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Life & Leisure in Whitetail Club and McCall, Idaho

2013

summitmag.com

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F E AT U R E S Whitetail Club Amenities McCall, Idaho Summer Session

Payette Lake A Destination 10,000 Years in the Making 2013 Volume 1: Issue 1 |

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Where the Great Indoors Meets the Great Outdoors

A home at Whitetail Club puts you and your family in the perfect spot to enjoy four-seasons of outdoor adventure in and around McCall. Whether you golf, ski, bike or snowmobile, Whitetail Club homes offer a luxurious and comfortable place to return to after a day of enjoying the natural playground around you. Come see why residents at Whitetail Club love to call this place home. Stop by our new sales office and let our team help you find the homesite or cabin that’s right for your adventures. There has never been a better time to be a part of Whitetail Club with homesites starting from the $80’s and cabins starting at $650,000. Visit our sales office at 402 W. Lake St, McCall , ID 83638 For more information visit whitetailclub.com or call 877.634.1725.

Obtain a Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property.


VOLUME I: ISSUE I Publisher, Editor in Chief Peter Dawyot Associate Publisher and General Manager Jeff Tippett Senior Editor Luke Whisnant Contributing Editor Jason Pedley Art Director Connie Oh Layout, graphics and design assistant: Richard Dixon, Maari Casey Contributing Writers Carol Gore, Victoria Morehead, Jason Pedley Advertising Director Jeff Tippett Advertising Support Carol Gore

Published by Whitetail Club 402 W Lake Street, McCall ID 83638 SUMMIT does not accept unsolicited manuscripts. Please contact Associate Publisher & General Manager Jeff Tippett at jeff@publicusco.com for freelance guidelines. Obtain the Property Report required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal agency has judged the merits or value, it any, of this property. Scenes and views may be of a location not on or related to the property. All

maps are artist renderings, for relative location purposes only, and are not to scale. Actual distances may vary. Copyright SUMMIT magazine. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without written consent of the copyright owner.


18 Features PAYET TE LAKE

SUMMER SESSION

A Destination 10,000 Years in the Making

Kids Explore the Great Outdoors

WHITETAIL CLUB AMENITIES

THE GREAT OUTDOORS COMES INDOORS

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Your Family Adventures Await

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228 Individual homes sites within a 1,300-acre private gated community

MCCALL, IDAHO

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Idaho offers some of the best whitewater anywhere

A Rowdy Western Town’s Journey to Renowned Destination

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WHITEWATER RAFTING IN MCCALL

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DEPARTMENTS Amazing Taste From Farm to Table Executive Chef Steven Topple

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The Cove An Authentic McCall Spa

Distinguished by Its Authenticity to McCall

Downhill Delight

20 Miles of Hand-built Single Tracks Designed With All Skills in Mind

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McCall’s Winter Wonderland Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow!

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An Interview With A Sommelier

The city’s most iconic landmark for over half a century

McCall Moment

Dave Boyle, Wine Manager at Whitetail Club and Shore Lodge

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Payette Lake A Destination 10,000 Years in the Making by JASON PEDLEY

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gary Ertter


O

ne glance at the sparkling, vast, deep blue waters of Payette Lake, and you’ll

“The Crown Jewel of McCall.” While its beauty know why it’s called

is something to behold, there’s more to

this natural wonder than just good looks. With a multiplicity of magnificent yearround recreational activities, Payette

Lake is revered and enjoyed by locals and tourists alike. It has long been a

destination for water lovers and thrill

seekers, and also holds a place in history, dating back to the last ice age.

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PAY E T T E L A K E

CAROL GORE

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gary Ertter

NATURE’S MASTERPIECE

The Grand Canyon, Niagara Falls, The Redwood Forest—all prove that Nature is an artist of unrivaled mastery. Payette Lake belongs on that list. It’s a masterpiece thousands of years in the making. Like other glacial lakes, its origins can be traced back to the late Pleistocene, over 10,000 years ago. A glacier measuring a thousand feet high, two-and-a-half miles wide, and eight miles long created the lake by first eroding the soil, then melting into the gouged-out space. Because of its ancient icy origins, Payette Lake is filled with pure, pristine H2O, and its startling turquoise hue comes from sunlight being dispersed by fine particles of glacial rock suspended in the water. Adding to the serene blue beauty of the 5,330-acre lake are its immediate surroundings. Spectacular mountain views make an awe-inspiring backdrop. White sandy beaches are perfect for lakeside picnics. For hiking and camping there’s nearby Ponderosa State Park—a thousand acres of virgin wilderness.

THE WILD, WILD WEST

Attracted by the natural abundance of fish, game, and edible plants, several Native American tribes once settled along the shores of Payette Lake. The Shoshone, Nez Perce, Paiute, and

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Bannock tribes thrived in the summer months by hunting, fishing, and gathering, and by storing enough to sustain them through the winter. Whites began exploring Idaho in the early 19th century. The Lewis and Clark expedition passed less than a hundred miles north of Payette Lake in 1805. In the next decades the fur trade took root; among the better-known traders was Francois Payette, a native of Montreal who spent his career working in the Upper Rockies. It’s said that following his death in 1855, he was buried near current-day Washoe, overlooking the lake that was named after him. The late 19th and early 20th centuries saw logging emerge as the main industry in the Payette Lake region. In the 1890s, Thomas and Louisa McCall established a homestead on the lakeshore, and a rough logging town grew up around them. McCall, as the place became known, was the epitome of the “wild, wild west,” complete with brothels, rowdy saloons, gambling establishments, and dance halls. Today, McCall is resort town and vacation destination, thanks to its unique position among mountain ranges, untouched forests, and the beautiful Payette Lake.


THE TWILIGHT MONSTER

Natural wonders often inspire local legend, and Payette Lake is no exception. The early Native American inhabitants told of an evil spirit that dwelled in the waters, and in modern times, mysterious sightings of “monsters” have continued. Cryptozoologists hypothesize that Sharlie—also known as Slimy Slim, or the Twilight Monster of Payette Lake—is related to Scotland’s well-known Loch Ness Monster. Reports describe Sharlie as thirty-five feet long, with scaly skin, camel-like humps, and the head of a dinosaur. The first documented sighting was reported in 1920. Lake workers thought they saw a log floating in the water, but then realized it—whatever it was—was moving too fast to be a log. Since then, Sharlie has been spotted several dozen times, most recently in 2002. With each sighting, the descriptive details of the dinosaur-like lake monster have remained consistent. Today, McCall residents affectionately view Sharlie as their town mascot, and delight in regaling visitors with tales of his existence. All, visitor and resident alike, keep an eyeball peeled for the Twilight Monster.

GOIN’ FISHIN’

In Payette Lake’s eight square miles of pristine glacial water, there’s room for all kinds of fish. A day’s catch might yield, Kokanee salmon, mackinaw, rainbow trout, or some of each! You can rent or buy all the gear you’ll need in McCall’s several bait and tackle shops, and you can sign on for a guided tour with a local fisherman, who’ll show you his favorite spots. Also available: fishing passage reports that include guidelines on fishing responsibly.

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AHOY THERE!

Payette Lake is ideal for sailing, jet-boating, canoeing, kayaking, or pontooning. Bring your own boat and put in at any of several public access boat launches, or rent what you like at one of McCall’s private marinas. Whitetail Marina is one such marina, offering club members the most enviable piece of the shoreline on the lake. In addition to private slips, club members enjoy a private beach, all the beach and water toys imaginable, and enviable access to the best dining experience on the Lake. A good time for boaters to visit is the first weekend in June, when the annual Payette Cup Regatta is held. You can also book a scenic guided cruise, a great way to orient yourself to the area. As your guide regales you with tales of old McCall and points out features of the lake and surrounding mountains, stay alert— you just might catch a fleeting glimpse of Sharlie.

ADRENALINE JUNKIES

Despite all its placid beauty, Payette Lake can also satisfy the need for speed. Popular activities sure to get the blood pumping include water skiing, jet skiing and wake boarding.

PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gary Ertter

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PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gary Ertter

One of the latest rages to hit Payette Lake is lake surfing—like traditional surfing but minus the salty water, hazardous currents, and lurking aquatic beasties (other than Sharlie, of course). Give it a try!

BUNDLE UP AND GO

In the winter months, the entire lake freezes over, marking an end to swimming and boating and a beginning to cold-weather fun. There’s iceskating and ice fishing on the solid white lake, and phenomenal skiing: cross-country in Ponderosa State Park, and alpine at several nearby resorts. For 10,000 years The Crown Jewel of McCall has beckoned visitors and sustained residents, finding a place in the hearts of all who love beauty and adventure. What will the next 10,000 years hold for Payette Lake? Perhaps only Sharlie knows.

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GEAR

SUMMER

Mountain Bikes Raleigh Bikes | raleighusa.com Revenio Carbon 4.0 A carbon powerhouse. Ultra light and durable, the Revenio 4.0 is the top model in the Revenio series of carbon endurance road bikes. Decked out in high performance electric Shimano Ultegra components that make shifting as easy as clicking a mouse. MSRP: $4,300

Raleigh Talus 29 Carbon Elite A rocket ship on wheels, the Raleigh Talus 29 Carbon Elite brings turbo-charged speeds to the singletrack. Constructed with Raleigh’s Direct Connect Carbon process, the Talus Carbon Elite is the lightest, stiffest, and most durable carbon frame available. Featuring a tapered head tub, internal cable routing, a 142x12mm rear thru axle, and IKT (Integrated Kevlar Technology) reinforcements on the downtube and chainstays, it is a sleek, stout racing machine. Weighing an impressive 1080g, the Talus Carbon Elite is spec’d with Shimano Deore and a Fox F29 CTD 100mm front fork. This steed is a thing of beauty and a force to be reckoned with. MSRP: $3,000

Raleigh Detour City Sport DLX This bike is the ultimate commuter. The Detour City Sport DLX has a suspension seatpost for comfort, 700c wheels for faster speeds, a belt drive for greaseless operation, and an internal Shimano eight-speed drivetrain for minimal maintenance. Throw in a built-in bell, cargo rack, and disc brakes, and you have all the commuting bases covered. MSRP: $1100


Water Apparel

Bomber Gear | bombergear.com The Bomber Gear Blitz Splash Top This top is perfect for any water-loving outdoors person. Whether you are out Stand Up Paddleboarding, kayak touring, or whitewater rafting, the Blitz will keep you warm and protected from the elements. Ergonomically cut for active movement, the Blitz is designed to keep you dry and comfortable during any water activity. With plenty of ventilation and Bombtech 2-ply waterproof breathable fabric, you can keep light water sprays off without feeling stuffed in a dry top. Also features a sleeve pocket on the long sleeve version, a polyurethane coated nylon waist with a dry cord, stitched and taped seams, cone-shaped cuffs with SlickSkin for added seal, and of course, our Performance Cut Design. MSRP: Long Sleeve $99, Short Sleeve $89.

Kayaking

Wilderness Systems | wildernesssystems.com The Wilderness Systems Tsunami 135 PRO & 140 PRO The 135 and 140 PRO kayaks are ultra-light, ultra fast composite kayaks. They are excellent for both novice and advanced users because of its responsiveness, stability, and tight tracking. The Premium Phase 3 outfitting offers unmatched comfort and adjustability for all-day or all-weekend treks. The Tsunami PRO boats are exceptionally versatile, offering the stability of a rec boat and the comfort, speed and tracking expected for a touring series. This slim and responsive kayak is one of the most exciting touring kayaks on the market. The new composite construction reduces weight while increasing paddling efficiency, resulting in boats that are ultrafast and ultra-light (44lbs and 47lbs). MSRP: $2099 (135) and $2199 (140).


GEAR Skis

K2 Skis | k2skis.com SuperSticious Skis A woman-specific ski focused on soft snow and off-trail performance that provides float and confidence everywhere from backside bowls to frontside trees. It is designed for all ability levels to ski anywhere on the mountain.

MSRP: $816 flat, $1080 with bindings

SpYne 130 After two-and-a-half years of development, K2 will this year introduce ski boots. Leading the first class men’s SpYne collection is the SpYne 130, which delivers a true 130 flex index and is offered in both a 97 and 100 mm last. The SpYne 130 is the flagship of the line, featuring the Energy Interlock and PowerFuse SpYne technologies, as well as a PowerCinch Strap and molded/lasted PrecisionFit INTUITIONŽ liner for maximum power transfer and comfort. MSRP: $800

WINTER


Snowboards

Ride Snowboards | ridesnowboards.com

Hurrithane

Ender

The Hurrithane is the binding that started the urethane

The brand new Ender offers the proven freestyle design and

highback movement five years ago. This year’s updated

flex of the Darko upgraded with a softer version of Endo

Tweekback FS shaves weight and takes even more advantage

construction durability and long-lasting flex. From early season

of the tweekable flex and comfort you can only get from a

rail missions to February storm chasing trips and summertime

full urethane highback. Skate-inspired technology for skate-

Hood visits, the Ender will remain true.

inspired grabs and slashing.

MSRP: $329.95

Triad

Slayblade

The Triad strikes a chord with established freestyle riders as

The Slayblade has bagged awards and dominated the all-

the go-to performance boot built for gold. Now featuring our

mountain freestyle category for four years now. This year

new Tongue Tied™ Boa closure system providing next level

it sees its first major redesign. Now with full Hybritech

heel hold and maximum control on a traditional lace boot.

construction and all-new Precision Lifted Baseline pop and

Blending proven technologies such as Intuition™ Mobile Foam

energy, the all-new Slayblade is set to lead riders into the next

Liner and Blown Light Summit sole, these lightweight kicks

level of all-terrain freestyle creativity.

MSRP: $179.95

prove durable and supportive, park lap after park lap. MSRP: $219.95

MSRP: $559.95


Whitetail Club

AMENITIES

Amenity |e’menitē, e’mē-| noun (pl. amenities) (usu. amenities) a desirable or useful feature or facility of a building or place.

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“TOP-100” RANKED 18 HOLE GOLF COURSE / THE COVE SPA SHORE LODGE / WHITETAIL MARINA


PHOTOGRAPH BY: Gary Ertter

FISH & SWIM CLUB / WHITETAIL PLAYGROUND INDOOR TENNIS & FITNESS CENTER / SNOWMOBILE & MOUNTAIN BIKING


WHITETAIL CLUB AMENITIES

JA S O N P E D L EY

The 18-hole, 7,200-yard Whitetail Golf Course —ranked as one of America’s 100 Greatest Courses by Golf Digest.

T

race the word “amenities” back through its Middle English and Old French origins, and you arrive at the Latin word amoenus, meaning “pleasant.” But “pleasant” doesn’t even begin to cover what’s waiting for you at Whitetail Club. Just take a look.

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GET YOUR GAME ON AT WHITETAIL GOLF CLUB

It’s a par 72. It’s 18 holes totaling 7,200-yards. And it was designed by two-time U.S. Open winner Andy North and veteran golf architect Roger Packard, so you know it’s going to be a fun challenge. Throw in McCall’s stunning natural beauty— the old-growth pines, the natural water hazards, the Salmon River Mountains in the background—and it’s no wonder that the Whitetail Golf Club was ranked by Golf Digest as one of America’s 100 Greatest Courses.


The 7,900 square-foot Cove Spa is a multi-faceted facility designed to indulge and invigorate.

