Page 1


THANK YOU! ...to our Conference Planning Committee members, who, along with our faculty, have made this meeting possible. CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS F. Claire Hankenson, DVM, MS, DACLAM Senior Associate Director, University Laboratory Animal Resources, Associate Professor, Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine University of Pennsylvania

Christian E. Newcomer, VMD, MS, DACLAM Executive Director AAALAC International

PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS Taylor Bennett, DVM, PhD Management Consultant and Senior Scientific Advisor National Association for Biomedical Research

Letty V. Medina, DVM, DACLAM Associate Director Animal Welfare and Compliance AbbVie, Inc.

Carol Clarke, DVM, DACLAM Senior Staff Veterinarian for Research USDA, APHIS, Animal Care

Jon D. Reuter, DVM, MPVM, DACLAM Senior Director of Animal Resources, Senior Staff Scientist, and Attending Veterinarian Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Elizabeth Ford, DVM, MPVM, DACLAM Senior Director The Scripps Research Institute Dara Kraitchman, VMD, PhD, FACC Cardiovascular Interventional Section Head Division of Magnetic Resonance Research Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Jori K. Leszczynski, DVM, DACLAM Director of the Office of Laboratory Animal Resources and Veterinarian, University of Colorado Denver; Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine Natalie L. Mays, BA, LATG, CPIA Director of the IACUC and IBC New York University Langone Medical Center

Mary Jo Shepherd, DVM, CPIA Director of the Office of the IACUC Columbia University Susan Silk, MS Director Division of Policy and Education OLAW, NIH Joanne Zurlo, PhD Director of Science Strategy Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


CONFERENCE INFORMATION Welcome from the Conference Co-Chairs Welcome from PRIM&R’s New Executive Director, Elisa Hurley Welcome from PRIM&R’s Executive Director Emerita, Joan Rachlin Announcements and Reminders

22 24 25 26

SCHEDULES Pre-Conference Programs Your Guide to the Tracks Your Guide to the 2014 IACUC Conference Schedule Schedule: April 2 and 3

44

POSTERS Posters Selected for Presentation

46 50

FACULTY Faculty List Keynote and Plenary Biographies

55

MAPS

58

NOTES

faculty

RECOGNITION Lifetime Achievement Award Board of Directors Staff Henry Spira Memorial Lecture Pillars of PRIM&R In Memoriam CPIA Council and Credential

posters

14 16 17 18 19 20 21

schedules

SUPPORTERS & EXHIBITORS Supporter and Exhibitor Map Supporter and Exhibitor Information

recognition

10 11

supporters & exhibitors

3 4 5 6

conference information

Contents

maps notes

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


conference information

Abbreviations and acronyms found in the 2014 IACUC Conference guide 3Rs reduction, replacement, refinement

IACUC institutional animal care and use committee

AAALAC International Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International

IBC institutional biosafety committee

AALAS American Association for Laboratory Animal Science

ILAR Institute for Laboratory Animal Research

ACLAM American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine APHIS Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service ASLAP American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners AWA Animal Welfare Act CPIAÂŽ Certified Professional IACUC Administrator FOIA Freedom of Information Act Guide The 8th Edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NRC 2011)

ILAM Institute for Laboratory Animal Medicine NIH National Institutes of Health NSF National Science Foundation OLAW Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare PHS United States Public Health Service PRIM&R Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research USDA United States Department of Agriculture VA United States Department of Veterans Affairs

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Welcome to the 2014 IACUC Conference: 40 Years of Public Responsibility: Supporting Good Science, Animal Welfare, and Compliance!

As your Conference Co-Chairs, we are delighted to welcome you to Denver, the first time the IACUC Conference has ventured to the Rockies. We’re also so pleased that this year’s conference is being held in conjunction with the 2014 AAALAC International Conference: The Path to Success Under AAALAC’s New Standards, as it means we can offer the animal care and use community an opportunity to learn about ethics, animal care and use best practices, and accreditation all under one roof! Each year, PRIM&R strives to create a forum at the IACUC Conference where animal care and use professionals can meet to exchange ideas, discuss best practices, and grapple with the complex ethical issues raised by research with animals. We’re confident the next two days will provide you with insight and inspiration, challenge you to think about the larger issues related to research ethics and animal care and use, offer you concrete tools to strengthen your knowledge and skills, and provide ample opportunities for networking with your colleagues from all over the world. The crafting of this year’s program was a collaboration involving 13 volunteers representing expertise from every corner of the field. This energetic, dedicated, hardworking—and always fun!—group was responsible for selecting four keynote speakers; designing four plenary sessions; planning 62 breakout sessions; identifying more than 130 faculty members best suited to bringing the content to life; and reviewing 21 poster submissions. It was a vast undertaking, and we believe it has paid off in a program that is as timely and contentrich as they come. This year’s keynote speakers, though diverse, promise to both inform and inspire. Gail Eckhardt, MD, will share the “bench-to-beside” nature of her lab’s work using human cancer biopsies grown in nude mice to test specific cancer treatments and to determine the course of treatment for actual patients. John P. Gluck, PhD, will describe his early work in the Harlow Laboratory, relating that experience to his development of moral ambivalence regarding the field of animal research.

Thomas D. Albright, PhD, will examine the value of sensitive animal models in research and implications for present and future research. And Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD, will discuss his work building complex, threedimensional models of living human organs, which can be used to replace traditional animal-based methods for testing drugs and toxins. This year’s program will also feature 15 breakout sessions derived from PRIM&R’s Call for Program Contributions. We received more than 38 ideas through this process, and we cannot thank our community enough for taking the time to submit their proposals for the program. Finally, we are proud to announce that 13 exemplary posters are being featured at this year’s event. Please stop by the poster gallery located in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer during your time in Denver to view this exciting and innovative work. We rely on our community for fresh ideas and perspectives, and the program is, without a doubt, stronger for these contributions. We encourage everyone to consider submitting a session proposal or poster abstract for the 2015 IACUC Conference! The Call for Program Contributions for 2015 is already open; please visit www.primr.org/iacuc15 for details. So, welcome, once again, to Denver and to the 2014 IACUC Conference. We hope you will not only enjoy the meeting, but will return to your institutions with innovative strategies and strong collegial networks that can help you enhance your research programs. We encourage you to make the most of this stimulating environment and the unique opportunities for dialogue, hard work, and fun offered in the 2014 program. Warmly, F. Claire Hankenson, DVM, MS, DACLAM Senior Associate Director, University Laboratory Animal Resources; Associate Professor, Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Christian E. Newcomer, VMD, MS, DACLAM Executive Director, AAALAC International

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

conference information

Welcome from the Conference Co-Chairs


conference information

Welcome from PRIM&R’s New Executive Director, Elisa A. Hurley Dear Friends, Thank you for joining us at PRIM&R’s 2014 IACUC Conference: 40 Years of Public Responsibility: Supporting Good Science, Animal Welfare, and Compliance! My colleagues and I are so pleased to welcome you to Denver for this opportunity to learn, share, and connect around our common goal of advancing the humane care and use of laboratory animals. This year’s meeting is a special one for three reasons. First, it is being held in conjunction with the 2014 AAALAC International Conference: The Path to Success Under AAALAC’s New Standards. As this gathering takes place only once every five years, I hope you have taken ample advantage of the chance to hear from AAALAC site visitors, Council members, and staff about trends around and expectations for quality animal care and use in research. We are so grateful to AAALAC International, as well as to our partners NIH/OLAW and USDA/APHIS, for their ongoing support and for their part in creating this rich learning experience for our community. Second, PRIM&R celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, and, as with all such milestones, this one presents an occasion to reflect on our four decades of promoting humane and ethically responsible research programs with animals and human subjects, and, perhaps more importantly, to look forward to the challenges and opportunities ahead. As you can see in the pages that follow, the conference program does just that, covering emerging issues such as the globalization of animal research, cutting-edge replacement and refinement techniques, and the use of metrics for program oversight, as well as perennial topics such as best practices in personnel training and assessment, communicating to the public about animal research, and IACUC standard operating procedures and record-keeping. So let me express my gratitude to all those who contributed to this bounty! First and foremost, thanks to our incredibly hard-working Planning Committee. Co-Chairs F. Claire Hankenson and Christian E. Newcomer were joined by Taylor Bennett, Carol Clarke, Elizabeth Ford, Dara Kraitchman, Jori K. Leszczynski, Natalie L. Mays, Letty V. Medina, Jon D. Reuter, Mary Jo Shepherd, Susan Silk, and Joanne Zurlo, all of whom generously volunteered their time and expertise to craft this exceptional program. I would also like to extend my heartfelt thanks to the more than 130 conference faculty members and 13 poster presenters who will bring the program to life by providing the most current information, innovative strategies, newest and best practices, useful tools, and their professional expertise

and wisdom, so that each of you might return to your home institutions ready and able to enhance your research programs. We are so grateful for their leadership and many hours of careful preparation. Finally, I want to thank each of you for being here and thereby demonstrating your commitment to advancing the responsible use of animals in research. We know your work is demanding and your time in short supply, so we encourage you to take what you need from this meeting. Remember that some of the best learning happens outside of the session rooms, so we hope you’ll seek out opportunities to connect and engage with colleagues and friends, new and old, at meals and in the halls. PRIM&R prides itself on being a welcoming community, so whether you’re a first-time attendee or a conference regular, please make a point of introducing yourself to someone new. And now I come to the third reason this year’s conference is special, this one more personal: this is my first meeting as PRIM&R’s executive director. I am honored to take the helm of this very special organization, and I wholeheartedly embrace this new opportunity to serve our extraordinary and diverse community of research professionals. I hope to meet many of you over the next few days and to hear about how PRIM&R can continue to support you in your efforts to advance the humane and ethical conduct of research with animals. So please introduce yourself when you see me out and about. I look forward to it! I hope you will also take a moment while with us to bid a personal farewell to Joan Rachlin. I know I speak for us all when I say we salute and thank you, Joan, for your 39 remarkable years of service. Thank you again for being here. May you leave Denver armed with new friends, fresh ideas, and a renewed sense of purpose. Warmly,

Elisa A. Hurley, PhD Executive Director, PRIM&R

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Dear Friends, Welcome to the 2014 IACUC Conference, and thank you for helping us celebrate PRIM&R’s 40th anniversary!

Although I have long since lost count, I suspect that I’ve written well over 130 welcome letters to conference attendees. This will be my last, though, as I have just handed over the reins of this incredible organization to Elisa A. Hurley, PhD, PRIM&R’s talented new executive director. But (to continue the metaphor) wild horses couldn’t keep me away from joining you in Denver and from extending my fond farewells via this letter. My first letter to conference attendees was written on my trusty IBM Selectric typewriter in 1977; I then hand-carried it to a dusty copy shop (few offices had photocopiers back then, and if they did, the machines were slow moving and odiferous). Along with words of welcome, it included an admonition to please “refrain from smoking during the conference sessions.” My second such letter, written in 1978, repeated that request, added a note about where to find the pay phones, and also stated that, since PRIM&R could not afford to transcribe the audiotapes of the plenaries, we would take notes that would be typed up and published in the form of conference proceedings. Ah the good ol’ days… life was simpler, conferences smaller, and mostly everyone knew each other by name. There were no personal computers, cell phones, tablets, or anything wired or digital for that matter. And, although rumor had it that one was about to be marketed, I had not yet seen one of those new-fangled facsimile machines. The issues surrounding the use of animals in science and research, though, were neither simple nor small, and were thus in need of focused examination and discussion, and that’s where PRIM&R came in. For the past 40 years, we have been privileged to provide a place where the community of principled IACUC professionals could participate in those essential and impactful conversations. Finding the right words to bid you “so long” is not easy, but swan songs never are. I’d first like to express my heartfelt gratitude for your support of our work. PRIM&R was founded to advance ethical research by helping educate those who work in the research protections and regulation fields, but it has thrived only because you responded to that mission, as evidenced by your presence here today. Our existence depends on you, as PRIM&R’s work is

intertwined with yours. Had you not believed that learning is a life-long pursuit, PRIM&R’s organizational life would have been a short one indeed. A final request… I’d like to let you know about a new project that is near and dear to my heart: People & Perspectives, PRIM&R’s online archive of stories about those who helped establish and who now keep the research ethics, review, regulation, and policy fields moving forward. Part of the archive consists of taped interviews, but there is also a user-generated section, so I ask that you visit www.peopleandperspectives.org, select the “Share Your Story” button, and tell us something about your experiences in the animal care and use world. We cannot be a truly connected community unless we share our stories, our struggles, and our successes, which will also enable us to learn from each other’s experiences. Before I harm more trees, I shall say “farewell.” Those who support PRIM&R’s mission and attend our programs have made this so much more than just a job for me. It has been a wonderful way of life that has provided me with a wellspring of energy, ideas, curiosity, connections, and with more joy, meaning, and fulfillment than I ever thought possible in the world of work. I know that PRIM&R will continue to flourish because of our incredible staff, which is as caring as it is competent; because of our Board members, who are wise, visionary, hardworking, and committed stewards; and because of our community. These are still the good ol’ days, and they will last so long as we have wholehearted people to share our journeys. Thank you for helping to make my days here the “good ol’” type, and for the gift of working for and with you. Please say hello if you see me in the Sheraton halls! I’m not so good at goodbyes, but I love hellos! Be well always, and in all ways!

Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH Executive Director Emerita

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

conference information

Welcome from PRIM&R’s Executive Director Emerita, Joan Rachlin


conference information

Announcements & Reminders Conference Check-in and the Help Desk Registration, Conference Check-in, and the Help Desk are located in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer on the Plaza Concourse level of the Sheraton Denver Downtown hotel, and will be open during the following hours: • Sunday, March 30: 4:00-7:00 PM • Monday, March 31: 7:00 AM-6:00 PM • Tuesday, April 1: 7:00 AM-6:00 PM • Wednesday, April 2: 7:00 AM-6:00 PM • Thursday, April 3: 7:00 AM-12:00 PM Please stop by the Help Desk with questions, and a PRIM&R staff member will be happy to assist you.

Name Badges and Agendas

Please wear your name badge at all times. Please note the personalized agenda included with your name badge may not reflect the most recent schedule changes or cancellations, so please double check your schedule against the daily schedules available in the Registration Area.

Networking Ribbons

Are you a first-time attendee, IACUC administrator, IACUC chair, IACUC member, researcher, institutional official, or university faculty member? Then don’t forget to pick up these name badge ribbons in the Registration Area. Networking ribbons are designed to enhance community building and to help you connect with colleagues who share similar professional experiences.

First-Time Attendees

Please help us welcome first-time attendees! You’ll know who they are by the rainbow-colored ribbons attached to their name badges.

Special Meals

If you indicated a specific dietary request as part of your registration, please alert a server to your needs before you are seated. Please see a PRIM&R staff member with questions or concerns.

Courtesy Reminder

As a courtesy to the speakers and to the other registrants, please turn off or silence all cell phones and electronic devices during sessions.

Internet Café and Wireless Internet

Want to check email or review the conference handouts electronically? You are welcome to utilize one of the computers in the Internet Café located in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer of the hotel, or you may connect wirelessly using your own device. To access the wireless internet in the meeting space, select “Sheraton Meeting Rooms” from your list of wireless networks and enter IACUC20 for both the username and password. If you are using a smartphone or tablet, please connect to the wireless network using the instructions above. Please note that you will have to open your web browser and enter the user name and password before you can use any application requiring the internet. Please log off the wireless internet when you are not using it, and please refrain from downloading large files.

Sessions

In order to keep the conference running on time, please familiarize yourself with the location of the sessions you plan to attend. Maps are included in the back of this guide, and our staff is ready to help with directions or with any questions you might have. It’s important that you attend the sessions you signed up for in advance, as space is limited. Please refer to the schedule in this guide for more information.

