG

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Contents Glossary

5

1 Introduction

9

2

The Issues For The Borough

12

3

Delivery, Implementation & Monitoring

27

4

Local Communities

29

5

Local Economy 

47

6 Environment

64

7

72

Leisure, Health & Wellbeing

8 Transport

77

9

Community Safety

81

10

Education & Learning 

82

Annexes A

Strategic Employment Sites

84

B

Public Open Space Definitions 

86

C

Parking Standards 

88

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Appendices

4

A

Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment sites tested

in the Sustainability Appraisal 

90

B

Housing Trajectory

96

Maps Key Diagram

102

A

Proposals at Whitenap, Romsey

103

B

Proposals at Hoe Lane, North Baddesley

104

C

Proposals at Picket Piece & Walworth Business Park, Andover

105

D

Proposals at Nursling

106

E

Proposals at George Yard/Black Swan Yard, Andover

107

F

Proposed Forest Park, Southern Test Valley

108

G

Proposals at Ganger Farm, Romsey

109

Index

110


Glossar y Annual Monitoring Report (AMR): This is part of the Local Development Framework. The AMR will assess the implementation of the Local Development Scheme and the extent to which policies in Local Development Documents are being successfully implemented.

Community Plan: Local Authorities are required by the Local Government Act 2000 to prepare these, with the aim of improving the social, environmental and economic wellbeing of their areas. Through the Community Plan, authorities are expected to co-ordinate the actions of public, private, voluntary and community sectors (through the Local Strategic Partnership). The Test Valley Partnership has produced ‘Your Test Valley’, the Community Plan for the Borough.

Core Strategy: This document sets out the long term spatial vision for the local authority area and the objectives and strategic policies to deliver that vision. The Core Strategy will have the status of a Development Plan Document. The Test Valley Core Strategy also includes development management policies and strategic site allocations.

Development Plan: The Development Plan comprises the Development Plan Documents contained within the Local Development Framework and the Minerals and Waste Plans produced jointly by Hampshire County Council, Portsmouth and Southampton City Councils and the New Forest and South Downs National Park Authorities. It also includes Regional Strategies such as the South East Plan, which will be revoked when the Localism Act 2011

Development Plan Documents (DPDs): Planning documents that are subject to independent examination and form part of the Development Plan. In Test Valley the Development Plan Documents include the Core Strategy DPD and Designations DPD. Individual Development Plan Documents or parts of a DPD can be reviewed independently from other DPDs. Each authority must set out the programme for preparing its Development Plan Documents in the Local Development Scheme (LDS).

Evidence Base: The Development Plan Documents should be based on evidence of participation and research. It should be as up to date as possible.

Examination in Public (EiP): An Inspector appointed by the Secretary of State will carry out an independent examination into the soundness of the Development Plan Document.

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comes into force in 2012.

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Habitat Regulations Assessment (HRA): This is based on a legal requirement (through the Conservation of Habitat and Species Regulations 2010). It involves assessing the potential effects of land use plans on the conservation objectives of Natura 2000 sites, which are designated for their nature conservation importance. This includes Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and Special Protection Areas (SPAs). Guidance also recommends considering the effects on Ramsar sites.

Key Diagram: This provides an overview of the proposals within the Core Strategy that relate to specific locations.

Local Development Document: This is the collective term for Development Plan Documents, Supplementary Planning Documents and the Statement of Community Involvement.

Local Development Framework (LDF): This is the collective term for the portfolio of documents including Development Plan Documents, Supplementary Planning Documents, Statement of Community Involvement, Local Development Scheme and Annual Monitoring Report. They provide the framework for delivering the spatial planning strategy for a local authority area and may also include local development orders and simplified planning zones.

Local Development Scheme (LDS): This sets out the programme for preparing Local Development Documents. The Council’s LDS was approved in September 2011 and can be found on the Planning pages of the Council’s website.

Local Strategic Partnership (LSP): This is a partnership of stakeholders who develop ways Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

of involving local people in shaping the future of their area in terms of how services are

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provided. They are often single, non-statutory, multi-agency bodies which aim to bring together locally the private, public, community and voluntary sectors. The Test Valley Partnership is the LSP for the Borough.

National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF): It is proposed that this will consolidate all current national planning policy into one document. It will set out the Government’s economic, social and environmental policies for England. A draft document was published in July 2011. The final NPPF is due to be in place by April 2012.

Northern Test Valley: This relates to the area of the Borough outside Southern Test Valley and the New Forest National Park.

Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (PUSH): This is an organisation comprising East Hampshire, Eastleigh, Fareham, Gosport, Hampshire County Council, Havant, Portsmouth, Southampton, Test Valley and Winchester Councils. They have come together to improve the economic performance of South Hampshire and enhance it as a place to live and work.


Proposals Map: The proposals map will identify areas of protection, allocated sites for development and set out areas to which specific policies apply.

Regional Strategy (RS): Formerly termed Regional Spatial Strategies (RSS), these set out the region’s policies in relation to the development and use of land – they form part of the Development Plan for local planning authorities. The South East Plan is the RS which applies to Test Valley. Through the Localism Act 2011 the Regional Strategies are to be abolished.

Saved Policies and Plans: This relates to certain policies within in the Development Plan (Borough Local Plan 2006) as saved by a Direction of the Secretary of State in May 2009 which continue to be relevant in the consideration of planning applications until new policy documents are in place.

Site Specific Allocations: These include sites for specific or mixed use development contained in Development Plan Documents. Policies will identify any specific requirements for individual proposals.

Southern Test Valley: This comprises the seven parishes of Ampfield, Chilworth, North Baddesley, Nursling and Rownhams, Romsey Extra, Romsey Town and Valley Park – these are within PUSH.

Statement of Community Involvement (SCI): This sets out the standards which authorities will achieve with regard to involving local communities in the preparation of Local Development Documents and development management decisions. The Statement of viewed on the Planning pages of the Council’s website.

Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): This is a generic term used to describe environmental assessment as applied to policies, plans and programmes. The European ‘SEA Directive’ (2001/42/EC) requires a formal environmental assessment of certain plans and programmes, including those in the field of planning and land use.

Strategic Sites: These are sites which are considered central to the achievement of the Strategy. The Test Valley Core Strategy includes a number of strategic sites at Andover and in Southern Test Valley.

Supplementary Planning Documents (SPD): These provide supplementary information in respect of the policies in Development Plan Documents. They do not form part of the Development Plan and are not subject to independent examination. The Council has produced a number of SPDs; they can be found on the Planning pages of the Council’s website.

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Community Involvement is not a Development Plan Document. The Test Valley SCI can be

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Sustainability Appraisal (SA): This is a tool for appraising policies to ensure they reflect sustainable development objectives (i.e. social, environmental and economic considerations). There is a requirement in the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act that sustainability appraisals are undertaken for all Development Plan Documents.

Tests of Soundness: An Inspector appointed to examine in public the Development Plan Documents will check that it complies with the legislation and to determine whether it is sound. To be sound the document should be justified, effective and consistent with national policy.

The Regulations: This relates to the Town and Country Planning (Local Development)

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(England) Regulations 2004 as amended by 2008 and 2009 Regulations.

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1 Introduction 1.1 The Core Strategy for Test Valley forms the main part of the Test Valley Local Development Framework (LDF). The document sets out a vision for the future development of the Borough. It includes the core objectives which underpin the Strategy together with policies and proposals. It will form the basis for planning decisions in the Borough up to 2031.

1.2 Proposals emerging from Government through the Localism Act 2011 will mean a renewed focus on working with infrastructure agencies, local communities and businesses with a focus on efficient partnership working. The Core Strategy has been drafted to reflect the Community Plan, which has been prepared by the Local Strategic Partnership (LSP), and the Council’s Corporate Plan.

1.3 The Council has extensive experience in joint working through the LSP. It has produced the Community Plan ‘Your Test Valley’ (2007) which sets out a high level strategy for meeting the needs and aims of the area’s community and partners. This message has been echoed in the Council’s Corporate Plan ‘Doing Things Differently’. The Core Strategy will set out how the Council will deliver the aspirations of the Corporate Plan and the Community Plan.

1.4 The close relationship between the Core Strategy, Community Plan and Corporate Plan is emphasised by the shared vision, objectives and proposals. The Core Strategy has also taken account of the content of various strategies produced by the Council, about the Borough.

Process so Far 1.5 Between 2006 and 2009 work was undertaken on producing a Core Strategy. This was submitted to the Secretary of State in March 2009. In May 2009 an Exploratory Meeting was held where the appointed Inspector raised a number of concerns. Following this meeting the Council decided to withdraw the Core Strategy. Work has since been undertaken on a revised document. This has included a focused ‘key issues’ consultation, updating the evidence base and further working with partners.

1.6 In the intervening period there have been a number of significant changes. The Localism Act 2011 has been passed, which includes provisions to revoke the Regional Strategy (the South East Plan). The draft National Planning Policy Framework was published for consultation in July 2011. There is a greater emphasis on decisions being made at a local level. At the same time the importance of bringing forward development has been reaffirmed by the Government in its Planning for Growth statement (March 2011).

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neighbouring authorities and partner organisations and what the evidence base tells us

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1.7 The Council’s Local Development Framework (LDF) and Local Development Scheme (LDS) have evolved to take account of these factors. The Council agreed its revised LDF and LDS in September 2011. Figure 1 sets out the components and structure of the LDF. The Core Strategy has been produced to; balance the need for development with the protection of the environment; meet what local communities, groups and organisations see as their main concern and how these can be best addressed based on local evidence.

1.8 The Core Strategy is being drafted and consulted upon during a period of change to the planning system, so it is likely that future changes may need to be made. The document has been written based on both current national policy guidance and draft guidance. The South East Plan will be revoked when relevant parts of the Localism Act 2011 are implemented. The Council has taken this into account and is proposing its own local development requirements.

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

Figure 1

10


Sustainability Appraisal & Habitats Regulations Assessment 1.9 The Sustainability Appraisal (SA) and Habitat Regulations Assessment (HRA) processes run parallel to and have helped to inform the preparation of the Core Strategy. The purpose of the SA is to ensure that all Development Plan Documents are compatible with the aims of sustainable development. The Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report (June 2011) provides the framework for undertaking the Sustainability Appraisal, setting out the key factors to be considered.

1.10 The Core Strategy has been subject to assessment in relation to Regulation 61 of the Habitats Regulations. This is to ensure that the proposals contained in the Core Strategy will not lead to adverse effects on the integrity of any Natura 2000 or Ramsar sites. The process has informed the development of strategic options and proposals to mitigate pressure on these designations.

Relationship with Saved Policies of the Borough Local Plan (2006) 1.11 The Planning & Compulsory Purchase Act (2004) makes provision for existing local plan policies to be saved for a period of time until new policy documents are in place. Following a direction from the Secretary of State (May 2009) certain policies have been saved. When the Core Strategy is adopted, the policies contained within this document will replace a number of policies which have been saved. The list of saved policies to be replaced can be found in the Local Development Scheme (2011).

1.12 The Core Strategy contains a key diagram and maps identifying strategic allocations. 1.13 The Core Strategy is complemented by the Designations DPD. The two documents have been produced in tandem for users to understand and respond to key aspects of the Core Strategy. The Designations DPD sets out the settlement boundaries, local gap boundaries, areas of special character, defines Andover and Romsey town centres and shopping frontages.

1.14 The Council has identified the merits of producing one document within its Local Development Scheme (2011). This approach will be kept under review.

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

Relationship with the Designations Development Plan Document (DPD)

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2 The Issues For The Borough 2.1 The issues facing the Borough are broad and cover the physical aspects of land use planning, as well as economic, social and environmental matters.

2.2 To highlight the links within the Community Plan, the Core Strategy has the same vision: “to create a Test Valley community where everyone has the opportunity to fulfil their potential and to enjoy a good quality of life”.

2.3 The Community Plan has eight key themes: • Local Communities • Local Economy • Environment • Leisure • Health & Wellbeing • Transport • Community Safety • Education & Learning

2.4 The chapters of the Core Strategy reflect the eight themes of the Community Plan. For each chapter objectives have been identified to shape their content. The objectives have been developed taking into account national guidance, the Community Plan, the Vision for Andover, and public comments. They underpin and

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

guide the content of the document.

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2.5 In order to deliver the vision for the Borough, these themes will be pursued through the implementation of the policies and proposals within the Strategy. The Council on its own will not be able to implement the Core Strategy. It will need the support of a number of key agencies. It will also rely on the availability of funding both from the public and private sector. In order to achieve this, the Core Strategy will seek the proactive involvement of key stakeholders and service providers in the planning process.

2.6 Set out in the following paragraphs, the Council has identified objectives and issues, related to each of the eight themes, which the Core Strategy will address.

2.7 Following the credit crisis and subsequent recession, the Borough is continuing to experience a challenging economic environment. The strength of the current recovery and future levels of growth and employment continue to be influenced by the wider national and international economic situation. Future prospects for the economy continue to be uncertain, however, Test Valley remains relatively prosperous and well placed to respond as the recovery strengthens.


2.8 The Core Strategy provides a positive framework to support and develop a successful Borough economy and assist economic recovery through future development. It seeks to ensure that enough land is made available to meet the needs of businesses and provide local job opportunities for the community. This is in line with the Corporate Plan priority of ‘Enabling a Prosperous Economy’ and the Government’s objective for the planning system to deliver sustainable economic growth.

LOCAL COMMUNITIES 2.9 The Community Plan aim is ‘to support and encourage a strong sense of local community’. There are a number of elements which are considered to help support that aim;

Providing for the future housing needs, types and tenures within the Borough 2.10 The population of the Borough is estimated at 113,5071, it is expected to rise by 5,200 by 20162. 60% of the population is estimated to be of working age, 20% is of state pensionable age, with those over the age of 85 expected to rise significantly. The percentage of Test Valley’s population of children of pre-school age is estimated at 5.5%. The age structure of Test Valley’s population is similar to that of Hampshire. However, it is expected to have the largest rise in pre-school children in the County by

2.11 A higher proportion of the housing stock in the Borough is in owner-occupation than for the national level, see Table 1. Table 2 sets out the forecast composition of households requiring market housing by 2026.

Table 1: Existing Housing Stock based on 2001 Census Test Valley

England and Wales

Owner Occupation

75%

69%

Social Housing

14%

19%

Privately Rented

11%

10%

1

Small Area Population Forecast, Hampshire County Council (HCC), 2010.

2

Small Area Population Forecast, HCC, 2010

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

2016.

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Table 2: Forecast Composition of Household Types Requiring Market Housing by 2026 2001

2026

Families

41%

36%

Single People

25%

34%

Couples

32%

26%

Others

5%

5%

2.12 An issue facing the Borough is the gap between house prices and income. There are relatively high house prices and relatively low incomes resulting in a large proportion of Test Valley residents being unable to access open market housing. This is issue is particularly prevalent in rural parts of the Borough. The overall average sale price of a house in Test Valley in the first quarter (April - June) of 2011 was £271,348, above the regional average of £207,189, and considerably above the England & Wales figure of £162,3473

2.13 The Strategic Housing Market Assessment (2007) identifies a current need of 2,290 households with 69% of new households unable to rent or buy market housing. The Council’s records indicate that there are currently (November 2010) 3,418 households on the Joint Housing Register of which 2,766 are on the general register and 652 on the transfer register. This need may increase with changes to Housing Benefits where there may be difficulties in finding suitable private rented sector accommodation locally for households that are accepted as homeless or at risk of homelessness. In the year up to

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

October 2011, 78 households made a homeless application of which 22 the Council had a

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duty to house. 330 households were prevented from becoming homeless through Council action. The current affordable housing target is 185 completions per year4.