And what’s a great course without a great pro? At Whitetail Golf Club, members and guests may schedule golf and fitness training sessions with resident pro Todd Bindner, named 2011 Golf Professional of the Year by the Rocky Mountain Section of the PGA. (He’s also won RMS-PGA “Teacher of the Year”— not once, but twice.) Todd loves to teach, and offers instruction on swing technique, specialty shot-making skills, mental and emotional focus, and golf fitness. When you’ve bagged that last putt on 18, it’s time to kick back in the 3,500-square-foot, full-service clubhouse, complete with spacious locker rooms, well-equipped pro shop, and grill. Have a brew and a burger on the patio, look out over the mountains, and plan your next round.

REJUVENATE AT THE COVE

With all the outdoor activity found in and around the Whitetail Club community, members need a place to recharge and refresh. The Cove, An Authentic McCall Spa offers plenty of ways to push the reset button and reboot for your next adventure.

Need a massage for those overworked muscles? Try the Skipping Stones treatment—heated stones and oils to melt tension. If hot rocks are not your thing, there’s more on the menu, including the Big Game massage, a deep-tissue session focusing on trigger points and muscle release and using essential oils to stimulate circulation. There’s also a reflexology massage for tired feet, and a side-by-side couple’s massage to share with someone special. Skin care at The Cove is all-organic; the facials and wraps use natural ingredients like fresh fruit pulps, therapeutic herbs, botanicals, vitamins, antioxidants, and spices. Also offered are eye and lip repair treatments, waxing services, and even a masculine facial, One Tough Mug, for tough guys who need a little pampering. The Cove’s fitness studio, open 24 hours a day, features stateof-the-art cardio and strength equipment. And don’t forget the hewn-granite saltwater immersion pools, where a blissful soak evokes one of Idaho’s natural hot springs.

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There’s always something fun to do at the Fish and Swim Club.

FISH AND SWIM CLUB: FAMILY FUN INSIDE AND OUT

From the outside, the Fish and Swim Club lives up to its name: there’s a catch-and-release trout pond for anglers of all ages, and in-ground saltwater pool and spa for swimming and soaking. But fishing and swimming is just the start of the story. The Club offers an immaculate white-sand beach where you can throw out a towel and catch some rays, and a large patio area where you can chow down on some fare from the grill inside. The fishing pond has room for rowboats and kayaks, and at night there are open fire pits for marshmallows under the stars.

The 14,000-square-foot Tennis and Fitness Center is one of the social hubs of Whitetail Club.

Inside the 6,000-square-foot clubhouse, friends and families can team up or face off over a game of Ping-Pong, darts, air hockey, foosball, or board games. It’s a great venue for family bonding, or a safe place for kids to play while the adults enjoy some quality together-time.

The Tennis and Fitness Center is a 14,000-square-foot facility that will give you and your family plenty to do. The main floor features a regulation-sized tennis court with natural light from the oversized windows, and moveable basketball goals for spontaneous pick-up games or just shooting some hoops.

BRING IT INSIDE AT THE TENNIS AND FITNESS CENTER

For guests and residents who want to start (or finish) their Whitetail day with a serious exercise routine, the upstairs fitness area is just what the doctor ordered. You can top your personal best 5K time on one of several treadmills while enjoying an inspiring McCall vista. If

On those rare occasions when you can’t get outside, Whitetail Club’s Tennis and Fitness Center is one good way to get your play-time in.

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There’s a stunning view from every table in The Narrows.

HIT THE LAKE FROM THE MARINA AT SHORE LODGE

Shore Lodge’s full-service marina offers everything you could need for a day on the water.

you prefer, take a spin on a sleek stationary bike or get a good “pump” on a variety of resistance machines. For you cross-trainers, there’s also an assortment of dumbbells and space for body-weight workouts and jump rope work. The Tennis and Fitness Center has a place for kids, too: The kids will find plenty to do in the Game Room, with Ping-Pong, pool, foosball,

air hockey, darts, pop-a-shot, a jukebox, and gaming consoles—there’s even a big stash of classic board games.

The Marina at Shore Lodge is your gateway to fun on beautiful Payette Lake. It’s a full-service facility; in addition to providing boat slips for members and Lodge guests, they rent almost anything you could want for your lake adventure. Available are single and tandem kayaks, stand-up paddle boards, canoes, wake boards, water skis, inner tubes, Hobie sailboats--you can even rent a fishing pole and a cooler. The Marina provides sailing and water-skiing lessons. If you’re up for more high energy fun, members can rent the Air Nautique wakeboard and ski boat. And if you’d like a guided tour of the lake you can choose from the 32-foot Cutwater, a classic 1958 Chris-Craft Constellation cabin cruiser, or the Manitou, a 24-foot pontoon boat. There’s a regularly-scheduled 90-minute Saturday evening excursion, and you can even book a catered cruise. Yum!

SHORE LODGE RESTAURANTS: FINE DINING ON THE LAKE

With everything to do around in the McCall area, you’re bound to work up a great appetite. At Whitetail Club, we’ve got you covered. The Narrows, Shore Lodge’s award-winning restaurant, showcases Executive Chef Steve Topple’s locally-sourced creations against

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the backdrop of Payette Lake and the surrounding mountains (every table has a panoramic lake view). The seasonal menu is updated often, but perennial favorites include local lamb, quail, venison, buffalo, and fresh Idaho trout. The extensive wine list has earned Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence for the past two years. Lake Grill is open year-round for breakfast and lunch. The Sunday breakfast is popular with guests and locals alike, and during summer months, dinner is served outdoors on the lakeside patio. The Narrows Grill is a great place for a light meal and a drink in a lounge setting. The atmosphere is casual and fun, with live music on Sundays and Mondays, and their famous Burger Night on Thursdays. And if you can’t get enough of Shore Lodge cuisine, you’re in luck: Chef Topple regularly holds cooking classes, teaching techniques and some of his signature recipes.

WHITETAIL CLUB CONCIERGE SERVICE

For Whitetail Club members, getting their favorite restaurant table or setting a tee time is as easy as calling the concierge service. Not only can the concierge staff make reservations and arrangements onsite, they can help plan a day full of activities off-site as well. From arranging ski or bike rentals to suggesting fun family activities, the concierge staff knows all the area’s best-kept secrets.

FORD THEATER

Inside Shore Lodge is McCall’s only movie house—the 45seat Ford Theater. Choose a movie from the extensive video library and settle in with popcorn and soda. The theater is also available for meetings or gatherings requiring media presentations.

THE PRIVATE SHORE LODGE LAKE COTTAGE

On a secluded 200-foot stretch of Payette Lake beachfront, the private Lake Cottage offers beautiful views of the water from all three of its suites. There’s a lakeside hot tub, a private dock, and a fully-appointed luxury kitchen, perfect for entertaining guests or clients. The cottage is available for rent year round.

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Steven Topple

EXECUTIVE CHEF AT WHITETAIL CLUB & SHORE LODGE WHAT HE DOES: Oversees multiple restaurants at Shore Lodge and Whitetail Club, including: The Narrows, Lake Grill, Narrows Grill, the Golf Grille and the Fish & Swim Club Restaurant

WHERE HE’S FROM: Originally from England, Chef Topple worked most recently at Sonnenalp Resort in Vail, Colorado

JOINED THE STAFF: April 2013 SPECIALTY: Fresh, local ingredients, Seafood


Amazing Taste from Farm to Table: McCall’s Local Food Movement by VICTORIA MOREHEAD

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AMAZING TASTE FROM FARM TO TABLE V I C T O R IA M O R E H E A D

C

hef Steven Topple is serious about elegant, delicious food. And while some of his former coworkers at the Sonnenalp Resort in Vail questioned his decision to take a position in Idaho, he couldn’t be happier with his move. This English chef has found a gold mine of high-quality, fresh ingredients in the Idaho region, ingredients that speak to his culinary passions. Recently he took time out of his very busy schedule running multiple kitchens to talk game meats, farm-to-table inspiration, and his master plan to put Idaho cuisine on the map.