Conference Dialogue and Discourse

PRIM&R promotes communication that is respectful, honest, and direct. Though there may be different philosophies, opinions, and views among our community, it is essential that attendees treat one another with respect and dignity. PRIM&R embraces ethical communication and respectful public discussion and opposes efforts that encourage threats, hateful or derogatory language, and mistruths, which are harmful to our collective mission. Aisle microphones will be set up in the keynote and plenary sessions, so please come forward with questions and/or comments. The workshops and didactic sessions will also provide a chance to be heard, but please remember that workshops have more time for discussion, while the didactic sessions have less.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


conference information

Messages

Looking for a colleague? Please post messages to the bulletin board located in the Registration Area in Plaza/ Exhibit Foyer. Also, please make sure to check the bulletin board for any messages you might receive.

In Case of Emergency

If friends or family need to contact you and cannot reach you directly, they should call the Sheraton Denver Downtown Loss Prevention Team at 303.893.3333. In case of an emergency on site, please dial 0 from a house or hotel room phone, notify a PRIM&R staffer at the Help Desk, and/or notify one of Executive Meeting Specialists who work for the Sheraton.

Luggage Storage

On the morning of your departure, we recommend that you check your luggage at the bell stand of the hotel and plan to return there prior to your departure.

Shipping, Fax, and Photocopy Services

The hotel’s business center, Penfield’s, offers shipping, mailing, faxing, and photocopying services. Penfield’s is conveniently located on the lobby level of the hotel, and is open Monday through Friday from 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM, and Saturdays and Sundays from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM.

Conference Passport

The Conference Passport includes select session handouts, a link to the conference program, an attendee list, keynote and plenary biographies, venue details, and information about PRIM&R. After the conference, audio and video recordings for designated presentations will be added to the Passport. Materials are now available for your use and reference. To access them, please follow these instructions: 1. Open your internet browser, and go to http://www.eventscribe.com/2014/PRIMR-IACUC 2. Enter the Conference Passport Code found on the back of your name badge (this was also emailed to you prior to the conference). 3. Select “Continue.” 4. Using the left-hand navigation titled “Conference Content,” select one of the available search options to locate a specific session. 5. If materials are available for a session, a document icon will appear next to or below the title. Click on the icon to access the materials for that session. Please note that not all sessions have handouts. Please check the Conference Passport periodically, as additional materials will be posted as they are received. You may print materials for any and all of the sessions that interest you. Printers are available at Penfield’s, conveniently located on the lobby level of the hotel.

Say Cheese!

Please be ready to say “cheese” for our conference photographer! We are working hard to create a rich and enduring archive of photos, and hope that each of you is willing to be a part of this. Some of the photos taken at this year’s conference may be used on our website and/or for other promotional purposes. If you prefer to opt out of having your photograph taken and used by PRIM&R, please be sure to alert the photographer during the conference. We are using passive consent for this project, but the photographer has been instructed to honor the request of anyone not wishing to be photographed. Thank you.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


conference information

Announcements & Reminders PRIM&R’s Green Initiatives

We’re doing our best to make the 2014 IACUC Conference another “green” PRIM&R meeting, and hope you’ll join us in our efforts! PRIM&R has taken several steps in this effort, including: • Using an electronic evaluation • Providing a reusable tote bag • Using soy-based ink in the printing of this guide • Using a printer for the guide that runs entirely on wind energy The Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel is also devoted to maintaining and cultivating green meeting practices. The hotel’s wide-ranging policies and practices include, but are not limited to: • Composting of all food waste from banquet events, kitchen preparations, and associate cafeteria, with an average of 546,000 pounds of food composted each year • The toilet paper is EPA compliant with a minimum of 20% recycled content • Approximately 234,000 pounds of cardboard boxes recycled annually • Providing e-folio services so guests can review their bills online • Availability of water stations at banquet events to eliminate the use of plastic bottles • Participation in Clean the World, a soap recycling program in which the hotel sends out lightly used guest amenities to a factory that then sanitizes the soap and re-distributes to children and families in need

Make a Green Choice

Guests may opt out of housekeeping services and receive a $5 voucher to be used in any of the hotel’s restaurants or outlets toward any food or beverage item (excluding alcohol). This program has resulted on average of over 35,000 pounds of laundry per month that the guests chose not to have washed during their stay.

Help us be Green

On Thursday, April 3, please recycle your name badge holder and/or lanyard in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer until 12:00 PM, or at the Closing Reception in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer from 6:00 to 7:00 PM.

Help Us Improve

Our goal is to make each IACUC Conference a positive experience for all who attend, but we cannot do this without your help. We want to hear your thoughts on what we did well and what we could do better. Please use the notepaper in the back of this guide to capture your thoughts, and then take a few minutes to complete the evaluation, which will be emailed to you at the conclusion of each conference day on April 2 and 3. Thank you in advance for your feedback.

Certificate of Attendance

A certificate of attendance for the 2014 IACUC Conference will be provided to attendees upon completion of the online conference evaluation. Please note that, this year, attendees will be emailed an evaluation at the conclusion of each conference day on April 2 and 3. The certificate of attendance will be included at the end of the evaluation that will be sent on April 3. Certificates of attendance will also be provided for each of the pre-conference programs on March 31, and will be included with the individual course materials. Such certificates are useful for obtaining continuing education credits from various professional associations. Please note that each association’s guidelines for acceptance of conference credit hours may differ, and you should consult the appropriate professional association representative for information as to whether, and how many, credits from PRIM&R conferences may be used.

CPIA® Recertification

Participation in the 2014 IACUC Conference qualifies as continuing education for the purpose of CPIA® recertification. A maximum of 15.25 credit hours are available for the 2014 IACUC Conference. Credit hours for the pre-conference educational programs vary depending upon the duration of the course.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


conference information

Institutional Capacity Building Scholarship Program

Many small, underfunded institutions of higher education in the United States need and lack fully functioning IACUCs. Of these, many institutions support primarily minority populations, such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic-Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities. Others are health institutions serving populations with significant health disparities, such as community clinics, regional or area Indian Health Boards, and tribal governments. In addition, many of these institutions are being asked to take on greater roles in research by participating in studies or initiating their own research activities. Therefore, to assist in the strengthening of the capacity of these entities, PRIM&R offers the 2014 IACUC Conference Institutional Capacity Building Scholarship Program, with the hope that, by participating in PRIM&R’s conference, valuable professional development/education and networking will aid in addressing these disparities.

General Assistance Scholarship Program

The General Assistance Scholarship Program assists those members of our community who cannot attend the 2014 IACUC Conference due to financial constraints. Specifically, the program’s goal is to ensure that community and non-scientist IACUC members receive the same educational opportunities as their colleagues so they may develop their IACUC knowledge.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


supporters & exhibitors

Supporters & Exhibitors PRIM&R is grateful to our Supporters and Exhibitors! Exhibiting Hours

Please visit our Supporters and Exhibitors in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel during the following hours: Monday, March 31 5:00-6:30 PM

Tuesday, April 1 7:00 AM-5:00 PM

Wednesday, April 2 7:00 AM-7:15 PM

Thursday, April 3 7:00 AM-2:00 PM

Company Plaza 5

Plaza 4 Plaza 3

Booth #

9

AALAS

13

a-tune Software

15

Booth #

12

Animalgesic Labs Inc.

6

Booth #

Booth #

The Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI)

16

Booth #

Booth #

Click: A Huron Solution, Bronze Supporter

19 & 20

Booth #

Booth #

5

13 14 15 16

Booth #

Booth #

Booth #

Booth #

4 3

17 18

Booth #

Booth #

Booth #

Booth #

2 1

Salon DEF

8

Booth #

8

6

Plaza 1

AAALAC International

Booth #

7

Plaza 2

Booth #

19 20

Plaza D

iMedRIS Data Corporation

3

InfoEd Global

5

IRBNet

9

Key Solutions

7

Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Bronze Supporter NTM, Inc. Pfizer, Gold Supporter Topaz Technologies, Bronze Supporter

1&2

4 No booth 17 & 18

Questx

12

USDA, APHIS, Animal Care

14

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Supporters & Exhibitors Gold Supporter

Bronze Supporters Click: A Huron Solution 800.590.5400 | www.huronconsultinggroup.com/click Booths: 19 and 20 Simplify animal protocol construction and improve turnaround times with Huron’s flexible Click® IACUC solution. Designed to support logical and efficient protocol data entry, Click IACUC also improves collaboration between investigators, IACUC coordinators, training coordinators, veterinary reviewers, and committee members through all IACUC activities from new protocols to de novo reviews. PRIM&R would like to thank Click: A Huron Solution for supporting this year’s chair massages at the Welcome Reception on April 2, 6:00-7:15 PM in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute 505.348.3400 | www.lrri.org Booths: 1 and 2 Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, a pre-clinical research Institute with over 60 years’ experience, is a leading provider in software solutions. The Animal Management System has been developed in a real work, pre-clinical environment focusing on compliance and operational efficiencies to better service the science. PRIM&R would like to thank Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute for supporting the morning break on April 2, 10:45-11:15 AM in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer. TOPAZ Technologies 512.249.8080 | www.topazti.com Booths: 17 and 18 TOPAZ Technologies is the leading provider of integrated enterprise software solutions and services to the medical research community, providing automated, regulatory compliant solutions for online protocol submission, review, and approval, as well as applications for clinical veterinary information, animal ordering/receiving, accounting, training, census, breeding, and facility management. Doing business for over 30 years, TOPAZ has been developing and implementing some of the most highly regarded software applications in the industry. PRIM&R would like to thank TOPAZ Technologies for supporting the morning break on April 3, 10:45-11:15 AM in Plaza/Exhibit Foyer. a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

supporters & exhibitors

Pfizer, Inc. 212.733.2323 | www.pfizer.com Booths: none At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to improve health and well-being at every stage of life. We strive to set the standard for quality, safety, and value in the discovery, development, and manufacturing of medicines for people and animals. Our diversified global health care portfolio includes human and animal biologic and small molecule medicines and vaccines, as well as nutritional products and many of the world’s best-known consumer products. Every day, Pfizer colleagues work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness, prevention, treatments, and cures that challenge the most feared diseases of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as the world’s leading biopharmaceutical company, we also collaborate with health care providers, governments and local communities to support and expand access to reliable, affordable healthcare around the world. For more than 150 years, Pfizer has worked to make a difference for all who rely on us. PRIM&R would like to thank Pfizer for supporting this year’s Common Ground Networking Lunch on April 2, 12:45-1:45 PM in Plaza Ballroom EF.


Supporters & Exhibitors supporters & exhibitors

Exhibitors

AAALAC International 301.696.9626 | www.aaalac.org Booth: 8 AAALAC International promotes the humane treatment of animals in science, research, and education through voluntary assessment, accreditation, and education programs. More than 900 institutions in 37 countries have earned AAALAC accreditation, demonstrating their commitment to responsible animal care and use.

AALAS 901.754.8620 | www.aalas.org Booth: 13 AALAS is a membership association of professionals advancing responsible laboratory animal care in quality research that leads to scientific gains benefiting people and animals. AALAS provides educational resources to IACUCs, researchers, technicians, and others on the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals.

a-tune software Inc. 512.243.8539 | www.a-tune.com Booth: 15 a-tune software Inc. is a provider of medical research software. tick@lab provides compliance management for IACUCs, IRBs, and IBCs, Protocol Management, Transgenic Breeding, Capacity Planning, Task Management, Accounting, Facility Management, and Vet Records. This software can be used on Mac, Windows PC, iPad, and mobile devices.

Animalgesic Labs, Inc. 410.514.5955 | www.animalgesiclabs.com Booth: 6 Animalgesic Labs, a niche pharmaceutical company, specializes in development and commercialization of products for pain management in rodents. Our first product launched is AnimalgesicsÂŽ for Mice, is an extended-release injectable buprenorphine. It is the first US Food and Drug Administration indexed pharmaceutical grade analgesic for mice and provides two to three days of continuous analgesia.

The Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Program 305.243.7970 | www.citiprogram.org Booth: 16 The CITI Program at the University of Miami offers customized web-based training in animal care and use, biosafety and biosecurity, conflicts of interest, export control, good clinical practice, human subjects research, information privacy and security, and responsible conduct of research.

iMedRIS 909.798.9100 | www.imedris.com Booth: 3 iMedRIS Data Corporation provides research facilities and institutions with a variety of integrated research information systems, including a comprehensive IACUC module. Backed by a dedicated team of developers, project managers, and customer service representatives, iMedRIS remains the industry leader of medical research software design and implementation.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Supporters & Exhibitors

IRBNet A WIRB-Coperincus Group Company 617.758.4202 | www.irbnet.org Booth: 9 IRBNet, a WIRB-Copernicus Group company, helps more than 2,000 research sites and boards manage the ethics compliance requirements governing human and animal research, and we seamlessly power COI, IRB, IACUC, biosafety, sponsored programs, training and credentials management, and more. Our members benefit from streamlined processes, reduced costs, process transparency, and superior data reporting, and participate in the largest research and compliance oversight network today.

Key Solutions, Inc. 510.456.4500 | www.keyusa.com Booth: 7 Key Solutions provides web-based Integrated Research Compliance and Administration Software for Animal Subjects (IACUC), Human Subjects (IRB), Bio Safety (IBC), Stem Cell (SCRO), Radiation Safety (RSC), Chemical Safety (CSC), Controlled Substance (CS), Post-Approval Monitoring (PAM), Animal Census and Facility Management (LARS), Animal Health Records (LAHS), Pre & Post-Award Grants Management (eGrants), System-to-System (S2S), Conflict of Interest (eCOI), and Material Transfer Agreement (MTA).

NTM, Inc. 1.888. eSirius | www.ntmcs.com Booth: 4 NTM has been developing IACUC and Research Facility software solutions since 1995. Our products have been successfully implemented at over 65 prestigious research organizations, including Fortune 500 pharmaceutical companies, biotechs, US government laboratories, and 15 of the top 25 largest research universities in the United States.

Questx 262.534.5181 | www.edstromsmartlab.com Booth: 12 Questx delivers comprehensive research management software that enables users to maximize resource efficacy and potential while maintaining facility best practices and adherence to industry protocols. Questx provides professional products and services tailored to the unique needs of the vivarium, and presents tools and support essential to reach your goals.

USDA, APHIS, Animal Care 301.851.3751 | www.aphis.usda.gov Booth: 14 Animal Care is the division of the USDA that is responsible for the enforcement of the AWA. The AWA provides minimum standards for the humane care and use of animals at licensed and registered facilities engaged in activities regulated under the law. The AWA regulates activities such as the use of animals in research, the exhibition of animals to the public, the trade in exotic and wild animals, and the wholesale trade in certain pet animals.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

supporters & exhibitors

InfoEd Global 518.713.4200 | www.infoedglobal.com Booth: 5 InfoEd Global provides research institutions worldwide with superior technology to reduce cost, improve data integrity, streamline processes, and accelerate compliance. Thousands of researchers across the globe rely on InfoEd Global software and services to support their operations. The fully-integrated InfoEd eRA Suite includes Solutions for Grants and Contracts, IRB and IACUC Submissions, COI, Clinical Trials, Animal Facilities, Technology Transfer, and Research Outputs.


recognition

Lifetime Achievement Award Conference Information PRIM&R’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Research Ethics was created in 2000 to recognize and honor individuals who have made a major and sustained contribution to the development and dissemination of the ethical principles that govern research. Previous recipients include some of the chief architects of the research ethics field such as Jay Katz, MD (2001), Charles McCarthy, PhD (2003), Robert J. Levine, MD (2005), Albert R. Jonsen, PhD (2009), and Ruth R. Faden, PhD, MPH, and Tom L. Beauchamp, PhD, who received the award jointly (2011). The PRIM&R Board of Directors selected PRIM&R’s executive director emerita, Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH, to receive the 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Research Ethics. One would be hard pressed to find another professional in the field of research ethics who has done more in the last 39 years to disseminate the ethical principles that govern research in this country. Ms. Rachlin’s career spans the evolution of the field of research ethics. She came to PRIM&R in 1975, a year after the passage of the National Research Act and the establishment of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. During her first decade at PRIM&R, the public was grappling with the revelation of the US Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee, The Belmont Report was published, and human research regulations were advancing. During her second decade, significant amendments were made to the Animal Welfare Act, the “Common Rule” was adopted by 16 federal agencies, and the Radiation Experiments were exposed. During her third decade at PRIM&R, AIDS activists and cancer survivors radically changed the public’s view of human subjects research, from an ominous enterprise to be feared to a hopeful opportunity for saving lives. Ironically, the terrible tragedy of Jesse Gelsinger’s death also occurred during that decade, spawning widespread recognition of the urgency for effective education in research ethics and the responsible conduct of research. And during Ms. Rachlin’s fourth decade of service, the internet and other technological advances dramatically altered the way research is conducted, giving rise to new ethical problems that were difficult to accommodate within a regulatory framework developed in a previous century.

