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Annual Report 2011-2012 2011-2012 Office Activity Report Class of 2012 Survey Report 2012 Summer Experience Report

Celebrating 100 Years of Career Services at Princeton University

1912-2012


Director’s Welcome Message

I am pleased to present the Office of Career Services’ Annual Report for 2011-2012. This year we celebrated a very special milestone—the 100 year anniversary of Career Services at Princeton! While a lot has changed since the office was founded as the “Self-Help Bureau” in 1912, one thing remains the same: Career Services’ commitment to assisting Princeton students and alumni as they develop and pursue their career goals. Throughout its 100 years, our office has encouraged students to get an early start on their career planning. Undergraduates, graduate students and alumni are encouraged to take advantage of the office’s numerous programs and resources, from one-on-one career counseling to workshops, recruiting, and networking events tailored to meet the career development needs of students during their time at Princeton and beyond.

In all of their endeavors, our dedicated team continues to successfully deliver highly personalized services as well as 24/7 accessibility via our online platforms. As part of the University’s comprehensive plan to expand our office and its services, this year we made significant strides in five strategic initiatives. We have: Expanded early, sustained, and intentional engagement of students Enhanced career-related engagement between students and alumni Strengthened partnerships inside and outside of the University Continued to emphasize the importance of internships, service, and leadership as central to career exploration and decision-making Increased student attainment of post-graduation goals I thank you for your interest in our office and invite you to explore the information contained in this report to learn more about our efforts on behalf of Princeton students as well as their post-graduation and summer pursuits. Sincerely,

Beverly Hamilton-Chandler Beverly Hamilton-Chandler, Director

1


Career Services’ 100 Year History 1912 Self-Help Bureau 32 Mercer Street

1920 Bureau of Appointments & Student Employment 316 Nassau Hall

1941 Bureau of Student Placement

1 South Reunion Hall

1964 Career & Study Services

212 West College

1966 Counseling & Career Services 212 West College

1968 Office of Career Services 3rd Fl., Clio Hall

1994 Moved to 201 Nassau Street

2008 Moved to 36 University Place

CONTENTS

2011-2012 OFFICE ACTIVITY REPORT

Summary of Office Activities and Constituent Participation

3-4

CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT Summary of Survey Results Graduate & Professional Schools and Fields of Study Nonprofit & Government Employment Full-Time Employment by Industry How Princetonians Found Their Full-Time Jobs Full-Time Employment by Geographic Region Full-Time Salary Averages by Job Function

5-6 7 8 9-10 11 11 12

2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT Summer Experience Report Overview Types of Primary Summer Experiences Distribution by Industry Distribution by Geographic Location Top U.S. Destinations How Princetonians Found Their Summer Opportunities

13 14 15-16 17 18 18

“Career Services has been an invaluable resource during my job search. My interactions with the career counselors have enabled me to be more strategic and purposeful in my career search rather than just casting a wide net.” -Katelyn Perry `13

www.princeton.edu/career

2


2011-2012 OFFICE ACTIVITY REPORT

Preparing Students for Life After Princeton

T

he Office of Career Services assists the undergraduate and graduate students, and alumni of Princeton University in all areas of career planning, including exploring career-related interests, applying to graduate or professional schools, and pursuing full-time employment, internships, fellowships, or other experiential learning opportunities.

Five Strategic Initiatives 2011-2012

1.

Expanded early, sustained, and intentional engagement of students.

FRESHMEN SOPHOMORE JUNIOR

SENIOR

2. 3. 4. 5.

3

47%

60% 61%

71%

71% 78% 80%

88%

We begin to engage students in the career development process as soon as they enter Princeton by sending personal invitations to all freshmen. Then, we sustain that engagement during all four years by offering customized programs and personalized services. (Please note, we also assist graduate students with career planning.) 2010-2011 2011-2012

Enhanced career-related engagement between students and alumni.