2.14 How the Council can address the issue of access to affordable housing will be a key issue. Within the context of the current economic climate and the impact on viability of development, the Council is faced with a difficult challenge of providing affordable housing, how that housing will be delivered, as well as achieving a mixture of housing types that will best reflect the profile of the population.

2.15 An important issue for the Borough is providing new housing through the identification of appropriate sites. The Core Strategy will provide a basis for identifying an appropriate and continuous phased supply of land. This will comprise existing commitments, permissions and windfalls. The rate at which land is brought forward will be influenced by factors beyond the Council’s control such as the strength of the economy. The Council will endeavour to work with key partners and the development industry to deliver as many new homes as possible. 3

Land Registry, 2011.

4

Housing Strategy, Test Valley Borough Council, 2008.


2.16 The Council will seek to maximise the contribution from brownfield land. Given the scale of the requirement and that the Borough is predominantly rural (with less than 5% being identified as “built up�) most of the unallocated housing will need to be met on greenfield sites to be proposed in the Core Strategy.

Promote appropriate scale of development in settlements in keeping with their size, character and function. 2.17 The population of the Borough is concentrated in the towns of Andover (37,471) and Romsey (17,746). The smaller settlements of North Baddesley, Valley Park, Chilworth and Nursling and Rownhams have a combined population of approximately 20,7785. These are located on the edge of Southampton and Eastleigh. In total these settlements account for 60% of the Borough’s population. The remaining is spread across a large number of small villages in the rural part of the Borough. Stockbridge acts as a centre for a number of rural communities.

2.18 To guide the location of future development, a settlement hierarchy has been developed. This identifies the most sustainable towns and villages, based on their facilities and accessibility, and sets out the broad scale of housing development considered appropriate. This will assist with identifying appropriate locations for development and help the promotion of sustainable development by focusing it where residents would have the most opportunities to access facilities. A consequence of this approach is that a number of the smaller settlements would not be considered

Create sustainable communities, locating development where daily needs for employment, shopping, leisure, recreation, education, health and other community facilities are accessible by sustainable modes of transport. 2.19 Andover is some distance from other larger centres including Basingstoke (20 miles), Winchester (13 miles), Southampton (24 miles) and Salisbury (19 miles). Andover is relatively self-contained providing a range of facilities including retail (within the town centre and out of centre shopping), leisure and recreation. It is also an important employment area. It serves its own residents and a wider catchment area approximately 70,000 people in total. However, for many residents it does not provide for all of their needs and residents go elsewhere. The key issue is how the town centre should develop in terms of the range and choice of shopping and as a leisure destination serving the growing population. Enhancing existing facilities would encourage people to spend more of their time and money in Andover, which would have a number of benefits. It would support the local economy, create employment and reduce the need to travel to other destinations. 5

Population Forecast for all Parishes in Hampshire, HCC, 2010.

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

appropriate locations for further allocated development.

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2.20 To maintain the existing levels of self containment and strengthen the range of shopping, education, health, leisure and other facilities in the town need to be developed. The Council considers that there is potential to improve the shopping offer, develop new leisure opportunities and strengthen the education sector. The issues are how to fund any improvements and achieving the appropriate mix of uses for the town given its proposed growth over the next plan period.

2.21 Romsey and the settlements of the southern part of the Borough are close to the larger centres of Southampton and Eastleigh. Consequently, residents look to them for a range of facilities and employment. The residential areas close to those centres look to them rather than Romsey. With respect to shopping, a large proportion of the convenience and comparison expenditure within the town’s catchment area is spent out elsewhere. The key issue is whether Romsey should expand its role as a centre serving the area and if so, what scale of development could be achieved without having an adverse impact on its character. The changing pattern of retailing has meant that the demand for shops is changing whilst the demand for other town centre uses increases e.g. coffee shops, food outlets have increased. Market towns have traditionally been places where people meet and it may be that whilst the reasons to come to the centre may change, the future planning of the area should consider how it can continue to perform that function.

2.22 Local facilities and services within the Borough are important for local communities especially for those members of the population who may not have access to a car or the availability of public transport is limited. The retention of such local centres and

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

shops has become more difficult as patterns of shopping have developed.

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2.23 Rural villages provide a range of facilities which support the daily needs of residents, some have a greater range than others e.g. Stockbridge, Longparish, Broughton. Most have limited or no facilities and will rely upon neighbouring villages or will travel to the larger adjoining towns such as Andover, Romsey, Winchester and Salisbury. The decline in rural facilities has been taking place for some time with changes in lifestyles and availability of services via the internet having a significant impact. The issue is how to and to support the remaining facilities in villages and promote new ones.

LOCAL ECONOMY 2.24 The Community Plan aim is ‘to ensure that the local economy thrives and remains competitive’ with the Corporate Plan aiming for a competitive local economy. This could be achieved by;


Providing a range of job opportunities. 2.25 The Borough’s economy has performed well in recent years, with a significant contribution being made by residents who work elsewhere. The Borough has relatively low numbers of people out of work (6.4% compared with 8.4% for Hampshire as February 2011)6. Certain areas of the Borough are on a lower average pay. The main sectors of employment are: distribution, hotels and restaurants, banking, finance and insurance and the health sector. Test Valley has a high percentage of people whose occupation can be classed as Managers and Senior Officials in comparison to the overall percentages for Hampshire, the South East and England7. Residue band full time gross weekly earnings are £506.90 (2010).

2.26 Tourism plays a valuable part to the Borough’s economy. Between 1998 and 2008, the number of day trips into Test Valley grew by one quarter from 2.5 million to 3.1 million. The total expenditure on tourism doubled from £89m to £178m. The number of full time equivalent (FTE) jobs in tourism more than doubled from 1,307 to 2,787 (110%) and the number of actual jobs (including part time, seasonal etc.) grew by three quarters (from 1,838 to 3,175). Simultaneously, the overall number of jobs in Test Valley grew marginally (from 47,200 to 48,897)8.

2.27 A distinctive feature of Andover is its high degree of self-containment with 70% of its residents living and working in the town. There are a range of businesses based in the town including several major employers e.g. Stannah, Twinings, the Army Land Command and a Co-Op distribution centre. In some areas of Andover there are occupations. In Alamein, 18.4% of the working age population are engaged in lower skilled occupations. The overall percentage of people engaged in these occupations in England is 11.8%.

2.28 In Andover, a rejuvenation project for Walworth Business Park, with an external private sector partner, has commenced. Walworth is experiencing high vacancy rates and poor environmental quality. The future economic performance of the town is closely linked to making improvements to the business park and improving its attractiveness to potential employers. A key issue will be how to initiate a successful regeneration programme in a difficult economic climate.

6

Hampshire Labour Market Bulletin, HCC, August 2011

7

Test Valley Borough Profile/ Office for National Statistics, 2009

8

Draft Tourism Statement , 2010

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significant numbers of people whose occupations are categorised as elementary

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2.29 The economy of Southern Test Valley is based on high value business sites (e.g. Adanac Park, Nursling), a highly qualified workforce and good communications. The University of Southampton Science Park, located at Chilworth, is one if the key locations in South Hampshire for high technology companies and high value jobs. The Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (PUSH) has identified the scale of new employment provision in South Hampshire with a distribution of floorspace amongst districts and the need for upskilling of the existing workforce.

2.30 Southern Test Valley is less self-contained than Andover and experiences a significant amount of out-commuting, reflecting its relationship with South Hampshire and its good transport links. However, given the employment opportunities within the area, there is a significant inward flow of workers. The issue to consider is the extent to which the imbalance between residents and jobs can be addressed in terms of creating greater opportunities to live and work locally.

2.31 The rural area of Test Valley experiences the highest proportion of out-commuting in the Borough and has the highest proportion of highly qualified people in the workforce. It is continuing to see the impact of changes in agriculture and diversification into other businesses. A significant amount of floorspace has been granted permission for employment use primarily resulting from the change of use of existing buildings. Access to high speed broadband is seen as a key issue, particularly for businesses for whom the internet is a key part of their operations. Agriculture is a significant part of the Borough’s environment and economy. In 2010, there were over 360 farm holdings covering 43,508 hectares in Test Valley. In total, approximately 1,100 people were

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

employed (either full or part-time, or casually) in farming9. Balancing the development of

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the rural economy with the increase in traffic movements on rural roads is a key issue.

THE ENVIRONMENT 2.32 The Community Plan aim is ‘to enable everyone to play their part in ensuring we maintain a high quality and sustainable environment’. This could be achieved by

Protect and enhance the built and historic environment, conserve and enhance the local character, identity and cultural heritage. 2.33 The built heritage of the Borough plays an important role in defining the character of the area and it is one of the main reasons for attracting visitors.

9

Local Authority Level Key Land Areas, DEFRA, 2010.


2.34 The central core of Andover was established in the Middle Ages. Most of the town’s larger surviving historic buildings date from the 19th Century. Romsey’s character stems largely from its medieval street pattern, architecture of the 18th and 19th Centuries and visual domination by the Abbey Church. Many of the villages grew up in the sheltered parts of the Downs and in the river valleys, evolving from farming communities or important roles such as coaching stops (e.g. Stockbridge and Hurstbourne Tarrant). They vary in character as well as size, from small tightly knit settlements to linear settlements stretching along a single road or valley. There are 36 Conservation Areas, over 2,300 listed buildings, and 105 Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAM) including the Danebury Iron Age Hill Fort. The Borough has 57% of the total number of cob buildings in Hampshire and 38% of the total number of thatched buildings. At 54% of the total, it also has the majority of Hampshire’s cob buildings with thatched roofs10.

2.35 The historic sites and buildings of the Borough are a finite resource and once lost cannot be replaced. The issue is how they can be best managed to ensure that their importance and value is retained whilst recognising the pressures arising from modern living.

Ensure development addresses sustainability issues such as combating climate change, implementing water and energy efficiency measures and reusing resources. 2.36 Responding to a changing climate is one of the key challenges in the coming years. to extremes of weather will need to be developed.

2.37 Reducing carbon emissions is one of the key aims of national government. The 2009 per capita carbon dioxide emissions for Test Valley (including domestic, road transport and industry / commercial aspects) were 7.3 tonnes per capita with the regional figure being 5.9 tonnes per capita and the UK being 6.4 tonnes per capita11.

2.38 Groundwater quality in Test Valley is good with the majority of public water supply in the area coming from this source. The Environment Agency’s Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy (2006) covering the River Test notes that many areas within the Borough are over licensed or have no water available for abstraction. The Environment Agency12 has identified Test Valley as an area of serious water stress.

10 Annual Monitoring Report 2009 / 2010, Test Valley Borough Council, 2010. 11 Carbon Dioxide Emissions within the Scope of Influence of Local Authorities (Previously NI 186), DECC, 2011. 12 Areas of Water Stress: Final Classification, Environment Agency 2007.

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The use of resources will need to be carefully managed and the community’s resilience

19


2.39 The Agency is monitoring the issue of water supply and has advised that there is no likelihood of increasing the amount of water taken out of local rivers and aquifers. Minimising the amount of water required by new development and maximising the replenishment of groundwater sources are particularly important within the Borough.

2.40 The rivers and streams within Test Valley are key elements of the landscape and help shape its character as well as being important habitats. Minimising the demand for water is a key issue for the Borough. How that can be achieved will be a challenge. The Council will need to work with the Environment Agency, the Water Companies, development industry and the community to achieve greater water efficiency and ensure protection of the water sources and supply within the Borough.

Protect high standards of water and air quality. 2.41 Whilst the quality of the watercourses is generally good, the quality of the River Test has deteriorated in recent years. The reasons for this are not yet fully understood. The River is the defining landscape feature of the Borough and is important for its ecological habitat as well as being an important economic resource, the fishing industry generates significant income for the local economy. Understanding the processes currently at work and addressing the problems arising is a key issue for the future. The Council will work with the Environment Agency, Southern Water and the fishing community to ensure that the River’s health is improved.

2.42 The air quality standard within the Borough is good. Road transport is the main source Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

of local air pollution. The issue for the future is how to maintain that quality.

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Conserve and enhance the countryside and landscape and improve access to it. 2.43 Test Valley has a diverse and high quality environment. The North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) covers much of the Borough north of Andover. To the south west of Romsey, the New Forest National Park extends into the Borough. In total, over 8,000 hectares of the Borough are covered by national landscape designations.

2.44 The protection of the landscape is important in terms of maintaining the character of Test Valley. The countryside plays an important role in maintaining the physical separation of settlements, particularly around Andover and in Southern Test Valley, and their setting. Residents place significant importance in the retention of the gaps between settlements.


2.45 The key issue is how to balance the high quality of the natural environments whilst accommodating the requirements for new development. The aim is to develop a comprehensive approach to the provision and management of natural and man – made assets and to improve public access to them.

Conserve and enhance biodiversity. 2.46 The Borough has a wide range of designations located in or close to Test Valley. These include the New Forest (Ramsar site, Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Special Protection Area (SPA)), Emer Bog (SAC), Mottisfont Bats (SAC), Porton Down (SPA), Salisbury Plain (SPA and SAC), the Solent and Southampton Water (Ramsar site, SPA) and the Solent Maritime (SAC). There are 21 SSSIs within Test Valley which cover over 1,869 hectares13. The County Council has identified a significant number of Sites of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINCs) which are of local importance.

2.47 All these sites are a valuable asset to the Borough’s biodiversity and are under pressure from a growing population and the need for development. The Council is seeking to manage its own natural assets. It is working with key agencies including Natural England and the Environment Agency and volunteer groups e.g. through the River Anton enhancement project, the local nature reserves at Andover, Romsey and Valley Park. The key issue is how to maintain and enhance the Borough’s ecological resource. The Council’s Biodiversity Action Plan prepared with partners provides a

LEISURE 2.48 The Community Plan aim is ‘to enable residents and visitors to enjoy a wide range of high quality leisure and cultural facilities’. This could be achieved by;

Provide for leisure, recreation, culture and tourism needs. 2.49 Test Valley has a range of facilities which are accessible to residents, although they tend to be on a small scale. These include; The Lights Theatre, the Reel Cinema, Andover Leisure Centre, Charlton Sports Centre, Finkley Down Farm at Andover. Two new large outdoor sports facilities are being provided at Augusta Park and Picket Twenty. At Romsey, there is The Plaza, Lantern Theatre, Romsey Rapids and Sport Centre.

13 Annual Monitoring Report 2009 / 2010, Test Valley Borough Council, 2010.

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framework for future action.

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2.50 The main sports centres and pitches are located at Andover, Romsey, North Baddesley and Valley Park. There are additional local facilities such as children’s play equipment and informal recreation areas and parks serving these areas and the other settlements in the Borough. Meeting the future recreation needs of the Borough’s population will be a key issue. The Council has identified the need to consider the role of the Andover Leisure Centre and Romsey Sports Centre. With respect to those open spaces, the Council manages a programme of improvements which has been identified in its Green Spaces Strategy (2007). The Council is developing a Green Infrastructure Strategy which will draw together the management of existing public spaces, access to natural green space and develop new provision. A key issue will be how to secure and manage the provision of new facilities.

2.51 The Borough is principally a day/short stay tourist destination. In addition to the high quality natural and built landscape, the area has a number of significant attractions e.g. The Hawk Conservancy, Finkley Down Farm, The Army Air Museum, Hilliers Arboretum, Romsey Abbey, Mottisfont Abbey, Thruxton motor racing circuit and Danebury Iron Age Hill Fort. Tourism generates a significant amount of economic activity and is an important component of the local economy. An issue for the Borough is how its tourism sector can be developed whilst minimising the impact of increased activity on the environment.