With near clairvoyance, Ms. Rachlin understood the need for research ethics education from the start of her career with PRIM&R. She organized PRIM&R’s first educational conference in 1977, and, fueled by the events of these decades, never relented in her quest to offer more and better educational programming during each of the years that followed. Ms. Rachlin’s passion and leadership in developing and providing this education was singular. Through her extraordinary efforts, force of will, and commitment, PRIM&R came to fill a unique role in the emerging field of research ethics education. PRIM&R’s programs provide practical tools for the application of ethical principles, and have had an extraordinary impact on the field. It is not possible to describe in a paragraph the achievements of a lifetime, but here are a few highlights. Over the course of her tenure at PRIM&R, Ms. Rachlin planned and organized more than 200 conferences and educational events, as well as produced and distributed their proceedings. Under Ms. Rachlin’s stewardship, PRIM&R developed its highly acclaimed educational programs, for both IRB and IACUC professionals, including IRB 101sm, IRB Administrator 101, and Essentials of IACUC Administration. She shepherded the development of PRIM&R’s two certification programs, the Certified IRB Professional (CIP®) and CPIA® credentials, both of which have successfully certified thousands of research professionals contributing to excellence in their respective fields. One of PRIM&R’s accomplishments in which Ms. Rachlin takes great pride is the growth of its membership from a small group of 61 charter members in 1986 to the large and active membership community of today that includes more than 4,000 research professionals from around the world.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Ms. Rachlin’s interest in the use of animals in research dates back to her middle school biology class where she dissected her first crayfish. Through PRIM&R, she was privileged to meet Dean Frank Loew, Dr. Andrew Rowan, and Dr. Christian E. Newcomer. All three became important and inspirational teachers to her, and Dean Loew and Dr. Rowan worked with Ms. Rachlin to plan PRIM&R’s first animal care and use meeting in October of 1983.

Ms. Rachlin has also served on the faculty of several colleges, where she taught women’s health, health law,

And then there are the achievements accumulated before her tenure at PRIM&R. Prior to her full-time commitment to PRIM&R, Ms. Rachlin practiced law, concentrating in the areas of women’s health, civil rights, and criminal and civil litigation. She holds a JD from the Suffolk University School of Law, and an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. Anyone who knows Ms. Rachlin recognizes that her greatest passion is to build and nurture relationships, both professional and personal, with an eye toward improving society. She believes that advancement of any kind is achieved through networking, mentoring, collaborating, and celebrating. The PRIM&R community, which largely owes its existence to her efforts, is proud to celebrate Ms. Rachlin and her extraordinary achievements. PRIM&R’s 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Ms. Rachlin on November 9 at the 2013 Advancing Ethical Research Conference in Boston, MA.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

recognition

A number of high-profile events also took place during her early years at PRIM&R, including the publication of two books that gave rise to the term “animal ethics”: Animal Liberation by Peter Singer in 1975 and The Case for Animal Rights by Tom Regan in 1983. In addition, there was a resurgence of the antivivisection movement in the late 1970s that involved an aggressive legislative campaign to prevent the use of animal testing by cosmetic companies. Ms. Rachlin believes in the necessity of respectful listening for constructive dialogue, and she has worked diligently to ensure that both opponents and proponents of animal research have a voice at PRIM&R’s animal care and use conferences.

and research ethics. Ms. Rachlin is a contributor to the well-known resource, Our Bodies, Ourselves, and serves on its Advisory Committee. She is a past member of the editorial board of the journal, IRB: A Review of Human Subjects Research, and of Boston-area IRBs.


recognition

Board of Directors Conference Information Officers

Members

Alexander M. Capron Chair University of Southern California

Barbara Bierer Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Susan Z. Kornetsky Vice Chair Boston Children’s Hospital

Cynthia A. Gómez San Francisco State University

Robert J. Levine Yale University

A. Cornelius Baker FHI 360

Joseph J. Byrne Tufts University

Leonard Glantz Boston University

Christine Grady National Institutes of Health Serves in Personal Capacity

Tanise L. Jackson Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University

Moira Keane University of Minnesota (retired)

Christian E. Newcomer AAALAC International

Judy Norsigian Our Bodies, Ourselves

P. Pearl O’Rourke Partners HealthCare Systems

Ada Sue Selwitz University of Kentucky

Barbara Stanley Columbia University

Walter L. Straus Merck Vaccine Division

Hugh Tilson University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Elisa A. Hurley Ex officio PRIM&R

Susan S. Fish Secretary Boston University

Heather Pierce Association of American Medical Colleges

David A. Borasky Treasurer University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

David Strauss Columbia University

Jeremy M. Sugarman The Johns Hopkins University

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Staff

Joanna Cardinal Assistant Director for Membership and IT Operations

Mariellen Diemand Associate Director for Conferences

Elizabeth Geer Program Assistant

Ali Hall Educational Program Assistant

Elisa A. Hurley Executive Director

Anne Meade Senior Manager for Website and Social Media

Dana Mikaelian Communications Coordinator

Alysa Perry Program Coordinator

Megan Frame Membership Coordinator

Jen Levine-Fried Staff Accountant

Kimberly Hensle Lowrance Managing Director

Maeve Luthin Professional Development Manager

Alexandra Shlimovich Webinar and Publications Specialist

Caroline Slymon Registration and Operations Assistant

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

recognition

Avery Avrakotos Education and Policy Manager


recognition

Henry Spira Memorial Lecture Conference Information Since his death in 1998, Henry Spira, a passionate and effective social justice advocate, an animal rights activist, and an uncommonly wise and grounded individual, has been recognized at PRIM&R’s IACUC Conference through the Henry Spira Memorial Lecture. PRIM&R hosts this lecture both to honor his memory and to commemorate his ability to bring together the scientific and animal rights communities. Mr. Spira was a frequent participant at PRIM&R’s meetings, active both at the podium and in dialogue with the scientific community on issues related to animal welfare. He emphasized the necessity of working across ideological lines and communicating with individuals and organizations that represented opposing points of view. In a 1997 film about his life, Mr. Spira stated: “If there are going to be alternatives to the use of animals, it’s the people in the research community who will be developing alternatives. If you’re going to get the regulatory agencies to change their requirements, it’s going to be animal researchers who are the ones who are going to do it... these are the folks that you need if you’re going to be serious about change…” In this spirit, and in Mr. Spira’s memory, PRIM&R is proud to present the 13th annual Henry Spira Memorial Lecture: Human Organs-on-Chips as Potential Replacements for Animal Testing Delivered by Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD Thursday, April 3, 2:00-2:45 PM Plaza Ballroom ABC Dr. Ingber is the founding director, core faculty member, and platform leader of Biomimetic Microsystems at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University; Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital; and professor of bioengineering at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Dr. Ingber is a founder of the emerging field of biologically inspired engineering. At the Wyss Institute, he oversees a multifaceted effort to identify the mechanisms that living organisms use to self-assemble from molecules and cells, and then applies these design principles to develop advanced materials and devices. He also leads the Biomimetic Microsystems platform in which microfabrication techniques from the computer industry are used to build functional circuits with living cells as components. His most recent innovation is a technology for building tiny, complex three-dimensional models of living human organs, or “organs on chips,” that mimic complicated human functions as a way to replace traditional animal-based methods for testing of drugs and toxins. Dr. Ingber has made major contributions to mechanobiology, tissue engineering, tumor angiogenesis, systems biology, and nanobiotechnology, has authored numerous publications and patents, and has received several honors. He serves on the board of directors of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, and is a member of both the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. It is Dr. Ingber’s commitment to replacement, as well as his impact on the field of biologically inspired engineering and research, that make him an appropriate and fitting choice to present this lecture in Henry Spira’s memory.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Pillars of PRIM&R In 2006, PRIM&R’s Board of Directors established the annual Pillars of PRIM&R Award as a meaningful and enduring memorial to deceased Board Members (our “Pillars”), whose vision, wisdom, and highly principled leadership were instrumental in helping the organization grow and thrive. Today, the Pillars of PRIM&R Award honors Louis Lasagna, MD; Herman Wigodsky, MD, PhD; Sanford Chodosh, MD; and Harry Rozmiarek, DVM, PhD. We are proud to announce the Pillars of PRIM&R Lecture:

As a companion to this award process, in 2011, PRIM&R established an annual Pillars of PRIM&R Lecture. The speakers chosen to present this lecture are selected based on their scholarship, principles, values, and professional accomplishments, as well as on their ability to educate and inspire our audience members. The remarks of the Pillars of PRIM&R lecturer serve as a reminder of the importance of keeping ethics at the center of our individual and shared work. They also serve to reflect the values embodied by Drs. Lasagna, Wigodsky, Chodosh, and Rozmiarek, as well as PRIM&R’s mission of advancing the highest ethical standards in research and its core values of excellence, community, diversity, integrity, knowledge, respect, creativity, and social responsibility.

Dr. Albright is the Conrad T. Prebys Chair in Vision Research, professor in the systems neurobiology laboratories, and director of the vision center laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Dr. Albright’s research into the mechanics of visual information processing is at the forefront of the field. He has received numerous honors for his work, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences, and he is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

In honor of Harry Rozmiarek, DVM, PhD, a cherished Board member who passed away in June 2013, and who became our first Pillar focused on research with animals, we will hold the Pillars of PRIM&R Lecture for the first time at the 2014 IACUC Conference.

Animal Models for the Study of Brain and Cognition Delivered by Thomas D. Albright, PhD Thursday, April 3, 8:15-9:00 AM Plaza Ballroom ABC

Dr. Albright and his team are interested in how neural systems reconcile conflicting demands in the visual system, specifically how optimal encoding of sensory information requires that sensory systems be continuously tuned to the prevailing environment. Yet, while it is important that sensory information be represented with high fidelity, the brain has only limited resources available. Taken together, the observations of Dr. Albright and his colleagues reveal that sensory processing is markedly adaptable. This adaptability enables people to optimize perception and behavior in a world that presents them with varying sensory demands.

Pillars Louis Lasagna, MD, (1923-2003) the “Father of Clinical Pharmacology,” was a vital member of the PRIM&R Board of Directors for nearly 20 years. When Dr. Lasagna first became involved with PRIM&R in 1980, he was already a prominent figure in the field of pharmacology, as well as in the emerging area of the responsible and ethical conduct of research. Everything he did was informed by his humanity, as well as by his concern that science and life in general must be a search for logic, wisdom, truth, meaning, and justice.

Herman “Wig” Wigodsky, MD, PhD, (1915-2005) was actively involved in promoting research ethics throughout his career, which spanned more than 60 years. Dr. Wigodsky served in the US Air Force (USAF) during World War II as the director of research at the USAF School of Aviation Medicine. He worked for the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission, the National Academy of Sciences, and the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. At PRIM&R meetings, his comments were strong, fiery, and on target.

Sanford Chodosh, MD, (1928-2010) was a cofounder of PRIM&R and the president of PRIM&R’s Board of Directors from 1979 to 2001. Dr. Chodosh, a clinical investigator for more than 40 years, retired from the Boston University School of Medicine where he was an associate professor, and from the VA outpatient clinic in Boston, MA, where he was chief of staff for 14 years. He received PRIM&R’s Founders’ Award in recognition of his extraordinary service to the organization.

Harry Rozmiarek, DVM, PhD, (19392013) served on the PRIM&R Board of Directors from 1990 to 2013. Dr. Rozmiarek’s long and distinguished career spanned the Armed Forces and academia. At the time of his death, Dr. Rozmiarek was professor emeritus of laboratory animal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, a visiting professor of laboratory animal medicine at the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, and the laboratory animal facility director at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. (Additional information about Dr. Rozmiarek can be found on page 20.)

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

recognition

The Pillars of PRIM&R Award supports early-career professionals whose scholarship in the field of research ethics reflects PRIM&R’s mission and core values. Past Pillars of PRIM&R Award recipients have demonstrated exceptional potential for leadership in advancing ethical research. In recognition of those accomplishments, awardees receive small grants to help further their professional development.


recognition

In Memoriam Conference

Information

Harry Rozmiarek, DVM, PhD, a cherished member of the PRIM&R Board of Directors since 1990 and a longtime leader in the laboratory animal medicine world, passed away on June 15, 2013 at age 74.

Dr. Rozmiarek’s career began in the US Army where he held the position of attending veterinarian at Fort Myer in Virginia. There he led the public health preventive medicine inspection services for the Washington, DC area. Dr. Rozmiarek also had the privilege of serving as a consultant for laboratory animal medicine to the Surgeon General of the Army and as the veterinarian to a number of US presidents. He cared for President Lyndon B. Johnson’s dogs, Caroline Kennedy’s pony, “Macaroni,” and several deer that had been given to the Kennedy family by the President of Ireland, and was also responsible for the horses that pulled the caissons for President Harry S. Truman, General Douglas MacArthur, and President John F. Kennedy. Upon his retirement from the Army in 1983, Dr. Rozmiarek had achieved the rank of Colonel, completed a master’s degree and residency in laboratory animal medicine, become Board certified in the field, earned his doctorate in immunology from The Ohio State University, and been elected national President of the AALAS. The remainder of his career was spent in academia. At The Ohio State University, Dr. Rozmiarek was a professor of laboratory animal medicine and director of the Office of University Laboratory Animal Resources through 1987. Dr. Rozmiarek next joined the University of Pennsylvania as a professor of laboratory animal medicine, where he established and served as the

first director of the university’s Laboratory Animal Resources Program. During this time, Dr. Rozmiarek also served as the university veterinarian, associate director for laboratory animal welfare in the Office of Regulatory Affairs, and as director of postdoctoral residency training for veterinarians in laboratory animal medicine. He retired from the university in 2004, but continued to serve until his death as professor emeritus of laboratory animal medicine, visiting professor of laboratory animal medicine at the Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, and laboratory animal facility director at the Fox Chase Cancer Center. Upon learning of Dr. Rozmiarek’s passing, Alexander M. Capron, chair of PRIM&R’s Board of Directors, said, “We will remember and celebrate his warmth, humor, and dedication to the welfare of humans and animals, and we will always be grateful for his wise counsel and unswerving support of PRIM&R.” Dr. Rozmiarek served as an active and valued member of PRIM&R’s executive, finance, and certification committees, and as PRIM&R’s Board treasurer and secretary. He served on the Planning Committee for and taught at PRIM&R’s annual IACUC Conferences for many consecutive years, and was one of the founding members of the Council for Certified Professional IACUC Administrators.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


PRIM&R established the CPIA® credential in 2007, and since then, more than 400 individuals have become certified. This certification was created to improve the quality of animal care and use programs nationwide and promote ethical practices and advanced knowledge of IACUC administration.

• Provides potential career advancement opportunities • Validates an individual’s professional experience and mastery of the body of knowledge determined by national experts to be essential to competent IACUC administrative practices • Strengthens the quality of IACUCs by providing an established body of relevant knowledge and national standards of practice in IACUC administration Complete information about the CPIA program can be found on the PRIM&R website at www.primr.org/certification.

CPIA Recertification Participation in the 2014 IACUC Conference qualifies as continuing education for the purpose of CPIA recertification. A maximum of 15.25 credit hours is available for the 2014 IACUC Conference. Credit hours for the pre-conference programs vary depending upon the duration of the course.

CPIA at the 2014 IACUC Conference • B8: What is the CPIA Credential? Is it for You? If So, How Do You Prepare? Wednesday, April 2, 4:45-6:00 PM, Plaza Court 8 The session is for individuals interested in earning the CPIA credential. • CPIA Networking Continental Breakfast Thursday, April 3, 7:00-8:00 AM , Plaza Ballroom D This is an opportunity for CPIA certified individuals to connect with one another and discuss recertification with members of the CPIA Council.