Student and alumni participation in all of our student-alumni engagement programs increased this year. We had a 12.78 percent increase overall in the Princeternship career exploration program, a 14.29 percent increase in student participation in the Princeton-in-Washington program, and more than 200 alumni participated as guest speakers and/or panelists throughout the year.

Strengthened partnerships inside and outside of the University.

We increased the number of programs offered by 28.57 percent (offering 324 programs as compared to 252 last year), in part, by developing new collaborative programs with our campus partners and alumni. Also, by expanding our employer outreach efforts, we more than doubled employer participation at our career fairs and increased our employer contacts by more than 45 percent.

Continued to emphasize the importance of internships.

This year, we expanded our individual Class programs on internship search as well as our Summer Internship Fair (moving it to Dillon Gym for the first year to accommodate more employers and students). Student participation in the Summer Internship Fair increased by 49 percent in 2012.

Increased student attainment of post-graduation goals.

We expanded our outreach to the senior class via messaging, programming, and extended walk-in hours. We also increased our efforts to help seniors (and all students) create a professional online presence using LinkedIn and other platforms. (Please see page 5 for more information about the post-graduation goals of the Class of 2012.)


2011-2012 OFFICE ACTIVITY Career Services’ constituents (undergraduate and graduate students, alumni, employers, and graduate or professional school representatives) participated in activities and engaged with our office in a variety of ways throughout the year via programs, services, and utilization of resources. Constituent Participation

OFFICE ACTIVITIES/RESOURCES

July 2011-june 2012

Career Counseling Appointments and Walk-Ins Includes undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni.

Skill-Building Workshops & Career Panels

7,133 4,189

Undergraduates= 3,294; Graduate Students= 895 Includes skill-building workshops and panel presentations with speakers from various fields and industries.

Graduate & Professional School Admissions Programs

974

Outreach Programs

2,489

Special Programs

1,371

Employer Relations & Recruiting

8,720

Includes programs for undergraduates on applying to graduate and professional school, and campus visits by admissions representatives and deans of graduate and professional schools.

Includes programs designed for Freshmen, specific classes and other student populations, and Open Houses. Includes the Princeternship Program, Princeton-in-Washington Program, the IMAGINE Speaker Series, Alumni Connections, and Summer Student/Alumni Networking Receptions. TigerTracks Student System Usage = 4,052 Employer Contacts = 2,931* Campus Interviews Held = 4,386**

* The number of employer contacts reflects the total number of organizations who either contacted or visited campus; it does not reflect the total number of job postings that each employer listed or multiple visits by the same employer. ** The number of campus interviews is not included in the total participation number above.

Career & Informational Fairs

Includes the General Interest Career Fair, Graduate and Professional School Fair, Summer Internship Fair, Nonprofit Fair, and off-campus or virtual fairs.

2,526

Online Communications & Surveys

14,328

Alumni Career Network Usage

26,414

Includes listserv communications, website inquiries, online surveys, and social media. The number of social media followers across all of our platforms (Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest) increased by over 200 percent this year.

Includes the total number of contacts between students and alumni via the online database of over 4,800 Princeton alumni.

www.princeton.edu/career

4


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

E

ach year the Office of Career Services at Princeton University surveys the graduating class to gather information about their post-graduation plans and follows up to determine their level of achievement of those plans within six months after graduation. The following pages summarize the responses from the Class of 2012. Within six months of graduation,

90.1% have achieved their post-graduation plans

“I can say from personal experience that the guidance and support I obtained from Career Services was crucial in helping me secure a full-time job.” -Carlos Sanchez ‘12

64.3%

have accepted employment

24.7%

have pursued further education

Highlights of Class of 2012* 4.7 % increase in graduates achieving their postgraduation goals 2.7 % increase in graduates reporting achievement of their employment goals

2.2 % increase in graduates reporting acceptance to further education programs * As compared to the Class of 2011

5


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

2012

2011

Total Graduates

1,229

1,202

Response Rate*

99.2%

99.4%

RESPONSE RATE

Total Completed Surveys *Surveys were collected in May during Senior Checkout to determine post-graduation plans and follow-up was conducted through December to confirm achievement of plans.