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ON THE PATH TO BECOMING A CHEF

Steve Topple had always wanted to be a pilot. He completed 15 lessons, but when he went in for the pilot’s license exam he was disqualified for red/green color blindness. That was when he turned to cooking—which in retrospect felt right to him, as his aunt was a chef, he was inspired by TV chefs, and he liked working with his hands. Steve attended culinary school at Highbury College, then apprenticed with other master chefs to learn the craft.

ON WHAT HE’S COOKING

“Seafood” is Chef Topple’s answer when asked his culinary passion. He also enjoys cooking game meats—perfect for Idaho. From buffalo and elk to rack of lamb and fresh salmon, he likes to let the main ingredient shine and be the star, rather than confuse it with too many additions.


ON HIS LAST REQUEST MEAL.

That’s a tough one. Something with foie gras in it for sure. If you’re gonna do it, do it right.

ON WHAT HE’S PROUD OF

Steve was proud to be invited to the very exclusive James Beard Chefs and Champagne event, held in the Hamptons. Getting to meet with world-famous chefs was truly an honor, he says, as was cooking for the James Beard house twice.

ON HIS LAST REQUEST MEAL

“That’s a tough one. Something with foie gras in it for sure. If you’re gonna do it, do it right.”

ON FINDING INSPIRATION IN THE KITCHEN

Chef Topple loves local. He’s a advocate of the farm-to-table movement, and is especially ardent about connecting with local farmers and cooking with local and regional ingredients. From Idaho lamb to freshly harvested morels, inspiration is always nearby. He’s also found that preparing dishes tapas style is an elegant way to introduce local ingredients to the plate.

ON HIS GREATEST TEACHER

Straight out of culinary school, Steve worked for one of Britain’s best-known TV chefs, the award-winning Brian Turner (OBE). Turner was a fantastic mentor for a young chef, Steve says. He took Steve under his wing, challenging him to expand his skills and do what he’d never done before.

ON WHAT MAKES IDAHO CUISINE DIFFERENT

According to Steve, a lot of people come to Idaho with no expectations about the food and then “they are blown away.” They see that it’s not just trout and potatoes. (Although Chef Steve does serve up a stunning potato-encrusted trout…)

ON THE ODDEST ITEM IN HIS FRIDGE

“Nutella spread.”

ON HIS COOKING STYLE

“Simple but elegant.”

ON WHAT DREW HIM TO THE IDAHO AREA

Although accustomed to natural beauty from his Colorado sojourn, Steve was knocked over by the stunning vistas and pristine wilderness in Idaho’s Heartland, and was excited at the chance to amp up the local cuisine in McCall. He fell in love immediately.

ON THE FUTURE OF SHORE LODGE

Besides showing visitors how incredible and varied the cuisine of Idaho is, Chef Topple says there may be a Shore Lodge cookbook down the road. (He’s already authored two other cookbooks.)

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Chef Steven Topple has found that the level of culinary artistry in Idaho often surprises visitors. But it’s no surprise to him; he has some of the country’s freshest, highest-quality ingredients right in his backyard. “My biggest point to get across,” he said “is that McCall is a destination area for amazing food.”

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ARE THERE CLOSE TIES BETWEEN LOCAL FARMERS AND CHEFS? I’ve just recently moved here, but building relationships is one of my goals. For instance, I work with a local goat cheese farm and use those cheeses in various dishes. Our beef comes out of Snake River Farms, and we do incredible beef dishes with their Kobe. We get lamb from Sun Valley. It’s just an amazing playground out here. HOW MUCH OF YOUR MENU IS INSPIRED BY THE SEASONAL FOODS AVAILABLE? DO THE INGREDIENTS INSPIRE NEW IDEAS FOR DISHES? Absolutely. When the Pacific salmons are in season—sockeyes and Copper River, Chinooks—I’m excited about being so close to that and having access to that. Halibut season just opened, and it’s incredible to work with that fish. I really try to focus on using local ingredients when they are in season, like ramps or morel mushrooms. My menus are definitely seasonally based.


DO YOU PLAN ON VISITING THE FARMERS’ MARKETS FOR INGREDIENTS AND INSPIRATION? I will be hunting down ingredients to put on the menus, and I’ll do one or two specials per night based on what I find. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DISHES YOU ARE CURRENTLY SERVING THAT USE LOCAL INGREDIENTS? With the Lava Lake Lamb, we’ve got a gingerbread-crusted Idaho rack of lamb served with sweet potato purée, braised red cabbage and thyme sauce. We also are using morel mushrooms from the local forest, paired with asparagus and sautéed in white wine and garlic. We do a Dungeness-crusted halibut served with a red pepper hummus and a saffron cream sauce. WHY DO YOU THINK IT’S IMPORTANT FOR CHEFS AND RESTAURANTS TO EMBRACE LOCAL FOOD? Well, you could use ingredients like big box commodity beef, but it’s just generic. Whereas if you use local ingredients, you’re supporting your state. It’s a representation of your establishment. It’s an honor for me, professionally, to use these items. I’m proud and super-excited.

PA N S E A R E D S C A L L O P S INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

8 Scallops 1 can of white bean 1 onion peeled and diced 2 cloves of garlic peeled and crushed ¼ cup of oil ¼ cup of heavy cream 1 sprig of chopped thyme ¼ cup grated parmesan cheese 2 rashers of bacon ¼ cup of sherry vinegar 1 cup of light olive oil Salt and pepper to taste

Pre heat a oven to 375 degrees, also pre heat a sauté pan, to medium heat.

In a small pot cook the onion in a tablespoon of olive oil, add garlic, cook until translucent, wash beans out of the thick syrup, then add to the onion mix, add the heavy cream and thyme cook until thick then sprinkle parmesan cheese season with salt and pepper. Cut the bacon into thin strips, render down, remove fat, add sherry vinegar and and oil, to make vinaigrette Season the scallops with salt and pepper, in a pre heated sauté pan, drizzle a small amount of oil, then place the scallops in, until they are brown and crispy cook for about 2 minutes each side, remove from heat and rest for 5 minutes to relax the scallop.

Place the white bean ragout in the middle of plate then place scallops on top then sprinkle bacon vinaigrette Serve and enjoy

YIELD: Makes 4 servings

ACTIVE TIME: 20 min

TOTAL TIME: 30 min

2013 Volume 1: Issue 1 |

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Main Street, McCall Idaho

McCall, Idaho:

A Rowdy Western Town’s Journey to Renowned Destination by LUKE WHISNANT

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I

n mid-August 1805, about 100 miles east of present-day McCall, the Lewis and Clark Expedition crossed the continental divide at Lemhi Pass and became the first white Americans to set foot into present-day Idaho. But of course the story doesn’t start there. The original inhabitants of this part of North America had arrived in Idaho around 4000 years earlier, following large game animals. These nomadic native peoples—mostly Shoshoni, Nez Perce, and Tukudeka—enjoyed the summer bounties of Payette Lake, and usually migrated to milder climes in the winter. Both the Shoshoni and the Nez Perce were of great help to Lewis and Clark; without their assistance it is likely the expedition would have come to disaster in the Bitterroot Mountains. Lewis and Clark were followed by the famous “mountain men,” fur traders and explorers at home in the Rockies. Adventurers like Jim Bridger, Jedediah Smith, and the French Canadian François Payette, namesake for Payette Lake, helped open the region up to further settlement; it also didn’t hurt that gold was discovered in the 1860s. The gold rush attracted tens of thousands of Civil War veterans, California miner-‘49ers, and ethnic Chinese workers, most of whom stayed on for the silver boom in the 1880s. The town we know as McCall got its start as a mining and logging camp originally called Lake City. How do you keep roughneck miners and loggers happy? How about a few dance halls and gambling houses, some saloons and brothels? Of course vice and violence went hand-in-hand with the boom economy: the region was rife with shootings and stabbings, thieves and scofflaws and prostitutes. During this period McCall developed a reputation as a rowdy Western town—not quite the family destination of today.