HEALTH & WELLBEING

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2.52 The Community Plan aim is ‘to promote and improve the physical, mental and social

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health and wellbeing of residents of Test Valley’. This can be achieved by;

Creating opportunities for improving the health and wellbeing of communities 2.53 The health of the population of Test Valley is generally better than the national average. The Indices of Multiple Deprivation show that of 354 local authority areas, Test Valley ranks 286th (where 1 is the most deprived)14. The Borough has a low rate of child poverty, however, there are still around 2,440 children living in poverty15.

14 The English Indices of Deprivation 2010, Communities and Local Government (CLG), 2010 15 Health Profile 2011: Test Valley, Public Health Observatories, 2011


2.54 Evidence shows that green and open spaces decrease health inequalities, increase life expectancy and generally have a positive impact on health and wellbeing16. The latest Active People survey results (April 2011) for Test Valley show that participation rates in sport and active recreation are higher then the national average, 25.6%17 compared to 21% national average. However, almost half the population of Test Valley (48.5%) had done no sport or active recreation in the previous four weeks. It is estimated that 24.4% of the adult population of Test Valley is obese and 15.7% of Year 6 children. The percentage of physically active children is high at 61.9% compared to the England average of 55.1%18.

2.55 Further opportunities need to be developed to encourage local residents to increase their participation levels in sport and physical activity, which would reduce levels of obesity and promote mental wellbeing.

TRANSPORT 2.56 The Community Plan aim is to ensure a ‘sustainable, efficient and integrated transport network which is based on the real needs and choices of local people and visitors’. This could be achieved by;

Encourage use of public transport, cycling and walking networks to help reduce reliance on cars and provide choice.

ownership rates. The average number of cars/vans per household for Test Valley stood at 1.5 in 200119. This is above the Hampshire average of 1.4, the South East average of 1.3 and national average of 1.2. The percentage of households without a car was 14.5%20. This high ownership rate is reflected in the high use of cars for travelling to work and low number of residents using public transport to commute. Accessibility to services in the rural area is quite poor with rural households located further away from key facilities than both the rural county and regional averages.

16 Great Outdoors: How our Natural Health Service Uses Green Space to Improve Wellbeing, Natural England 17 Adult Participation in Sport and Active Recreation, Sport England, 2011 18 Health Profile 2011: Test Valley, Public Health Observatories, 2011 19 A profile of Hampshire 2011, HCC (HCC website) 20 Office for National Statistics, 2010

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2.57 The rural nature and relative wealth of most of the Borough is reflected in high car

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2.58 The majority of journeys within the Borough are made by car. There has been significant investment in road infrastructure in Andover as part of its planned expansion. Subsequently, low levels of congestion and high car ownership means most journeys are made by car. However within parts of the town there is a greater reliance on public transport.

2.59 In southern Test Valley the 2001 Census indicates that there is high car usage for journeys to work however, within the town car usage is significantly lower than for trips out of the town.

2.60 In the rural parts of Test Valley public transport is limited and there are few opportunities for non-car based trips. Community transport schemes play an important role in providing access to key facilities and destinations for those who have limited or no access to a car.

2.61 The Borough is served by a network of bus services; within the built-up areas of Andover, Southern Test Valley and to a lesser extent, the rural communities. Longer distance services also operate to centres outside the Borough such as Salisbury and Winchester.

2.62 Two main railway lines pass through the Borough; London – Exeter with stations at Andover and Grateley. There is a railway line from Bristol – Southampton with stations at West Dean, Mottisfont and Dunbridge and Romsey. There is also a local passenger

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service from Romsey to Southampton via Chandlers Ford and Eastleigh.

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2.63 Cycling as a means of transport accounts for only a small percentage of trips within the Borough. In terms of the number of trips use is less than the national average. The existing network is fragmented particularly in the older more established urban areas. However, there is potential to develop cycling as an activity, as both Andover and Romsey are relatively compact towns and distances to key destinations are relatively short. Within the more recent large scale developments at Andover and Valley Park, a comprehensive network of routes has been developed as an integral part of the transport network.

2.64 Outside of the larger urban areas there are few dedicated cycle routes and on well trafficked roads, cycling may be less appealing to many residents. The Council’s Cycle Strategy (2009) is seeking to develop links to Andover and Romsey from the adjoining villages as and when opportunities are available. The quieter rural roads and public rights of way have potential to provide attractive leisure routes.


2.65 The Council, together with the County Council, has prepared a number of Access Plans for the Borough which provides a framework for securing investment in the area’s transport infrastructure. It has also produced a Cycle Strategy which seeks to develop the Borough’s network of routes linking key destinations such as the town centres to adjoining residential areas, schools and major employment areas.

2.66 The key issues are; how the reliance on the private car could be reduced particularly for local journeys within Andover and Romsey, how to provide for and improve the transport needs of those living outside of the major towns of the Borough and the future funding of transport schemes.

COMMUNITY SAFETY 2.67 The Community Plan aim is ‘to ensure that people in all parts of the Borough enjoy a quality of life that is undiminished by crime, fear of crime and anti-social behaviour’.

Create high quality, low crime environments and spaces. 2.68 Crime was reduced in Test Valley for 2009/10 by 16% which compares very favourably with the Hampshire and national averages21. Whilst recorded crime is relatively low, the Community Plan identifies that there is a high fear of crime. The Council is part of the Test Valley Community Safety Partnership which comprises a wide range of organisations. It has produced a Plan22 wherein reducing anti-social behaviour, criminal justice system have been identified its strategic outcomes of the Partnership Plan. One of the key national themes is designing out crime. The Council as a planning authority can seek to create an environment which minimises the opportunity for crime through design and layout of schemes. Better designed areas can also reduce the perception and fear of crime. The key issue is to achieve well designed spaces and developments which are attractive.

EDUCATION & LEARNING 2.69 The Community Plan aim is ‘to promote a learning culture in the whole community and to provide education and learning that meets the needs of individuals’. This could be achieved by;

21 Test Valley Borough Profile/ Office for National Statistics, 2010 22 Community Safety Partnership Plan, Test Valley Community Safety Partnership, 2008

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improving community cohesion and reducing the number of young people entering the

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Raise skill levels and reduce economic disparities across the Borough. 2.70 The Borough has a range of skills and knowledge within its population. It has a relatively small percentage of the population who have no qualifications in comparison to the South East region and England, and a relatively high percentage of the population with level 4/5 qualifications (21%)23 in comparison to England (20%). However, there are some parts of the Borough where the level of skills and education is an issue.

2.71 Andover lacks some of the key features of a competitive economy including a strong pool of highly skilled people, high value jobs and strong links with universities. The proportion of highly skilled workers is below the Hampshire and regional average. Approximately, 23% of the Borough’s population has no qualifications. In St Mary’s and Alamein Ward in Andover 31% of the population do not have any qualifications. This is identified as a weakness in the town’s future economic development and a concern regarding the employment potential of those residents24.

2.72 With regard to the GCSE results in Alamein and St Mary’s, the average capped GCSE score is lower per pupil than the South East and national average.

2.73 The southern part of the Borough has a highly qualified population. The wards of Valley Park and Ampfield and Braishfield, contain the largest percentage of people with their highest qualification at Level 4/5. This exceeds the overall Test Valley percentage, and the percentage of the population in the South East and England25. The rural area

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has the highest percentage of highly qualified residents employed in higher order

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occupations.

2.74 The Council has had some success in securing funding for training programmes from major developments within the Borough at Andover Business Park and Adanac Park, Nursling. The key issue is how to improve the level of skills and education attainment within the Borough and in particular, those areas where shortcomings have been identified.

23 First degree, Higher degree, NVQ levels 4 and 5, HNC, 24 Test Valley Borough Profile/ Office for National Statistics, 2009 25 Test Valley Borough Profile/ Office for National Statistics, 2009


3 Delivery, Implementation & Monitoring Delivery 3.1 The Core Strategy is a mechanism to deliver the Community Plan and its objectives. The objectives have been identified through the Local Strategic Partnership (LSP). The LSP contains representatives from the Council, Hampshire County Council (HCC), Test Valley Association of Parish Councils, Hampshire Primary Care Trust, Winchester and Eastleigh Health Trust, local Chambers of Commerce, Hampshire Constabulary, Hampshire Fire and Rescue, Faith Community, Ministry of Defence, the arts, secondary and higher education and community services. There are also representatives from each service of the Council. Many of these have been involved in the preparation of the Core Strategy.

3.2 The Test Valley LSP has established four Joint Areas of Focus (JAFs). The JAFs underpin the aims contained within the Community Plan and provide a mechanism for organisations to work jointly and focus resources.

3.3 The four JAFs are: • Increasing the capacity within our communities to take a lead on and resolve issues that are important to them • Tackling the root cause and effects of anti-social behaviour and alcohol misuse • Sustaining the learning and skills environments within Test valley where people • Tackling health inequalities in a targeted way to support independent living and active communities.

3.4 The Core Strategy will be one of the tools in setting out how the Council intends to help deliver the four JAFs. Some detailed aspects of the JAFs are outside of the control of planning. Other detailed aspects will need the support of a number of organisations.

Implementation 3.5 The Council will not be able to deliver the development proposed or resolve the issues that have been identified alone. It will need the support and involvement of a number of organisations. The LSP provides a sound basis for joint working. Many of the key organisations prepare and implement their own plans and strategies which often have different timescales and processes to follow.

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can achieve their potential

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3.6 In support of the Core Strategy and the Council’s commitment to delivering the policies and proposals it contains, an Infrastructure Delivery Plan has been prepared. It sets out who the key partners are, what the key infrastructure projects are, when they are likely to be required, potential costs and sources of funding.

Monitoring 3.7 Monitoring the progress and development outcomes of the Core Strategy is important in realising its objectives. The Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) sets out a number of targets and indicators which will be used to assess the impact of the Council’s policies and proposals. It will provide the principle mechanism for collecting and analysing information. Where major development takes place, the Council will have more site specific arrangements for monitoring progress based on the legal agreements put in place when planning permission is granted.

3.8 Where monitoring identifies a lack of progress the Council and its partners will evaluate the reasons why and take appropriate action. It has identified a number of actions it could take to facilitate delivery including: • identifying strategic sites in the Core Strategy; • bringing forward additional opportunities through Supplementary Planning Documents as identified through reviews of the SHLAA. • assisting with the delivery of Neighbourhood Plans; • keeping under review its own land holdings and the potential to release them to the

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development industry;

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• partnership working with Registered Providers (RP) and the development industry; • regular liaison with key infrastructure providers.


4 Local Communities 4.1 The Borough comprises a number of settlements each having their own community ranging from the larger towns of Andover and Romsey to small rural villages. The issues they face and what helps create and sustain them are very similar i.e. availability of housing, employment, education, cultural and recreation facilities.

4.2 The purpose of the hierarchy is to understand the current provision of facilities and services and to provide a basis for the distribution of development across the Borough in the most sustainable locations. This hierarchy is based upon the settlements’ current characteristics, population, and access to a range of services and facilities26.

Policy COM1: Settlement Hierarchy Within the boundaries of the settlements identified in the hierarchy (Table 3) the principle of development and redevelopment will be permitted. Development proposed within settlements must be appropriate in scale to its location within the hierarchy. Development outside the boundaries of settlements in the hierarchy will only be permitted if it is appropriate as set out in the other Council policies or if it is

Table 3: Settlement Hierarchy Hierarchy

Associated Scale of

Settlement

Designation

Development

Major Centres

• Strategic allocations

Andover

• Windfalls

Romsey*

• Replacement dwellings • Community Led Development Key Service

• Strategic allocations

Charlton

Centres

• Windfalls

Chilworth*

• Replacement dwellings

North Baddesley

• Community Led Development

Nursling and Rownhams Valley Park

26 Services and facilities include shop, bus route, primary school, employment, public house and church

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essential for the proposal to be located in the countryside.

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Hierarchy

Associated Scale of

Designation

Development

Rural Villages

• Windfalls

Settlement

Abbotts Ann*, Ampfield*,

• Rural Affordable Housing sites Amport*, Appleshaw, • Replacement dwellings

Awbridge, Barton

• Community Led Development

Stacey, Braishfield*, Broughton*, Chilbolton*, Enham Alamein*, Fyfield, Goodworth Clatford*, Grateley, Hatherden, Houghton, Hurstbourne Tarrant, Ibthorpe, Kimpton, Kings Somborne, Leckford, Lockerley, Longparish*, Longstock*, Michelmersh*, Monxton*, Nether Wallop*, Over Wallop*, Palestine, Penton Grafton/Mewsey*, Shipton Bellinger, Stockbridge*, Thruxton*, Timsbury*, Upper Clatford/ Anna Valley*, Vernham

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Dean*, West Tytherley,

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West Wellow*, Weyhill, Wherwell Countryside

• Replacement dwellings

All other villages

• Reuse of buildings • Rural Affordable Housing Sites Note: Ampfield is located within Southern Test Valley * These settlements have an adopted Village Design Statement which is available on the Council’s website.

4.3 The hierarchy shows that the settlements with the widest range of facilities are Andover, Romsey. North Baddesley, Nursling and Rownhams and Valley Park. The latter are located close to Southampton and Chandler’s Ford. All these settlements have access to at least eight of the identified facilities. In assessing merits of locations for development, the proximity of facilities outside of the Borough boundary has been considered.


4.4 The settlements within the ‘Rural Villages’ category do not contain the concentration of facilities and services or have the accessibility of the main centres to sustain strategic development allocations. However, because of the level of facilities available to help support and sustain communities, some additional development may be appropriate.

4.5 The Council is committed to creating and maintaining sustainable settlements. To do this, it recognises that development and redevelopment within the settlements identified in the hierarchy is acceptable in principle. The approach taken by the Council is to define new boundaries for each settlement within the Designations DPD. Those areas outside of the defined boundary are classed as countryside.

4.6 Within the countryside, development will only be permitted if it is essential to be located there. Any proposal will need to be supported by evidence demonstrating that the location and scale is suitable and that there is a clear justification for an exception to the general policy of restraint. Some exceptions to the general policy of restraint in the countryside may be acceptable if they help to meet the social or economic objectives of rural communities.

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Housing 4.7 The housing requirement for the Borough has, historically, been set by the Hampshire County Structure Plan or the South East Plan. With the Localism Act 2011 including its own requirement based on local evidence.

4.8 To inform the Core Strategy to establish a Borough wide housing figure the Council commissioned consultants Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners (NLP) to examine the impact of demographic trends, economic activity and the scale of housing need in the Borough.

4.9 The report recommended the Council consider a range of 450 – 700 dwellings per annum. Other figures above or below that range were included in the report but have not been taken forward. The Council in assessing the merits of the recommended range have taken account of the Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA), the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) and capacity of the development industry to deliver new homes. Taking a long term view, over the last 20 years rarely has 700 dwellings per annum been exceeded. It considers that a figure of 502 dwellings is realistic and achievable.

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provision to revoke the South East Plan, the Council has the responsibility for setting

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4.10 Since the 1980s the housing requirement for the Borough has been split. This is to reflect the different housing market areas and the close relationship the southern part of the Borough has with the South Hampshire Sub-Region. A characteristic recognised by successive Structure Plans and the South East Plan. The Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (PUSH) boundary includes the seven southern parishes27.

4.11 A 65:35 split between Northern Test Valley and Southern Test Valley is proposed, taking account of the distribution of population and housing needs. It also reflects the Council’s aspiration for Andover to maintain the current level of self containment of the labour market and aspirations for a market to sustain addition leisure and retail facilities. To reflect the predominantly rural area of Northern Test Valley, the housing requirement has been split to provide a rural Test Valley and an Andover figure. The rural figure of 30 dwelling per annum (10%) is apportioned to the Rural Villages as identified in the settlement hierarchy. The figure for Rural Villages would be indicative and reliant on either exceptions schemes or windfall applications coming forward.