POST-GRADUATE PLANS Plan Employment

1,219

Total Number

Percent of Class

Total Number

25.9%

292

882

71.8%

Employed (Full-Time)

570

Internship (Year-Long)

134

Plan Further Education

EMPLOYMENT

Employed (Part-Time) Military

Professional Sports Self-Employed

Seeking Employment

GRADUATE STUDY

318

42 8

12 24 92

Graduate/Professional School (including fellowship study)

280

Seeking Graduate School

14

Post Baccalaureate Program

OTHER ENDEAVORS Travel

Other*

*Other plans include volunteer work.

1,195

Percent of Class

870

72.4%

46.4%

510

42.4%

10.9%

140

11.6%

3.4% 0.7% 1.0% 2.0% 7.5%

22.8%

48 6

16 21

129 237

24.3%

4.0% 0.5% 1.3% 1.7%

10.7% 19.7%

24

2.0%

34

2.8%

8

0.7%

15

1.2%

5

1.1%

0.4%

21

1

1.7%

0.1%

Please note: Student self-reported data was collected using the following methods: the post-graduation plans survey form completed in May prior to graduation, e-mail messages from graduates received within six months after graduation, Internet sources such as LinkedIn, and information verified by employers and academic departments. There are some students who reported upon graduation that they were seeking employment or graduate study but did not respond to follow-up requests from the Office of Career Services. It is possible that by the end of the six-month data collection period their status had changed.

www.princeton.edu/career

6


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

Graduate & Professional Schools and Fields of Study Top Schools & Number of Graduates Attending

Harvard University

20

Princeton University

10

Stanford University

20

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 13 Columbia University

Oxford University

University of California at Berkeley University of Cambridge University of Virgina

Georgetown University

Johns Hopkins University

Carnegie Mellon University

University of Southern California University of Texas

New York University

California Institute of Technology University of Pennsylvania University of Wisconsin

10

Sciences/Math

10

Medicine

8

8

Social Sciences

6

Engineering

5

Humanities

5

Law

5 5 5

Fields of Study

4

4

*Includes graduates attending graduate or professional school programs beginning in Fall of 2012.

4 4

Degrees & Number of Graduates

96

91

40

Master’s Doctoral Medical

7

Business/Finance

27

6

3

Law

Dual Degree

Other


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

Nonprofit & Government Employment Princeton in the Nation’s Service and in the Service of All Nations

20.7%

of the Class of 2012 employed in nonprofit

Over the past several years, when combining all types of employment (full-time, parttime, self-employed, military, professional sports, and participation in one-two year internships), a significant percentage of graduates have been employed by organizations in the nonprofit sector (percentage of total class). The Class of 2012 also obtained employment in a wide range of organizations within the nonprofit sector including educational institutions, health care and social assistance organizations, grantmaking and giving services, social advocacy groups, civic and social organizations, government support, and some scientific research and development services/foundations.

In reviewing the Class of 2012 survey findings, it is important to note that the NAICS industry classification system, used to identify and categorize the industries in which our graduates obtained employment, does not include nonprofit as a separate industry category. Nonprofit and government organizations are incorporated into several different NAICS categories, including, but not limited to, educational services, health care and social assistance, scientific research and development services, religious, grantmaking, and civic organizations, and public administration. Of the Class of 2012 graduates employed in all possible types of employment combined (full-time, part-time, self-employed, military, professional sports, and participation in one-two year internships), 254 obtained employment in the nonprofit sector including government and the military. (Please note, this does not include fellowship study.) A sample of nonprofit and government employers with multiple hires is included below. Employers with less than two graduates employed are not included.

Sample Nonprofit Employers Aspen Institute, Inc.