A special thank you to the Council for Certified Professional IACUC Administrators (CCPIA)! PRIM&R would like to thank the current members of the CCPIA for their dedication to the program:

Deb Frolicher Chair

Marcy Brown Vice Chair

William Greer

Tracy Heenan

recognition

The CPIA credential… • Demonstrates the certified IACUC professional’s high level of dedication to IACUC administration as a profession

CPIA Exams Examinations are conducted during two periods in the spring and fall. The spring 2014 exam registration deadline has passed. The fall examination deadline is September 2, and the testing period will take place October 10-25, 2014.

Rob Anderson

Alison Pohl

Jamie Gothro

Molly Greene

Shannon Stutler

Sally Westlake

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


Pre-Conference Programs Recognition Conference Information PRIM&R’s 2014 IACUC Pre-Conference programs will be held on Monday, March 31, 2014. As registration for these programs is now closed, only those attendees who pre-registered are able to participate in these courses. A continental breakfast will be served from 7:00 to 8:00 AM in Plaza Ballroom EF. Boxed lunches will be provided for all sessions. Please review your program’s agenda, as lunch times differ for each course. Please consult the room assignments below for your program location. At the conclusion of the pre-conference programs, you will be asked to complete an evaluation. Your feedback is essential to improving the quality and scope of our educational programming, and we would appreciate your completion of this survey.

schedules

Essentials of IACUC Administration—Intensive 8:00 AM-5:30 PM Plaza Ballroom D Faculty: Marcy Brown, BS, MA, CPIA; Deb Frolicher, BS, CPIA; Mary Jo Shepherd, DVM, CPIA IACUC 101™: “The Basics” 8:00 AM-5:00 PM Plaza Ballroom ABC Faculty: John Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM; Marilyn Brown, DVM, MS; J.G (Jerry) Collins, PhD; Cynthia Gillett, DVM, DACLAM, CPIA; Molly Greene, BA, CPIA; Mary Lou James, BA, LATG, CPIA; Monte Matthews, BA, CPIA; Eileen M. Morgan, BS; Marky Pitts, CPIA; Ernest D. Prentice, PhD; Tanya Tims, DVM Pre-Conference Programs Networking Reception 5:00 PM-6:30 PM Plaza/Exhibit Foyer Continuing Education Credits Both IACUC 101™: “The Basics” and Essentials of IACUC Administration—Intensive are eligible for CPIA® recertification credit. IACUC 101™ has been approved by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards (AAVSB) Registry of Approved Continuing Education (RACE) program for 6.5 hours of continuing education in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thank you Marky Pitts and Molly Greene for 10 years of service to PRIM&R’s Essentials of IACUC Administration!

We are grateful for your leadership in creating a course that has been so critical to the animal care and use community, and we congratulate you on its uninterrupted success through these many years.

Learn more about PRIM&R and gain insight into the fields of animal care and use and human subjects protections through our blog, Ampersand. A key source for research ethics commentary, Ampersand offers something for every research professional. Posts feature interviews filled with helpful tips, analyses of important events in the field, and detailed examinations of pressing issues, keeping our community up-to-date and well-informed.

Alongside staff writers, Ampersand regularly features a wide breadth of guest bloggers who help showcase the diverse and varied perspectives of our community, including the PRIM&R Blog Squad, who will be blogging live from the 2014 IACUC Conference. Be sure to read their posts both during and after the meeting!

www.primrblog.org a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


Your Guide to the Tracks Recognition Conference Information TRACKS

Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs

This track will review issues related to animal well-being, including the 3Rs, pain and distress, humane endpoints, enrichment, justification of animal numbers, the changing needs of society regarding the treatment of animals, the use of simulation methods in medical training, and more.

2

Communication and Advocacy

This track will provide attendees with an opportunity to engage in an open dialogue on issues of importance to institutional officials, IACUC chairs, attending veterinarians, administrators, and unaffiliated/non-scientific members. In addition, this track will focus on strategies for improving internal and external communications, creating effective crisis management and security systems, managing the inspection process, and more.

3

Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues

This track consists of sessions addressing issues that may be novel and/or particularly complex.

4

IACUC Administration/ Management and Process

This track will address issues of importance to IACUC administrators, coordinators, and managers, including the roles and responsibilities of IACUC administrators, implementing the 8th edition of the Guide, IACUC policies and procedures, IACUC forms, record keeping, protocol review and management, IACUC jurisdiction, and more.

Program Oversight

This track will cover issues related to post-approval monitoring (PAM), compliance, semiannual inspections, and programmatic review. Specifically, this track will include an overview of PAM, emergency planning, performance standards, facility inspections, and assessing programmatic deficiencies.

6

Protocol Review

This track is designed to help those who work with or on animal care and use programs to effectively review protocols. Topics will include a review of the science and ethics inherent in the protocols, managing the protocol submission and review process, ensuring congruency between grants and protocols, and more.

7

Qualifications and Training

This track will help attendees develop effective educational programs for the assorted stakeholders involved in the IACUC process. In addition, the faculty members in each session will describe, and then discuss with the attendees, the various resources available for education and training.

8

Updates: A Dialogue With‌

This track will provide attendees with an opportunity to hear from, and ask questions of, representatives from various oversight agencies.

1

schedules

Descriptors

5

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Your Guide to the Conference Schedule The 2014 IACUC Conference features a wide variety of breakout sessions on a multitude of topics. To make the breakout sessions easy to navigate, we have organized them into eight thematic categories called “tracks.” We organize sessions into tracks to assist you in choosing sessions that will help you gain the most from your conference experience. Within each track, there are three types of breakout sessions: workshops (interactive), didactic sessions (presentation-based), and double sessions (hybrid workshop/didactic sessions that are twice as long as regular breakout sessions). Since there are so many choices, we advise you to use the descriptors to identify the breakout sessions that are most relevant to your needs and interests. As you consult these descriptions, please also note the following:

2. Please note that not every topic is a perfect fit for one of the eight tracks. We request your indulgence if you come across an occasional square peg in a round hole. 3. The tracks are not meant to be exclusive, and any person can go to any session. For example, feel free to attend a session in the “IACUC Administration/ Management and Process” track even if you are not an IACUC administrator. 4. PRIM&R classifies some breakouts as “basic” or “advanced.” Please see the descriptors below for more information. • Basic: Session provides an introduction to the topic for those who have little or no prior knowledge of it. Teaching styles will be largely didactic, and focus will be on introducing, explaining, and illustrating basic concepts, principles, regulations, policies, or best practices relevant to the topic. Sessions labeled basic are designed for attendees new to the particular topic being discussed or individuals looking for a refresher on the fundamentals. • Advanced: Session a) assumes mastery of central ethical concepts and principles, of the regulations, and of the processes of applying them to the dayto-day work of protocol review or other research oversight activities, and b) aims to provide attendees

5. Sessions that do not have a learning level are intended for all audiences.

Icon Key Indicates a didactic session (presentation-based).

Indicates a workshop (interactive). Indicates session will be recorded for the Conference Passport. Pre-registration was required. Please visit the Help Desk to inquire about space availability. Indicates a session chosen from our Call for Program Contributions. Indicates a double session, which includes both lecture and discussion segments. Double sessions are held over lunch and will end at 1:45 PM on April 3. Pre-registration is required to attend, and a lunch ticket is included on your name badge. Please use this ticket to pick up your boxed lunch in Plaza Ballroom EF before you proceed to the session room.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

1. All double sessions are held over lunch and include a boxed lunch, which is provided prior to the start of the session (please pick up your boxed lunch in Plaza Ballroom EF before going to your session room). Preregistration is required to ensure meal availability. If you pre-registered for a double session and are unable to attend, please let a staff member at the Help Desk know so another person may attend in your place.

with the in-depth knowledge of an area and robust set of skills required for addressing difficult problems and navigating “grey areas” in that area, improving their animal care and use programs, shaping their institutional cultures, or advancing their careers. Sessions will often make heavy use of active learning techniques, such as case studies and question-based lectures. Attendees are expected to have sufficient experience and understanding in order to actively contribute to discussion and the solution of difficult problems discussed. These sessions will not review basic concepts.


Schedule Recognition Conference Information Wednesday, April 2 7:00 AM

Registration Opens

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

7:00-8:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom EF

7:00-8:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom D

Continental Breakfast

Continental Breakfast to Welcome First-Time Attendees

schedules

Hoping to connect with other first-time attendees before the conference starts? If so, please join us at this breakfast where you’ll have an opportunity to meet and network with colleagues, as well as hear answers to the 10 most frequently asked questions about the conference from the PRIM&R staff. All first-time attendees are welcome.

8:00-8:15 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Welcome from the 2014 IACUC Conference Co-Chairs

F. Claire Hankenson, DVM, MS, DACLAM and Christian E. Newcomer, VMD, MS, DACLAM

8:15-9:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Keynote Address: PatientDerived Tumor Xenografts: A Next Generation Murine Model for Cancer Drug Development

S. Gail Eckhardt, MD Stapp/Harlow Endowed Chair for Cancer Research, Professor and Co-Head of the Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center

9:00-9:15 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Remarks from PRIM&R’s Executive Director Emerita Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH

9:15-10:45 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Panel I: IACUC Conundrums— Mechanisms for Assessing Qualifications and Training of Research Personnel

Moderator: Jon D. Reuter Panelists: Natalie A. Bratcher, Matthew D. Rosenbaum, Rivka L. Shoulson

Of all the elements of an animal care and use program, training of personnel arguably has the largest impact on animal welfare. Furthermore, the federal regulations expect training to be an intrinsic part of any program. It is thus increasingly important for institutions to provide training for research personnel and to develop mechanisms for assessing qualifications. However, many IACUCs struggle with how best to accomplish this. In addition, training is often used as a response to, or even as a penalty for, being noncompliant, rather than as a proactive mechanism for improving research. During this panel, speakers will discuss a number of challenging issues around the assessment of personnel training, including defining target cohorts, content scope, and frequencies of review. Panelists will also review what institutions can do to reinforce a culture of proactive training, how to determine if a training program is successful, whether training programs are best done in conjunction with protocol approval or post approval, and how training can be integrated with post-approval monitoring.

10:45-11:15 AM

Break

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

Join us for coffee. 11:15 AM –12:30 PM

Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series A A1

Governor’s Square 17

Creating Quantifiable and Objective Indices of Animal Well-Being (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Tracy M. Heenan, Debra L. Hickman For many reasons, it is important to balance scientific objectives with the well-being of research animals during a study. However, the measures and timing of monitoring and intervention are not always easy to identify. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review the influence of animal well-being on scientific objectives • Define well-being and assessment strategies, including pain and body condition scoring mechanisms for rodents, livestock, and other animals • Identify the practical aspects of assessment implementation within an organization, including how much monitoring is needed, by whom, and when

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Wednesday, April 2 • Explore how to manage information effectively to support the science and ensure animal well-being • Discuss several research models that present challenges for assessment and maintenance of well-being in animals and measures to develop strategies for optimizing health and welfare

A2

Director’s Row J

Are We Using Too Few or Too Many? Animal Numbers Justification from a Biostatistician’s Perspective (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

A3

Plaza Court 4

Global Harmonization of Laboratory Animal Care: Is it on Track? (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Kathryn Bayne, Francis A. Fakoya, Sherry E. Vaughn Biomedical research and the data and/or products derived from it are recognized globally as valued commodities that frequently involve the use of animal models. In recent years, financial incentives and national and scientific interests have all contributed to global growth in animal research programs, as well as to increasing international scientific collaboration around animal models. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review the international guidelines on animal care and use in research • Discuss trends around the globalization of animal research

A4

Plaza Court 5

Open Forum for Laboratory Animal Veterinarians (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Elizabeth Ford, Christopher Manuel Laboratory animal veterinarians in the United States are in a unique position compared to many of their colleagues in other countries in that they have been granted a tremendous amount of responsibility and authority for managing their institutions’ animal care and use programs. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss the challenges that arise for veterinarians in exercising their responsibilities and authority • Review suggestions for coping effectively with challenges to that authority

A5

Governor’s Square 10

Managing Potential Conflict Within the Animal Care and Use Program (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Advanced

Faculty: Sally E. Light, Jennifer A. Perkins, Cyndi Rosenblatt For many of the day-to-day issues that arise within an institution’s animal care and use program, there can be confusion over who has the authority to do what. This can lead to potential conflicts between functional groups who may not understand each other’s responsibilities. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Define the roles of the various “players” in the animal care and use program • Share tips and tricks to defuse heated situations so that constructive progress can be made • Review how to accept input from entities that may overstep their responsibilities while still maintaining proper lines of authority and oversight

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

Faculty: Linda N. Brovarney, Nancy Hills, Wendy Koch, Travis Porco, Susan Silk This interactive session will introduce useful approaches to, key principles around, and regulatory requirements for justifying the number of animals used in research. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review how statisticians can facilitate an appropriate animal study design prior to protocol submission • Explore how statisticians can enhance the IACUC review process • Discuss how statisticians can promote the 3Rs through better experimental design and data analysis

• Explore the variation in the quality of animal care worldwide • Address the ethical treatment and welfare of animals internationally • Consider how a global corporation may have its own internal corporate policies, as well as a desire to achieve other accreditations


Schedule Recognition Conference Information A6

Director’s Row E

schedules

The IACUC’s Role in Maintaining Institutional Credibility (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Matthew Bailey, Elizabeth Goldentyer, Cindy Hoorn, Axel Wolff In an era of 24-hour news media, an institution may only have seconds to decide how to present findings to preserve or rebuild its reputation around sensitive topics. Knowing the steps to take, and practicing them beforehand, can give IACUC members the confidence to participate in the communication process at critical touch points during an investigation. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Use real-life scenarios to examine what happens when information is leaked, distorted, or both, and how to mitigate these situations • Analyze the communication situations that can sabotage trust in the institutional oversight process • Explore how perceptions can be powerful influencers in the IACUC investigation process • Share information that advances understanding of how oversight agencies respond to reported concerns or complaints • Discuss the possible consequences and/or protections for both individuals and institutions if reports about animal welfare concerns become public

A7

Open – No session is scheduled A8

Governor’s Square 16

Defining “Metrics” for Program Oversight (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

Faculty: David Cannon, Kathy Meunier In this session, faculty will: • Discuss whether there can be unique noncompliant events, or whether similarities can be identified for grouping and categorizing all events: Is there a system in place institutions can follow? • Explore the potential pitfalls to grouping events into defined categories: Can there be too many categories? How can one ensure items are grouped correctly? Could an event fit into multiple categories

that, during trend analysis, may worsen some areas, but improve others? • Outline how to evaluate data once metrics are defined: Can positive trends be identified? If there are fewer items in one category, but more in another, can generalities about the success of the program be made? • Explore the question of whether metrics are even useful, given the current trend towards more “performance standards” and fewer “engineering standards” • Provide examples of what to measure and how

A9

Governor’s Square 15

Electronic Methods for Streamlining IACUC Business (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Marcy Brown, Alison D. Pohl, Stacy Pritt IACUCs have the opportunity to reduce steps and paper by creatively using software solutions. While everyone is familiar with protocol management systems, other online applications can help ease paperwork burden. Examples of such applications include electronic signatures, online sign-up websites for inspections, document review sites for protocol or policy review, institutional shared drives, inspection management software packages, and other products. This session will focus on several specific examples of how IACUCs can go “green” while also streamlining operations and increasing effectiveness. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Share their experiences using electronic methods of protocol processing, data management, and other applications from home-grown to commercial products • Explore the available information about commercial systems, and discuss how to implement electronic applications • Address how pre-approved procedures may be incorporated into an electronic system for easy download • Review how regulatory compliance can be maintained while using new electronic applications

