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Annual Report 2012–13 2012-13 Office Activity Report Class of 2013 Survey Report 2013 Summer Experience Report


Welcome

I am pleased to present the 2012-13 Annual Report for the Office of Career Services. I joined the team in December, just as the Class of 2013 survey period was coming to a close, and I feel fortunate to have joined a staff that is dedicated and committed to serve our diverse and multifaceted student population. Princeton University prepares the leaders of tomorrow for lives of contribution and impact in the world, while encouraging a lifelong commitment to curiosity and learning. The Office of Career Services plays an important role in that process by helping students to think boldly and broadly about the career possibilities ahead. As we look ahead, our office is well-positioned to be a connector among our students, external organizations and Princeton’s incredibly committed alumni base. I look forward to engaging in dialogue with our stakeholders as we embark on a new strategy for Career Services—one that will help each of our students define a unique and compelling vision for their career and life, and then help to connect each student with the resources, people, organizations and opportunities that will make their unique vision a reality. Sincerely,

Pulin Sanghvi Pulin Sanghvi, Executive Director

1


CONTENTS

2012-2013 OFFICE ACTIVITY REPORT

Summary of Office Activities and Constituent Participation

3-4

CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

Summary of Survey Results Graduate & Professional Schools and Fields of Study Nonprofit & Government Employment Full-time Employment by Industry How Princetonians Found their Full-time Jobs Full-time Employment by Geographic Region Full-time Salary Averages by Job Function

5-6 7 8 9-10 11 11 12

2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Summer Experience Report Overview Types of Primary Summer Experiences Distribution by Industry Top U.S. Destinations How Princetonians Found their Summer Opportunities Distribution by Geographic Location

13 14 15-16 17 17 18

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

2


2012-2013 OFFICE ACTIVITY REPORT

Preparing Students for Life After Princeton

T

he Office of Career Services assists the undergraduate and graduate students, and alumni of Princeton University in all areas of career planning, including exploring career-related interests, applying to graduate or professional schools, and pursuing full-time employment, internships, fellowships, or other experiential learning opportunities.

89%

Student Engagement with Career Services by Class*

Senior

88%

Junior

78%

Sophomore

71%

Freshman

90.1%

82.6%

of students surveyed, would recommend the Career Services’ programs they attended to a friend.

81.3%

67.5% 64%

*Percentage of students engaging in appointments and programs offered through our office.

2012-2013 2011-2012

Student Career Development Process

DISCOVER YOUR PATH

EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS

FIND INTERNSHIPS/JOBS

PLAN FURTHER EDUCATION

LAUNCH YOUR CAREER

Your journey on the path to developing a fulfilling future career begins with selfdiscovery. We can help you assess your skills, strengths, interests, values and personality as you make decisions about majors and careers you would like to pursue.

By using our services, online resources and programs, you can research a variety of career options that might be a good fit for you. We can help connect you with alumni and employers as you explore industries and fields of interest.

We will help you develop a customized strategy to find an internship or job in your field of choice and create targeted resumes, cover letters and online profiles. Our skill-building workshops and resources can show you how to interview and network with confidence.

If you are considering graduate or professional schools, we can advise you regarding applications, personal statements and recommendations, as well as help you explore potential schools and programs.

We offer programs and resources to help enrich your knowledge of the workplace, grow your professional network and develop strategies for transitioning from college to career.

3


2012-2013 OFFICE ACTIVITY REPORT

Constituent Participation

OFFICE ACTIVITIES/RESOURCES Career Counseling Appointments and Walk-ins

6,851

Includes undergraduates, graduate students, and alumni.

4,073

July 2012-June 2013

Skill-Building Workshops & Career Panels Undergraduates= 3,294; Graduate Students= 895 Includes skill-building workshops and panel presentations with speakers from various fields and industries.

863

Graduate & Professional School Admissions Programs Includes programs for undergraduates on applying to graduate and professional school, and campus visits by admissions representatives and deans of graduate and professional schools.

Outreach Programs

2,952

Includes programs designed for freshmen, specific classes and other student populations, and open houses.