Great Oaks Charter School

National Institutes of Health

Chiang Mai University*

Johns Hopkins University

Public Religion Research Institute

Association to Benefit Children*

Character Education Partnership*

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Columbia University Medical Center

Community Day Charter Public School* Education Through Music*

Educational Testing Services

Environmental Defense Fund

Harvard University

Housing Development Fund* Mah Fae Luang University*

Manna Christian Fellowship

Massachusetts General Hospital MATCH School

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center National Coalition on Health Care*

New York University

Princeton University Teach for America The Food Project

United Nations World Food Program* United States Army United States Navy

World Faiths Development Dialogue*

*Please note: Graduates obtained one-two year internships at these nonprofit or government organizations through Princeton-specific programs such as Project 55 and Princeton-in-Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

www.princeton.edu/career

8


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

Full-Time Employment by Industry

The chart on the following pages shows the range of industries represented in the employment plans of the Class of 2012 for full-time employment only. Industries listed in the chart below are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), a standardized industry classification system used by federal statistical agencies and the Hoover’s Business Database to analyze and publish data related to U.S. businesses and the economy. This system offers comprehensive industry categories and subcategories and illustrates the wide range of industries our graduates pursue after Princeton. There are 18 primary industry categories and 60 industry subcategories represented in the employment choices of the 570 graduates with full-time employment. The nonprofit sector is incorporated in the industry categories below and does not appear as a separate category. Please refer to subsequent pages of the report regarding graduate employment in the nonprofit sector.

Primary NAICS Industry Category

Sample Employers

2012

2011

Number Employed

Percent of Class

Number Employed

Percent of Class

176

14.3%

168

14.0%

Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, & Payroll Services; Advertising, Public Relations, & Related Services; Architectural, Engineering, & Related Services; Computer Systems Design & Related Services; Legal Services; Management, Scientific, & Technical Consulting Services; Scientific Research & Development Services; Specialized Design Services; Other Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services

Finance & Insurance

Acumen, Bain & Co., Cornerstone Research, Dalberg Global Development Advisors, Deloitte Consulting, Elysium Digital, IBM Global Business Services, Kobre & Kim, McKinsey & Co., Oliver Wyman Management Consulting, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Rosetta Marketing Group, The Boston Consulting Group, White & Case

Credit Intermediation & Related Activities (includes Commercial Banking); Funds, Trusts, & Other Financial Vehicles; Insurance Carriers & Related Activities; Securities, Commodity Contracts, & Other Financial Investment Activities; Investment Advice; Investment Banking and Securities Dealing

Barclays Capital, BlackRock, Bridgewater Associates, Credit Suisse, DC Energy, Deutsche Bank, Gleacher & Company, Goldman Sachs, Jane Street Capital, JP Morgan, Morgan Stanley, Susquehanna International Group

141

11.5%

155

12.9%

Applied Predictive Technologies, Bloomberg, Epic Systems, Facebook, Google, Microsoft Corporation

64

5.2%

45

3.7%

Business Support Services; Employment Services; Travel Arrangement & Reservation Services; Other Administrative and Support Services

Promontory Risk Review, Teach for America

41

3.3%

21

1.7%

27

2.2%

37

3.1%

Apparel Manufacturing; Beverage Manufacturing; Chemical Manufacturing; Computer & Electronic Product Manufacturing; Transportation Equipment Manufacturing; Other Manufacturing

Educational Testing Services, New York University, Princeton University, Stanford University Anheuser-Busch, ExxonMobil Corporation, Johnson & Johnson, Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, L’Oreal

24

2.0%

16

1.3%

Information Administrative & Support Services Educational Services Manufacturing

9

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Broadcasting (except Internet); Motion Picture and Sound Recording Industries; Publishing Industries (except Internet); Telecommunications; Other Information Services

Colleges, Universities, & Professional Schools; Educational Support Services; Elementary & Secondary Schools; Other Schools & Instruction


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

Full-Time Employment by Industry (continued) Primary NAICS Industry Category

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Sample Employers

2012

Number Employed

2011

Percent of Class

Number Employed

Percent of Class

Unspecified

N/A

N/A

23

1.9%

4

0.3%

Health Care & Social Assistance

Ambulatory Health Care Services; Hospitals; Social Assistance

13

1.1%

14

1.2%

Other Services (except Public Administration)