entrepreneur known as “Jew’s Harp Jack” began charging tourists for recreational sailboat rides around the lake, advertising his service in the Idaho Statesman. In the first years of the 20th century, hotels and resorts began springing up nearby; in 1914 the Oregon Short Line Railroad arrived, helping make the area a viable destination. By 1917, the village of McCall had incorporated, and started becoming known around the state as a “pleasure resort.” The year 1924 saw the inception of what is now an annual McCall tradition: the Winter Festival, which brought hundreds of visitors into town, including the governor. Fifteen years later, the breathtaking beauty of the wilderness around McCall attracted a Hollywood production crew for the Spencer Tracy film Northwest Passage, which was subsequently nominated for an Academy Award for cinematography. Around the same time, McCall’s first ski area, Little Ski Hill, opened as recreation for local loggers. Logging was still the main industry, but it became less lucrative as more and more of the region earned protected wilderness status. Over two million acres surrounding McCall was designated as Payette National Forest, and Ponderosa State Park was created from a thousand-acre peninsula jutting out into Payette Lake. The last sawmill closed in 1977, leaving tourism and outdoor recreation as McCall’s top economic mainstay. Today, visitors from all over the world come to McCall to enjoy its lakes, rivers, forests, and mountains, its resorts, ski slopes, golf courses, and hiking trails. The Winter Carnival continues to draw thousands of visitors annually, as do summer’s IdahoDown and Roseberry Music Festivals. McCall has evolved into a fantastic destination for outdoor adventure and family fun. And although the brothels and gambling houses are long gone, you can still feel the spirit of that Old West town in today’s McCall.

Yet there were harbingers of McCall’s future even then. In the early 1890s, the Thomas and Louisa McCall family established a homestead on the shore of Payette Lake. In the next few years they built a school, a hotel, and a post office. An

2013 Volume 1: Issue 1 |

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The Cove

AN AUTHENTIC MCCALL SPA by CAROL GORE

The idea behind The Cove was simple, according to co-designer Mark Natale: make it “another

McCall adventure.”


35


THE COVE

CAROL GORE

Melding of opulence and wilderness along with locally-sourced materials create the perfect get away.

NATALE NOTES THAT A THEMED SPA IS NOTHING NEW: there are spas with Asian themes, spas with Tuscan themes, country-and-western spas, futuristic spas, you name it. But few spas are set amidst the kind of natural beauty that surrounds The Cove, and the design team decided that their task was to incorporate as much of that beauty as possible. The spirit of McCall and its natural environment should shine through. “Our goal was to build something authentic to McCall,” Natale says. And so they did. Natale and his design partner Colum McCartan, interior designer for some of the world’s most exclusive hotels, created The Cove as a masterful melding of opulence and

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wilderness. Keeping it local, they constructed the interior of the spa with regionally-sourced materials. More than sixty Douglas fir tree trunks form the two-story-tall entrance hall walls. There’s 5000 square feet of antique Pacific Northwest oak for the floors, and over forty tons of local granite lining the immersion pools. The overall effect is at once invigoratingly natural and luxuriously indulgent. Moving through The Cove, Natale says, should feel like moving from one outdoor adventure to the next. That outdoor adventure theme has also influenced the extensive menu of treatments and amenities, as evidenced by some of the names and details of specific services. If you’re in need of a massage, you can choose from The Vintage McCall, The Big Game, The Trailblazer, Skipping Stones, or Footprints. For facials, there’s


Wildflowers, Mountain Mist, or Forest Flora, and body wraps

There’s even more to The Cove: a fitness studio with state-of-

Natural aromatherapy and cleansing herbs and fruits are used in

room, and showers; and an outdoor sanctuary featuring fire-pits

include The Deep Blue, The Clearwater Scrub, and Sharlie’s Secret. many of the treatments: paprika, blueberries, strawberrys, rhubarb, gingko, yam, pumpkin, citrus, lavender, lemongrass, rosemary, eucalyptus, peppermint, ginger—you get the idea.

Too many options? Instead of picking a la carte, you might try one of The Cove’s “Daily Excursions,” service packages named after

area mountain climbs. Try the three-hour-long Granite Mountain

the-art cardio and strength equipment; a steam room, locker

and a beautifully manicured garden. And the staff, of course, are professional and knowledgeable.

The Cove is a restful refuge, a place to pamper yourself, to relax and recuperate from all that outdoor excitement. All you have to do is open the door to another McCall adventure.

excursion, which includes a Trailblazer Massage, a Wildflower Facial, and The Cove Manicure and Pedicure. Or go all in with Borah Peak’s six-hour treatment: a Skipping Stones Massage, the Clearwater Scrub, the Forest Flora Facial, the McCall Spa Manicure and

Pedicure, and a healthy spa lunch served beside the Immersion Pools. Speaking of which, designer Natale says, “The idea was to make

them feel almost as if they were ‘found’ natural pools.” The pools are

modeled on Idaho’s naturally-occurring hot springs; they use pure salt water instead of chemicals, and are ringed by real granite boulders

incorporated into the design. The indoor pool is a peaceful, sheltered retreat from the elements, while the outdoor pool connects you back to the natural beauty of water and sky, birdsong and wind.

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Summer Session by JASON PEDLEY


W

hen School is out, fun is the only thing on the schedule at Camp Sharlie

as kids explore the great outdoors! Summer in McCall was made for fantastic family adventures. Those mid-year months are a great time to bring everybody closer together and make some special memories. But now and then the kids could use a little social and recreation time on their own—without parents around to spoil the fun.

39


SUMMER SESSION

JASON PEDLEY

That’s where Camp Sharlie comes in. Named after Payette Lake’s apocryphal (or maybe not?) lake monster, Camp Sharlie is designed for children of Whitetail Club members and Shore Lodge guests, aged 4 through 13. Activities vary from day to day and are determined in part by campers’ interests, but often include golf, tennis, art, swimming, kayaking, and hiking. Mornings at Camp Sharlie start at Shore Lodge, where campers and parents gather. At the Herrick Street basecamp, a short walk away, counselors run down the day’s schedule. Then it’s off to the morning’s first activity: golf, tennis, Frisbee, or agility activities. There’s usually a creativity session scheduled each morning, too, where campers make arts and crafts inspired by McCall’s beautiful natural surroundings. At midday the kids enjoy a healthy boxed

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lunch, and in the afternoon, more fun—swimming, boating, or even ice-skating at the Manchester Ice Rink—fueled by a tasty mid-afternoon snack. Then it’s back to Mom and Dad with a new Camp Sharlie tee-shirt and a full day’s worth of adventures to recount. Camp Sharlie’s dedicated and friendly counselors are professional coaches, teachers, or college students working toward a recreation or education degree. Each is CPR-, Heartsaver Adult-, and Pediatric First Aid-Certified by the American Heart Association, and each has passed federal, state, and local background checks. Camp Sharlie runs Tuesday through Sunday during the summer months. Half- and full-day options are available. Registration is easy: just call the front desk or concierge. An up-to-date registration and health form is required ahead of time.


A TYPICAL CAMP SHARLIE DAY School is out and fun is in at Camp Sharlie. Here’s an idea of what campers can expect on any given day:

8:30AM: Campers and parents gather at Shore Lodge before the five-minute walk to Camp Sharlie

9:00-9:15AM: Meet up with counselors for the lowdown on the day’s coming adventures

9:15-10:30AM: Campers take to the putting greens with Whitetail Club’s golf pro

10:30AM-12:00PM: Creativity time with nature-inspired arts and crafts

12:00-1:00PM: Refuel with lunch and take a quick break 1:00-2:00PM: Off to the Manchester Ice Rink in downtown McCall

2:30-3:30PM: Chill by the pool or get in a few laps 3:30-4:00PM: Grab an afternoon snack and recap the day’s activities

4:30PM: Meet parents at the designated pick-up location

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The Great Outdoors Comes Indoors by JASON PEDLEY


A

fter a visit to McCall, it’s easy to start dreaming of being

here on a regular basis. Your

memory drifts through the fantastic

beauty of the outdoors, and your heart

begins to put down roots. You imagine a

place to return to, even a place to live, to stay. You imagine a home.