4.12 The Council has undertaken a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) which has informed the number of homes likely to come forward. Having considered the findings of the NLP report, previous completion rates and the SHLAA, it is proposed that the Borough’s annual requirement should be 502 dwellings per annum. This approach will support local housing need, the local economy and a changing population whilst being within likely delivery rates.

4.13 To provide a long term view beyond the estimated date of adoption of 2013 the Council Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

is proposing to plan for the period to 2031. To provide a degree of consistency and

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understanding with existing South East Plan figures the base date is 2006.

4.14 The proposed requirement will be 12,550 dwellings for the period 2006 – 2031. The housing requirement over the plan period will be met through completions, existing commitments and strategic allocations. A proportion of the housing requirement will be met through windfall sites which will come forward through the review of the settlement boundaries and informed by past trends.

27 Ampfield, Chilworth, North Baddesley, Nursling & Rownhams, Romsey Extra, Romsey Town, Valley Park.


Policy COM2: Housing Provision 2006 - 2031 Between 2006 – 2031 the Council will meet the housing requirement of 12,550 homes through completions, commitments, identified capacity and strategic allocations. Area of the Borough

Housing Requirement for 25 year Plan Period (per annum figures provided in brackets)

Andover

Northern Test

7,500 (300)

Rural Test Valley

Valley

750 (30)

Southern Test Valley

4,300 (172)

Borough Wide Total

12,550 (502)

8,250 (330)

4.15 Policy COM2 sets out the total amount of housing that is expected to be delivered over the plan period. The housing requirement is based on distinct local factors and it is inappropriate, where a housing shortfall is identified within one housing area for it to be accommodated within the other.

4.16 The character of the Borough and the scale of development to be accommodated, means that most of the new homes will be built on greenfield sites. The Council is (PDL) but does support the approach of development of ‘brownfield’ land wherever appropriate. In order to make best use of land within settlement boundaries, the Council has not specified individual densities. There may be circumstances where higher density is acceptable. The density of individual proposals should not be dictated by the surrounding character but should be sympathetic to it.

Current Housing Position 4.17 In determining how much greenfield land needs to be allocated in the Core Strategy the Council has taken into account the amount of housing that is likely to come from other sources. This is set out in Tables 4 and 5.

4.18 The SHLAA sites within the existing and proposed settlement boundaries have been included in the proposed supply assumptions as the principle of development is acceptable, they have, therefore, not been allocated.

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not proposing a target for development on brownfield or Previously Developed Land

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4.19 Within Southern Test Valley, there are three strategic sites which have planning permission they are included as existing commitments. The greenfield sites at Abbotswood, Romsey and Redbridge Lane, Nursling can provide the housing required in the short and medium term. The Romsey Brewery site is a brownfield site in the centre of Romsey. Delivery of this site is anticipated to come forward over the course of the plan period.

Table 4: Housing Requirement - Southern Test Valley Southern Test Valley

No. of Dwellings

Total

4,300

4,300

559

3,741

Existing Commitments and Identified Capacity

1,428

2,313

Existing Commitments

1,383

Requirement 2006/07 – 2030/31 (25yrs) Completions 2006/07 – 2010/11 (5yrs)

Identified Capacity

45

Windfalls (2016 – 2031 at 25 p.a)

375

Boundary review sites

85

Residual requirement

1,853 1,853

4.20 Within Northern Test Valley there are three strategic sites with planning permission, they are included as existing commitments. The greenfield sites at East Anton, Picket Twenty and Picket Piece can provide the housing required in the short to medium term.

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Table 5: Housing Requirement – Northern Test Valley

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Northern Test Valley

No. of Dwellings

Total

Requirement 2006/07 – 2030/31 (25yrs)

8,250

8,250

Completions 2006/07 – 2010/11 (5yrs)

1,043

7,207

Existing Commitments and Identified Capacity

5,171

2,036

Existing Commitments

4,107

Identified Capacity

1,064

Windfalls (2016 – 2031 at 46 p.a)

690

1,346

Rural Test Valley

750

596

Residual requirement

596

4.21 There are no proposals to allocate housing sites within the rural villages, however, through rural exception sites, neighbourhood planning and likely windfall potential as a result of the revised settlement boundaries a housing figure can be assumed.

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Strategic Sites 4.22 In reaching its decision on the proposed strategic sites, the Council has applied a two stage approach. The first stage looked at broad areas of search followed by a site specific appraisal of those sites submitted as part of the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) that fell within the broad areas of search.

4.23 The broad areas of search had regard to the settlement hierarchy, level of facilities and services within these settlements. The facilities outside of the Borough boundary were taken into account with respect to those broad areas on the Borough boundary. For Southern Test Valley, the broad areas of search being considered are; two on the edge of Southampton, one near Chilworth and one around Nursling and Rownhams, the edge of Valley Park, Romsey and North Baddesley respectively.

4.24 For Northern Test Valley, the broad areas of search were focused on Andover, the existing settlement, as well as north, north east, south, south east, south west and north west of the town. Weyhill, has also been included as a broad area of search.

4.25 There are no broad areas of search relating to the potential for new settlements, this is based on issues of delivery and infrastructure availability. No broad areas were identified in the rural areas due to focusing allocations on sustainable settlements.

4.26 The site specific appraisal considered sites that have been submitted as part of the SHLAA28. Those SHLAA sites that fall within the broad areas of search, and have Appendix A.

4.27 Each site was appraised against a framework which allowed for an informed judgement of specific sustainability matters. The Sustainability Appraisal forms part of the evidence base and can be viewed on the Council’s website.

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Southern Test Valley 4.28 Southern Test Valley comprises the parishes of Ampfield, Chilworth, North Baddesley, Nursling and Rownhams, Romsey Town, Romsey Extra and Valley Park. The area forms part of the South Hampshire sub-region identified in the former South East Plan and is part of the Partnership for Urban South Hampshire (PUSH). The area has a population of approximately of 40,000. The relationship between the settlements of Southern Test Valley and the adjoining areas of Southampton and Chandler’s Ford is important to recognise. 28 Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment, Test Valley Borough Council, 2011

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a capacity of 50 or more dwellings, have been appraised. These sites are listed in

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4.29 The Council is proposing two locations for residential development. A site at Whitenap, Romsey and a site at Hoe Lane, North Baddesley.

Policy COM3: Whitenap, Romsey A new community of approximately 1,500 dwellings together with a range of facilities is proposed to the south of Romsey at Whitenap (see Map A). The proposal should include: a) Affordable housing provision in accordance with policy COM6; b) Community and education facilities, including a primary school and local centre, to meet the needs of the new community; c) Public open space provision in accordance with policy LHW1 d) Access to the development for vehicles including public transport, pedestrians and cyclists including:• A27/ A3057 junction (Ashfield Roundabout); • Links to Botley Road/ Whitenap Lane and Tadburn Road. e) Off site improvements to the transport network may be required to:• Junctions of the A27, A3090 and A3057 • Strategic Road Network

4.30 The site should provide for a range of recreation activities in accordance with policy LHW1. The open space should be located to provide easily accessible recreation

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opportunities to new and existing residents. An area of varying depth, but with

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a minimum of 40m, should be provided along the northern boundary in order to accommodate open uses such as public open space, landscaping, the proposed school and land required for surface water drainage. This will enable the retention of the existing community's identity whilst providing access to the new facilities.

4.31 The development should be designed to respect the setting of Beggerspath Wood; neighbouring buildings, including those of historic character, and road and rail corridors.

4.32 Providing links between the proposed development and the area around it will be important. The Council’s approach is for the principle vehicular access to be off the existing roundabout at the junction of the A27/A3057. The existing vehicular access serving the barns at Whitenap could be retained. In addition potential pedestrian; cycle and public transport routes linking the site to Romsey will need to be provided. An additional vehicular access to the A27 via a bridge over the railway line should also be provided.


4.33 The master planning of the site involving the community will provide the opportunity to develop proposals in more detail. The Council will consider a phased approach to the development of the site.

Policy COM4: Hoe Lane, North Baddesley A new development of approximately 300 dwellings together with a range of associated facilities is proposed to the north of Hoe Lane, North Baddesley (see Map B). The proposal should include a) Affordable housing provision in accordance with policy COM6; b) Improvements to local facilities; c) Public open space provision in accordance with LHW1 d) Access to the development for vehicles including public transport, pedestrians and cyclists linking to the local centre and other key destinations. This will include:• Hoe Lane • Sylvan Drive e) Off site improvements to the transport network may be required to:• Junctions of the A27 and Rownhams Road • Junction of the A27 and Rownhams Lane • Junction of the A3057 and Hoe Lane

accommodate 300 dwellings. It comprises open farmland with woodland on the northern and eastern boundary. The woodland should be retained to provide a landscape setting for the proposal. To complement the existing woodland and to provide an attractive boundary between the existing and proposed development new landscaping, together with open space to meet the needs of the new residents, should be located on the eastern boundary of the site.

4.35 The scale of the proposal is unlikely to require new local facilities on site. Evidence from the statutory providers is that the existing facilities can accommodate the extra population and demand. It will be important to ensure that appropriate improvement and investment is secured to enhance existing services and facilities including education and health.

4.36 The primary access for the development should be via Hoe Lane with a secondary access from Sylvan Drive. The improvements to the local highway network, including the link between Hoe Lane and the A3057 should be considered.

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4.34 The land at Hoe Lane on the western edge of North Baddesley is proposed to

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Northern Test Valley 4.37 The settlement hierarchy identifies Andover as the most sustainable settlement in the area and is therefore the most appropriate location to allocate new housing.

4.38 Andover is a historic market town which has experienced planned expansion since the 1960s. Compared to other Hampshire towns, it is relatively self-contained with a high proportion of residents working locally. The Strategic Housing Market Assessment (2007) recognises that Andover has its own local housing market. There is limited market integration with the nearby towns of Salisbury, Basingstoke and Winchester.

4.39 The delivery of housing at Andover is closely linked to the capacity of the waste water treatment infrastructure to achieve the necessary water standards, required by the Water Framework Directive. The Environment Agency has advised that future development would need to be phased so as to not to be delivered ahead of the available infrastructure. The Council, with the Environment Agency and Southern Water will continue to work together in relation to this issue and monitor the situation.

4.40 The existing commitments at East Anton and Picket Twenty, along with the Picket Piece (Policy COM5) and George Yard/ Black Swan Yard (Policy LE15) proposals will provide a significant number of affordable homes and a range and mix of housing types.

4.41 The other settlements of Northern Test Valley are significantly smaller with a more limited range of services. It is not proposed to allocate land at these settlements.

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However, to recognise that some growth will occur through policies COM1, COM7 and

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COM8 an assumed housing requirement has been set.

Policy COM5: Picket Piece, Andover A new development of approximately 1,000 dwellings together with a range of associated facilities is proposed at Picket Piece, Andover (see Map C) The proposal should include a) Affordable housing provision in accordance with policy COM6; b) Improvements to local facilities; c) Public open space provision in accordance with policy LHW1 d) Access to the development for vehicles (including public transport), pedestrians and cyclists linking to the town centre and other key destinations. e) Off site improvements to the transport network may be required to:• Junctions of the A3093/ A3057/ A303(T)


4.42 Picket Piece is located to the east of Andover and is made up of a number of existing land uses including residential, employment and grazing. The central part of the area has outline planning permission for 530 dwellings and is included within the proposed 1,000 dwellings.

4.43 The area lies within a broad valley which rises to the south and east. The proposal will need to take into account the landscape setting of both Picket Piece and Andover. Future development would also need to take full account of the design, layout and landscaping proposals of the outline permission.

4.44 Access to Andover town centre, the permitted local centre and other key destinations should be provided. Ox Drove is unsuitable for vehicular access with the preferred route being Walworth Road. Pedestrian and cycle routes along Ox Drove linking the site to the new development at Picket Twenty should be provided.

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Phasing and Delivery 4.45 The proposed phasing of provision is based on bringing forward a continuous supply of housing. The delivery of identified housing sites is key to providing economic and social benefits. The Council has experience of completions being heavily biased to the front end of the plan period leading to fewer opportunities later in the process. Details of the

4.46 The delivery of housing is a complex issue. It concerns the creation and extension to existing communities. The appropriate way of dealing with such sites is to meet the identified needs of the community through the local planning process. Situations may occur where the delivery of sites is lower than that assumed within the housing trajectory and annual monitoring report. Where housing sites are not being delivered because of factors under the Council’s control it will review the circumstances and take appropriate steps.

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Affordable Housing 4.47 The combination of relatively high house prices and low household incomes means that a high proportion of households are unable to access owner occupied property and the private rented sector is often unaccessible. The Council’s Strategic Housing Market Assessment (SHMA)29 has identified 2,296 households in housing need. To address the need, the Council has set a target of 185 homes per year. 29 Central Hampshire and New Forest Strategic Housing Market Assessment, DTZ, 2007

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proposed phasing of housing delivery is set out in the Housing Trajectory in Appendix B.

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Policy COM6: Affordable Housing in Settlements The Council will negotiate provision on housing sites within or on the edge of settlements of: •

1-4 dwellings (or sites of up to 0.19ha) a financial contribution equivalent to up to 20% of dwellings to be affordable.

5-9 dwellings (or sites of 0.2ha-0.39ha) for up to 20% of dwellings to be affordable;

10-14 dwellings (or sites of 0.4-0.49ha) for up to 30% of dwellings to be affordable; and

15 or more dwellings (or sites of 0.5ha or more) for up to 40% of dwellings to be affordable;

In assessing the suitability of such sites for the provision of an element of affordable housing the Council will take into account: a) the suitability and the viability of provision; and b) the need to achieve a successful housing development.

4.48 To support the delivery of the target, the Council will seek to secure a proportion of affordable housing within new development. Informed by studies on viability30 the thresholds are considered achievable.

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4.49 The Council will negotiate with developers for the inclusion of a proportion of affordable

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housing on all sites above the threshold of 4 dwellings. The size and type will be considered on a site by site basis but should seek to achieve 25% social rented and 15% shared ownership. On sites below the threshold of five dwellings, the Council will negotiate a commuted sum. On sites above the threshold, affordable housing will be sought on the basis of the applicable percentage. Whole dwellings will be sought on-site and where the number sought does not equate to a whole number units, the remaining part dwelling will be sought as a financial contribution e.g. 1.6 affordable dwellings would be sought from a site of 8 dwellings (20%) of which, 1 would be onsite and 0.6 as a financial contribution. The precise scale and form of provision or contribution on each site will be the subject of negotiation. To inform the process, the Council has produced an Affordable Housing Supplementary Planning Document (March 2008).

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30 Adams Integra Housing Viability Studies 2004, 2007 and 2009/10


Policy COM7: Rural Affordable Housing In rural areas development for affordable housing, within or adjoining settlements, will be permitted provided that: a) the proposal is accompanied by evidence which demonstrates there is an unmet need within the parish for accommodation by households unable to afford open market housing where a member of each household has either: i) been ordinarily resident in the parish or previously lived in the parish and has a strong family connection; or ii) a demonstrable need by virtue of their employment to live in the village or its immediate surroundings; or iii) a demonstrable need to live within the village either to support or be supported by a family member; and b) it is restricted in perpetuity to occupation by households with a member in housing need; and c) the proposed mix of housing meets the identified need.

4.50 In rural areas, affordable housing may be permitted on sites within or adjoining settlements. In order to justify affordable housing contrary to established policies of restraint, a local need for such housing within the parish would have to be clearly identified. It is not intended to meet the needs arising from the larger towns and villages, which can better be met by developments within those settlements.

will be limited in perpetuity to those residents with links to that community.