Personal Services; Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, & Similar Organizations

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Massachusetts General Hospital, Columbia University Medical Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

13

1.1%

18

1.5%

Mining, Quarrying, & Oil and Gas Extraction

Support Activities for Mining

Schlumberger Oilfield Services

Real Estate & Rental & Leasing

Offices of Real Estate Agents & Brokers; Consumer Goods Rental

Rent the Runway

5

0.4%

5

0.4%

5

Wholesale Trade

Household Appliances & Electronic Goods Merchant Wholesalers; Machinery, Equipment, & Supplies Merchant Wholesalers; Professional & Commercial Equipment & Supplies Merchant Wholesalers

Public Administration

Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation

Retail Trade

Construction

Accommodation & Food Services

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Management of Companies & Enterprises

Administration of Human Resource Programs; Executive, Legislative, & Other General Government Support; Justice, Public Order, & Safety Activities; National Security & International Affairs

Amusement, Gambling, & Recreation Industries; Museums, Historical Sites, & Similar Institutions; Performing Arts, Spectator Sports, & Related Industries

Council on Foreign Relations, United States Department of Defense, United States Department of Energy

Environmental Defense Fund

Toronto Blue Jays

15

7

5

1.2%

0.6%

8

6

0.7%

0.5%

0.4%

*

*

0.4%

9

0.7%

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores; General Merchandise Stores/ Department Stores; Misc. Stores Retailers; Electronic Shopping & Mail-Order Houses

Amazon

AppNexus

5

0.4%

*

*

Land Subdivision

Hines

3

0.2%

3

0.2%

1

0.1%

*

Traveler Accommodation Crop Production Corporate, Subsidiary, & Regional Managing Offices

* * *

1

1

0.1%

0.1%

1

0.1%

*

*

*

* Sample employers only listed if multiple hires or multiple years of hiring. Percentages have been rounded to the nearest tenth. www.princeton.edu/career

10


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

How Princetonians Found Their Full-Time Jobs

Career Services/TigerTracks Not disclosed

Summer Internship

57.9%

Friend/Family Other

Internet Posting

of graduates found their jobs using Career Services’ resources

Alumni/Alumni Careers Network (ACN) Faculty/Staff

Princeton-Specific Program

Of the 570 graduates in the Class of 2012 with full-time employment, 86.3 percent disclosed the original source of the job posting or referral that led to the job offer they accepted. Survey responses indicate that Career Services’ resources (combined with TigerTracks and the Alumni Careers Network) were the primary referral source for 57.9 percent of graduate full-time job opportunities.

Full-Time Employment by Geographic Location 3.9%

Northwest

5.1%

Midwest

48.9%

Northeast

19.5%

Mid-Atlantic

13%

Southwest/West

2.3%

Southeast

6.3%

International

1.1%

Not Disclosed

11

Region Breakdown: Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA, WV); Midwest (IA, IL, IN,KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI); Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT); Northwest (AK, CO, ID, MT, OR, UT, WA, WY); Southeast (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN); Southwest/West (AZ, CA, HI, NM, NV, OK, TX); International (Africa/SubSahara, Canada, East Asia/Pacific, Europe/Euroasia, Latin America/Caribbean, Near East, South/Central Asia)


CLASS OF 2012 SURVEY REPORT

Full-Time Salary Averages by Job Function

Of the 570 graduates who accepted full-time employment, 418 (73.3 percent) reported salary information. Job functions in which at least two students are employed and corresponding salary averages and range are listed below. * Range is not listed if less than three salaries were reported. Number Reporting

Salary Average

Salary Range*

Account Management

5

$43,200

$35,000 - $58,000

Analyst (Investment Banking)

97

$70,232

$43,000 - $100,000

Job Function

Analyst (Consulting)

Brand Management/Product Management Buyer/Merchandising Chemical Engineering

5 4 2

Computer Programming

10

Editing/Writing

2

Engineering (Other)