People build homes in McCall for various reasons. Some want a vacation home. Others desire a seasonal retreat, living through part of the year close to the nature they love. Many choose a permanent home here. Whichever of these appeals most to you, when you are ready to call McCall home, there is one best option: Whitetail Club.

Nature is not a place to visit. It is home. Gary Snyder

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THE GREAT OUTDOORS COMES INDOORS JA S O N P E D L EY

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The home should be the treasure chest of living. Le Corbusier


Whitetail Club is many things, but most of all, it’s a community of like-minded people, people who love outdoor adventure and family togetherness, people who cherish Nature and all the opportunities provided by an unspoiled natural environment. Designed with those values in mind, Whitetail Club is a 1,300acre private gated community comprising 228 individual home sites. At 400 acres, the Whitetail golf course takes up a little less than a third of the property; there are 18 acres of freshwater lakes, and the rest is meadow, ridgeline, woodland, and mountain prairie—aspen and spruce, poppy and lupine, native grasses and chokecherry trees. The homes at Whitetail Club are designed to harmonize with the beauty of their surroundings. If you’re interested in the best that mountain lake living has to offer, then bring your own architect’s plans for us to review, or let us help you choose a turnkey home from our collection of American Camp-inspired designs.

THE SELWAY CABIN

At 2,600 square feet, the two-story, three-bedroom Selway has plenty of space for family and friends. The downstairs master suite, with its walk-in closet, his-and-hers dual vanity, and spacious soaker tub, makes for easy ground-floor living. Each upstairs bedroom also has its own bathroom, and each adjoins the loft game room, which is large enough for a pool table. The Selway’s open floor plan is great for entertaining, and vaulted ceilings heighten the feeling of spaciousness. The cabin’s exterior is cedar and stone, with a covered deck and front porch. There’s a three-car garage; the extra bay gives you room to store outdoor gear or park a golf cart, a boat, or other recreational vehicles. The Selway Cabin: From $849,000.

All three models in the Cabin Collection are constructed with Anderson windows and and a Presidential lifetime roof. They’re energy-efficient, too, with extra insulation, zoned heating and A/C, and an on-demand hot water system. And whichever version you choose, you’ll be in the middle of it all at Whitetail Club—literally. From the master-planned Cabin Collection community it’s just a short walk or golf cart ride away to the Whitetail Golf Course, the Fish and Swim Club, the Clubhouse, and the Golf Shop and Grill.

There are elements of intrinsic beauty in the simplification of a house built on the log cabin idea.

Gustav Stickley, American Craftsman designer

THE CLEARWATER CABIN

At 3,100 square feet, the Clearwater is the largest member of the Whitetail Cabin Collection. All three bedrooms (each with its own private bath) are on the ground floor. Climb the stairs to a cozy bonus room—perfect for a home office, overflow guests, or a game room/home theater. Off the three-bay garage is a familysized mudroom, and the spacious gourmet kitchen features a breakfast bar, a prep island, a freestanding wet bar, and of course, top-of-the-line appliances. And the Master Bedroom showcases its own cozy fireplace. The Clearwater Cabin: From $935,000

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LAKEVIEW RIDGE

To get a taste of luxurious mountain living, all you have to do is visit Lakeview Ridge, Whitetail Club’s showcase residence. This 5,011-square-foot home offers four bedrooms, four bathrooms, two powder rooms, and scenic views from every window and deck (true to its name, the house is sited atop the development’s upper ridge and features stupendous lake views to the east). McCall architect Andrew Laidlaw envisioned the house as an interaction with—and a reflection of—its surroundings, a conversation with the mountains and lake and sky. Inside, the house is a playbook of modern convenience and individual style. Toe-kick mood lighting, remote-controlled steam showers, heated tile floors—these are just a few up-tothe-minute conveniences designed in. The interior space is beautifully appointed by Boise designer Dee Vinci, who took an organic approach, incorporating casual, unpretentious furniture and objects—even down to the large bowl of pine cones on the oversized living room table. Here, every element has been considered, weighed, and selected with discernment and taste. Lakeview Ridge is exceptional in every way, and indicative of the kind of quality and attention to detail that Whitetail Club puts into its home design and construction. The Whitetail Club community has been meticulously masterplanned. Each site has water, sewer, electricity, phone, and broadband in place. Each site features gorgeous views and access to Whitetail Club amenities. Imagine living here. Imagine a home with us. Let’s get started.

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Home is the nicest word there is. Laura Ingalls Wilder

| SUMMIT


W LAKE ST. ENTRANCE

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W H I T E TA I L C L U B H O M E S I T E S AT A G L A N C E : Number of homesites: 228 Total community acreage: 1,300 acres Homesite sizes: .5 - 2.5 acres Views available: Golf Course, Salmon River Mountains, Payette Lake

2013 Volume 1: Issue 1 |

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WHITEWATER RAFTING IN McCALL BY CAROL GORE


I

t’s a well-known fact: Idaho has some of the best whitewater anywhere. Period. And with access

to three river systems and whitewater runs appropriate for both novice and experienced rafters and kayakers, McCall is smack dab in the middle of all that fun.

WA

MT

OR ID

Snake River

CA

WY

NV UT

49


SALMON RIVER Say “Salmon River” to any whitewater enthusiast and you’ll get a knowing look. This is not only primo whitewater — some of the country’s best rapids — but also the setting for a river vacation you’ll be recounting for years. The elements are all there. You’ve got your Native American and pioneer history in the villages, ghost towns, homesteads, and abandoned mines found along the river’s route. You’ve got your wildlife viewing (cougar, elk, bighorn sheep, black bear!) and rugged backcountry hiking that ol’ Teddy Roosevelt himself would endorse. You can pitch your tent on broad sandy beaches or in campsites tucked in groves of majestic ponderosa pines. And oh, yeah — there’s the rafting.

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Nicknamed “The River of No Return,” the Main Salmon River is 425 miles of undammed, free-flowing wilderness waterway, winding its way through the Salmon River Mountains, the Lemhi Range and the Clearwater Mountains. The Middle Fork — one of the Main Salmon’s many tributaries — is one of the planet’s best-known whitewater sites. National Geographic ranks it number three in the entire world. At 110 miles long and around 300 runs rated from Class I to Class IV, the Middle Fork features steep drops, large waves, big gaps, and plenty of rocks interspersed with calm pools where you can catch your breath. You’re surrounded by sagebrush and mountain mahogany, with Douglas fir and lodgepole pine at the higher elevations. And at intervals along the route are a half-dozen natural hot springs, good for a quick soak before hopping back into the raft.


The rapids are stupendous. Class III+ runs include Cliffside, Rubber, and Devil’s Tooth. Power House, Pistol Creek, and Tappan Falls are class IV. Dagger Falls is a class V. A guide is essential here (and permits are required). Try Canyons River Company, a “tribe of whitewater professionals with the great passion for sharing what we love to do.” They offer several boat options, unbelievable custom cuisine, and even red — or white — wine with dinner! Learn more at canyonsinc.com.

SNAKE RIVER The Snake River’s evocative name arose from a misunderstanding. The Shoshone Indians’ squiggly sign for “fish” was wrongly interpreted by white explorers to mean “snake,” and you can imagine the rest. The Native Americans had a story about the Snake River’s famous Hells Canyon, too. Their legend said the 10-mile wide gorge—North America’s deepest—was dug by coyotes to protect their ancestors from the Seven Devils mountains that loom over the canyon. Modern geologists have a different explanation: the place was created by an arc of volcanoes 300 million years ago. Whatever you choose to believe, there’s no denying that the trip down this part of the river is flat-out spectacular. In between negotiating the Class II-IV rapids, rafters and kayakers can expect to see Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, mountain goats, deer, elk, eagles, and hawks, all in an awe-inspiring natural setting.