Special Programs

1,557

Includes the Princeternship Program, Princeton-in-Washington Program, the IMAGINE Speaker Series, Alumni Connections, and Summer Student/Alumni Networking Receptions.

9,502

Employer Relations & Recruiting TigerTracks Student System Usage = 4,086 Employer Contacts = 3,376* Campus Interviews Held = 4,262** * The number of employer contacts reflects the total number of organizations who either contacted or visited campus; it does not reflect the total number of job postings that each employer listed or multiple visits by the same employer. ** The number of campus interviews is not included in the total participation number above.

Career & Informational Fairs

3,788

Includes the General Interest Career Fair, Graduate and Professional School Fair, Summer Internship Fair, Nonprofit Career Fair, Startup Fair, All-Princeton Resources Fair

18,373

Online Communications & Surveys

Includes listserv communications, website inquiries, online surveys, and social media. The number of social media followers across all of our platforms (Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest) increased by over 67 percent this year.

Alumni Career Network Usage

Includes the total number of contacts between students and alumni via the online database of over 5,000 Princeton alumni.

24,841

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

4


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

E

ach year the Office of Career Services at Princeton University surveys the graduating class to gather information about their post-graduation plans and follows up to determine their level of achievement of those plans within six months after graduation. The following pages summarize the responses from the Class of 2013.

86.6% Have achieved their post-graduation goals within six months of graduation.

65.4% Have accepted employment within six months of graduation.

Career Services was an invaluable resource during my job search. My interactions with the career counselors enabled me to be more strategic and purposeful in my career search rather than just casting a wide net. – Katelyn Perry `13

Photo source: Office of Communications

The Importance of Internships

92%

reported having had at least one work experience or internship during their time at Princeton.

5

93 students

accepted full-time offers as a result of summer internships with employers that had participated in our recruiting programs. (7.38 percent of the class).

19.7% Have pursued further education within six months of graduation


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

RESPONSE RATE

2013

2012

Total Graduates

1,261

1,229

Total Completed Surveys

1,244

1,219

Response Rate*

98.7%

99.2%

*Surveys were collected in May during Senior Checkout to determine post-graduation plans and follow-up was conducted through December to confirm achievement of plans.

Total Number

Percent of Class

Total Number

Plan Employment

940

74.6%

882

71.8%

Plan Further Education

278

22%

318

25.9%

Employed (Full-time)

634

50.3%

570

46.4%

Employed (Part-time)

15

1.2%

42

3.4%

Internship (Year-long)

129

10.2%

134

10.9%

Military

9

0.7%

8

0.7%

Professional Sports

21

1.7%

12

1.0%

Self-Employed

16

1.3%

24

2.0%

Seeking Employment

115

9.1%

92

7.5%

Graduate/Professional School (including fellowship study)

232

18.3%

280

22.8%

Post Baccalaureate Program

15

1.2%

24

2.0%

Seeking Graduate School

29

2.3%

14

1.1%

Travel

17

1.4%

8

0.7%

Other*

2

0.2%

5

0.4%

POST-GRADUATE PLANS

Percent of Class

EMPLOYMENT

GRADUATE STUDY

OTHER ENDEAVORS

*Other plans include volunteer work.

Please note: Student self-reported data was collected using the following methods: the post-graduation plans survey form completed in May prior to graduation, e-mail messages from graduates received within six months after graduation, Internet sources such as LinkedIn, and information verified by employers and academic departments. There are some students who reported upon graduation that they were seeking employment or graduate study but did not respond to follow-up requests from the Office of Career Services. It is possible that by the end of the six-month data collection period their status had changed.

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

6


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

Graduate & Professional Schools and Fields of Study 2.8% .9%

8.1% 10.5%

28.2%

14.3% 15.3%

19.6%

Sciences/Math Medicine Social Sciences Engineering Humanities Law Business/Finance Other (no field specified)

91

43.5%

Doctoral 66

31.5%

Masters Medical

35 16 1

7

Top Schools & Number of Graduates Attending

16.7% 7.6%

Law Other

.47%

14 12 12 12 9 7 7 6 6 6 5 5 4 4

Stanford University Princeton University University of California Harvard University Massachusetts Institute of Technology University of Texas New York University University of Oxford University of Cambridge Cornell University University of Pennsylvania University of Michigan University of Chicago Carnegie Mellon University