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Community Led Development 4.52 The Localism Act 2011 recognises that communities should have opportunities to take responsibility for promoting development in order to help support local services and facilities. These proposals should be led by the community either through a neighbourhood plan, parish plan or by interested parties with community backing. The Council will support proposals initiated by the community provided they are justified and have local support. Policy COM8 provides the framework for considering development which will meet community needs and help support facilities.

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4.51 The mix of dwellings will be guided by the identified need. Access to exception scheme

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Policy COM8: Community Led Development Community led development, within or adjoining settlements, will be permitted if: a) it is demonstrated that the proposal is supported by the community; and b) the proposal, if for residential development, satisfies the affordable need in accordance with policies COM6 and COM7

4.53 The issue of maintaining services is especially acute in rural communities. Only those rural communities identified in the settlement hierarchy are considered appropriate locations for community led housing.

4.54 The Council would need to be satisfied that the site is appropriate for development and that the proposal would sustain or deliver new facilities and services31 which maintains or enhances the sustainability of that settlement. Any proposals for housing should satisfy the existing need for affordable housing within the parish.

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Occupational Dwellings 4.55 The countryside of Test Valley is a base for many employment activities, with agriculture alone employing 1,500 people (either full or part time) in the industry. In certain circumstances, it is essential for workers to be located where they work. These

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could include agricultural, forestry, equine related activities, New Forest commoner

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or boarding schools. In considering whether a dwelling is essential, the Council will apply the functional and financial tests of PPS7 Annex A. To determine whether a new dwelling is required, the following core policy will be applied.

31 The services and facilities are those used to create the settlement hierarchy.


Policy COM9: Occupational Dwellings in the Countryside Proposals for dwellings for full time occupational workers, including agricultural and forestry workers, will only be permitted if: a) there is an existing established functional need for the operation; b) an existing restricted dwelling, either in or closely connected to the unit, has not been sold separately from the unit or in some other way alienated from it within the past five years; c) an existing non residential building cannot be utilised to provide the accommodation or a building either closely connected with the unit which would have been suitable for conversion has not been sold separately from the unit or in some other way alienated from it within the past two years; and d) the occupancy of the new dwelling is restricted.

4.56 The Council wishes to ensure that any proposal for a dwelling is not an abuse of the concession that the planning system makes for such dwellings. The Council will carefully scrutinise proposals to ensure that the demand has not been generated through the disposal on the open market of existing dwellings used by essential workers or of other buildings, which may be suitable for conversion. Evidence will be required to demonstrate that an existing dwelling had not been sold separately from the unit, or otherwise alienated from it, in the past five years.

4.57 Where an occupational dwelling is permitted, the occupancy of the dwelling will be the open market. The occupancy conditions of an agricultural or forestry worker’s dwellings will include their dependants or widowed partners. Any dwellings permitted under this policy should be of an appropriate size to meet the needs of that essential worker and should be contained within the curtilage of the site to which the dwelling relates. Generally such dwellings would be limited to a size of 150 – 180sqm unless there is a functional need for the dwelling to be larger. The removal of an occupancy condition will only be considered if it can be demonstrated that there is no longer a need for the dwelling and that it has been on the market, and advertised widely in appropriate publications, for a minimum of six months at a price reflecting the occupancy condition.

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controlled by condition or legal agreement to prevent the disposal of the dwelling on

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Policy COM10: Existing Dwellings in the Countryside In the countryside proposals for a replacement dwelling, extension or the creation of ancillary domestic buildings will be permitted provided that: a) the size of the proposal would not be disproportionate to the original dwelling; b) the original dwelling is not temporary in nature nor the result of a temporary permission; and c) the proposal would not be visually intrusive in the landscape. In the case of extensions and ancillary buildings the proposal is not capable of severance from the original dwelling and is not used for any purpose other than the domestic use for which it was intended.

4.58 Whilst it is important to restrain development in order to protect and preserve the rural character of the Borough, this has to be balanced with recognising that situations may arise where residents wish to alter or replace a dwelling within the countryside. The impact of a replacement dwelling or significant extension to existing dwellings is likely to increase with its size.

4.59 The increase in size will be assessed in terms of volume (measured externally). As a general guide, an extension more than 50% greater than the original dwelling32 is unlikely to be acceptable if its impact on both the existing dwelling and its surroundings is considerable and the dwelling is out of scale with its plot. The cumulative impact of

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incremental extensions can significantly alter the impact of the original dwelling over

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time. In considering an application for an extension, account will be taken of previous extensions to the property.

4.60 The proposal should be sensitive to its surroundings. Insensitive design or location can have an impact on the character of the countryside. A replacement dwelling should be replaced on its original site or as close as possible unless re-locating it elsewhere would result in a positive environmental benefit, including to the local landscape or amenity.

4.61 Extensions and domestic buildings can be used for various purposes or activities such as for a hobby room or workshop, or as a residential annexe for dependent relatives or domestic household staff. Any such buildings should not be used for any commercial or business activities. In the case of a residential annexe, the imposition of a planning condition restricting occupancy will be considered, so that the building would not create or be occupied as a separate dwelling. Extensions to existing ancillary domestic buildings will be assessed against similar criteria.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------32 An original dwelling is defined as the dwelling as it stood on 1 July 1948 or as first built


Policy COM11: Gypsy, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople Development to accommodate gypsy, travellers and travelling showpeople will be permitted provided that:a) The potential occupants are recognised as gypsies, travellers or travelling showpeople; b) Evidence is provided to justify the reason for the proposal to be located in the Borough; and c) The site is of sufficient size to provide for parking; turning; servicing and storage of vehicles and equipment.

4.62 The Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople community should have access to appropriate accommodation to meet their needs and that sufficient sites are identified. These should be in locations where facilities and services are accessible. Government guidance is currently being revised. How the Council addresses the changes will be considered in the Pre Submission version of the Core Strategy.

4.63 For any application, the Council will need to be satisfied that the potential occupants are bona-fide and that there is a case for the proposal to be located within the Borough. The site would also need to be able to accommodate the storage and maintenance of vehicles and equipment without causing detriment to the potential occupiers or neighbouring residents or uses.

Policy COM12: Community Services and Facilities Development (including the change of use of existing premises) which involves the loss of local shops, public houses, cultural and community facilities will be permitted if it can demonstrated that the use is no longer or cannot be made commercially viable, or the building can no longer provide suitable accommodation for a facility needed for a community use. New facilities outside of town centres will be permitted provided that they are within settlements or involve the reuse of rural buildings which are located close to existing residential areas.

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4.64 The settlement hierarchy is based, in part, on the current provision of services and facilities. Any change to the quantity or range may have an impact on the community and its location in the hierarchy. This is especially important within the lower tiers of the hierarchy where the loss of a service may be felt more acutely by the local population. The Council will resist the loss of facilities or services but will not seek to retain those facilities that are proved to be unviable33. Proposals for new services or facilities that help meet local community needs will be encouraged.

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Policy COM13: Provision of Infrastructure Development will be permitted provided that provision has been made to: a) minimise its impact on the infrastructure required to support it; b) the infrastructure will not have an adverse impact on the character or amenity of the surrounding area; and c) the appropriate investment has been secured either in the form of works and/or financial contributions to mitigate the cumulative impact on infrastructure.

4.65 Investment in a range of infrastructure and services is often necessary for development to proceed. Such services include water supplies, waste water, schools, health, green infrastructure and transport. Developers will be expected to negotiate with the Council or the relevant provider for the provision of infrastructure. Some infrastructure can have

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an impact on the character and amenity of the area which the Council wants kept to a

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minimum.

4.66 The Council will work closely with adjoining authorities, particularly those within PUSH, to identify and achieve sub-regional infrastructure schemes. The Council will review its approach in seeking obligations in the light of further work being undertaken on the Community Infrastructure Levy. The Council will also work with its partners to identify areas of shortfall through the Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

33 Evidence of attempts to market the property for a 6 month period in appropriate publications will be required.


5 Local Economy 5.1 Test Valley is a prosperous and attractive place. It is accessible via the major road and rail network to surrounding centres such as Basingstoke, Newbury, Winchester, urban South Hampshire and beyond.

5.2 The Test Valley economy performed well in the years prior to the recession with economic output or Gross Value Added (GVA) expanding by 2.9% on average in the five years to 2006, slightly better than the county (2.7%) and region (2.8%). The area tends to perform better against residence based measures than it does against workplace based measures, suggesting that while the Borough is an attractive place to live, it is less so as a place to work.

5.3 To inform the economic proposals and policies of the Strategy, the Council commissioned a Long Term Economic Strategy34 and Employment Land Review35 (ELR). It highlighted a number of features of the local economy.

5.4 Andover currently lacks many of the characteristics associated with a competitive economy,36 including highly-skilled people, high value jobs, quality employment sites and strong links with universities.

5.5 The south of the Borough in and around Romsey37 is adapting well to the 21st Century economy, building on its high value business parks, strong road and rail links, proximity

5.6 Rural Test Valley has the highest out-commuting rate of the three areas and a smaller workforce and business base38. The rural economy continues to diversify in response to changes in the agricultural sector with tourism having an important impact.

5.7 The issues to be addressed are providing premises and space for companies to develop and expand and the availability of a skilled workforce.

5.8 In a challenging economic environment, the Council welcomes proposals which will support and develop the Borough’s economy in particular, proposals which would make a positive contribution to developing the skill level of residents, especially at Andover, and reduce the vacancy rates in the town’s business estates. Development which reduces out-commuting and supports the objective of promoting sustainable development is welcomed.

34 A Long Term Economic Strategy, Experian, 2007 and 2009 Update. 35 Test Valley Employment Land Review and Andover Employment Floorspace Demand Study, DTZ, 2008 36 Test Valley: An Economic Profile, 2006, Hampshire County Council, 2007 37 Test Valley: An Economic Profile, 2006, Hampshire County Council, 2007

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to higher education and relationship with South Hampshire.

38 Test Valley: An Economic Profile, 2006, Hampshire County Council, 2007

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5.9 The existing employment sites within the Borough make a significant contribution to the local economy as a focus for jobs and opportunities to live and work in close proximity. There is pressure to redevelop existing sites for a range of uses, the cumulative impact of which in terms of loss of both sites and jobs could be significant. The Employment Land Review highlighted the importance of retaining existing sites as part of an overall strategy.

5.10 To ensure that there is enough land to meet the needs of businesses and support the objective of increasing self containment the Core Strategy will identify important strategic employment sites (see Annex A) as informed by the Employment Land Review and safeguard against their loss to other uses.

Policy LE1: Retention of employment land and strategic employment sites On existing employment sites, allocated employment sites, or sites with planning permission for employment use, which have not yet been fully developed, development for an alternative use will not be permitted unless: a) the land is no longer required to meet economic development needs; or b) the current activity is causing, or could cause significant harm to the character of the area or the amenities of residents; and additionally on strategic employment sites identified in Annex A, c) it would not prevent or have a significant detrimental impact upon the continued primary use of the strategic employment site as a whole for

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employment use, unless a) or b) apply to the entire strategic employment site.

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5.11 Proposals for small-scale employment development within existing settlements can help to sustain the economy as well as provide jobs that are easily accessible to local residents. The Council will adopt a flexible approach to the development of new employment sites or the expansion of existing employment uses in settlements provided that the impact on the area and nearby residents is acceptable when judged against the relevant planning policies.

5.12 The loss of land currently in employment use to alternative uses can increase existing problems such as out-commuting and the lack of certain types of employment, particularly manufacturing. In rural areas, such sites may be difficult to replace.

5.13 The Council will not permit other forms of development on these sites, unless it can be demonstrated that they are no longer required to meet economic development needs. Developers will be expected to show evidence of positive marketing of the site for an appropriate employment use.

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Policy LE2: Re-use of buildings in the countryside The re use of buildings in the countryside for commercial use (including tourist accommodation) will be permitted provided that: a) the building is worthy of retention due to its historic, architectural or landscape value; b) the building is structurally sound and suitable for conversion without substantial rebuilding, extension and alteration; c) the proposal would not result in the requirement for another building to fulfil the function of the building being converted; and d) the proposed use is restricted primarily to the building. The re use of buildings in the countryside for residential use will be permitted provided that: e) it is demonstrated that every reasonable attempt has been made to secure commercial use; or f) it is required to meet a proven need for an essential worker; g) the creation of a residential curtilage does not harm the character of the countryside; and h) the proposal complies with criteria a, b, c and d above.

5.14 There is scope for some existing buildings in the countryside to be put to alternative uses, particularly during a period when agricultural production is changing and the of buildings which are historic or have architectural and / or landscape value need to be balanced with long term conservation of the countryside. The character of the countryside would be jeopardised if the many buildings, which are still capable of continued agricultural use, were put to other more lucrative uses, thereby generating the potential demand for new agricultural buildings. Many agricultural buildings can be erected without planning control39. It is therefore important not to permit a change of use of an agricultural building if a new building would be required on the farm unit to fulfil the function of the building being converted.

5.15 Buildings constructed of temporary or short-life materials, or which are derelict or in an advanced state of disrepair, are not considered suitable for re-use. The extent of adaptation required to bring them into use is likely to have an impact on the rural scene similar to that of a new building. A structural survey of the building to be converted may be necessary. The re-use of buildings with architectural or historic merit will be positively encouraged. The retention of buildings which are not in keeping with their rural setting or are visually intrusive because of their location, form, bulk or general design will be discouraged. 39 General Permitted Development Order 1995.

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rural economy needs support. Encouragement for rural diversification and retention

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5.16 In the first instance, buildings suitable for conversion should be put to small scale commercial uses to help sustain the rural economy without creating the need for new buildings in the countryside. Many buildings are capable of conversion to provide an efficient working environment attractive to firms and staff. Employment uses will often require only minor alterations to the structure or exterior of the building, thereby maintaining its traditional appearance in the rural scene and, in the case of buildings of historic or architectural merit, its original character.

5.17 Care will need to be taken to ensure that uses ancillary to the new use of the building, such as car parking and open storage do not have an intrusive impact on the rural environment including the extensions of the curtilage of the development into the countryside. Account will also be taken of amenity issues such as noise, smell or over illumination.

5.18 The aim is to keep the amount of new building required in the countryside to a minimum and to protect the character of the existing building, in the latter instance by maintaining its original structure, built form, architectural detail, materials and general design. New buildings and extensions will not normally be permitted in association with a change of use.

5.19 There is a general policy constraint on new dwellings in the countryside, which would be circumvented if the residential conversion of farm buildings were generally allowed. Conversion to residential use will only be allowed if it has been demonstrated that employment or tourist uses are not viable. Evidence should be submitted that

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a marketing exercise (for a minimum of six months) has been undertaken within

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appropriate press and at a price reflecting the potential for other uses, excluding residential, and not just the existing use.

5.20 In certain circumstances, residential use may be justified as an appropriate means of preserving a building of particular architectural or historic merit because it is the only means of funding its restoration and retaining its original features. In these circumstances, evidence should be provided which sets out that a commercial proposal would not be appropriate in retaining the building.

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Policy LE3: Employment Sites in the Countryside On existing employment sites, redevelopment, extension of buildings or erection of new buildings on existing employment sites for employment use will be permitted provided that: a) it is appropriate in scale to a rural location and is contained within the curtilage of the site; b) the proposals is well related to any retained buildings; c) it does not include outside storage where this could be visually intrusive; and d) in the case of significant redevelopment, the proposal: i. deals comprehensively with the full extent of the site, and ii. would achieve an environmental improvement in relation to the impact of the site on its surroundings and the landscape.