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Wednesday, April 2 A10

Director’s Row H

How to Effectively Conduct IACUC Investigations (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Emily Hearne, Brent Morse, Mary Jo Shepherd, Tanya Tims During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review requirements for addressing animal welfare concerns and noncompliance • Share processes and best practices for conducting investigations • Discuss optimal follow-up and plans for correction and prevention • Explore how to assemble an appropriate investigation team/subcommittee

A11

Governor’s Square 12

Faculty: Mary Lou James, Monte Matthews, Marky Pitts IACUC Boot Camp is a two-part IACUC cram session for those new to the field and will take place during the A and B breakout session series. These two sessions will provide a comprehensive overview of the oversight process, IACUC functions, regulations, frequently used acronyms, the Guide, protocol review process, and committee make-up. During Part I, faculty will: • Review frequently used acronyms • Examine specific USDA, OLAW, and AAALAC requirements and regulations • Outline IACUC membership requirements • Discuss IACUC responsibilities and charges

A12

Director’s Row I

Inter-Institutional Collaborations and Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs): What Are We Responsible For? (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: William Greer, Justin A. McNulty, Eileen M. Morgan During this session, faculty will: • Define inter-institutional collaborations and review the regulatory requirements that require attention • Review the primary components of a MOU • Outline strategies to identify collaborations, and discuss when collaboration necessitates a MOU (e.g., for PHS studies when custom antibodies are being made commercially, when institutions

A13

Plaza Court 3

Satellite Housing Facilities: How to Ensure Attending Veterinarian (AV) Oversight of Health and Well-Being (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: Troy Hallman, Gordon Roble Satellite housing areas (i.e., housing areas for animals not maintained within a centralized facility) are often necessary due to equipment needs, behavioral assays, sensitive tissue harvests, and space restrictions. However, these areas can become difficult for the IACUC and the AV to manage, may not provide the best environmental conditions for maintaining animals, may be inappropriately justified as a convenience for investigators, and may serve as a potential liability for institutional commitments to animal welfare. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss how programs can evaluate criteria for appropriate satellite housing justification • Explore how to develop and review satellite housing areas that are compatible with the need for animal comfort, health and welfare, veterinary care, biosecurity, and occupational health and safety measures • Review compliant centralized reporting mechanisms for animals maintained in approved satellite housing areas

A14

Ensuring Congruency Between Grants and Protocols: Who, How, and When? (Protocol Review Track)

Plaza Court 7

Faculty: Patricia A. Brown, Todd Forsythe, Tanise Jackson In this session, faculty and attendees will: • Define the requirements for congruence among grants, contracts, and protocols • Discuss various mechanisms for developing and implementing a program to accomplish this congruency

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

IACUC Boot Camp (Part I) (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

subcontract a portion of a project, and/or when a principal investigator oversees a project outside the home institution) • Discuss who initiates the MOU (i.e., the grantee, the subcontractor, or both) • Provide practical examples and templates of MOUs • Share experiences and ideas about managing collaborations across institutions


Schedule Recognition Conference Information • Review the PHS guidance on vertebrate animals with respect to grants • Compare notes on comparative reviews

A15

Plaza Court 2

schedules

Panel I Follow-Up: Assessing and Ensuring Qualifications, Competence, and Proficiency of Research Personnel (Qualifications and Training Track)

Faculty: Natalie A. Bratcher, Jon D. Reuter, Matthew D. Rosenbaum, Rivka L. Shoulson Technical competence and proficiency in the care and use of research animals is the ultimate goal for assuring compliance, regulatory mandates, and improving animal welfare. During this follow-up session to Panel I, faculty and attendees will: • Review the methods that work best in various settings for assessing qualifications, competence, and proficiency • Discuss staffing, training metrics, and documentation that must be factored into the development of an assessment method that best fits an institution • Assess best methods for assembling a training team • Address questions that came up during Panel I

A16

Governor’s Square 9

A Dialogue with USDA, APHIS, Animal Care (Updates: A Dialogue with… Track)

Faculty: Robert M. Gibbens For more than 40 years, Congress has entrusted APHIS with the stewardship of animals covered under the AWA and Horse Protection Act. APHIS continues to uphold that trust, giving protection to millions of animals nationwide. APHIS provides leadership for determining standards of humane care and treatment of animals, implements those standards, and achieves compliance through inspection, education, cooperative efforts, and enforcement. This session will provide an opportunity for attendees to: • Ask questions of a representative of USDA, APHIS, Animal Care • Participate in an open discussion about issues relevant to USDA, APHIS, Animal Care stakeholders

12:45-1:45 PM

Plaza Ballroom EF

Common Ground Networking Lunch

Time to connect…over lunch! Meet peers for conversation and networking. Tables will be divided by institution type: University/College (Medical), University/College (NonMedical), Hospital/Medical Center, Government Agency, Pharma/Biotech Company, and Small Research Programs. We will also have tables available for those wishing to “just lunch.” All are welcome!

12:45-1:45 PM

Plaza Ballroom D

Luncheon with the Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Research Ethics Recipient Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH

Join us for a luncheon with the 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Research Ethics recipient, PRIM&R’s Executive Director Emerita, Joan Rachlin. This event will provide attendees the opportunity to celebrate this distinguished leader as she retires from nearly 39 years at the helm of PRIM&R.

2:00-2:45 PM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Keynote Address: Facing the Morally Perilous World of Animal Research

John P. Gluck, PhD Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Senior Advisor to the President on Animal Research Ethics and Welfare, University of New Mexico; Affiliate Faculty, Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University

2:45-3:00 PM

Break

3:00-4:30 PM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Panel II: Managing Field Research

Moderator: Jori K. Leszczynski Panelists: John F. Bradfield, John A. Bryan, II, Pieter Johnson, Robert S. Sikes Conducting and overseeing field research often presents unique challenges for everyone involved. Regulations and protocol forms designed for biomedical research include many items that may not be relevant to work with wild animals and that omit issues of critical importance when working with these animals in their natural environments. These incongruities can lead to delays, frustrations, and misinterpretations for investigators and oversight personnel alike. In addition

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Wednesday, April 2 to protocol review, field research challenges the animal care and use program by presenting novel concerns for employee health, the conduct of semiannual inspections and reviews, and completion of annual reports. In this session, panelists will explore the challenges faced by investigators and IACUCs in assuring compliance of field research, including how one investigator addressed these challenges in carrying out his research.

4:30-4:45 PM

Break

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

B3

Join us for coffee. 4:45-6:00 PM

Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series B Plaza Court 2

Evidence-Based Enrichment Strategies that Promote SpeciesTypical Behaviors (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Jennifer Camacho, Debra L.Hickman, Robyn B. Lee During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss the role and responsibility of the IACUC in reviewing and promoting enrichment strategies, including what is required, minimal, optimal, and beneficial • Review best enrichment practices for non-human primates (e.g., complex and novel environments or social housing), and rodents (e.g., social housing and species typical behavior) • Examine performance criteria and how to use assessment data • Learn about the use of exemptions • Identify reporting requirements • Explore data-based outcomes in enrichment in rodents

B2

Governor’s Square 10

New Techniques for Refinement of Difficult Models (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Advanced

Faculty: Jon Geller, Dara Kraitchman, Letity V. Medina In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss ways to refine challenging animal models by adoption of humane endpoints, analgesics, less invasive methods and better clinical oversight and supportive care.

Governor’s Square 9

Activist Challenges to Research: Tactics Encountered and Proactive Response Strategies (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Matthew Bailey, John J. Sancenito, Eric Sandgren In this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review tactics, both legal and illegal, used by animal rights extremists to eliminate the humane use of animals in biomedical research • Identify high-level best practices to prevent, prepare for, and respond to animal rights extremism resulting from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology meeting • Discuss what happens when an institution has an issue that, because of FOIA, entails USDA or NIH OLAW involvement

B4

Governor’s Square 17

Managing the USDA Inspection Process (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Taylor Bennett, Marcy Brown, Robert M. Gibbens, Michelle Wallace-Fields This interactive session will review the components of a program for effectively managing the USDA inspection process, as well as provide insight into assuring compliance in frequently cited areas. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss how to effectively manage the inspection process • Review recent changes to the inspection process • Identify the most frequent findings during inspections, and how to assure compliance within the relevant sections of the regulations and standards

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

B1

• Review supportive care (refinements in clinical medicine) that are used in emergency medicine and could be applied to laboratory animals. • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of newly emerging refinement techniques. • Explore minimally invasive surgery including percutaneous techniques and endoscopy. • Discuss simulation training, human medical training, and veterinary medical training, and review the use of animals in simulated training for humans.


Schedule Recognition Conference Information B5

Governor’s Square 15

schedules

Horizontal Alignment in the IACUCPrincipal Investigator Partnership: Getting Everybody on the Same Page (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Cory Goracke-Postle, Mary Jo Shepherd, Sandy Wilkins The key to engendering a successful institutional culture of compliance around the humane care of use of animals in research is to build a strong IACUC-principal investigator partnership. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review common situations in which IACUC intervention may be needed, and explore how positive resolution can be achieved through relationship-building with individual principal investigators • Discuss what is involved in an effective IACUCprincipal investigator partnership •Compare strategies used in problem solving, and identify strengths and weaknesses to those approaches •C  onsider the impact on research, the animal care and use program, and the institution of implementing the IACUC-principal investigator partnership approach

B6

Director’s Row I

Panel II Follow-Up: Protocol Oversight, Including Special Challenges When Conducting Field Research (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

Faculty: John F. Bradfield, John A. Bryan, II, Pieter Johnson, Jori K. Leszczynski, Robert S. Sikes, Axel Wolff During this Panel II follow-up session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss whether the ILAR Guide pertains to field research • Consider the broader-scale consequences of manipulations performed on individuals, such as long-term or population-level impacts • Review the special circumstances IACUCs face when reviewing field research, including: distress and mortality during capture or marking; logistical details of anesthesia and analgesia; safety of research personnel; periodic evaluation and oversight responsibilities; and more • Explore how the IACUC administers the occupational health and safety program with regard to field research

B7

Plaza Court 7

A Conversation About Diversity: Why it Matters (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

Faculty: Donna Matthews Jarrell, Stacie Knight, Natalie L. Mays Diversity is one of PRIM&R’s core values. This session will discuss ways to promote regulatory affairs/regulatory compliance as a career option for under-represented minorities, and to encourage more diversity within the field, as well as within the PRIM&R membership. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Explore ways to promote science-based careers for under-represented minorities (e.g., the Biomedical Sciences Career Program at Harvard Medical School) • Discuss mentorship of high school and college/ graduate school students • Share recommendations for how to promote animal care and use program careers to a wider audience • Examine why increased attention to diversity issues within the field is important, including the value of increased sensitivity on the part of compliance personnel who work with or communicate with researchers from multiple nationalities/ethnicities

B8

Plaza Court 8

What Is the CPIA® Credential? Is it for You? If So, How Do You Prepare? (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Melinda Bruns, Deb Frolicher In this interactive session, a member of the CPIA Council, a recently successful examinee, and attendees will: • Review the development and status of the credentialing program • Discuss examination preparation tactics based on first-hand experience • Answer attendee questions about the CPIA credential and how to prepare for the exam

B9

Director’s Row E

Doing More with Less: Meeting Regulatory Requirements Despite Fewer Resources and Fewer Staff (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Jamie Gothro, William Greer, Cyndi Rosenblatt In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will: • Share thoughts about doing more with less

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Wednesday, April 2 • Discuss strategies for dealing with the institutional administration in order to receive necessary resources and support • Examine best practices for preventing employee burnout and dealing with the subsequent loss of valued staff

B10

Director’s Row H

IACUC Boot Camp (Part II) (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

B11

Plaza Court 3

How to Identify and Correct Specific, Isolated Deficiencies Before They Become Larger, More Pervasive Programmatic Issues (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: CeCe Brotchie-Fine, Linda N. Brovarney, Brent Morse In this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review programmatic deficiencies, including inadequacies in veterinary care programs (e.g., the training of technical/husbandry staff and in occupational health), inadequate sanitation due to malfunctioning cage washers, room temperature extremes due to HVAC failures, and IACUC problems • Review administrative problems, such as policies and procedures that do not meet institutional requirements • Discuss strategies and best practices for addressing these problems

Governor’s Square 16

Performance Standards: Simultaneously Liberating and Intimidating (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: Samuel C. Cartner, Guy B. Mulder, Susan Silk Performance-based standards are the hallmark of the Guide. However, institutions often struggle to design specific performance-based outcomes and goals, define how quality outcomes will be measured and monitored, and implement the resulting standards successfully. During this session, faculty will: • Briefly review general concepts involved in using performance-based standards, including the role of professional judgment, collaboration among experts at the institution, and IACUC involvement • Review the importance of understanding and utilizing the performance-based approach if an institution’s goal is to have flexibility in its program • Provide useful examples of successful performancebased standards and discuss how they were designed, monitored, implemented, and defended • Examine in detail, through attendee participation, the performance-based approach for a particular topic with widespread interest (e.g., breeding scenarios and housing density options for mice and rats) • Help attendees understand the roles of scholarship, data-analysis, personnel training, and consistency in the successful use of performance standards

B13

Director’s Row J

Occupational Health and Safety Programs (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: Alison D. Pohl, James M. Schmitt, Sandra Sonoda Occupational health and safety programs are integral to animal care and use programs and are mandated by the PHS policy and the Guide. During this session, faculty will: • Explain the essential concepts in the creation, management, and monitoring of occupational health and safety programs • Address various occupational health and safety issues to illustrate how the hazard survey and risk assessment processes influence occupational health and safety program intensity and complexity • Review methods for creating and maintaining effective IACUC interactions • Examine the roles of the principal investigator (scientific staff) and/or expert consultants in the optimization of occupational health and safety programs

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

Faculty: Mary Lou James, Monte Matthews, Marky Pitts Part II of IACUC Boot Camp will continue the new IACUC personnel’s saturation of vital information. During this session, faculty will: • Review other required institutional program components (e.g., occupational health and safety programs, training programs, and emergency/ disaster plans) • Discuss the protocol review process (e.g., full committee review and designated member review, protocol form components (handout), and amendments: minor vs. significant modifications)

B12


Schedule Recognition Conference Information B14

Plaza Court 5

Veterinary Review of Protocols: How Do We Obtain Congruency Within the Program? (Protocol Review Track)

Faculty: F. Javier Cisneros, F. Claire Hankenson In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss how to ensure consistency of veterinary review within and among institutional clinical veterinarians • Review established and common animal research procedures for expediting protocol review and approvals in order to alleviate confusion for investigators • Explore strategies for establishing consistent veterinary reviews for the selection of anesthesia, post-surgical monitoring, and pre- and post-procedure analgesia, as well as euthanasia expectations

schedules

B15

Plaza Court 4

Training Resources and Certification Programs (Qualifications and Training Track)

Faculty: Nicole Duffee, Melissa S. Hunsley Is your institution struggling to do more training with fewer resources? Training programs for animal welfare compliance depend upon having resources to enhance or extend face-to-face training and, in some instances, even to replace it. A growing number of resources are available to provide training, content, and documentation tools. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review various resources that could enhance a training program • Discuss what training resources they are using that have had a favorable impact at their institutions • Share innovative and successful training resources with other attendees • Explore third party certification (e.g., AALAS, Academy of Surgical Research, American Biological Safety Association) and/or internal institutional mechanisms

B16

Governor’s Square 12

A Dialogue with the NIH OLAW (Updates: A Dialogue with…Track)

Faculty: Patricia A. Brown The NIH OLAW provides guidance and interpretation of the PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, supports educational programs, and monitors

compliance with the PHS Policy by assured institutions and PHS funding components to ensure the humane care and use of animals in PHS-supported research, testing, and training. This session will provide an opportunity for attendees to: • Ask questions of a NIH OLAW representative • Participate in an open discussion about issues relevant to NIH OLAW stakeholders

B17

Plaza Court 6

IACUC Challenges for Small Organizations, Including Biotechnology Companies, Contract Research Organizations, and Colleges (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Shameen A. Afif-Rider, Christopher Dillon, Eileen M. Morgan, Sylk Sotto In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will focus on creative solutions for challenges inherent to small organizations, including: • Maintaining a small IACUC where members must wear multiple hats • Reviewing protocols in spite of limited scientific expertise • Performing program reviews and inspections with inexperienced members and consulting veterinarians • Dealing with conflicts of interest • Creating an IACUC from scratch

6:00-7:15 PM

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

2014 IACUC Conference Welcome Reception and Meet and Greet the Supporters, Exhibitors, and Poster Presenters

Join us to kick off the 2014 IACUC Conference, meet and greet our supporters and exhibitors, and view this year’s poster presentations! Complimentary mini-massages will be available, and light refreshments will be served.