•  Check local regulations. Some rivers and specific runs have age restrictions or may require a permit. •  Never raft alone. Even the most experienced rafters shouldn’t tackle a river solo. •  Stay safe. Always wear a life jacket and helmet. Avoid alcohol before or during rafting, and never raft in the dark. •  Float feet first. Falling off of the boat does happen. Don’t try to climb back in; instead, float feet first, letting the current take over. Never try to stand in the river. •  Raft in smart style. Wear comfortable, fast-drying clothes. Don’t forget the sunscreen. The whitewater rafting season in Idaho starts in May and runs through September. The biggest water is found in late May and early June, with summer months bringing calmer waters. Happy rafting!

Since the run is part of the protected Hells Canyon Natural Recreation Area, a permit is required. Several area outfitters provide guided tours. Hells Canyon Raft, with over 25 years of experience, offers river adventures featuring spacious tents and decadent meals (rib-eye steak, Alaskan salmon). Canyon Outfitters has led river trips in Hells Canyon for 34 years, and are known for their innovative packages, such as the popular Massage and Martinis tour (massages, yoga, and cocktails).

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR ADVENTURE Whitewater rafting is an exhilarating experience best enjoyed with appropriate planning and safety precautions. Before embarking down the river, keep the following tips in mind: •  Know your limitations. Beginners should start with guided trips on milder runs, and should avoid more challenging areas until acquiring more experience.

2013 Volume 1: Issue 1 |

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Get Lost ‌In a skipping stones Massage! Summertime, and the living is easy! One of our favorite ways to pass the time is a Skipping Stones Massage. Indulge in smooth, heated stones and warming oils to melt away any pre-summer tension. Top it all off with a soak in our immersion pools and you have the perfect summer escape.

Get lost with a Skipping Stones Massage and Immersion Pool soak only $145. call

208.630.0280 today to schedule your appointment.

See our adventures at TheCoveMcCall.com

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208.630.0280 Located next to 501 West Lake street, MccaLL Idaho 83638


An Interview With A Sommelier

Dave Boyle, Wine Manager at Whitetail Club and Shore Lodge by VICTORIA MOREHEAD

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WHAT EXACTLY DOES A SOMMELIER DO, AND WHY IS HAVING ONE SO IMPORTANT TO A PHENOMENAL DINING EXPERIENCE? We do everything from curating a wine list to educating a staff to educating the customer. At the end of the day it’s all about the best customer experience, whether that be the perfect wine pairing for an entrée, or the perfect glass that suits that guest’s particular tastes. The level of comfort of the average diner is enhanced when someone can walk them through the process. My goal is to take the intimidation factor out of it, make them comfortable, and introduce them to an experience that they wouldn’t have otherwise had. HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN INTERESTED IN WINE? WHAT LED YOU TO BECOME A SOMMELIER? I’ve always been in the restaurant industry. My father is a 40year veteran in it. I started working for some of his friends that had world-class wine cellars, seeing their sommelier and their programs. When it really clicked was with pairings and seeing the way wine enhances food, but that it goes both ways; the

perfect dish can accentuate the wine. When we bring a wine maker in, our goal is to make the wine shine. WHAT WOULD YOU SUGGEST TO SOMEONE THAT IS NEW TO WINE APPRECIATION? What I’ve taken away from all my training is to appreciate the entire process from the seed to the bottle to the glass. It’s such a deep process, and almost seems infinite. There are so many things to learn, and some people overcomplicate it to the point that they aren’t enjoying it. Yes, there’s a whole wealth of knowledge and science that goes into that glass of wine, but at the end of the day, you’re here to sit down and enjoy it and the people you’re with. DOES A PERSON NEED TO BE A WINE EXPERT TO APPRECIATE AND BENEFIT FROM A SOMMELIER? Absolutely not. We’ve got over 210 wines on the list, and that can be overwhelming and intimidating. There’s a certain romance and pomp and circumstance around the wine service world. We want to respect that, but we want to offer that without the intimidation.

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WHAT’S YOUR HOLY GRAIL WINE, THE ONE YOU’D LOVE TO TRY?

That’s an easy one. It’s gonna take some savings. It’s a 1982 Pétrus.

WHAT’S A GOOD RULE OF THUMB WHEN PAIRING WINES WITH COURSES? The one-word answer would be “balance.” For instance, with a very fatty food, on the opposite side of that you want acid to cut through and balance out your palate. You don’t want a heavy, rich entrée with a very light wine, because that scale is going to tip. So, you’re matching flavors. Lots of people like to pair the protein with wine. I don’t think that’s necessarily the case. You can pair with sauces, you can pair with spices. Think regionally, too. There are regionally specific styles of wine because there are regionally specific styles of food. It works naturally to pair regionally. WHAT DOES IDAHO HAVE IN THE WAY OF WINERIES?

There are a quite a few, and they are a relatively young industry. We like to feature those. So the maturity of fruit and vines has a way to go, but the passion is there, and there’s definitely a presence. We also focus on Washington and Oregon wines.

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IF A WHITETAIL CLUB MEMBER WERE TO HOST A PARTY, WHAT SORT OF SERVICES COULD YOU OFFER THEM? We’ve done all sorts of different events and services, from developing a cellar, accessing cool new wines, in-home education, or just fun tastings. We did the Men’s Invitational Golf Tourney and did a champagne tasting. It runs the gamut. We host chef dinners, and bring in those access-limited wines. We host, educate, and help people have a good time with it. WHAT’S YOUR HOLY GRAIL WINE, THE ONE YOU’D LOVE TO TRY? That’s an easy one. It’s gonna take some savings. It’s a 1982

Pétrus. It’s a Bordeaux wine, merlot based…the finest merlot in the world, really.


Downhill Delight

20 Miles of Hand-built Single Tracks Designed With All Skills in Mind by JASON PEDLEY

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T

wenty miles of downhill mountain biking trails make Brundage as much fun in summer as it is in winter.

When the melt-off kicks into high gear and snow enthusiasts hang up their skis and snowshoes, many of them waste no time pulling out their bikes. And in Idaho’s heartland, there’s no better place for downhill warm-weather biking than Brundage Ski Resort. With twenty miles of hand-built, single-track trails cascading down the mountain’s western face, there’s a route for riders of every skill—and courage—level. Those who prefer a slower ride enjoy Elk Trail, a gently winding path that descends 1,640 feet through pine forests and scenic meadows (bring your camera!). Elk Trail takes around an hour to complete if you aren’t in a hurry, but experienced riders can add a little downhill peddle-power for more of a challenge. For those who enjoy a bit more velocity, Brundage offers Hidden Valley and Zorro, two trails designed for intermediate and expert riders. Of the two, Hidden Valley is the most technical, with big drops and large rocks in and along the carved track (body armor recommended). Zorro is less technical, but will keep you on your toes (and your toes on your brakes) as you navigate switchbacks and fast downhill passages. Zorro links up with the Growler trail, which despite forks and crossroads eventually returns you to Mountain Bike Headquarters next to Brundage Lodge.

Brundage is open to mountain bikes June through October, depending on the snow melt. A summer-season lift ticket is $99, or a single ride (with bike) is $16. Riders fourteen and under and 70 and older qualify for a discount, and kids six and under are free.

For more information on trail conditions, lifts and rentals, check brundage.com or call (800) 888-7544. BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN BIKING PRICES 2013 Summer Season Lift Pass: $99 Summer Biking Pass added to 2013/14 Winter Ski Pass: $69 Full-day Lift Ticket (15-69): $32 Full-day Lift Ticket (7-14 and 70+): $20 One-Ride Lift Ticket – Rider (15 -69) and bike: $16 One-Ride Lift Ticket – Rider (7-14 years) and bike: $9 One-Ride Lift Ticket – Rider (70+ years) and bike: $5 Children 6 & Under: Free

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

Watch for other riders. Since Brundage still has a bit of a “well-kept secret” status, over-crowding is usually not a problem. Things do move fast in downhill biking, though, so try to stay aware of traffic and yield the right-of-way.. Snow melt status. Even if 99.9% of a trail is snow free, the .1% that remains could be several feet deep. Get the latest trail information prior to your descent.

