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Welcome to Puget Sound! This booklet of readings is an introduction to academics at Puget Sound. All incoming students will read these before coming to campus in preparation for Bookends, the academic portion of Orientation. At Bookends, you and the group of students in your immersive Orientation experience will meet with a faculty member for an introduction to academic life at Puget Sound, through common readings, discussion, and writing. The Bookends sessions will be on Sunday, Aug. 25, and Friday, Aug. 30. The readings in this booklet have been chosen for you and other incoming students by the Puget Sound faculty in preparation for Bookends. We wanted to choose readings that would introduce and welcome you to studying about and in this place that is the University of Puget Sound. Over the course of long conversations, we decided that there is no one piece that could encompass what we want you to know about Puget Sound as you enter into your studies here; to belong here, in this community, is to belong to a dynamic place that is rich in natural beauty and in the intermixing of cultures, both in the past and in the present. We wanted you to read different perspectives on this place, from different cultural vantage points and historical moments, as well as from different disciplinary perspectives. We wanted you to read work that presents the tensions between competing interests that have led to what is most promising and troubling about this place. In each reading, we hope that you find something that intrigues you, that introduces you to new ideas, and that you can use and reflect upon as you enter into Orientation and the years that follow.

The epigram to our collection, “A Tacoma Sonnet,” was written by an emeritus (retired) faculty member, Hans Ostrom, as a love song to the gritty place that he calls home. “Forests” is a chapter on something that we Loggers hold dear, even as our forebears radically altered the forests on which the campus of the University of Puget Sound now stands. This chapter offers a scientific perspective on why our trees are evergreen and what is distinctive about the interdependent soils, trees, and animals of the Pacific Northwest forests you’ll encounter on campus and beyond. The chapter was written by Stewart T. Schultz and illustrated by John Megahan and Kathy Kellerman. We thank Puget Sound Professor Carrie Woods for her work to excerpt this chapter. Just as our forests contain layers of history, so too do the stories of our places and even the names of our places. “The Miser on Mount Rainier” is a myth about a man’s experience on the mountain that dominates the horizon here (at least on clear days!). The version of the myth that you will read encapsulates a history of encounters between newcomers to Puget Sound. This story was shared by an elder from the Nisqually Indian tribe in 1853 with a European American newcomer to the region, Theodore Winthrop, reportedly at Fort Nisqually (which was formerly located south of Tacoma, but has been relocated and recreated as a historical site in Tacoma’s Point Defiance Park). Eventually, the story was gathered and published in

1953 by Ella E. Clark, a European American English professor who sought to collect and share the folklore of the Pacific Northwest. As you read the story, you may notice an unfamiliar place name, “Tacobud,” which is one of the many names that Native American tribes had for the great mountain that is now more commonly known as Mount Rainier (named after Rear Admiral Peter Rainier, who never came to this region himself). “The Mother of Progress Finds Home” is a chapter from modern-day Tacoma resident Justin Wadland’s book-length account of another group of newcomers to the area, a small group of people who in 1896 rowed their boats from Tacoma up and around Point Defiance and over to the Key Peninsula, where they founded Home, Washington, a late-19th-century anarchist community. Much of the chapter is based on speculation, given that the records of those early days don’t include many of the details we might want to know now in understanding the motivations behind their 19th-century “Nationalist” interests, and Wadland weaves in his own story of discovery of the anarchists’ ideals and dissolutions. “Camp Harmony” is an excerpt from Jamie Ford’s novel Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, in which protagonist Henry Lee narrates his relationship with a girl named Keiko Okabe, who was incarcerated in an internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War II. Henry, as a Chinese American, was not imprisoned in an internment camp, but he nonetheless

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Profile for University of Puget Sound

Bookends Reader  

Welcome new students! This reader is a collection of readings from and about Puget Sound and that will be at the heart of the Bookends orien...

Bookends Reader  

Welcome new students! This reader is a collection of readings from and about Puget Sound and that will be at the heart of the Bookends orien...