5.21 There are a number of sites which have a variety of industrial, storage or business uses. These sites comprise an important element of the rural economy and provide local job opportunities for those in rural areas. Proposals for their redevelopment or intensification through extensions, new buildings or redevelopment can take place within the curtilage without a significant impact or harm to the countryside. Growth contained within the curtilage which is appropriate in scale and design, provides the ability for a degree of expansion to be accommodated without the encroachment into adjoining open countryside.

environmental harm that their removal may be desirable and redevelopment of the site for more appropriate business activities may be justified. It would need to be demonstrated that the displaced uses would not be seeking an alternative site which would simply mean the relocation of the environmental problem to another location and that the redevelopment proposal would result in a substantial gain in terms of environmental impacts, such as traffic and visual impact and other potential nuisances.

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Andover 5.23 The Employment Land Review (2008) concluded that when taking account of the current supply of sites and existing commitments within the Borough Local Plan (2006), there was no requirement to make further allocations.

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5.22 In some cases the particular existing uses on site may be causing such serious

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Walworth Business Park 5.24 The Council is working in partnership with a private sector partner on the longterm rejuvenation of the Walworth Business Park. Using the partner’s skills and expertise in development and management the Council aims to increase occupation and employment levels, redevelop and refurbish existing buildings and develop new buildings with diversified uses, attracting investment and new business into the Borough.

Policy LE4: Extension to Walworth Business Park Approximately 11 hectares of land to the east of the Walworth Business Park is proposed for employment uses (Class B1(b), Class B1(c), Class B2 and Class B8). Development should be designed to take account of its surroundings particularly with regard to Picket Piece and policy COM5 (see Map C).

5.25 The extension to Walworth Business Park will provide additional choice for existing and new companies requiring modern premises. The allocated land which is south of Walworth Road is within the Borough Council’s control. Land to the north of Walworth Road already has permission for employment use. Any future scheme would need to respect the development at Picket Piece and the rejuvenation of the wider business park.

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Andover Commercial Park Policy LE5: Andover Commercial Park Land off Monxton Road is identified for employment uses (Class B1, B2 and B8). Development will be permitted provided that: a) a site of at least 0.5 hectares is to be reserved for community facilities to serve the site including a day nursery, small convenience store and public house/restaurant; b) It is designed and landscaped to respect its surroundings and minimise visual intrusion particularly in relation to the A303(T); c) within the development Class B1 elements should provide 45% of the site as landscaping and within the Class B2 & B8 elements should provide 20% of the site as landscaping.


5.26 The Commercial Park on the western edge of Andover is intended to provide employment for a significant number of people. The site currently comprises a distribution centre and ancillary uses of approximately 40,000sqm40.

5.27 Land within the commercial park has been reserved for a nursery and convenience store to meet the needs of those working on the site. The site also has permission for a hotel which has been included to meet the needs of local businesses and support the tourism in Andover.

5.28 The site is largely open and is visible from a number of locations. Work to create mounds and landscaping has been undertaken to limit its visual impact. The permitted landscaping should be retained. Internal landscaping should be provided in order to have an attractive setting within the site and complement the existing provision.

5.29 The provision of the highway infrastructure for the site has been completed. Any further improvements necessary to deliver the remainder of the site would need to ensure that any impact on the highway network is minimised.

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Southern Test Valley University of Southampton Science Park

location for research and development within an attractive ‘campus’ setting. The Council recognises the benefits the site has for both the local economy and higher education and is supportive of the principle of further development provided it retains its current research and development function.

40 07/01951/OUTN Land at former Andover Airfield.

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5.30 The University of Southampton Science Park is a valuable facility in providing a

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Policy LE6: University of Southampton Science Park Employment development falling within Class B1 will be permitted within the University of Southampton Science Park, provided that: a) the use comprises scientific research and development, including ancillary industrial production and, exceptionally, support facilities; b) it is not visually intrusive in views from the M27 Motorway, the A27, Chilworth Old Village, or Chilworth and does not detract form the setting of Chilworth Manor and garden; c) any development does not result in the loss of important trees within or adjoining the science park and is landscaped to maintain its attractive ‘campus’ character; and d) any new building, redeveloped building or extension to an existing building, is designed to a high standard and contributes to the character of the science park.

5.31 One of the features of the Science Park is its campus setting in the countryside. The Council wishes to maintain this character and ensure that any future development is designed to a high standard. The Science Park is located within areas of woodland which have high amenity and ecological value. There are residential properties and Chilworth Manor in close proximity. The site also adjoins the M27 motorway and A27 corridor. Future development within the Science Park boundary should not be

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visually intrusive.

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5.32 Land at Kennels Farm (Benham Campus) formed an allocation within the Borough Local Plan (2006) and work is nearing completion. It is not proposed to allocate additional land at the Science Park; the Council will consider the merits of any further extension against the criteria of the policy and pertinent policies of the Core Strategy.

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Adanac Park, Nursling 5.33 Adanac Park is located east of the M271 motorway. It has been safeguarded for some time as a high quality office/ research/ manufacturing development for either a single user or a small number of users. The whole site has outline permission41 for five plots with a detailed permission for one plot. This has been implemented and occupied by the headquarters of the Ordnance Survey.

41 07/02872/OUTS Outline planning permission was granted in June 2008


Policy LE7: Land at Adanac Park Approximately 30 hectares of land to the east of the M271 at Nursling is safeguarded for a high quality office / research / manufacturing development which will be permitted only if: a) the development is for a single user (or a small number of large users) seeking to establish a major operation with secure boundaries and a clear corporate identity; b) it can be demonstrated that there is no land allocated or permitted for business or industrial use elsewhere in South Hampshire which is capable of meeting the requirements of that operation; c) it is designed to respect the characteristics of the local area; and d) Any built development should be designed to a high standard and should not exceed 2,500 square metres of gross floorspace per hectare.

5.34 The site is of particular importance to the sub regional economy in terms of size and location which supports a policy to safeguard its use to meet the requirement of uses which require large sites with good access to the strategic road network. Evidence would be needed to demonstrate that there is no other land available for such a proposal.

5.35 Future development would be highly visible from the highway network and would therefore need to be designed to a high standard. It should be clearly recognised as a

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Nursling Estate Policy LE8: Nursling Estate Within Nursling Estate, the use of land and buildings will be restricted to storage and distribution uses (Class B8). Development will be permitted provided that: a) any buildings or structures are designed and landscaped to ensure that they are not intrusive in significant views from the surrounding area and adjacent motorways; and b) open storage, including stacking or containers, will be restricted in height to no more than 7.8 metres or three containers, whichever is the lowest.

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high quality corporate building.

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5.36 The Nursling Estate is located south of the M27 motorway, west of the M271 motorway and east of the Southampton – Bristol railway line. The Estate predominantly comprises storage and distribution (B8) uses. The PUSH strategy seeks additional B8 floorspace use in South Hampshire. In this context it is appropriate to retain the Estate’s primary function as a B8 site and restrict other uses. Furthermore, there are limited opportunities where B8 uses can operate for 24 hours, that are located close to the strategic road network, centres of commercial activity (i.e. Southampton Docks) and are relatively isolated from residential areas.

5.37 The existing buildings have been designed to allow views from the M27/M271 junction across to the New Forest and the Lower Test. Any development, redevelopment or open storage, including containers, should be designed to minimise their prominence in the landscape and retain those wider views.

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South of Brownhill Way, Nursling Policy LE9: Land south of Brownhill Way, Nursling Approximately 5 hectares of land for employment (Class B8) south of Brownhill Way, Nursling (see Map D) is proposed to be allocated. Development will be permitted provided that: a) Sufficient soft landscaping on the boundaries of the site with the M271,

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Brownhill Way and Redbridge Lane is provided; and

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b) The development provides appropriate improvements to the transport network.

5.38 The Council proposes to allocate land south of Brownhill Way for warehouse and distribution uses (Class B8). The site would contribute to the PUSH employment requirement. Proposals for this site should be comprehensive and take into account land within Southampton City. The proposal would need to provide appropriate landscaping on its boundaries taking account of existing features. Improvements to the transport network should be provided. The developments impact will need to take account of proposed and permitted development which has yet to be completed in both Test Valley and Southampton City.

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Bargain Farm, Nursling Policy LE10: Land at Bargain Farm, Nursling Approximately 2 hectares of land for employment (Classes B1 and B2) north of Brownhill Way, Nursling at Bargain Farm is proposed to be allocated (see Map D). Development will be permitted provided that: a) Sufficient soft landscaping on the boundaries of the site with Brownhill Way and Frogmore Lane is provided; b) It respects the setting of Bargain Farm; and c) The development provides appropriate improvements to the transport network.

5.39 The proposal at Bargain Farm comprises new employment provision of approximately 2ha of employment land for B1 and B2 uses and a site (approximately 3ha) for a park and ride facility (see policy T3). The employment allocation forms part of the strategic requirement for South Hampshire.

5.40 Nursling is located in close proximity to Southampton but has a different character from that part of the city closest to it. The landscaping, hedgerows and open space within the village and that adjoining in Southampton provide the perception of separation and transition. To retain the character of Nursling a landscape belt of a minimum of 20 metres width along Brownhill Way and Adanac Drive and a landscape belt of 5m width along Frogmore Lane and Yew Tree Lane should be provided prior to development Council will work with Southampton City Council to establish a Landscape Strategy for the length of Brownhill Way to enhance the approach to the City and support the distinctiveness of Nursling.Â

5.41 The proposed development at Bargain Farm should be designed to take full account of the setting of the listed buildings, their agricultural character and the aim of retaining Nursling's identity.

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commencing. Any additional landscaping should complement existing features. The

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Land at Whitenap, Romsey Policy LE11: Land at Whitenap, Romsey Approximately 6ha of land for employment at Whitenap, Romsey (see Map A) is allocated as part of the new community proposed under Policy COM3. Development will be permitted provided that:a) sufficient landscaping on the boundaries to complement the existing features and to take account of proposals contained within Policy COM3. b) The development provides appropriate improvements to the transport network.

5.42 As part of the new community proposed at Whitenap an area of approximately 6.0Ha of employment land is identified. This will provide opportunities for jobs for new and existing residents of Romsey.

5.43 The proposal would need to provide appropriate landscaping which complements the existing features of the site as well as that proposed as part of the new community.

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Tourism

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5.44 The tourism industry represents expenditure in the Borough of approximately ÂŁ178m

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and accounts for 3,175 jobs (2008). There is a strong relationship between the quality of the built and natural environment and the reasons behind why visitors are attracted to the area.

Policy LE12: Tourism Tourist related development (including accommodation) should help sustain the tourist economy. Proposals will be permitted provided that: a) The proposal is located within or adjoining an existing settlement; or b) Where the proposal is located within the countryside; i. it utilises an existing building; or ii. any extension or new buildings are small scale; and iii. in the case of touring caravans and camping sites these are satisfactorily screened. c) Where criteria 2b) and 2c) are applicable the proposal would need to support the diversification of, and be ancillary to, a local business in maintaining its long term viability.


5.45 The Council wants to encourage visitors to the Borough whilst recognising that a balance needs to be maintained with regards to preserving the high quality environment, historic, and cultural assets of the Borough. The re-use of existing buildings limits the harm to the environment and may help farm diversification schemes.

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Town Centre Uses 5.46 Town centres have a variety of functions for both retail, commercial and leisure uses. Within Test Valley, the Council identifies both Andover and Romsey Town Centres as locations where existing town centre uses should be retained and where other key town centre uses are encouraged to locate.

Policy LE13: Key Town Centre Uses Key town centre uses (such as large scale retail, office, entertainment and leisure) will be permitted within the town centres of Andover and Romsey provided that they are designed at a scale appropriate to the size of the centre. Development for key town centre uses and extensions, with a gross floorspace exceeding 200sqm, outside of Andover and Romsey town centre will not be permitted if following a sequential assessment it could be accommodated with a

Development for key town centre uses over 2,500sqm outside of Andover and Romsey town centre will be permitted if it would, following an Impact Assessment, not have an adverse impact. Any development that would harm the vitality and viability of town centres will not be permitted.

5.47 The Council, within the Designations Document, has identified the town centre boundaries for Andover and Romsey. This reflects the extent of the primary shopping areas and predominantly the leisure and commercial uses.

5.48 The Council will adopt a sequential approach in considering proposals for key town centre uses and will expect applicants to demonstrate that a thorough assessment has been undertaken. The first preference will be for a ‘town centre’ location followed by ‘edge of centre’. Development outside of the town centre will not be permitted if it were to result in an adverse impact of the existing town centre uses.

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town centre, or edge of centre location.

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5.49 An Impact Assessment will be required to assess what impact the proposal would have on the vitality and viability of the town centre. Any major development proposed in the two town centres should be of a scale that respects the size and character within which it is proposed.

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Retail Southern Test Valley 5.50 Romsey serves both its residents and those of its immediate rural catchment as a shopping, service and business destination. Romsey is set apart from other immediate town centres because its mix of shops and restaurants are set in a historic context. A mix of town centre uses has a positive effect on its viability and vitality and the Council wants to encourage its prosperity and provide a focus for community activity. However, these factors needs to be balanced against preserving the character of the centre of Romsey both in terms of types of use and the more detailed aspects of shop front design42.

5.51 The Council has identified both the primary and secondary frontages and seeks to retain these units for shops (Class A1 use), financial and professional services (Class A2 use), restaurants and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishments (Class A4 use),

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and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use).

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5.52 In the primary shopping area, it is desirable to maintain a high proportion of retail (Class A1 use) and restrict other uses. An over concentration of non A1 uses may lead to less active frontages and make areas less attractive to shoppers thus causing an impact on the existing retail units.

42 Shopfront Design Guide SPD, Test Valley Borough Council, 2010


Policy LE14: Ground Floor Uses in Romsey Within the primary shopping area uses other than shops (Class A1 use), financial and professional services (Class A2 use), restaurants and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishments (Class A4 use), and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use) will not be permitted within the ground floor units fronting a street and pedestrian thoroughfare. Within the primary shopping frontages of Romsey, the use of ground floor units fronting a street or pedestrian thoroughfare for financial and professional services (Class A2 use), restaurant and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishment (Class A4 use) and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use) will not be permitted if either: a) the proposed use would result in the number of units in non shop (Class A1) use exceeding the proportion of 35%: or b) the proposed use would result in a concentration of more than three consecutive units in non shop (non-Class A1) use. Elsewhere within the primary shopping area outside of the secondary frontages, Class A2, A3, A4 and A5 uses will not be permitted if the proposed use would result in the number of units in non shop (non-Class A1) use exceeding the proportion of 35%.

5.53 Within Romsey there are limited opportunities for large scale convenience development in the town centre. Retail studies commissioned by the Council have reaffirmed previous work that a significant amount of expenditure goes to other centres such as Chandler’s Ford, Totton and Southampton.

5.54 A town centre location for future retail development is preferred to an edge of town or out of town location. However, evidence43 shows that to achieve a store of sufficient scale to meet future needs and reduce the amount of trade leaking from Romsey, would require major re-development involving the loss or relocation of a number of uses. Accessing a large development in the centre is likely to have a significant impact on the town’s transport network. The Council considers that in the event that a location within the town is not achievable, then sites further away from the centre may need to be considered. The consultant’s study highlighted the uncertainty of long term retail forecasting and in that context together with other issues identified the Council does not propose to make any allocations at this stage. The Council is continuing

43 Retail Development Potential in Romsey, Nathaniel Lichfield & Partners, 2008

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Future Retail Opportunities

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to investigate the potential for enhancing the town’s role as a shopping and visitor destination and will bring forward proposals at a later stage of the Core Strategy’s development if the key issues identified above have been addressed.