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

Nonprofit & Government Employment

22.62% T

he University’s informal motto, “Princeton in the Nation’s Service and in the Service of All Nations,” reflects a long history of preparing students for positions of leadership and lives of service in a wide variety of fields. Of the Class of 2013 graduates employed in all possible types of employment combined (full-time, part-time, selfemployed, military, professional sports, and participation in one-two year internships), 285 obtained employment in a wide range of organizations within the nonprofit sector including educational institutions, health care and social assistance organizations, grantmaking and giving services, social advocacy groups, civic and social

of the Class of 2013 employed in nonprofit sector organizations, government support, and scientific research and development services/foundations.

A sample of nonprofit and government employers with multiple hires is included below. Employers with less than two graduates employed are not included.

Please note that the NAICS industry classification system, used to identify and categorize the industries in which our graduates obtained employment, does not include nonprofit as a separate industry category. Nonprofit and government organizations are incorporated into several different NAICS categories including, but not limited to, educational services, health care and social assistance, scientific research and development services, religious, grantmaking, civic organizations and public administration.

Sample of Nonprofit Employers American Enterprise Institute Association to Benefit Children* Baylor College of Medicine Chiang Mai University * Community Day Charter Public School* Denver Public Schools Environmental Defense Fund* FOCUS: Fellowship of Christians in Universities and Schools Harvard University

Khon Kaen University* Mah Fae Luang University* Manna Christian Fellowship City Year MATCH School Mt. Sinai Medical Center National Coalition on Health Care* National Institutes of Health Ngee Ann Polytechnic* Population Service International*

Princeton University Teach for America True Action Network UCSF Breast Care Center* United States Army Wellbody Alliance USA Field Hockey U.S. Department of Defense Vera Institute of Justice, Inc. World Faiths Development Dialogue*

*Please note: Graduates obtained one-two year internships at these nonprofit or government organizations through Princeton-specific programs such as Project 55 and Princeton-in-Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

8


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

Full-time Employment by Industry The chart on the following pages shows the range of industries represented in the employment plans of the Class of 2013 for full-time employment only. Industries listed in the chart below are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), a standardized industry classification system used by federal statistical agencies and the Hoover’s Business Database to analyze and publish data related to U.S. businesses and the economy. This system offers comprehensive industry categories and subcategories and illustrates the wide range of industries our graduates pursue after Princeton. There are 19 primary industry categories and 63 industry subcategories represented in the employment choices of the 634 graduates with full-time employment. The nonprofit sector is incorporated in the industry categories below and does not appear as a separate category. Please refer to subsequent pages of the report regarding graduate employment in the nonprofit sector.

2013 Primary NAICS Industry Category

9

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Sample Employers

Number Employed

Percent of Class

2012 Number Employed

Percent of Class

Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services

Accounting, Tax Preparation, Bookkeeping, and Payroll Services; Advertising, Public Relations, and Related Services; Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services; Computer Systems Design and Related Services; Legal Services; Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services; Scientific Research and Development Services; Other Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services

Accenture, Bain & Company, Booz & Company, Booz Allen Hamilton Holding Corporation, Cornerstone Research, D. E. Shaw Research, Dalberg Global Development Advisors, Dean & Company, Deloitte Consulting, Dropbox, Inc., First Manhattan Consulting Group, McKinsey & Company, Oliver Wyman, Palantir Technologies, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Rosetta Marketing Group, The Boston Consulting Group, United States Department of Energy, Vera Institute of Justice, Inc., Yext, Inc.

155

12.3%

176

14.3%

Finance & Insurance

Credit Intermediation and Related Activities; Funds, Trusts, and Other Financial Vehicles; Insurance Carriers and Related Activities; Monetary Authorities - Central Bank; Securities, Commodity Contracts, and Other Financial Investment Activities; Investment Advice; Investment and Securities Dealing Investment Advice; Investment and Securities Dealing

Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Bank of Tokyo, Barclays Capital, BlackRock, Bridgewater Associates, Citi, Credit Suisse, DC Energy, Deutsche Bank, GE Capital Corporation, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase & Co., Morgan Stanley, PIMCO, PRINCO, Susquehanna International Group UBS, Vanguard, Wells Fargo

154

12.2%

141

11.5%

Information

Broadcasting (except Internet); Motion Picture and Sound Recording Industries; Publishing Industries (except Internet); Telecommunications; Other Information Services

Applied Predictive Technologies, Inc., AT&T Inc., Bloomberg, Epic Systems, Facebook, Inc., Google, Inc., Microsoft Corporation, Verizon Communications Inc.