6:00-7:15 PM

Speed Mentoring

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

Gather with your colleagues for a one-on-one networking event where you can connect with seasoned IACUC professionals, the Feds, and other experts to receive personalized answers to your regulatory, ethical, and/or operational questions. Mentoring will begin promptly at 6:15 PM.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thursday, April 3 Thursday, April 3 7:00 AM

Registration Opens

9:00-9:15 AM Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

7:00-8:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom EF

7:00-8:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom D

Continental Breakfast

CPIA® Networking Continental Breakfast

7:00-8:00 AM

Governor’s Square 11

AALAS Learning Library Continental Breakfast

Join AALAS for this continental breakfast to learn what’s new in the AALAS Learning Library, including new courses, tools, and interface! The curriculum is expanded, and the new tools will streamline management of personnel training. In addition, the interface has been engineered for greater speed and efficiency.

8:00-8:15 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Welcome from the 2014 IACUC Conference Co-Chairs

F. Claire Hankenson, DVM, MS, DACLAM and Christian E. Newcomer, VMD, MS, DACLAM

8:15-9:00 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Pillars of PRIM&R Lecture: Animal Models for the Study of Brain and Cognition

Thomas D. Albright, PhD Conrad T. Prebys Chair in Vision Research, Professor in the Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, and Director of the Vision Center Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies.

Elisa A. Hurley, PhD

9:15-10:45 AM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Panel III: The Analysis of Harm vs. Benefit

Moderator: Letty V. Medina Panelists: Thomas D. Albright, Adam Shriver, Janet D. Stemwedel Animal research is a privilege granted to the scientific community with the expectation that the research be ethical. It is not possible to legislate ethical research, but it is possible to establish a framework that promotes ethical standards through regulations. This requires an oversight body, with sufficiently diverse expertise to “provide the justification for the use of animals.” Is this justification, or validity of the proposed science, addressed by the investigator when he/she clarifies the scientific purpose and provides data to support a reasonable expectation that the results will increase scientific knowledge? Some would consider this scientific review, while others would consider this an evaluation of the potential benefit(s) of the study. An alternative view is that the work would not be funded if it weren’t beneficial, so the emphasis is placed on review that evaluates the sequential description of procedures and their anticipated impact on the animals’ well-being. This is where the controversy within our field begins. Are IACUCs already performing a harm/benefit analysis? Is the IACUC legally mandated to perform a harm/benefit analysis? If a committee chooses to emphasize one aspect of the analysis over the other, is this adequate? The IACUC, being qualified by the collective expertise of the different members, brings to its review a variety of perspectives and ideally a vested interest in maintaining the integrity of the review process. An important component of responsible use is the ethical evaluation of proposed studies performed by the IACUC. Is the ethical appraisal of protocols enough to ensure best practice, or just one part of a bigger process? What constitutes a harm/benefit analysis? Too much inquiry can produce a “paralysis of analysis,” and too little inquiry may indicate a lack of moral imagination, a desire to support a predetermined decision, or just plain ignorance. Our panelists will discuss these issues from their unique perspectives.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

Do you hold the CPIA credential and have an interest in connecting with other CPIAs? If so, please join the CPIA Council and PRIM&R staff at this continental breakfast! We’ll be discussing recertification, and will be answering any of your other questions. If you do not currently hold the CPIA credential, but are interested in taking the exam or learning more about the program, we invite you to attend the workshop B8: What Is the CPIA® Credential? Is it for You and, If So, How Do You Prepare? on April 2, 4:45-6:00 PM.

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Remarks from PRIM&R’s New Executive Director


Schedule Recognition Conference Information 10:45-11:15 AM

Break

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

Join us for coffee. 11:15 AM-12:30 PM

Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series C C1

Plaza Court 2

schedules

Are Mice the Models We Think They Are? Consequences of Environmental Stress (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Jennifer Camacho, Jennifer A. Perkins In this session, faculty will: • Address some of the current studies on cold stress in mice • Discuss the implications of bedding, caging, nesting materials, light, and noise on mouse well-being and research outcomes • Review information on social housing for mice • Examine whether the Guide recommendations regarding social housing for mice—for example, mouse room temperature—may perpetuate the environmental stress problem

C2

Director’s Row J

How to Discuss and Reach Consensus as an IACUC on Studies Involving Unalleviated Pain and Distress (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Tim Allen, Barbara Garibaldi, Joanne Zurlo In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will: • Review published guidance from NIH, the Guide, and USDA to better categorize protocols • Discuss the legal and ethical obligations for minimizing pain and distress in animals • Use specific examples to discuss individual and collective responsibilities, the development and validation of humane intervention points and endpoints, and the implementation and assessment of specific measures for minimizing pain and distress • Examine the use of observation to optimize animal welfare • Outline strategies for evaluating concerns that pain management medications will be incompatible with proposed animal experiments.

C3

Open – No session is scheduled

C4

Governor’s Square 9

Identifying Common Ground Between the Animal Protection and Research Communities (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Allyson J. Bennett, Taylor Bennett, Cathy Liss, Kenneth Litwak, Andrew N. Rowan This session will provide representatives from the animal protection and research communities an opportunity to discuss potential areas of common ground identified by the faculty in advance of the meeting, as well as issues raised during the session. During the session, faculty and attendees will: • Identify potential areas of agreement related to improving the well-being of animals used in research • Discuss mechanisms for addressing areas of disagreement in a positive and constructive manner • Explore how to start constructive conversation

C5

Plaza Court 5

Open Forum for Unaffiliated/ Non-Scientific Members (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Carol R. Byerly, Kathy S. Dyer This interactive session will provide a forum for unaffiliated/non-scientific members of IACUCs to discuss issues that arise when carrying out their duties with respect to overseeing animal care and use programs. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review the roles and responsibilities of unaffiliated/ non-scientific members • Discuss issues submitted in advance by unaffiliated/ non-scientific members • Explore any other issues raised by attendees during the session

C6

Governor’s Square 15

Top Deficiencies from the Perspectives of AAALAC, OLAW, and USDA (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

Faculty: John F. Bradfield, Carol Clarke, Brent Morse In this interactive session, attendees and representatives from federal and private oversight bodies will: • Discuss the most common problems encountered during inspections and site visits • Identify the common deficiencies self-reported by institutions

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thursday, April 3 C7

Governor’s Square 17

Cutting-Edge Developments in the 3Rs (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

C8

Plaza Court 7

Poster Session: How Many Legs? Institutional Oversight Involving Research with Invertebrates (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track)

Faculty: Bradley Ahrens, Gayle A. Orner During this session, faculty will: • Review the challenges of invertebrate research as it relates to the IACUC • Discuss the role and responsibility of the IACUC in reviewing studies involving invertebrates • Compare the requirements for invertebrate oversight in the European Union versus the United States • Describe how the European Directive on the Protection of Animals used for scientific purposes may affect invertebrate researchers in the United States, and discuss a simple solution developed for invertebrate researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison

Director’s Row H

Where the Rubber Meets the Road! Challenging Scenarios and Complex Advanced Issues in IACUC Administration (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track) Faculty: Patricia A. Brown, Robert M. Gibbens, Jaimie Graff, Mary Jo Shepherd This interactive session will provide faculty and attendees an opportunity to: • Work through simulated, problematic scenarios in IACUC administration • Explore possibilities for resolution without conflict • Discuss resolving conflict while maintaining compliance • Address specific scenarios attendees have faced and wish to explore with the group

C10

Governor’s Square 12

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About IACUC Forms, Guidelines, Policies, Meeting Minutes, and Ensuring Adequate and Effective Record Keeping (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Rob W. Anderson, Bill Moseley, Susan Silk, Tanya Tims In this interactive session, faculty and attendees will: • Share ideas regarding the preparation of minutes that meet requirements, and discuss how to ensure minutes are FOIA-ready • Examine strategies for reducing unnecessary, selfimposed regulatory burden • Review what records are required and/or expected by AAALAC, OLAW, and USDA • Discuss strategies for protecting the institution under FOIA or state/local open records laws • Review what forms, guidelines, and policies an IACUC should have in place • Share best practices for developing, maintaining, and implementing these documents (e.g., involving the research community in their development, and creating user-friendly, customer-focused forms, guidelines, and policies that really work)

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

Faculty: Kathryn Bayne, Dara Kraitchman, Letty V. Medina This session will explore examples of good practices in science-led approaches to implementing the 3Rs. During this session, faculty will: • Review how to better communicate to the science community the message that implementing the 3Rs is “good for science” • Propose ways in which IACUCs can play an active role in identifying good practices for the 3Rs and endorsing them at their institutions • Provide examples of new technologies that can refine existing studies, such as non-invasive imaging in vivo, use of in vitro techniques, creation of organs on chips, and bioinformatics • Review how the IACUC can be more systematic in identifying new refinement technologies

C9


Schedule Recognition Conference Information C11

schedules

Program Review and Facility Inspections (Program Oversight Track)

Director’s Row E

Faculty: Michelle J. Denning, Donna Matthews Jarrell, Eileen M. Morgan Semiannual program reviews and facility inspections are envisioned as a function to aid in developing a sound animal care and use program. However, changes involving the institutional official, IACUC membership, IACUC staffing, organizational resources and infrastructure, and the organization’s scientific mission can frequently precipitate perturbations or perplexing new challenges to these important tools of institutional oversight. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review the basic precepts of facility inspections and programmatic review • Identify common and uncommon problem areas • Explore preemptive or restorative approaches to weaknesses in these oversight tools

C12

Governor’s Square 16

Attaining a New Performance Plateau Through Post-Approval Monitoring (Program Oversight Track)

Faculty: Ron Banks, Melinda Bruns, Melissa S. Hunsley Many institutions are now embracing post-approval monitoring as a useful means for assuring animal welfare and institutional compliance. However, there are no prescriptive regulatory expectations for post-approval monitoring. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review the factors that can affect the success of a post-approval monitoring program, including: an appreciation of the organizational philosophy and culture; the style, character, pertinent content, authority, and reporting structure of a postapproval monitoring program; and the collaborative engagement of scientific colleagues • Discuss the facets of a successful post-approval monitoring program from conception to delivery that can: a) assure the proficient and humane implementation of animal procedures in accordance with approved protocols; b) foster the continuing education of users; and c) integrate new techniques to benefit scientific outcomes

C13

Governor’s Square 10

Pre-Approved IACUC Experimental Procedures for Principal Investigators to Use on Protocols (Protocol Review Track)

Faculty: David Cannon, Sonja L. Wallace During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss how to create standard operating procedures for common experimental procedures • Review what level of detail regarding standard operating procedures should be included in the protocol (i.e., do regulatory agencies allow protocols to refer to a specific standard operating procedure, or should they be fully incorporated into the protocol?) • Explore the pros and cons of using standard operating procedures in protocols while respecting the individual nature of research

C14

Director’s Row I

Training and Assessment for IACUC Members and Staff (Qualifications and Training Track)

Faculty: Erica Armstrong, Elizabeth Ford, Daphne Molnar During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review and explore basic IACUC functions (PHS IV.B.1-8 and AWR 2.31.c.1-8) • Examine the role and day-to-day work of the IACUC with experienced experts in the field • Review ways to ensure the IACUC is qualified through training, expertise, and/or the experience of IACUC members, including through the use of webinars and professional meetings, the Guide Training Treasures, AWA, etc. • Discuss opportunities for continuing education of IACUC members • Explore IACUC reviewer process assessment tools, e.g., reviewer report cards, protocol review turn-around times, etc.

C15

Plaza Court 8

Developing Surgical Skills in Researchers (Qualifications and Training Track)

Faculty: Rivka L. Shoulson, Jason Villano The recent Guide intensified a focus on training researchers how to perform surgery in animals and raised the bar for rodent surgeries. For any animal species, investigators must have the necessary skills in

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thursday, April 3 aseptic technique, gentle tissue handling, appropriate use of instruments, effective hemostasis, and appropriate technique and materials for wound closures. At institutions where animal surgeries are performed, a surgical training program including competence assessment is an essential component of the investigator training program. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Discuss how to cultivate the necessary surgical skills in researchers and how to create training programs • Review options for implementing such programs • Address the challenges of how to ensure surgical competence in animal research personnel

12:45-1:45 PM

C16

2:00-2:45 PM

Plaza Court 3

A Dialogue with the VA (Updates: A Dialogue with… Track)

12:45-1:45 PM

Lunch

Plaza Ballroom EF

Participate in a vibrant discussion of Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts by Emily Anthes, a journalist and author who specializes in telling the stories of science. Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss the book with their peers and the author, and she will be available to sign books during this time. Copies of Ms. Anthes’ book will be available onsite in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer.

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Henry Spira Memorial Lecture: Human Organs-on-Chips as Potential Replacements for Animal Testing

Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD Founding Director, Core Faculty Member, and Platform Leader of Biomimetic Microsystems, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard University; Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology, Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital; Professor of Bioengineering, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

2:45-3:00 PM

Break

3:00-4:30 PM

Plaza Ballroom ABC

Panel IV: Virtual IACUC – This Meeting Is in Session!

Moderator: Mary Jo Shepherd Panelists: George F. Babcock, John F. Bradfield, Patricia A. Brown, Carol R. Byerly, Carol Clarke, Natalie L. Mays, Gordon Roble, Richard J. Traystman Be sure not to miss this real-time virtual IACUC meeting! Virtual agenda items will be made available to conference attendees prior to the “meeting,” and attendees will have the opportunity to electronically participate in the virtual committee voting process via text or web polling. Audience vote tallies will then be displayed and discussed in real time, and representatives from AAALAC, OLAW, and/or USDA will provide their perspective on each issue discussed by the virtual IACUC. Items on the agenda were included on the Conference Passport in advance of the meeting.