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Andover 5.55 Andover town centre serves the town and a large rural catchment with an estimated population of 70,000. Within the South East Plan it was identified as a secondary regional centre suitable for major retail development and uses which attract a large number of people. The Council wants to maintain and encourage people to the town centre. It is therefore important to maintain a variety of uses. Other non A uses would present dead frontages and result in the frontages losing their attractiveness.

Policy LE15: Ground Floor Uses in Andover Within the primary shopping area uses other than shops (Class A1 use), financial and professional services (Class A2 use), restaurants and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishments (Class A4 use), and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use) will not be permitted within the ground floor units fronting a street and pedestrian thoroughfare. Within the primary shopping frontages of Andover, the use of ground floor

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units fronting a street or pedestrian thoroughfare for financial and professional

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services (Class A2 use), restaurant and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishment (Class A4 use) and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use) will not be permitted if either: a) the proposed use would result in the number of units in non shop (Class A1) use exceeding the proportion of 30%: or b) the proposed use would result in a concentration of more than three consecutive units in non shop (non-Class A1) use. Elsewhere within the primary shopping area outside of the secondary frontages, Class A2, A3, A4 and A5 uses will not be permitted if the proposed use would result in the number of units in non shop (non-Class A1) use exceeding the proportion of 30%.


5.56 A mix of town centre uses has a positive effect on its viability and vitality and the Council wants to encourage its prosperity and provide a focus for community activity. However, these need to be balanced against preserving the character of the centre of Andover both in terms of types of use and the more detailed aspects of shop front design44.

5.57 The Council has identified both the primary and secondary frontages and seeks to retain these units for shops (Class A1 use), financial and professional services (Class A2 use), restaurants and cafes (Class A3 use), drinking establishments (Class A4 use), and hot food takeaways (Class A5 use).

5.58 In the primary shopping area, it is desirable to maintain a high proportion of retail (Class A1 use) and restrict other uses. Over concentration of non A1 uses may lead to less active frontages and make areas less attractive to shoppers thus causing an impact on the existing retail units.

Future Retail Opportunities Policy LE16: Retail development at George Yard/Black Swan Yard Land at Eastern Avenue is proposed for approximately 10,000sqm of retail floorspace together with offices, housing, leisure uses and car parking (see Map E).

5.59 The Retail Studies 2007 and 200945 identified the potential for additional retail

5.60 There are few opportunities within the town centre where additional provision for comparison shopping could be accommodated. The area to the west of Eastern Avenue has been identified as the best location. The area is of sufficient size to accommodate the scale of new retail development envisaged and is well related to the existing primary shopping area, with opportunities to utilise new and existing pedestrian links. The scale of development would need to respect the existing town centre and not detract from its character or make it a less attractive location in which to shop.

5.61 As part of the mix used it is considered that the site can accommodate approximately 100 dwellings.

44 Shopfront Design Guide SPD, Test Valley Borough Council, 2010 45 Retail Capacity Study, NLP, 2007 and 2009 Update

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floorspace for both food and non-food.

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6 Environment 6.1 The protection and enhancement of the Borough’s environment and its resources under the wider objective of delivering sustainable development are key issues for the Core Strategy. How the natural and built environment is managed has a significant impact on the character of the Borough.

6.2 Approximately 95% of the Borough is outside the built-up areas of the towns and villages. Its high quality landscape provides an attractive setting for the settlements and combined with good access out of the area, makes for a very desirable location. These circumstances generate significant pressures on the countryside to meet a range of demands. The Core Strategy seeks to minimise the cumulative impact of development on the character of the countryside over time.

6.3 It is not just the countryside that makes Test Valley attractive. The built environment reflects the Borough’s heritage and makes a significant contribution as a place to live and work. Its heritage is a valuable asset and the protection and enhancement of the historic environment is essential to retain the distinctiveness of the Borough’s settlements.

6.4 In protecting and enhancing the environment, consideration needs to be given to a number of detailed matters. Issues such as building materials and layout can have an impact when taken into context of the local landscape and townscape.

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Policy E1: Creating & Retaining the Quality Environment of the Borough

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Development and redevelopment within the Borough will be permitted provided that: a) it would not result in the loss of land proposed or protected for other uses or which contributes to the character of the area; b) it integrates and complements the character of the surrounding buildings and area in terms of design , layout, scale, styles and materials; c) it does not result in the loss of features of historical importance or their setting; d) it does not breach or otherwise result in the removal of features, such as hedgerows, walls, trees or watercourses which help to define the character of a settlement or the countryside; e) the design does not detract from the dominance of, or interrupt important views, of key landmark buildings or features. f) it is not intrusive in important views from publicly accessible routes.


6.5 Development within the boundaries of defined settlements can contribute to the efficient use of land and help provide and sustain communities through the provision of housing and facilities. New development should be designed to integrate with existing development and respect the character of the area in which it is located. To promote the efficient use of land, new development should be laid out to ensure that the potential to develop or redevelop adjoining land is not unreasonably compromised.

6.6 New development should take account of the character and appearance of the surrounding area and be of a high quality design. This does not mean that it should exactly match existing development, rather that any design solution should be a sensitive response to the local context. In larger settlements, it is appropriate to consider development in the context of surrounding properties, streets and spaces. In smaller settlements it would be appropriate to consider development in the context of the settlement as a whole as well as the immediate area. A number of communities have prepared Village or Town Design Statements. Those which have been adopted as Supplementary Planning Documents will be used to inform the decision making process.

6.7 The heritage of the Borough is a key component in what makes it locally distinctive. The Council will seek to retain those historic buildings and features which make up the character of the area. Development both inside and outside the defined boundaries can have a significant impact on its character, unless it can be demonstrated that the design will make a positive contribution.

6.8 The retention of trees and hedgerows is vital for the character of the area and the their growth and viability46.

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46 For the purposes of the Core Strategy the appropriate distance betweens built development and the outer edge of any mature canopy of trees will be 15m. However, each case will be considered on its merits.

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biodiversity benefits they provide. Development should be located so as to not effect

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Policy E2: Protecting and Enhancing the Landscape Character of the Borough The landscape of the Borough will be protected to ensure that development will be permitted provided that : a) it does not have a detrimental impact on the appearance of the immediate countryside or the landscape character of the area within which it is located; and b) the landscaping proposed enables it to positively integrate into the landscape character area; and c) arrangements for the long term maintenance of any proposed landscaping have been made.

6.9 The landscape is the most readily appreciated feature of Test Valley’s built and natural environment. Certain areas such as the New Forest National Park and North Wessex Downs AONB47 receive special protection. The Council has a duty under Section 85 Countryside and Rights of Way Act 2000, to have regard to the purpose of the AONB designation in making decisions as the local planning authority. The purpose (Section 82(1) of the Act) is to conserve and enhance the natural beauty of the area. It is not proposed to include a specific policy in the Core Strategy relating to the AONB, as the formal duty is considered to provide the appropriate policy framework. A Management Plan48 for the AONB has been prepared by the Council of Partners on behalf of the constituent local authorities. The Council has adopted the Management Plan and will

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take account of it in its decision making.

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6.10 However, the Council is concerned about the impact of new development on local landscapes within the Borough. Any new development should be in keeping with the character of the local landscape in terms of its location, siting and design. The Landscape Character Assessment 200449 was prepared jointly with the County Council and former Countryside Agency. It is an important tool to inform decisions on the impact of development and ensure that development will not be an anomaly in the local landscape.

6.11 The provision of landscaping can visually enhance an area and support local biodiversity. In considering any proposals, the Council will need to be satisfied that they have been informed by and taken into account the Test Valley Biodiversity Action Plan and the Landscape Character Assessment. The future management of landscaping is an important consideration and needs to be agreed prior to permission being granted.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------47 A landscape character assessment is available for the North Wessex Downs AONB. 48 North Wessex Downs Management Plan 2009-2014, The Council of Partners, 2009 49 Test Valley Community Landscape Project: Volume 1 Landscape Character Assessment, 2004


Policy E3: Local Gaps Development within the Gaps will only be permitted if: a) it would not diminish the physical and/or visual separation; and b) it would not individually or cumulatively with other existing or proposed development compromise the integrity of the gap. The boundaries of the Local Gaps will be defined within the Designations DPD. Local Gaps have been identified between:•

Andover – Anna Valley/Upper Clatford

Andover – Enham Alamein/ Smannell

Andover – Abbotts Ann

Andover – The Pentons

and •

Ampfield – Valley Park

North Baddesley – Chilworth

North Baddesley – Valley Park

Romsey – North Baddesley

Southampton – Eastleigh

6.12 Parts of the countryside have a role in separating settlements and creating distinct places. The countryside around Andover which separates it from the adjoining villages and the settlement boundaries. Development on the edge of settlements will reduce the physical extent of the gaps and development within the gap could reduce the visual separation of settlements.

6.13 In defining the extent of the gaps no more land than is necessary to prevent the coalescence and retain separate identities of settlement has been included in the local gaps. To ensure that the local gaps can be easily identified, physical boundaries have been used to define their extent.

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and in southern Test Valley plays a critical role in defining the character of the areas

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Policy E4: Local Areas of Green Space Local Areas of Green Space should be designated where they: a) help to separate, define and identify a settlement or neighbourhood. b) provide an attractive and tranquil setting for the settlement or neighbourhood. Development will be permitted within the designated area provided that the proposal does not reduce the effectiveness of its function.

6.14 Relatively small open spaces can make an important contribution to the setting of a settlement or a specific part of the settlement. These are highly valued by local communities. The Council considers that it is for local communities to identify such areas in accordance with the policy. The Council will work with communities to help identify the Local Areas of Green Space (LAGS) through Neighbourhood Plans, Village Design Statements and Conservation Area Appraisals.

6.15 The LAGS that will be identified must all contribute to the character, beauty and history of the settlement either through defining their edges, providing attractive approaches or where helping to define the structure of the settlement and individual neighbourhoods. These all assist in defining the distinctiveness of the settlement.

6.16 Proposed development that will have an effect upon LAGS, the Council will assess how the proposals are likely to impact on the designated area and how the scheme

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might prevent or reduce the effectiveness of its intended function.

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Policy E5: Residential Areas of Special Character Development within residential areas of special character identified in the Designations DPD will be permitted provided that:a) the proposal involves the subdivision of a plot which is not significantly smaller than those in the immediate vicinity; and b) the development’s size, scale, layout, type, siting and detailed design are compatible with the overall character of the defined area.

6.17 The Council has previously identified a number of residential areas of special character. These have been supported by the community, supplementary planning documents and at planning appeals.


6.18 The areas identified are characterised by low density development. These areas typically have larger than average plots and often a similar architectural style with mature landscaping and have similar boundary features. Their sub-division can have a detrimental impact on the area’s character. The policy does not intend to prevent development, but retain their distinctive character.

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Policy E6: Managing the Borough’s Biodiversity The Council will seek to manage biodiversity and geological interests in the Borough and in particular, the biodiversity and geological interests of: a) internationally, nationally or locally important nature conservation sites ; b) priority habitats listed in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan; c) ancient semi-natural woodlands (including ancient replanted woodlands which have the potential to be restored through appropriate management); d) features of the landscape that, by virtue of their linear and continuous structure or their function as ‘stepping stones’, are of major importance for the migration, dispersal and genetic exchange of wild species; e) biodiversity or geological interests of recognised local importance on sites proposed for development, including previously developed land; f) species of principal importance for the conservation of biodiversity in England; and trees, woodlands or hedgerows.

only be permitted if: g) the need for, and benefits of, development in the proposed location outweighs the loss of or harm to the relevant biodiversity or geological interests; h) it can be demonstrated that it could not reasonably be located on an alternative site that would result in less or no harm to biodiversity or geological conservation interests; and i) measures can be provided to prevent, mitigate against or, as a last resort, compensate for the significant harm likely to result from development.

6.19 Test Valley includes many internationally and nationally important wildlife areas, contains an exceptional range of habitats and is home to a number of rare and declining species. Locally important sites also play a significant role in supporting the Borough’s natural environment. These are under pressure from increased use as locations for recreation and development. The Council will seek to avoid any net loss of biodiversity across the Borough and will pursue opportunities to enhance the environment. This will include the conservation of those features included in The Habitats Regulations50 which 50 The Conservation of Habitats & Species Regulations 2010 SI No. 490.

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Development likely to result in significant harm to the interests listed above, will

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are essential for their migration, dispersal and genetic exchange. It may be necessary for project level assessments to be undertaken where there is a likelihood of significant effects on Natura 2000 and Ramsar sites to ensure that these designations will not be adversely affected by any development proposals. The Council is committed to working with other local authorities to develop and implement a strategic approach to protecting ecological sites through mitigation and access management.

6.20 The Council will use planning conditions and/or agreements to secure measures including financial contributions to ensure that biodiversity conservation and geological interests are delivered. The Council will encourage the sympathetic management of existing wildlife sites and the restoration of priority habitats, particularly where it would extend or link existing wildlife sites. The methods for undertaking and delivering this approach will be included in the Green Infrastructure Strategy.

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Policy E7: Water Management Development will be permitted provided it does not cause deterioration to, and where possible assists in improving, water quality. The Council will work with water utility providers and the Environment Agency to ensure that new developments (including their phasing) do not exceed water supply and waste water / sewerage treatment capacity.

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Development will be permitted subject to:

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a) All new homes (including replacement dwellings) achieving at least level 4 of the Code for Sustainable Homes in terms of indoor water consumption b) All new non-residential development of 1,000 sqm or more to meet the BREEAM ‘excellent’ standards for water consumption Criterion a) or b) needs to be satisfied unless it can be demonstrated that it is not technically or financially viable. Development within a Groundwater Source Protection Zone will be permitted provided that there is no risk of adverse impact on the quality of the groundwater source or a risk to its ability to maintain a public water supply.

Â


6.21 The water environment of the Borough is important for a number of reasons including its ecological value, its influence on the character and setting of the Borough and as a source of drinking water. Approximately 77% of Test Valley overlies chalk strata and is defined as a principal aquifer. There are a significant number of public and private abstractions. Groundwater in the Borough is also very important in supplying the base flows to local rivers and supporting habitats.

6.22 Test Valley is identified as an area of serious water stress51 and is classed as having ‘no water available’52 - there is no likelihood of increasing the amount of water taken out of local rivers or aquifers. Development will have to be planned within existing water resources, it is therefore particularly important to carefully manage how we use water. This includes ensuring that the delivery of strategic development is phased to take account of any capacity constraints. Promoting more efficient use of water will be essential to help balance the needs of the community and the environment.

6.23 There are legal requirements through the Water Framework Directive to give full consideration to the quality and quantity of ground and surface water bodies in order to meet at least 'good' status or 'good ecological potential' in all water bodies by 202753. It is essential that development does not cause deterioration in the status of water bodies. Where possible, schemes to enhance the status of the water bodies should be undertaken.

6.24 The Environment Agency has defined Groundwater Source Protection Zones across the Borough in order to protect these sources. When considering development groundwater resources from pollution or other activities such as engineering works. The Council will consult the Environment Agency on proposals for residential, industrial or commercial development greater than 0.5 hectares in area and other developments which may pose a threat to groundwater resources.

51 Areas of Water Stress: Final Classification, Environment Agency, 2007 52 Test and Itchen Catchment Abstraction Management Strategy (CAMS), Environment Agency, 2006 53 For more information see the River Basin Management Plan South East River Basin District, Environment Agency, 2009.

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proposals within these zones the Council will assess the likely risk of harm to

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7 Leisure, Health & Wellbeing 7.1 The two Community Plan themes of Leisure and Health & Wellbeing are closely linked and have been combined in this chapter. The residents of the Borough are active in terms of exercise when compared with the rest of the country. Test Valley is ranked 8th out of 354 authorities in terms of the percentage of its population exercising three times a week54. However, issues of health, especially obesity, are a factor within the Borough. The promotion of a healthy lifestyle through access to a range of high quality leisure facilities, formal and informal recreation activities is an element that the Core Strategy can help deliver.