63

5.0%

64

5.2%

Educational Services

Colleges, Universities, & Professional Schools; Educational Support Services; Elementary & Secondary Schools; Other Schools & Instruction

Baylor College of Medicine, California Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, Harvard University, New York University, Perelman School of Medicine, Princeton University, University of Pennsylvania, University of Rochester, University of Southern California

45

3.6%

27

2.2%

Administrative & Support Services

Business Support Services; Employment Services; Travel Arrangement and Reservation Services; Other Administrative and Support Services

Kayak Software Corporation, Teach for America, TripAdvisor

44

3.5%

41

3.3%

Manufacturing

Apparel Manufacturing; Beverage Manufacturing; Chemical Manufacturing; Computer & Electronic Product Manufacturing; Transportation Equipment Manufacturing; Other Manufacturing

Cisco Systems, ExxonMobil, GlaxoSmithKline, Hewlett-Packard, Lockheed Martin, Merck & Co., Nike, RockTenn, Boeing, Procter & Gamble, THK Manufacturing of America

23

1.8%

24

2.0%


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

2013 Sample Employers

2012

Primary NAICS Industry Category

NAICS Industry Subcategories

Health Care & Social Assistance

Ambulatory Health Care Services; Hospitals; Social Assistance

Icahn School of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, National Institutes of Health

17

1.3%

13

1.1%

Retail Trade

Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores; General Merchandise Stores/Department Stores; Misc. Stores Retailers; Electronic Shopping & Mail-Order Houses

Amazon

13

1.0%

5

0.4%

Wholesale Trade

Household Appliances & Electronic Goods Merchant Wholesalers; Machinery, Equipment, & Supplies Merchant Wholesalers; Professional & Commercial Equipment & Supplies Merchant Wholesalers

AppNexus, McMaster-Carr Supply Company

11

0.9%

5

0.4%

Other Services (except Public Administration)

Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional & Similar Organizations

Environmental Defense Fund

8

0.6%

13

1.1%

Public Administration

Administration of Human Resource Programs; Executive, Legislative, & Other General Government Support; Justice, Public Order, & Safety Activities; National Security & International Affairs

National Institutes of Health, United States Department of Defense, United States Department of Justice

7

0.6%

15

1.2%

Arts, Entertainment, & Recreation

Performing Arts, Spectator Sport, & Related Industries

The Gazelle Group, Jacksonville Jaguars, Ltd.

5

0.4%

7

0.6%

Accommodation & Food Services

Food Services and Drinking Places

Burger King Worldwide, Inc.

4

0.3%

1

0.1%

Real Estate & Rental & Leasing

Real Estate

Foros Group

4

0.3%

5

0.4%

Construction

Construction of Buildings; Civil Engineering Construction

Fluor Corporation

3

0.2%

3

0.2%

3

0.2%

1

0.1%

2

0.2%

5

0.4%

Management of Companies & Enterprises

*

*

Number Employed

Percent of Class

Number Employed

Percent of Class

Mining, Quarrying, & Oil and Gas Extraction

Mining (except oil and gas); Support Activities for Mining

Utilities

Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

*

2

0.2%

*

*

Transportation & Warehousing

Support Activities for Transportation

*

1

0.1%

*

*

*

*

*

*

1

0.1%

N/A

N/A

70

5.6%

23

1.9%

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Unspecified

Schlumberger Oilfield Services

* Sample employers only listed if multiple hires or multiple years of hiring. Percentages have been rounded to the nearest tenth. http://careerservices.princeton.edu

10


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

How Princetonians Found Their Full-time Jobs

59.8%

2.4%

of graduates found their jobs using Career Services’ resources

2.2% 1.6% 1.6%

Career Services’ TigerTracks

5.8%

Summer Internship* 8.8%

Friend/Family Other/Unspecified

37 graduates did not indicate the source that led to their opportunity.