Fund Raising/Development General Management

Government Policy Resource/Analyst Hardware/Software Development Hospital/HMO Administration Human Resources/Recruiting

Internet Design/Development Management Training Marketing Analysis

Mechanical/Aerospace Engineering Paralegal

Performing Arts

Portfolio Management/Brokerage Post-secondary Teaching

Primary/Secondary Teaching Public Relations Research

Sales (Advertising/Marketing) Sales/Trading (Finance)

Systems Analysis & Design

87

Technical/Information Systems

5 3 2 4

30 2 3 4 7 8 8

15 2 9 2

28 2 7 7

15 8 6

$64,213

$30,000 - $90,000

$74,400

$47,000 - $120,000

$45,250

$41,000 - $50,000

*

$100,000 $83,500

$45,000 - $100,000

$68,800

$47,000 - $84,000

*

$39,000 $47,667

$33,000 - $60,000

*

$67,500 $49,500

$42,000 - $60,000

$85,967

$32,000 - $115,000

*

$40,500 $49,333

$40,000 - $60,000

$56,357

$45,000 - $67,000

$87,500

$60,000 - $100,000

$52,000

$36,000 - $70,000

$63,500

$50,000 - $80,000

$45,067

$38,000 - $60,000

*

$35,000 $80,000

$55,000 - $95,000

$42,625

$24,000 - $60,000

$35,357

$28,000 - $40,000

$85,667

$65,000 - $125,000

*

$28,500

*

$33,000 $54,786

$40,000 - $70,000

$62,875 $64,083

$42,000 - $84,000

Salary Average for Full-Time Employment =

$30,000 - $82,500

$63,615

www.princeton.edu/career

12


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

T

he Office of Career Services promotes the value of experiential learning to students, encouraging them to pursue experiences through which they can explore career-related interests, and enhance their skills. We provide many services, resources, and events to help students connect with opportunities. We also build and maintain ongoing relationships with employers, alumni, and campus partners to identify internships and other summer experiential learning programs for our students.

Each year, we ask students to complete a voluntary online survey to identify the ways in which they spent the summer.

What did you do this summer?

internship

volunteer

summer off

academic/ independent research other activities

Survey Respondents by Class Year

901

students completed the survey; a 23.1% response rate

13

academic study

summer job

study abroad

# of responses

% of responses

CLASS OF 2013

309

34.3%

CLASS OF 2015

305

33.85%

CLASS OF 2014

287

31.85%


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Types of Primary Summer Experiences

For reporting purposes, the internship/summer job, academic/independent research, and volunteer categories were combined into two categories: worked (paid/funded) vs. volunteered (unpaid/ unfunded). This allowed for data to be compared based on funding/compensation. # of responses

% of responses

WORK (PAID/FUNDED)

646

71.7%

SUMMER STUDY

96

10.6%

VOLUNTEERED (UNPAID/UNFUNDED)

128 25

OTHER ACTIVITY

6

SUMMER OFF

14.2% 2.8% 0.7%

The “Paid/Funded” category includes those that reported receiving a wage, stipend, grant, or other external funding. The “Unpaid” category includes those who did not receive any compensation (e.g., external funding or wages).

FULL-TIME * PART-TIME

75% 25%

* Full-time is considered 35 hours or more.

676 RESPONSES 225 RESPONSES

“One of the best things about Career Services is that they help you with the tools and vocabulary to market yourself, whether on resumes, in interviews or networking situations.” -Gavin Cook ‘15

www.princeton.edu/career

14


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Industry

The chart on the following pages shows the range of industries represented in the summer experiences reported by students for the summer of 2012. Industries listed in the chart below are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), a standardized industry classification system used by federal statistical agencies and the Hoover’s Business Database to analyze and publish data related to U.S. businesses and the economy. This system offers comprehensive industry categories and subcategories and illustrates the wide range of industries in which our students pursue summer experiences.

There are 19 primary industry categories and 69 industry subcategories represented in the summer experiences of Princeton students (a sample of subcategories appears in the chart below). The nonprofit sector is incorporated in the industry categories below and does not appear as a separate category.