7.2 Access to areas for formal and informal recreation activities is an important part of a healthy community. Informal open spaces provide local recreation opportunities and are also important for wildlife. Retaining existing facilities and providing new ones are important in promoting a high quality of life for the Borough’s residents. The Core Strategy sets out the requirement for Public Open Space and includes specific leisure proposals. In providing facilities at a local level, the Council can advise and assist local groups in the provision of recreation facilities.

Policy LHW1: Provision of Public Open Space Any new housing development where there is a net increase in population will be permitted subject to: a) the provision of open space to a standard of at least 3 hectares per 1,000

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population comprising:

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• outdoor sports facilities 1.0 hectares • parks and gardens 0.4 hectares • informal recreation areas 0.8 hectares • provision for children and teenagers 0.6 hectares • allotments 0.2 hectares

as net areas of usable open space, excluding access, parking, ancillary buildings, landscaping and safety;

b) the laying out and equipping of the open space to a high standard at an early stage in the development; and c) arrangements for the long term maintenance for the open space have been made.

54 TVBC Borough Profile, 2011


7.3 New residential development should not cause or exacerbate deficiencies in the provision or quality of recreational open space. The recreational needs of any new development should be met on-site or as close to a development site as possible. Where new open space is proposed, particularly on large scale developments, opportunities to use it to provide a link to existing residential areas should be explored. The Council will seek open space provision, or contributions towards open space provision, from all new housing developments, unless they are of a type of housing unlikely to generate demand for such facilities (e.g. sheltered housing for the elderly).

7.4 Where some or all of the required open space cannot be provided on site the open space should be provided off-site. This can be achieved either directly or through a commuted sum. This equivalent area should be located so that the population of the new housing can conveniently use it. Contributions will be spent on enhancing existing facilities close to the new housing.

7.5 The conversion in Table 6 will be used to apply the open space standard to a proposed number of dwellings. If the type of dwellings is not known, a conversion of 2.4 persons per dwelling will be applied to give a provisional calculation of the open space requirement. This calculation will be revised once house types are known. A developer should therefore allow (in the layout) for the size of open space to be altered depending on the mix of house types which is finally proposed. The definitions of the types of open space are contained in Annex B.

Number of Bedrooms per Dwelling

1

2

3

4 or more

Number of Persons per Dwelling

1

2

2.5

3

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Forest Park, Southern Test Valley Policy LHW2: Forest Park Land adjoining the M27 is proposed as a forest park (see Map F). Any future proposal will need to:a) provide car parking which is accessible, safe and of scale and design which reflects its countryside location; and b) provide and enhance pedestrian and cycle links to the forest park.

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Table 6: Applying the Open Space Standard

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7.6 The New Forest National Park lies close to the western boundary of south Hampshire. The proposed residential development in the Core Strategy could increase the pressure on the National Park for leisure and recreation activities. The provision of more locally accessible green spaces and greater access to the countryside by residents of southern Test Valley, Eastleigh and Southampton could help ease that pressure and encourage healthy living.

7.7 The potential for a forest park on the edge of Southampton has been identified in a Green Infrastructure Study for PUSH55. The woodlands adjoining the M27 motorway cover approximately 400 hectares, most of which is managed by the Forestry Commission. The Council will work with the respective landowners and the leaseholder in order to deliver the forest park.

7.8 The public have some access via the existing Rights of Way or permissive routes. It is envisaged that the extent of public access could be significantly improved subject to careful management. The woods are well located with respect to the residential areas of Southern Test Valley, Chandler’s Ford, Eastleigh and Southampton. Access via existing pedestrian and cycle routes, particularly from North Baddesley, Nursling and Rownhams and Southampton is good. It is envisaged that other routes can be developed reducing the need to travel by car to the forest park.

7.9 It is recognised that some provision for car parking, in addition to that which is currently available, will need to be made. The size and location will be the subject of further detailed work. The principle approach would be to provide a number of

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sites dispersed around the area in scale and keeping with the character of the

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area. PUSH commissioned a feasibility study56 in 2010 which will form the basis for detailed proposals.

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Ganger Farm, Romsey 7.10 There is a shortfall of formal playing field provision in Romsey. This shortfall will be exacerbated by future development that cannot accommodate its own requirement. The Council has identified land at Ganger Farm as an appropriate location to meet this need.

7.11 There will be a need for built facilities to provide changing rooms, club room and adequate storage of equipment and parking. The location of the buildings and parking will need to have regard to the setting of the Sir Harold Hiller Gardens and Arboretum and nearby residents. 55 PUSH Green Infrastructure Study, 2010 56 Feasibility study for the provision of a forest park in South West Hampshire, Forestry Commission, 2011


Policy LHW3: Ganger Farm, Romsey Approximately 12.6Ha of land at Ganger Farm, Romsey is allocated for formal recreation and should include approximately 9.0Ha of sports pitches; pavilion and appropriate car parking (see Map G). Any future proposal will need to:a) maintain and protect the rural setting of the site and the Sir Harold Hiller Gardens and Arboretum through the provision of landscaping; b) avoid harming the amenity of nearby residents and visitors to the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens and Arboretum; c) provide vehicular access from Jermyns Lane and pedestrian and cycle access from Ganger Farm Lane.

7.12 Ganger Farm’s northern boundary is close to the Sir Harold Hiller Gardens and Arboretum, a registered historic park and garden. To maintain the Arboretum’s rural setting, a landscape belt of between 15 – 20 metres depth will be required.

7.13 To allow the use of the pitches during the winter months and early evenings, there may be a requirement for floodlighting. The lighting should be designed to minimise its impact to both the Arboretum and nearby residents.

Policy LHW4: Amenity Development will be permitted provided that: a) it provides for the privacy and amenity of its occupants and those of neighbouring properties; b) in the case of residential developments it provides for private open space in the forms of gardens or communal open space; and c) it does not reduce the level of daylight and sunlight below acceptable levels reaching the proposed neighbouring properties and their private amenity space.

7.14 Residential amenity is of considerable importance to the wellbeing of the public in terms of enjoying their private open space without being overlooked or over-bearing on their living conditions. Where a proposal involves a change of use, or one that intensifies an outdoor use, the impact on the amenity of neighbouring residents should be minimised.

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

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7.15 Permanent residential development should be provided with adequate private open space to meet the needs of the people likely to occupy the properties. The amount of private open space required will depend on the type of residential development being proposed and the topography and character of the area in which it is located. Private open space should be provided not only for new dwellings, but also where existing residential properties are extended, or subdivided, or where existing buildings are converted to residential use.

7.16 New development should receive adequate daylight and sunlight to create satisfactory living and working environments and should not have an adverse impact on the levels of natural light received by adjacent properties. The Council will permit development, provided that both the proposed development and any existing adjacent properties will receive adequate natural light once the scheme has been implemented. Any associated open spaces, such as gardens, should not be overshadowed to the extent

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where daylight levels are reduced to unacceptable levels.57

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57 The Council will have regard to the standards for direct and indirect sunlight set out in The Building Research Establishment’s ‘Site Layout Planning for Daylight and Sunlight: A Guide to Good Practice’ (1991). Minimal daylight standards are also given under BS 8206 Part 2 (1992) Code of Practice for Daylighting.


8 Transport 8.1 The majority of residents of the Borough have good access via the transport network to destinations both within and outside the Borough. The M3 and M27 motorways, A303(T), A34(T), A36(T) and the main rail links provide access to London, south coast, West Country and Midlands respectively. The good communications of networks to destinations outside of the Borough is reflected in the level of out-commuting, particularly from rural Test Valley. Access to facilities within the urban areas of the Borough is generally good. Andover has a high level of self containment, and southern Test Valley, despite its location (close to other large urban centres), has a significant number of people living and working in the area.

8.2 To assist in meeting the objective of creating sustainable communities, the Council will, working in partnership with Hampshire County Council and others, aim to improve accessibility to services, reduce the need to travel, manage congestion, and achieve more sustainable travel behaviour through the policies and proposals within the Core Strategy. This includes concentrating development at sustainable locations and encouraging sustainable modes of transport primarily through the preparation of Travel Plans, Council’s Cycle Strategy and Access Plans.

Policy T1: Managing Movement Development will be permitted provided that: a) its location is connected with existing and proposed pedestrian, cycle and b) measures are in place to minimise its impact on the transport and rights of way network and pedestrian, cycle or public transport users; and c) the internal layout, highway and route network is safe, attractive, in character, functional and accessible for all users and does not discourage existing and proposed users; and d) it does not have an adverse impact on the function, safety, character and accessibility to the highway or route network.

8.3 To encourage sustainable modes of transport, design and layout of development will need to show primacy being given to walking, cycling and public transport. All routes and access points must be safe for all users and linked to the highway network. Directing and linking routes to key facilities is important to achieve the most efficient use of the existing and proposed infrastructure. This can be achieved through the use of traffic management measures and by the control of the scale and/or type, location and layout of new development.

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public transport links to key destinations and networks; and

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8.4 Development must be able to provide safe access for all users of the highway where new accesses or additional use of existing unsatisfactory access(es) or minor roads are required. The Highway Authority or its agents will need to be satisfied that it is safe and that the appropriate visibility to all highway users can be provided. All development must meet the needs of the likely occupants and those services which are an integral part of its day to day function. In new residential areas particular attention is required to mitigate the impact of the private car with emphasis given to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport depending upon the scale of the proposals.

8.5 The Rights of Way Network within the Borough is an important part of the transport infrastructure in providing alternative routes as well as an important recreation resource. The County Council has prepared Countryside Access Plans for Hampshire, three of which cover Test Valley; The Hampshire Downs58, The Test and Itchen59 and the New Forest and South West Hampshire60. They provide a framework for seeking improvements to the network in association with new development. Key issues arising from work undertaken so far are fragmentation of the existing network and poor condition of parts of the network.

Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

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58 The Hampshire Downs Countryside Access Plan 2008-13, Hampshire County Council, 2008 59 The Test and Itchen Countryside Access Plan 2008-13, Hampshire County Council, 2008 60 The New Forest and South West Hampshire Countryside Access Plan 2008 - 13, Hampshire County Council, 2008


8.6 The control of parking provision is an integral element of the wider strategy and objectives of reducing the need to travel by private car. However, decisions on the amount of parking to be provided in association with new development needs to take account of local circumstances and to prevent an increase in parking pressure elsewhere. The level of parking provision should reflect local conditions and factors such as car ownership. For many residents requiring access to or from rural locations, the car may be the only viable option.

Policy T2: Parking Standards Residential development (including change of use and conversions) will be required to provide parking in accordance with the minimum standards set out in Annex C. Residential parking provisions below the minimum standards will be considered in certain circumstances, including: a) where there is likely to be low demand for parking; b) where there are significant heritage or urban design issues; c) where any parking off site can be appropriately controlled. It will be necessary for applications to be accompanied by evidence justifying variations from the minimum standards. Parking provisions should be well designed and appropriately located so as to be

Older persons’ housing will be required to provide the parking spaces as set out in Annex C. Non residential parking will be required to meet the Hampshire County Council Parking Standards.

8.7 Parking spaces must be located and designed to ensure that they are safe, secure and practicable. Garages would only count as parking spaces if they meet the minimum internal dimensions of 3 metres by 6 metres. This is to ensure that garages are of a sufficient size to be usable for the parking of modern cars and do not increase pressure to park elsewhere.

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convenient to users.

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Park & Ride, Nursling Policy T3: Park & Ride at Bargain Farm, Nursling Development for a park and ride site will be permitted provided that: a) it can be demonstrated that the facility will promote sustainable travel patterns; b) sufficient soft landscaping on the boundaries of the site with Brownhill Way, Frogmore Lane and Adanac Drive is provided; c) the site is designed to create a safe and secure facility.

8.8 The park and ride site forms part of a Transport Strategy for Southampton and is included with the Transport for South Hampshire’s proposals for the sub-region. Part of Bargain Farm lies within Southampton and could be included within the park and ride proposal. Regards should be given to the requirements of policy LE10.

8.9 To screen the park and ride from Brownhill Way and Adanac Drive, a landscape belt of a minimum of 20 metres width should be provided to complement existing features. The Council will work with Southampton City Council to establish a Landscape Strategy for the length of Brownhill Way. Any proposal should take into account the requirements within Policy LE10.The park and ride should be designed to be visually attractive and be internally landscaped to soften its appearance.

8.10 The site would need to be designed and managed to ensure a safe environment for Draft Core Strategy and Development Management DPD January 2012

users. Any lighting proposed for the site must take account of the amenity of nearby

80

residents.


9 Community Safety 9.1 The Core Strategy includes an objective of ‘creating high quality, low crime environments and spaces’.

9.2 Test Valley experiences low levels of crime and anti-social behaviour. The rate for recorded crime per 1,000 population for the Borough is 32 which is lower than the county and England and Wales averages61.

9.3 The Council is part of the Test Valley Community Safety Partnership which comprises a wide range of organisations. It has prepared a Plan62 which has taken account of the Government advice on reducing crime. One of the key national themes is designing out crime. The Core Strategy has included a policy which requires positive design to improve the physical environment in support of this theme.

Policy CS1: Community Safety Development will be permitted provided that it supports and contributes to the creation of safe and liveable environments and that the design takes account of the need to reduce the opportunities for crime and anti-social behaviour.

9.4 The relationship between buildings, spaces and transport routes such as footways and cycleways is important and can influence the way the public use them. The Council Council and other Partners to make the Borough a safe and attractive place to live and work. Layouts should provide a clear distinction between public and private spaces. Opportunities for passive surveillance of public spaces should be incorporated into schemes. The designing out of crime should not be the only consideration of new development but part of the overall process of achieving good design.

61 Crime in England and Wales 2009/10, Home Office, 2010 (based on Recorded Crime BCS Comparator Offences). 62 Community Safety Partnership Plan, Test Valley Community Safety Partnership, 2008

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will look to developers to design layouts which complement the work being done by the

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10 Education & Learning 10.1 The Long Term Economic Strategy (LTES)63 identified people and their skills as one of the three key elements of the Borough’s economy, the others being enterprise and places. The Community Plan recognises that education attainment and skills of the Borough compares well with the county and national averages with respect to qualifications. It has a greater percentage of its population possessing qualifications at NVQ level 4/5. At level 3 the Borough is behind the County and regional averages. For levels 1 and 2 the Borough is ahead of all other comparable areas. However, there is significant variation across the Borough. At Andover, residents qualified to a lower level have a higher presence and those with no qualifications are also over-represented in the town.

10.2 The knowledge economy is likely to continue to account for an increasing proportion of the economy, although not all jobs will be high value and knowledge intensive. In raising education attainment and upskilling, it will be imperative to maximise the population’s potential and to attract and expand this type of economy in Test Valley, especially Andover. The review of the LTES in 2009 assessed its objectives against a very different economic context. It concluded that the down turn in the economy made it even more important to invest in knowledge and skills in the Borough.

10.3 The provision of new education facilities such as schools and further education establishments is necessary to allow children develop their skills. The Council will work closely with the Education Authority and other providers to ensure that the Borough

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has the appropriate infrastructure. It will also support programmes in partnership to

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develop the skills of the population such as training initiatives.

63 A Long Term Economic Strategy, Experian, 2007 and 2009 Update

Test Valley Borough Core Strategy  

The Core Strategy for Test Valley forms the main part of the Test Valley Local Development Framework (LDF). The document sets out a vision f...

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