Faculty/Staff Alumni/Alumni Careers Network (ACN) Internship Posting

17.8%

Princeton-specific Program 59.8%

Top Geographic Destinations

*Includes 93 students who found their full-time opportunity via a summer internship sourced through TigerTracks.

4% Northwest

48% 6%

19%

Midwest

4%

Northeast

Mid-Atlantic

International

14% Southwest/West

3% Southeast

Top International Destinations:

China France India United Arab Emirates

11

Region Breakdown: Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA, WV); Midwest (IA, IL, IN,KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI); Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT); Northwest (AK, CO, ID, MT, OR, UT, WA, WY); Southeast (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN); Southwest/West (AZ, CA, HI, NM, NV, OK, TX); International (Africa/Sub-Sahara, Canada, East Asia/ Pacific, Europe/Euroasia, Latin America/Caribbean, Near East, South/Central Asia)


CLASS OF 2013 SURVEY REPORT

Full-time Salary Averages by Industry & Job Function

Of the 634 graduates who accepted full-time employment, 462 (72.8 percent) reported salary information. Below is a summary of the averages by industry using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) categories. Industry

Number Reporting

Salary Average

Salary Range

Finance and Insurance

135

$71,525

$40,000 - 120,000

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

121

$63,295

$33,000 - 100,000

Information

52

$84,086

$35,000 - 120,000

Unspecified

36

$57,850

$41,550 - 62,500

Administrative and Support Services

28

$43,973

$20,000 - 105,000

Manufacturing

19

$70,035

$49,000 - 82,300

Educational Services

16

$40,518

$30,000 - 70,000

Healthcare and Social Assistance

13

$38,475

$24,000 - 80,000

Wholesale Trade

11

$78,636

$60,000 - 95,000

Retail Trade

9

$57,850

$41,550 - 62,500

Other Services (except Public Administration)

6

$36,400

$24,000 - 48,000

Public Administration

5

$39,966

$24,000 - 48,000

Accommodation and Food Services

2

$55,000

Construction

2

$64,250

Management of Companies and Enterprises

2

$77,500

Real Estate, Rental and Leasing

2

$75,000

* * * *

Below are the average starting salaries by job function using the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. The SOC system is used by federal statistical agencies to classify workers into occupational categories for the purpose of collecting, calculating, or disseminating data. Job functions in which at least two students are employed are listed below. Occupational Job Function

Number Reporting

Salary Average

Salary Range

Business and Financial Operations

249

$67,288

$20,000 - 120,000

Computer and Mathematical

69

$79,128

$20,000 - 110,000

Education, Training, and Library

35

$40,340

$25,000 - 62,000

Architecture and Engineering

26

$70,235

$35,000 - 100,000

Life, Physical, and Social Science

24

$44,947

$27,200 - 102,000

Legal

13

$43,615

$36,000 - 65,000

Sales and Related

13

$70,000

$35,000 - 100,000

Management

11

$68,773

$25,000 - 120,000

Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media

4

$43,800

$31,200 - 55,000

Community and Social Service

3

$27,284

$24,000 - 33,100

Office and Administrative Support

3

$39,433

$35,000 - 43,000

Healthcare Practitioners and Technical

2

$36,500

$35,000 - 38,000 http://careerservices.princeton.edu

12


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

T

he Office of Career Services promotes the value of experiential learning to students, encouraging them to pursue experiences through which they can explore career-related interests, and enhance their skills. We provide many services, resources, and events to help students connect with opportunities. We also build and maintain ongoing relationships with employers, alumni and campus partners to identify internships and other summer experiential learning programs for our students. Each year, we ask students to complete a voluntary online survey to identify the ways in which they spent the summer. The following summarizes the responses for summer of 2013.

