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training

Medical graduates ‘poorly prepared’ to become doctors

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ewly qualified medical graduates are poorly prepared to work as junior doctors say their senior colleagues, according to the results of a survey published in the Postgraduate Medical Journal. Senior doctors were asked to score how well prepared their FY1 trainees were to work as doctors six months after they had graduated from medical school. Using the GMC ‘five point’ scale for competency the juniors scored below three on 48 of the 70 items. For clinical and practical skills only six of the 20 were above the midway point. “The findings give cause for concern,” say the researchers. “Senior doctors perceived that the undergraduate medical degree had not adequately prepared F1s for practice, especially in clinical and practical skills.” Basic respiratory function tests, prescribing, and more advanced communication skills were some of the areas where juniors performed poorly. They scored well on basic communication skills and how to ask for help, prompting the

authors to wonder whether medical schools had ‘gone too far in emphasising risk management and, perhaps inadvertently, helplessness’. The study at two major teaching hospitals in the East Midlands of England called for more opportunities for ward based experiential learning and for senior doctors to be more explicit about what is expected of FY1 trainees. pmj.bmj.com

MEDICAL STUDENTS

MEDICAL STUDENTS TO GET MANAGEMENT TRAINING

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edical students are to be offered management training under a new scheme launched by The British Association of Medical Managers (BAMM). BAMMdot will train students who are interested in management careers within the health service, through Begin To Lead - a junior spinoff from BAMM’s acclaimed Fit To Lead training

Professor Jenny Simpson OBE Chief Executive of BAMM

“We’ve seen an increase in interest from medical students who are keen to learn about medical management and pursue careers in clinical leadership.”

programme. It will be organised to fit around students’ existing academic commitments. “With public interest in the management of the NHS at an all-time high, we’ve seen an increase in interest from medical students who are keen to learn about medical management and pursue careers in clinical leadership,” said Professor Jenny Simpson OBE, Chief Executive of BAMM. “We’re looking forward to being able to provide medical students with opportunities and training that will meet their needs exactly, in order to provide insight into management careers within the health service and increase their understanding of clinical leadership, so that, come graduation, they are completely prepared to begin the first steps of their careers.” BAMMdot members will also receive advice, invaluable networking opportunities, regular policy updates and material. www.bamm.co.uk

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Junior DR #15  

Junior DR magazine design and layout. Issue 15.

Junior DR #15  

Junior DR magazine design and layout. Issue 15.

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