2011

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Educational Services

Colleges, Universities, & Professional Schools; Elementary & Secondary Schools; Other Schools & Instruction; Educational Support Services

262

N/A

Legal Services; Architectural, Engineering, & Related Services; Computer Systems Design & Related Services; Management, Scientific, & Technical Consulting; Scientific Research & Development Services; Advertising, Public Relations, & Related Services

190 80

8.9%

75

8.8%

Investment Banking; Commercial Banking; Securities and Commodity Exchanges; Funds, Trusts, and Other Financial Vehicles

58

6.4%

52

6.1%

Other Information Services; Publishing Industries (except Internet) - Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Directory Publishers; Motion Picture & Sound Recording Industries; Telecommunications

55

6.1%

65

7.6%

Social Advocacy Organizations; Civic & Social Organizations; Business, Professional, Labor, Political, & Similar Organizations; Religious Organizations

54

6.0%

72

8.5%

Executive, Legislative, & Other General Government Support; National Security & International Affairs; Justice, Public Order, & Safety Activities; Administration of Economic Programs; Space Research & Technology; Administration of Environmental Quality Programs

54

6.0%

67

7.9%

Ambulatory Health Care Services; Hospitals; Social Assistance

39

39

4.6%

Chemical; Pharmaceutical & Medicine; Computer & Electronic Products; Aerospace Product & Parts; Transportation; Food; Apparel

36

4.3%

Unspecified

Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services

Finance & Insurance Information Other Services (except Public Administration) Public Administration

Healthcare & Social Assistance Manufacturing

15

2012

Primary NAICS Industry Category

Number Students

Percent Respondents

Number Students

Percent Respondents

29.1%

285

33.5%

21.1%

94

11.0%

4.0%

39

4.6%


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Industry (continued) Primary NAICS Industry Category

2012

2011

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Number Students

Museums & Historical Sites; Performing Arts & Spectator Sports

28

3.1%

22

2.6%

Retail Trade

Store & Nonstore Retailers

11

1.2%

4

0.5%

Accommodation & Food Services

Recreational & Vacation Camps; Restaurants

7

0.8%

7

0.8%

Real Estate & Rental & Leasing

Real Estate Agents & Brokers; Lessors of Real Estate

Arts, Entertainment & Recreation Administrative & Support Services Construction

Business Support Services; Travel Services

Construction of Buildings; Specialty Trade Contractors

10

4 3

Percent Respondents

1.1%

0.4% 0.3%

11

6 2

Percent Respondents

1.3%

0.7% 0.2%

Management of Companies & Enterprises

Holding Companies

2

Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction

Oil & Gas Extraction; Support Activities for Mining

Transportation & Warehousing

Air Transportation

2

0.2%

0

0.0%

Utilities

Wholesale Trade

Electric Power Generation; Natural Gas Distribution Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods

2

0.2%

1

0.1%

0

0.0%

3

0.4%

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting

*

2

2

0.2%

Number Students

0.2%

0.2%

2

0

5

0.2%

0.0%

0.6%

Percentages have been rounded to the nearest tenth.

“I participated in the Princeton-in-Washington program which really enriched my overall summer experience and allowed me to meet alumni in the powerhouse of politics and the nation.” -Krystle Manuel-Countee ‘13

www.princeton.edu/career

16


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Geographic Region

73%

U.S. Destinations*

29

Northwest

267

40

Midwest

87

199

Northeast

Mid-Atlantic

31

Southeast

Southwest/West

27%

International Destinations

NORTH AMERICA Bermuda, 4 Canada, 4

CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA Brazil,10 Costa Rica, 5 Peru, 5 Bolivia, 4 Honduras, 3 Chile, 3 Mexico, 3 Ecuador, 2 Argentina, 1 El Salvador, 1 Guatemala, 1