Survey Respondents by Class Year

13

# of responses

% of responses

Class of 2014

314

34.4%

Class of 2015

270

29.6%

Class of 2016

304

33.3%

At the start of the spring semester, I began applying to a number of different internship opportunities. It didn’t take long for me to realize that I had no idea what I was doing. Looking for help and guidance, I scheduled an appointment with a career counselor. I was blown away by their patience and willingness to help me in an honest and genuine manner. What I appreciated most was that they showed me how to leverage my skills in a way that will help me have a diverse and broad array of options in the future. – Paul Riley`15

23%

response rate

913

students completed the survey


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Types of Primary Summer Experiences # of responses

% of responses

Work (Paid/Funded)

503

55.1%

Volunteered (Unpaid/Unfunded)

250

27.4%

Summer Study

123

13.5%

Other Activity/Summer Off

37

4.1%

For reporting purposes, the internship/ summer job, academic/independent research, and volunteer categories were combined into two categories: worked (paid/funded) vs. volunteered (unpaid/unfunded). This allowed for data to be compared based on funding/compensation.

The “Paid/Funded” category includes those that reported receiving a wage, stipend, grant, or other external funding. The “Unpaid” category includes those who did not receive any compensation (e.g., external funding or wages).

653 responses

28.5%

Part-time

71.5%

Full-time*

260 responses

* Full-time is considered 35 hours or more. Startup Career Fair 2014

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

14


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Industry The chart on the following pages shows the range of industries represented in the summer experiences reported by students for the summer of 2013. Industries listed in the chart below are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), a standardized industry classification system used by federal statistical agencies and the Hoover’s Business Database to analyze and publish data related to U.S. businesses and the economy. This system offers comprehensive industry categories and subcategories and illustrates the wide range of industries in which our students pursue summer experiences. There are 19 primary industry categories and 68 industry subcategories represented in the summer experiences of Princeton students (a sample of subcategories appears in the chart below). The nonprofit sector is incorporated in the industry categories below and does not appear as a separate category.

Primary NAICS Industry Category

15

NAICS Industry Subcategories

2013

Number Students

Percent Respondents

2012

Number Students

Percent Respondents

Educational Services

Colleges, Universities, & Professional Schools; Elementary & Secondary Schools; Other Schools & Instruction; Educational Support Services

246

26.9%

262

29.1%

Unspecified

N/A

241

26.4%

190

21.1%

Professional, Scientific, & Technical Services

Legal Services; Architectural, Engineering, & Related Services; Computer Systems Design & Related Services; Management, Scientific, & Technical Consulting; Scientific Research & Development Services; Advertising, Public Relations, & Related Services

71

7.8%

80

8.9%

Public Administration

Executive, Legislative, & Other General Government Support; National Security & International Affairs; Justice, Public Order, & Safety Activities; Administration of Economic Programs; Space Research & Technology; Administration of Environmental Quality Programs

66

7.2%

54

6.0%

Finance & Insurance

Investment Banking; Commercial Banking; Securities and Commodity Exchanges; Funds, Trusts, and Other Financial Vehicles

60

6.6%

58

6.4%

Information

Other Information Services; Publishing Industries (except Internet) Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Directory Publishers; Motion Picture & Sound Recording Industries; Telecommunications

48

5.3%

55

6.1%

Other Services (except Public Administration)

Repair and Maintenance; Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, & Similar Organizations

48

5.3%

54

6.0%

Healthcare & Social Assistance

Ambulatory Health Care Services; Hospitals; Social Assistance

40

4.4%

39

4.3%

Manufacturing

Chemical; Computer & Electronic Products; Plastics and Rubber Products; Transportation; Food; Apparel

39

4.3%

36

4.0%


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Industry (continued)

Primary NAICS Industry Category

NAICS Industry Subcategories

2013

Number Students

Percent Respondents

2012

Number Students

Percent Respondents

Arts, Entertainment & Recreation

Museums & Historical Sites; Performing Arts & Spectator Sports; Gambling and Recreation Industries

12

1.3%

28

3.1%

Retail Trade

Nonstore Retailers; Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

12

1.3%

11

1.2%

Administrative & Support Services

Business Support Services; Travel Services

12

1.3%

10

1.1%

Wholesale Trade

Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods

6

0.7%

2

0.2%

Construction

Construction of Buildings; Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction

5

0.5%

4

0.4%

Accommodation & Food Services

Accomodation; Food Services and Drinking Places

2

0.2%

7

0.8%

Real Estate & Rental & Leasing

Real Estate Agents & Brokers

1

0.1%

3

0.3%

Management of Companies & Enterprises

Holding Companies

1

0.1%

2

0.2%

Support Activities for Mining

1

0.1%

2

0.2%

Transportation & Warehousing

Air Transportation

1

0.1%

2

0.2%

Utilities

Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution

1

0.1%

2

0.2%

Mining, Quarrying, & Oil & Gas Extraction

*Percentages have been rounded to the nearest tenth.