While getting down Brundage by bike is never a problem, getting to the top is another matter. If you’re “up” for it, you can ascend via Lodge Lane, the mountain’s only two-way hike-and-bike trail (uphill riding is prohibited on all other trails). Or, taking the path of least resistance, you can schedule your rides for Friday, Saturday, or Sunday, when the resort operates special biker-and-bike ski lifts.

Bring sunglasses (but not too dark). When the sun shines at Brundage, it can be blinding—until you suddenly fly around a switchback and find yourself in the low light of dense forest. Overlydark sunglasses can make this part of the ride seem like nighttime.

And in case you find yourself in McCall without the necessary gear, you can simplify your biking experience by allowing Shore Lodge to handle all the details. The concierge will assist with ticket purchases and guest services rents high-end mountain bikes. The Adult bikes, Trek Fuel Ex 6, come in a full range of sizes (15.5 to 21.5); Trek MT240 bikes for kids feature front suspension. Guest services will also make sure you’re set with all the needed gear.

Getting to Brundage from McCall by car is easy, but getting back to town on a mountain bike is even easier (and much more fun). If you’re car-free, just zip down Old Brundage Mountain Road when you’re ready to head home. A quick left onto West Lake Street brings you back into McCall.

LITTLE-KNOWN BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN BIKING FACT:

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BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN BIKING AT A GLANCE: Mountain:

Summit Elevation: 7640 ft (2328 meters) Base Elevation: 6000 ft (1829 meters) Total Vertical: 1800 ft (548 meters) Bike Park Vertical: 1640 ft (500 meters)

Trails:

Total Miles: 20 Total Trails: 10 Beginner Trails: 4 Intermediate Trails: 3 Advanced Trails: 3

Brundage Bike Park Features: Lift access Cross Country Trails Downhill Trails

When to go:

June - Labor Day (Opening day varies based on snow melt)

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GEAR

SIMMS

G4Z® Stockingfoot, US SRP $799.95 A New 5-layer GORE -TEX® fabric - only featured in the G4Z & G4 Pro Waders - found in the seat, waist & throughout leg with 25% more breathability •E  xtended YKK® Aquaseal waterproof centerfront zipper in the G4Z allows easy access for quick relief & additional ventilation; the centerfront zip also allows for easy on/easy off • Most feature-rich wader in the Simms line: - Large zippered chest pockets -C  omfortable lined hand warmer pockets provide room for heater packs, offer quick/ easy hand warm-up & convenient hand placement -B  uilt-in low profile belt loops with high-quality 2” elastic belt featuring Simms Trout buckle -2  Retractor docking stations; G4Z includes 1 Simms Retractor - Includes Super-fly Patch • Adjustable stretch spacer mesh/elastic suspenders provide the most advanced & comfortable suspender system available •B  uilt-in Gravel Guards feature ultra abrasionresistant material for added durability •U  pdated styling details set this wader apart from all others

Stone Cold Shirt, US SRP $79.95 • Cool Control™ fabric technology provides a cooler, more comfortable garment • UPF 30 sun protection - inherent in the fabric and will not diminish due to laundering • Ideal for warm fishing environments • Fabric absorbs and dissipates heat • Two fly box compatible zip close chest pockets • Under-collar buttons and straight hem • Off-shoulder seams for added comfort • Sun Cuff design lengthens sleeve over back of hand to provide greater sun protection • SOLID - 100% Nylon with sanded finish; PLAID - 50% Polyester/50% Nylon - both with COR3 Technology & Cool Control • Approximate weight: 8 oz

RiverTek™ BOA® Boot, US SRP $179.95 •C  leanStream™ design elements incorporating features that include a synthetic upper that won’t absorb water, minimal exposed stitching and Boa lacing system to eliminate water & debris absorbing laces • Boa® M3 reel tightens laces 3-4 times faster than previous models •P  erforated neoprene lining with closed-cell foam and full-coverage molded rubber toe cap • Rubber toe cap for durable protection against rocks & debris • TPU heel clip for added stability • Synthetic construction • Approximate pair weight (size 10): 59.2 oz • Men’s whole sizes: 7-14, Width: EEE


McCall’s Winter Wonderland Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow! by LUKE WHISNANT

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B

y now you know that there’s always something fun to do in McCall’s Great Outdoors, no matter what time of year. But with an annual average snowfall of 174 inches, and a season that lasts from November through April, winter here has a special allure, a magic that you won’t find just any-oldwhere. In some ways, McCall is at its best in the winter. When you’re talking wintertime fun, downhill skiing is probably the first thing most folks think of. It’s not for nothing that McCall is known as “Ski Town USA.” You’ll find some of Idaho’s best snow at family-owned Brundage Mountain, which features five lifts, 46 runs, and a vertical drop of 1,800 feet; there’s also the venerable Little Ski Hill, Idaho’s second-oldest ski area (established 1937 as recreation for forest workers). And if you prefer to get off the beaten path, McCall’s backcountry skiing is superb (try Brundage Mountain’s Snow Cat Adventures, or call Chuck or Marty at Payette Powder Guides).

institution since 1924, the Carnival is usually held the last week of January, and features (take a deep breath) a snow sculpture contest, a torchlight parade for kids, snowshoe golf, snowbike racing (“a ski and a lightweight high-performance track are fitted to modern off-road motorcycles”), collegiate ice hockey games, a children’s snowcross race with kids competing on 120cc mini-snowmobiles, all kinds of music, a teen dance, a Monster Dog Pull (open to all dogs, including family pets), the Winter Ale Festival, a Best Beard / Hairy Legs / Sexy Legs Contest, McCall’s Starz on Ice, wine tastings and special dinners, Family Bingo, and fireworks over the lake—and that’s just scratching the surface. McCall is just the best place you can find for winter fun. And after a fun-filled day in the invigorating cold, there’s nothing like warming up with a long soak in one of the area’s natural hot springs. Relax, sooth those tired muscles, and get ready to do it all again tomorrow.

Wherever there’s great downhill skiing, there’s usually great sledding and snowboarding too, and McCall is no exception. Before hitting the slopes, snowboarders can practice their skills at area terrain parks (Brundage alone offers three: Big Easy, Bear Park, and Rodeo Park). For younger kids, there are loads of perfect sledding sites around, from gentle swells to steeper hillsides. And for shrieking, heart-pounding family fun, take the whole crew snow tubing at The Activity Barn. Of course your winter sport doesn’t have to be oriented vertically. Frozen lakes make for great skating and ice-fishing. Get out there for some cross-country skiing or snowshoe hiking, or if you prefer mechanized action, the McCall area boasts over 500 miles (!) of snowmobile trails. One unique winter excursion is offered by Blue Moon Outfitters: after a one-mile snowshoe / ski trek in Ponderosa State Park, you arrive at the warm and cozy Blue Moon yurt, on the shores of Payette Lake, for a gourmet multicourse ethnic-themed meal, cooked on site. Any guide to McCall’s wintertime fun would be sadly incomplete if it didn’t mention the famous Winter Carnival. An

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McCall Moment by CAROL GORE

This vintage black-and-white from Shore Lodge’s photo scrapbook shows two ski-wielding ladies brandishing figurines of a certain local legend (yes, you guessed it): Sharlie, the Payette Lake monster and unofficial mascot of McCall. Established by a group of Lewiston businessmen in 1948, Shore Lodge has been McCall’s most iconic landmark for over half a century. Originally conceived as a comfortable, family-oriented refuge for tourists and locals alike, the Lodge continues to fulfill that mission today. (Photo courtesy of Shore Lodge)

(Shore Lodge today)

SUMMIT Magazine  

Life & Leisure of Whitetail Club and McCall, Idaho

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