4:30-4:45 PM

Break

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

Join us for coffee.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

Faculty: Susan Harper, Alice Huang, Joan T. Richerson This interactive workshop session is designed to provide an opportunity for participants to engage VA representatives on topics that are specific to animal research within the VA. The VA Research and Development program plays a key role in advancing the health and care of veterans. As part of the largest integrated healthcare system in the United States, research at the VA is not only important for addressing the service-related health concerns of veterans, but also makes important contributions to scientific inquiry and understanding that impacts American healthcare in general and the animal research programs on which that work relies. During this workshop, faculty (representatives from VA Central Office) and attendees (from stations across the nation) will: • Review current issues in animal research that are of special concern to the VA • Discuss questions encountered at the station level related to animal research within the VA (those who plan to attend are encouraged to submit questions to the faculty members ahead of time, as well ask questions during the session) • Exchange ideas and share experiences to gain greater perspective on ways to improve the management of animal research within the VA

Plaza Ballroom D

Research Ethics Book Group Lunch and Book Signing with Author Emily Anthes


Schedule Recognition Conference Information 4:45-6:00 PM

Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series D D1

Governor’s Square 9

The 3Rs at Work: Case Studies on Protocols Involving Complex Animal Models (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

schedules

Faculty: Ernest D. Prentice, Joanne Zurlo During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review challenging animal models • Define the principles of the 3Rs, including when it is better to use more animals for the benefit of the individual animals • Use specific case studies to address project planning, training, monitoring and, ultimately, intervention and decision making

D2

Director’s Row I

Current Approaches to Effective Pain Management for Research with Animals: What’s New? What Works? What Doesn’t? (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Barbara Garibaldi, Gordon Roble During this session, faculty will: • Review current methods for managing pain in laboratory animals • Discuss how to maintain a surgical plane of anesthesia in rodents • Outline the challenges of providing analgesia for immunological studies • Explore current thinking on peri-operative pain management • Address the use of neuromuscular blockers and how to assess their value to animal welfare

D3

Governor’s Square 10

Open Forum for IACUC Chairs (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: George F. Babcock, Peter J. Koch This interactive session will provide a forum for IACUC chairs to discuss the issues they face in carrying out their duties, including, their role as leaders in the process of certifying the institution’s compliance with regulations, polices, and guidelines. During this session, faculty and attendees will:

• Discuss the roles and responsibilities of IACUC chairs at various institutions and the support needed to carry out those responsibilities • Examine the core responsibilities of the institutional official from the USDA and PHS perspectives, and delineate the respective responsibilities of the institutional official, the IACUC, and the attending veterinarian • Review the methods used by the IACUC to deliver quality service, liaise with investigators to resolve problems, and promote IACUC programs and advocate for the development of research animal resources • Participate in an open dialogue around questions raised by attendees during the session

D4

Director’s Row J

Educating the Public About Biomedical Research (Communication and Advocacy Track)

Faculty: Emily Anthes, Allyson J. Bennett, Elizabeth Goldentyer, Tracy M. Heenan In the last decade, surveys have shown that public support for biomedical research with animal models has fallen. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Review recent polling data on public support for research using animal models • Explore options for educating the public in an effort to provide a balanced understanding of the pros and cons of research with animals • Discuss how best to provide the facts about why animals are used in research, what kind of care is provided to the animals during a research study, and what the benefits are for both people and animals from this type of research • Review where information about educating the public is available

D5

Plaza Court 2

Implementing a Rodent PeriOperative Care Program in a Large Advanced Academic Facility (Hot Topics, Trends, and Special Issues Track) Faculty: Jeffrey Fortman, Julia Goldman The Guide’s section on protocol review includes a list of topics that should be considered by the IACUC. One topic is post-procedural care and observation (e.g.,

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thursday, April 3 inclusion of post-treatment or post-surgical assessment forms). During this session, faculty will: • Review the development and implementation of a program to document a peri-operative care program for rodents • Discuss the options that need to be considered in setting up such a program, and the processes for doing so • Review the role of self-assessment in, and common investigator mistakes and findings around, implementing a peri-operative care program • Outline strategies for managing push back from investigators

D6

Open – No session is scheduled D7

Governor’s Square 16 Basic

Faculty: Natalie L. Mays, Rachel A. Murray, Felicia Ponce During this session, seasoned faculty will review the basics of IACUC administration including: • Managing protocol review • Managing inspections and program reviews • Post-approval monitoring • IACUC/investigator interactions • Fostering a culture of compliance that is essential for optimizing an institution’s research environment • Dealing with challenging customers and situations and promoting customer service

D8

Governor’s Square 15

Identifying and Tracking Exceptions and Deviations: How Does the IACUC Staff Make Sure Nothing Is Missed? (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

Faculty: Linda N. Brovarney, Patricia A. Brown During this session, faculty and attendees will share ideas and processes for: • Identifying true deviations and exceptions • Documenting and assuring that all deviations and exceptions are accounted for

D9

Plaza Court 4

Social Housing for Species Other than Mice and Monkeys (Animal Well-Being and the 3Rs Track)

Faculty: Torrie L. Condet, Emily Miedel, Axel Wolff The Guide now recommends that social housing for social species be the default for most research species. Yet, intra-species aggression can present challenges to meeting this recommendation. During this session, participants will be asked to share their experiences, and with the faculty they will: • Review the common problems faced in meeting social housing requirements, particularly for rabbits and pigs • Discuss possible solutions to fulfill the needs of social animals maintained at biomedical research sites • Explore specific cases related to social housing at individual institutions

D10

Auditing Outsourced Animal Activities (Program Oversight Track)

Director’s Row E

Faculty: Donna Goldsteen, Amber Lange, Eileen M. Morgan During this session, facility will: • Discuss the necessity of monitoring contract research organizations, specifically for welfare compliance • Review how the auditing process should be managed, and discuss what to do with the results of an audit • Outline how to prepare for audits, and review how laboratories are deemed acceptable for use • Address how this type of monitoring differs from routine Study Monitoring or Good Laboratory Practices inspections • Explore how academia interfaces with contract research organizations

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

schedules

IACUC Administration for New Administrators/Coordinators (IACUC Administration/Management and Process Track)

• Determining which deviations and exceptions should be included in the semiannual reports • Defining which deviations and exceptions must be reported


Schedule Recognition Conference Information D11

schedules

Scientist User Committees: Constructive or Constrictive (Program Oversight Track)

Plaza Court 8

Faculty: Kevin Prestia, Jennifer Pullium, Jon D. Reuter Scientist user committees are usually created by senior administration in the spirit of collaboration and as a mechanism to offer constituents a voice in shaping program and research support needs. They are generally composed of representative faculty and administrative staff offering representation of major interest groups. While ideally functioning as an advisory committee for animal program related issues, if left unmanaged, committee meetings can quickly turn into gripe sessions and platforms for personal vendettas. Major functions of these committees should include meeting periodically to review and provide representative faculty input and guidance on major animal care and use program and IACUC initiatives, policies, health status of animal colonies, resource limitations, vivarium space usage, proposed financial reimbursements that impact overall per diem rates, and other animal management related activity. Their authority, membership, and administrative placement together influence the effectiveness and value to the institution. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Define the purpose and authority of scientist user committees • Evaluate who should participate in these committees • Discuss the benefits and pitfalls of these committees • Explore how these committees interact with the institutional official and IACUC

D12

Plaza Court 3

Testing Your Disaster Plans: Don’t Let Your Plan Be a Disaster! (Program Oversight Track)

Advanced

Faculty: Essi Ellis, Stuart Pike During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Briefly review the various elements of a disaster plan • Learn how to conduct and participate in a table top exercise using the components of a typical disaster plan so as to determine the weaknesses of the plan in advance of a disaster • Develop an understanding that there is no “perfect” plan, and that any plan must meet the individual needs of an institution—one size does not fit all!

D13

Director’s Row H

Panel III Follow-Up: IACUC Review of Protocols – Harm/Benefit for Balancing Ethics, Compliance, and Science (Protocol Review Track)

Faculty: Elizabeth Ford, Adam Shriver, Janet D. Stemwedel During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Explore the ethical issues that may arise when an IACUC reviews a protocol • Examine the ways an IACUC review can ensure both institutional compliance and ethical responsibility, while also facilitating research • Discuss how to use standardized procedures • Review how a culture of welfare can promote a more rigorous harm/benefit review

D14

Governor’s Square 17

Advantages and Disadvantages of Combined and Master Protocols (Protocol Review Track)

Faculty: Charles Burnett, Jr., Jori K. Leszczynski, Nancy Figler Marks Should you group together or split apart your protocols? Some institutions believe that each grant should have its own protocol, while others follow the philosophy that, as long as the specific aims of the research are the same, multiple grants can be covered under the same protocol. During this session, faculty and attendees will: • Explore the pros and cons of each approach • Review the decision-making process with regard to combining or splitting protocols • Determine how to tie protocols and monies to grants when using a master protocol, and explore the challenges related to this approach • Review the process of congruence of protocols with grants as it relates to combined vs. split protocols

D15

Governor’s Square 12

Changing the Culture to Improve Compliance (Qualifications and Training Track)

Advanced

Faculty: Ron Banks During this session, faculty will: • Review how to design a local research administrator certification curriculum and enlist institutional support • Discuss the value of educated staff to the IACUC’s mission and responsibilities • Explore how thinking outside the box keeps compliance inside the box • Review other ways to expand this program through subcommittees, subject matter experts, etc.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Thursday, April 3 D16

Plaza Court 5

A Dialogue with AAALAC International (Updates: A Dialogue with…Track)

Faculty: Christian E. Newcomer AAALAC International is a voluntary accrediting organization that enhances the quality of research, teaching, and testing by promoting humane, responsible animal care and use. It provides advice and independent assessments to participating institutions and accredits those that meet or exceed applicable standards. This interactive session will provide an opportunity for attendees to: • Ask questions of a representative of AAALAC International • Participate in an open discussion about issues relevant to AAALAC International stakeholders

6:00-7:00 PM

Closing Reception

Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

Join us for fond farewells and to make plans for the 2015 IACUC Conference. Light refreshments will be served.

schedules

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


Posters Selected for Presentation Recognition Conference Information PRIM&R is pleased to present the IACUC Conference Poster Presentation Program at the 2014 IACUC Conference. Thirteen posters* were selected for display throughout the conference. Posters are on display in the Plaza/Exhibit Foyer at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, and may also be accessed via the Conference Passport**. Many thanks are owed to the Planning Committee for their work in coordinating the Poster Program. 1. Achieving Global Animal Welfare Compliance

Zoetis Sherry Vaughn, BS, DVM; Kimberly Frazier, MS; Melissa Perez; Torrie Condet, BS, MA

2. Post-Approval Monitoring of Field Protocols

posters

University of New Mexico Katy Mirowsky-Garcia, MS; Jerry W. Dragoo, PhD; Vicki A. White, LATg

3. Zoetis Global Third Party Risk Assessment Process

Zoetis Pete Barrett, DVM; Torrie Condet, BS, MA; Yvette Diamondidis, DVM; Kris Fairbanks, DVM, MS; Kimberly Frazier, MS; Gregory A. Inskeep, DVM; Becky Klimesh, BS, DVM; Peter Little, BVSc (Hons), MVS, MACVSc; Helena Paradell, DVM, MSc; Michael Pearce, BVSc, MSc; Melissa Perez; Jim Strake, DVM; Sherry Vaughn, BS, DVM; Taylor Barbosa, DVM, MS, PhD, ACPV

4. Occupational Health and Safety Solutions Texas Tech University Karin Fritz, MS

5. Ensuring Ethical Animal Use and Care Globally—What Happens When There Isn’t an Established Oversight Body?

6. Invertebrate Oversight

University of Wisconsin—Madison Gayle A. Orner, PhD, CPIA; Holly McEntee, MA, CPIA; Janet Welter, DVM, MPH, PhD PRIM&R is pleased to feature this poster in a breakout session during the conference: C8 (workshop): Poster Session: How Many Legs? Institutional Oversight Involving Research with Invertebrates on April 3 from 11:15 AM to 12:30 PM. Please see the conference schedule for more information.

7. Accreditation Readiness—A Team Effort

Pfizer, Inc. Robert Gunnels, BS, DVM, MS; Gary Borkowski, DVM, MS, DACLAM; Stephen Baker, MA; Marcy Brown, BS, MA, CPIA; Jennifer Bielawne, BS

8. Animal Concerns: The Investigating and Reporting Process University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Rene Cutting, BS, MS

9. Analysis of Animal Research Ethics Committee Membership at American Institutions

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Lawrence Hansen, MD; Justin Goodman, MA; Alka Chandna, PhD

Zoetis Torrie Condet, BS, MA; Gregory A. Inskeep, DVM; Sherry Vaughn, BS, DVM

*Please note the inclusion of posters featuring commercial products should not be considered an endorsement by PRIM&R. ** For more information on accessing the Conference Passport, please see p. 7.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


10. Three Rs Concept Interpretation by Animal Ethics Committee Members in Egypt

12. Standardization of Training Through Use of Computer Based Training

11. H  armonizing Enrichment and Behavioral Management Globally

13. A Global Approach to Post-Approval Monitoring

Faculty of Science, Cairo University K. Gaafar, PhD; S. R. Fahmy, PhD; A.M. Badr, PhD; H. Hamdi; A. Afif, PhD; M.M. Mostafa, PhD; K. Said, PhD

Pfizer, Inc. Gina Prochilo-Cawston, MS, CPIA; Rebecca Varrall, BSc (Hons); Catharine Andresen, BS; Stephen Baker, MA; Danielle Bornstein-Elbirt, DVM, MS, DACLAM; Katherine Brodeur, RLATg; Dorian L. Culmer, DVM, DACLAM; Marie Debrue, DVM, MSc, DACLAM; Melissa Dragon, BS, LATg; Laura Danner, BS, LATG, CVT; Susan Rubino, LATg; LaWanda Thompson, PhD

Pfizer, Inc. Kim Froeschl, BS, LATG, CMAR; Brian Beer, CMAR, LATG; Melissa Dragon, BS, LATg; Dotty Paquin, MBA, LATG, CMAR; Lynn Collura, DVM, DACLAM; Gloria Gaito, CPIA, MS, MBA

Pfizer, Inc. Marcy Brown, BS, MA, CPIA; Jennifer Bielawne, BS; Monica DeFeo, CPIA, BS, MS; Cyndi Filliettaz, LVT, LATG; Josh Folden, BSB/M, RALAT; Gloria Gaito, CPIA, MS, MBA; Lauren Kelley, AS, PMP, LATG; Toni O’Connell, CPIA; Gina Prochilo-Cawston, MS, CPIA; Amie Rossi, AS, CVT, LATG; Patti Turner, CPIA, BS, LATG; LaWanda Thompson, PhD

posters

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


Faculty List Recognition Conference Information A

Shameen A. Afif-Rider, BS, LATG, CPIA, RAC Associate Director of Regulatory Governance, MedImmune, LLC. B17. Bradley Ahrens, DVM Laboratory Animal Veterinary Fellow, Division of Comparative Medicine, Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope and University of Southern California. C8. Thomas D. Albright, PhD Conrad T. Prebys Chair in Vision Research, Professor in the Systems Neurobiology Laboratories, and Director of the Vision Center Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Keynote Address (April 3), Panel III. Tim Allen, MS Technical Information Specialist, Animal Welfare Information Center, USDA. C2. Rob W. Anderson, BS, LATG, CPIA IACUC Director, University of Cincinnati. C10. Emily Anthes, MA Science Writer. Research Ethics Book Group Lunch and Book Signing (April 3), D4. Erica Armstrong, BS, CPIA Associate Director, Office of Animal Welfare Assurance, Vanderbilt University Medical Center. C14.

B

George F. Babcock, PhD Professor and IACUC Chair, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; Deputy Director of Research, Shriners Hospitals for Children-Cincinnati. Panel IV, D3. Matthew Bailey Vice President, National Association for Biomedical Research. A6, B3. Ron Banks, DVM, CPIA Director, Office of Animal Welfare Assurance, Duke University. C12, D15. Kathryn Bayne, MS, PhD, DVM, DACLAM, DACAW, CAAB Global Director, AAALAC International. A3, C7. Allyson J. Bennett, PhD Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Wisconsin—Madison. C4, D4. Taylor Bennett, DVM, PhD Management Consultant and Senior Scientific Advisor, National Association for Biomedical Research. B4, C4. John F. Bradfield, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Veterinarian and Senior Director, AAALAC International. IACUC 101, Panel II, B6, C6, Panel IV. Natalie A. Bratcher, MS 3Rs Scientist/Alternatives Coordinator & Global Animal Welfare Coordinator, AbbVie, Inc. Panel I, A15. CeCe Brotchie-Fine, MA, CPIA Regulatory Compliance Specialist, Animal Welfare Committee, and Deputy IACUC Chair, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc. B11. Linda N. Brovarney, BS, RVT, CMAR, CPIA IACUC Director, University of California, San Francisco. A2, B11, D8. Marilyn Brown, DVM, MS Executive Director, Animal Welfare and Training, Charles River Laboratories. IACUC 101. Marcy Brown, BS, MA, CPIA Regulatory Compliance Lead, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development. EIA, A9, B4. Patricia A. Brown, VMD, MS, DACLAM Director, OLAW, NIH. A14, B16, C9, Panel IV, D8. Melinda Bruns, RVT, RLATG, CPIA Regulatory Manager and Quality Improvement Specialist, Office of Responsible Research Practices, The Ohio State University. B8, C12. John A. Bryan, II, DVM, MS Veterinary Medical Officer, Wildlife Veterinarian, and IACUC Chair, US National Park Service. Panel II, B6. Charles Burnett, Jr., MHA, MSW, CPIA Executive Director, Division of Laboratory Animal Resources, University of Pittsburgh. D14. Carol R. Byerly, PhD Lecturer, Department of History, University of Colorado Boulder. C5, Panel IV.

faculty

C

Jennifer Camacho, LVT, RLATG, CMAR Animal Enrichment Program Manager, Center for Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. B1, C1. David Cannon, CPIA IACUC Director, University of Alabama at Birmingham. A8, C13. Samuel C. Cartner, DVM, PhD Associate Vice President for Animal Research and Animal Resources Program Director, University of Alabama at Birmingham. B12. F. Javier Cisneros, DVM, MS, PhD, CPIA Veterinary Reviewer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center. B14. Carol Clarke, DVM, DACLAM Senior Staff Veterinarian for Research, USDA, APHIS, Animal Care. C6, Panel IV. J.G. (Jerry) Collins, PhD Professor Emeritus of and Senior Research Scientist in Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine. IACUC 101. Torrie L. Condet, BS, MA Senior Associate Scientist, Zoetis. D9.