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

16


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Top U.S. Destinations

103

New York, NY

95

Princeton, NJ

62

Washington, DC Summer Internship Career Fair 2014

How Princetonians Found Their Summer Opportunities Given the variety of ways that students find and learn about summer opportunities, students were asked to select as many of the resources listed below that helped them find their summer experience. Since students could select multiple resources, the graph depicts the total number of students that reported using each of the resources below.

Career Services’ Resources*

29.9%

Family/Friend

29.1%

Faculty/Staff

23.2%

Princeton-specific Program**

14.9%

Internet Posting

10.8%

Previous Internship/Activity Other***

212 136 99

8% 7.1%

73 65

Los Angeles, CA

13

Boston, MA

273 266

14 13

Philadelphia, PA

12

Chicago, IL

11

San Francisco, CA

9

Cambridge, MA * “Career Services’ Resources” includes TigerTracks, UCAN, Alumni Careers Network, On Campus Recruiting, Career Services’ Event, Career Fair, Employer Information Session, and Career Counselor. ** “Princeton-specific Program” includes programs such as the International Internships Program, Princeton Internships in Civic Service, and the Princeton-in-Asia, Beijing, France, Ishikawa, and Latin America. *** “Other” included researching organizations online, direct outreach to employers, independently creating the opportunity, and reading poster advertisements.

17


2013 SUMMER EXPERIENCE REPORT

Distribution by Geographic Region

23

185

Northwest

45

269

Midwest

95 Southwest/West

Top Countries

28 Southeast

Northeast

71%

U.S. Destinations*

Mid-Atlantic

*U.S. Region Breakdown: Mid-Atlantic (DC, DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA, WV); Midwest (IA, IL, IN,KS, MI, MN, MO, ND, NE, OH, SD, WI); Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY, RI, VT); Northwest (AK, CO, ID, MT, OR, UT, WA, WY); Southeast (AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN); Southwest/West (AZ, CA, HI, NM, NV, OK, TX).

United Kingdom 16 Germany 17 France 13 Japan 15

Canada 8

China 32 India 13

27.6%

International Destinations

Brazil 12

Kenya 16

http://careerservices.princeton.edu

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Office of Career Services Pulin Sanghvi, Executive Director Administrative Staff Beverly Hamilton-Chandler, Director Vanessa Ross, Assistant to the Executive Director Evangeline Kubu, Associate Director of Communications and Outreach Jaysen LeSage, Systems Analyst Dawn Morton, Information Specialist/Credentials Coordinator Dorothy Farina, Counselors’ Assistant Lisa Martiny Festa, Graphic Designer Career Counseling Staff Kathleen Mannheimer, Senior Associate Director for Career Counseling & Programming Satomi Yaji Chudasama, Assistant Director, Liberal Arts & Engineering Career Counseling Andrea Rydel, Assistant Director, Internships & Career Counseling Lyon Zabsky, Assistant Director, Pre-Law Advising Amy Pszczolkowski, Assistant Director, Graduate Student Counseling Abigail Racelis, Assistant Director, Arts, Nonprofit & Public Sector Rachel Jimenez, Assistant Director, Student/Alumni Engagement Programs Employer Relations Staff Grace Williamson, Associate Director for Recruitment and Employer Relations Seeta Hayban, Recruiting Assistant Anne Degnan, Internship Assistant Annual Report Layout and Design Lisa Martiny Festa Photo Credits Commencement photo provided by the Office of Communications Reproduction in whole or part of this publication without written permission is strictly prohibited. Š 2014 The Trustees of Princeton University


Princeton University Office of Career Services 2012-13 Annual Report