17

EUROPE France,17 Germany,16 United Kingdom,13 Spain,10 Greece, 5 Italy, 5 Hungary, 3 Czech Republic, 2 Denmark, 2 Norway, 2 Poland, 2 Sweden, 1 AFRICA Ghana, 8 Kenya,4 South Africa, 4 Tanzania, 4 Uganda, 2 Madagascar, 1 Nigeria, 1 Rwanda, 1 Sierra Leone, 1

MIDDLE EAST Israel, 4 Morocco, 4 Turkey, 4 Jordan, 2 Palestine, 1 Lebanon, 1

ASIA China, 43 South Korea, 9 Japan, 7 Russia, 4 India, 3 Vietnam, 3 Singapore, 2 Bangladesh, 1 Cambodia, 1 Fiji, 1 Indonesia, 1 Taiwan, 1 Tajikistan, 1

*U.S. Region Breakdown: Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA, WV); Midwest (IA, IL, IN,KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI); Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT); Northwest (AK, CO, ID, MT, OR, UT, WA, WY); Southeast (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN); Southwest/West (AZ, CA, HI, NM, NV, OK, TX). Five students did not disclose a U.S. location.


2012 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Top U.S. Destinations 120

111

Princeton, NJ

11

New York, NY

Philadelphia, PA

9

41

14

Washington, DC

Cambridge, MA

12

Los Angeles, CA

9

San Francisco, CA

Boston, MA

7

Chicago, IL

How Princetonians Found Their Summer Opportunities

Given the variety of ways that students find and learn about summer opportunities, students were asked to select as many of the resources listed below that helped them find their summer experience. Since students could select multiple resources, the graph depicts the total number of students that reported using each of the resources below.

26.0%

Family/Friend 234

18.6%

Career Services’ Resources* 168 Faculty/Staff 151

Princeton-specific Program** 135 Not Disclosed 134

Other*** 112

Internet Posting 102

Previous Internship 68 or Activity

16.8% 15.0% 14.9% 12.4%

11.3%

* “Career Services’ Resources” included TigerTracks, UCAN, Alumni Careers Network, On Campus Recruiting, Career Services’ Event, Career Fair, Employer Information Session, and Career Counselor.

** “Princeton-specific Program” included programs such as the International Internships Program, Princeton Internships in Civic Service, and the Princeton-in-Asia, Beijing, France, Ishikawa, and Latin America. *** “Other” included researching organizations online, directly outreaching to employers, independently creating the opportunity, and reading poster advertisements.

7.5%

www.princeton.edu/career

18


Office of Career Services Administrative Staff Beverly Hamilton-Chandler, Director Vanessa Ross, Assistant to the Director Evangeline Kubu, Associate Director of Communications and Outreach Jaysen LeSage, Systems Analyst Dawn Morton, Information Specialist/Credentials Coordinator Dorothy Farina, Counselors’ Assistant Lisa Martiny Festa, Assistant Graphic Designer Career Counseling Staff Kathleen Mannheimer, Senior Associate Director for Career Counseling Satomi Yaji Chudasama, Assistant Director, Liberal Arts & Engineering Career Counseling Jennifer Prudencio, Assistant Director, Internships & Career Counseling Lyon Zabsky, Assistant Director, Pre-Law Advising & Alumni Resources Amy Pszczolkowski, Assistant Director, Graduate Student Counseling Abigail Racelis, Assistant Director, Arts, Nonprofit & Public Sector Lisa Bogdanski, Assistant Director, Student/Alumni Engagement Programs Employer Relations Staff Julie Shurts, Associate Director for Recruitment and Employer Relations Seeta Hayban, Recruiting Assistant Anne Degnan, Internship Assistant Annual Report Layout, Editing, and Graphic Design Evangeline Kubu and Lisa Martiny Festa Photo Credits Commencement photos provided by the Office of Communications Campus photos by Career Services staff Reproduction in whole or part of this publication without written permission is strictly prohibited.

Š 2013 The Trustees of Princeton University

Princeton Office of Career Services 2011-2012 Annual Report  

The Office of Career Services at Princeton University assists undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni with all aspects of career plann...

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