D

Michelle J. Denning, BS, LATG, CPIA IACUC Manager and Grants Specialist, Office of Animal Care and Use, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. C11. Ngaire Dennison, MA, VetMB, MRCVS Animals in Science Regulation Unit Inspector, The Home Office (United Kingdom). C7 Christopher Dillon, BA, LATG, CPIA IACUC Chair and Animal Welfare and Compliance Manager, MPI Research; Member, Board of Directors, The Michigan Society for Medical Research. B17. Nicole Duffee, DVM, PhD Director, Education and Scientific Affairs, AALAS. B15. Kathy S. Dyer Senior Curriculum Specialist, Northwest Evaluation Association. C5. p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


E

S. Gail Eckhardt, MD Stapp/Harlow Endowed Chair for Cancer Research, Professor, and Co-Head of the Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center. Keynote Address (April 2). Essi Ellis Emergency Preparedness Manager, University of Colorado Boulder. D12.

F

Francis A. Fakoya Professor of Anatomy, Histology, and Cell Biology, St. George’s University, Grenada. A3. Elizabeth Ford, DVM, MPVM, DACLAM Senior Director, The Scripps Research Institute. A4, C14, D13. Todd Forsythe Grant-Protocol Congruence Specialist: Animal Research, University of Wisconsin—Madison. A14. Jeffrey Fortman, DVM Director, Biologic Resources Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago. D5. Deb Frolicher, BS, CPIA IACUC Director, The Scripps Research Institute. EIA, B8.

G

Barbara Garibaldi, DVM, DACLAM Director, Animal Research Facility, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. C2, D2. Jon Geller, DVM, DABVP Emergency Veterinarian, Fort Collins Veterinary Emergency and Rehabilitation Hospital. B2. Robert M. Gibbens, DVM Director, Western Region, USDA, APHIS, Animal Care; Veterinarian, Oklahoma State University. A16, B4, C9. Cynthia Gillett, DVM, DACLAM, CPIA Director, Research Animal Resources, University of Minnesota. IACUC 101. John P. Gluck, PhD, Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Senior Advisor to the President on Animal Research Ethics and Welfare, University of New Mexico; Affiliate Faculty, Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. Keynote Address (April 2). Elizabeth Goldentyer, DVM Regional Director, USDA, APHIS, Animal Care. A6, D4. Julia Goldman, DVM, MS Clinical Veterinarian, University of Illinois at Chicago. D5. Donna Goldsteen, BS, RLATG, CMAR, CPIA Senior Manager, Laboratory Animal Resources, MedImmune, LLC. D10. Cory Goracke-Postle, PhD, CPIA Associate Director, IACUC Office and IACUC Member, University of Minnesota. B5. Jamie Gothro, RVT, LATG, CMAR,CPIA Animal Welfare Officer and IACUC Administrator, VA San Diego Healthcare System. B9. Jaimie Graff, BS, MA, CPIA IACUC Administrator and Post Approval Monitor, US Environmental Protection Agency. C9. Molly Greene, BA, CPIA IACUC Advisor, Michigan State University. IACUC 101. William Greer, BS, CPIA, RLAT Associate Director, Office for Research Protections, Pennsylvania State University. A12, B9.

H

I

Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD Founding Director, Core Faculty Member, and Platform Leader of Biomimetic Microsystems, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University; Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology, Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital; Professor of Bioengineering, Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Keynote Address (April 3).

J

Tanise L. Jackson, DVM, DACLAM Director, Animal Welfare and Research Integrity, Florida A&M University. A14. Mary Lou James, BA (biochemistry), LATG, CPIA Consultant, Regulatory Compliance, Research Animal Welfare; President, IACUC 101 Series. IACUC 101, A11, B10. Donna Matthews Jarrell, DVM, DACLAM Attending Veterinarian and Director, Center for Comparative Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital. B7, C11. Pieter Johnson, PhD Associate Professor in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Colorado Boulder. Panel II, B6. a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

faculty

Troy Hallman, MS, VMD, DACLAM Director, Office of Animal Welfare, University of Pennsylvania. A13. F. Claire Hankenson, DVM, MS, DACLAM Senior Associate Director, University Laboratory Animal Resources, and Associate Professor, Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. B14. Susan Harper, DVM, MS, DACLAM, DACVPM Veterinary Medical Officer, VA Office of Research Oversight. C16. Emily Hearne, MS Training and Compliance Manager, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A10. Tracy M. Heenan, DVM, CPIA Director, Office of Animal Care and Use and Associate Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. A1, D4. Debra L. Hickman, DVM, MS, DACLAM Veterinarian, Indiana University School of Medicine. A1, B1. Nancy Hills, PhD IACUC Member, University of California, San Francisco. A2. Cindy Hoorn, DVM, PhD Director, Global Animal Welfare & Compliance, Worldwide Comparative Medicine, Pfizer, Inc. A6. Alice Huang, PhD, CPIA Staff Scientist and Deputy, IACUC Guidance, Atlanta VA Medical Center. C16. Melissa S. Hunsley, PhD, CPIA Consultant, Animal Care and Use Program Consulting; Educational Resources Editor, AALAS. B15, C12.


Faculty List Recognition Conference Information K

Stacie Knight Director of Regulatory Affairs and Director of Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Regulatory Affairs, Safety, and BenefitRisk Management, Biogen Idec. B7. Peter J. Koch, PhD Professor, Charles C. Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine; IACUC Chair, University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Medical Center. D3. Wendy Koch, DVM Regional Animal Care Specialist, USDA, APHIS, Animal Care. A2. Dara Kraitchman, VMD, PhD, FACC Cardiovascular Interventional Section Head, Division of Magnetic Resonance Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. B2, C7.

L

Amber Lange Executive Director, Laboratory Animal Services, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc. D10. Robyn B. Lee, MS, CPIA Statistician and IACUC Chair, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense. B1. Jori K. Leszczynski, DVM, DACLAM Director of the Office of Laboratory Animal Resources and Veterinarian, University of Colorado Denver; Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine. Panel II, B6, D14. Sally E. Light, BA, CPIA IACUC Administrator, Michigan State University. A5. Cathy Liss, BA President, Animal Welfare Institute. C4. Kenneth Litwak, DVM, PhD Laboratory Animal Advisor, Animal Welfare Institute. C4.

M

Christopher Manuel, DVM, PhD, DACLAM Clinical Veterinarian, University of Colorado Denver. A4. Nancy Figler Marks, DVM, MS, DACLAM Veterinarian and IACUC Director, University of Iowa. D14. Monte Matthews, BA, CPIA Director, Animal Care Services, University of Oregon. IACUC 101, A11, B10. Natalie L. Mays, BA, LATG, CPIA Director of the IACUC and IBC, New York University Langone Medical Center. B7, Panel IV, D7. Justin A. McNulty, CPIA, LATG Senior Program Coordinator, The University of Texas at Austin. A12. Leticia V. Medina, DVM, DACLAM Associate Director, Animal Welfare and Compliance, AbbVie, Inc. B2, Panel III, C7. Kathy Meunier, CPIA Senior IACUC Administrator, Harvard University. A8. Emily Miedel, VMD Veterinarian, University of Pennsylvania. D9. Daphne Molnar, CPIA Training Coordinator, Vanderbilt University Medical Center. C14. Eileen M. Morgan, BS Director, Division of Assurances, OLAW, NIH. IACUC 101, A12, B17, C11, D10. Brent Morse, DVM, DACLAM Animal Welfare Program Specialist, OLAW, NIH. A10, B11, C6. Bill Moseley, CPIA IACUC Coordinator, Colorado State University. C10. Guy B. Mulder, MS, DVM, DACLAM Executive Director, Veterinary and Professional Services, Charles River Laboratories. B12. Rachel A. Murray, MS, CPIA, RLATG Research Compliance Specialist, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. D7.

N faculty

Christian E. Newcomer, VMD, MS, DACLAM Executive Director, AAALAC International. D16.

O

Gayle A. Orner, PhD, CPIA Associate IACUC Administrator, University of Wisconsin—Madison. C8.

P

Jennifer A. Perkins, MA, CPIA Director, Office of Animal Research Oversight, University of California, Los Angeles. A5, C1. Stuart Pike Director, Division of Emergency Management, University of Colorado Boulder. D12. Marky Pitts, CPIA IACUC Advisor. IACUC 101, A11, B10. Alison D. Pohl, MS, RLATG, CPIA Resesarch Compliance Monitor and IACUC Coordinator, University of Connecticut Health Center. A9, B13. Felicia Ponce, CPIA, CMAR, RLATG IACUC Program Coordinator, The University of Texas at Austin. D7. Travis Porco, PhD IACUC Member, University of California, San Francisco. A2. Ernest D. Prentice, PhD Associate Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs, Regulatory Compliance, University of Nebraska Medical Center. IACUC 101, D1. Kevin Prestia, DVM, DACLAM Chief, Comparative Medicine; Assistant Professor of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University. D11. Stacy Pritt, MS, DVM, MBA, CPIA, DACAW Director, IACUC, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. A9. Jennifer Pullium, MVB, DACLAM Director, Division of Laboratory Animal Resources, New York University Langone Medical Center and School of Medicine. D11. p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


R

Jon D. Reuter, DVM, MPVM, DACLAM Senior Director of Animial Resources, Senior Staff Scientist, and Attending Veterinarian, Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Panel I, A15, D11. Joan T. Richerson, DVM, DACLAM, CPIA Assistant Chief Veterinary Medical Officer, Office of Research and Development, VA. C16. Gordon Roble, DVM, DACLAM Clinical Veterinarian and Research Assistant Professor, New York University School of Medicine. A13, Panel IV, D2. Matthew D. Rosenbaum, DVM, MS, DACLAM Director and Attending Veterinarian, Animal Care Facility, Biological Resource Center, National Jewish Health. Panel I, A15. Cyndi Rosenblatt, MPA, CPIA IACUC Program Manager, Medical University of South Carolina. A5, B9. Andrew N. Rowan, PhD President and CEO, Humane Society International. C4.

S

John J. Sancenito President, Information Network Associates, Inc. B3. Eric Sandgren, VMD, PhD Animal Program Director, University of Wisconsin—Madison. B3. James M. Schmitt, MD, MS Medical Director, Occupational Medical Service, NIH. B13. Mary Jo Shepherd, DVM, CPIA Director of the Office of the IACUC, Columbia University. EIA, A10, B5, C9, Panel IV. Rivka L. Shoulson, DVM, MPH Clinical Veterinarian and Chief of Quality Assurance and Training, Columbia University Medical Center. Panel I, A15, C15. Adam Shriver, PhD Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Panel III, D13. Robert S. Sikes, PhD Professor of Biology and Director of the Basic Animal Services Unit, University of Arkansas at Little Rock; Vice President and Animal Care and Use Committee Chair, American Society of Mammalogists. Panel II, B6. Susan Silk, MS Director, Division of Policy and Education, OLAW, NIH. A2, B12, C10. Sandra Sonoda, RN, PhD Occupational Health Nurse, University of Colorado Boulder. B13. Sylk Sotto, MBA, MPS Division Administrator, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine. B17. Janet D. Stemwedel, PhD Associate Professor of Philosophy, San Jose State University. Panel III, D13.

T

Tanya Tims, DVM Veterinary Medical Officer, USDA, APHIS, Animal Care. IACUC 101, A10, C10. Richard J. Traystman, PhD Vice Chancellor for Research and Distinguished University Professor, University of Colorado Denver. Panel IV.

V

Sherry E. Vaughn, DVM Lead, Global Animal Welfare Compliance, Zoetis. A3. Jason Villano, DVM, MSc, MS, DACLAM Assistant Professor, University of Michigan Medical School. C15.

Sonja L. Wallace, BA, CPIA Associate Director, IACUC, Stanford University. C13. Michelle Wallace-Fields, LATG Facilities Manager, Office of Laboratory Animal Resources, University of Colorado Denver. B4. Sandy Wilkins, LVT, CPIA Post-Approval Monitor and IACUC Member, Michigan State University. B5. Axel Wolff, MS, DVM Director, Division of Compliance Oversight, OLAW, NIH. A6, B6, D9.

Y

Stephen C. Yang, MD The Arthur B. and Patricia B. Modell Endowed Chair in Thoracic Surgery, Vice-Chair of Faculty Development and Education in the Department of Surgery, and Professor of Surgery and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. B2.

Z

Joanne Zurlo, PhD Director of Science Strategy, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. C2, D1.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

faculty

W


Keynote and Plenary Biographies Recognition Conference Information

faculty

Thomas D. Albright, PhD, is the Conrad T. Prebys Chair in Vision Research, a professor in the systems neurobiology laboratories, and director of the vision center laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. He is an authority on the neural basis of perception, probing the relationship between the activity of brain cells and the experience of perceiving motion. An important goal of his work is the development of prostheses to correct visual disorders and blindness resulting from brain conditions such as stroke. Dr. Albright has helped identify individual cells in the brain that underlie the perception of motion, color, and shape. He is interested in understanding how many cells work together in a coordinated manner to produce a complete visual image. His laboratory also seeks to understand how visual perception is affected by attentional state, memories of previous experiences, and emotions. Emily Anthes, MA, is a science journalist and author. She has a master’s degree in science writing from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in the history of science and medicine from Yale University, where she also studied creative writing. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Wired, Scientific American, Psychology Today, BBC Future, SEED Magazine, Discover, Popular Science, Slate, The Boston Globe, and elsewhere. Her new book, Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts, was published in March 2013 by Scientific American/Farrar, Straus and Giroux. She is also the author of Instant Egghead Guide: The Mind (St. Martin’s Press, 2009). Ms. Anthes blogs at Wonderland, which is part of the blog network of the Public Library of Science. Her blog post, “When a Deaf Man Has Tourette’s,” was selected for inclusion in The Open Laboratory 2010: The Best of Science Writing on the Web. Ms. Anthes has discussed her work on many radio programs and podcasts, including “Fresh Air,” “The Brian Lehrer Show,” “The Leonard Lopate Show,” Scientific American’s “Science Talk,” BBC Radio, “Science for the People,” “Virtually Speaking Science,” “Lapham’s Quarterly,” The Guardian’s “Science Weekly” podcast, Animal Radio, Newstalk Radio Ireland, Radio New Zealand, and more. She has also appeared on “PBS NewsHour” and “The Big Picture with Thom Hartmann.” Ms. Anthes lives in Brooklyn, New York with her dog, Milo. George F. Babcock, PhD, is IACUC chair at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine, a position he has held since 2000. The UC IACUC is responsible for the animals at UC’s three main campuses and two branch campuses, in addition to the Shriners Hospitals for Children-Cincinnati, where he is

the deputy director of research. In his role as IACUC chair, Dr. Babcock reports to the vice president for research, who serves as the institutional official. Dr. Babcock also serves as a professor in the department of surgery at the College of Medicine at UC. Additionally, he represents the IACUC on the IBC, and interfaces with the radiation safety department, the human health and safety department, and the office of research compliance and regulatory affairs on issues relating to animals and animal workers. Dr. Babcock has a background in immunology and obtained his PhD and postdoctoral training in this area from the University of Nebraska Medical Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, respectively. He currently performs research in the area of trauma/sepsis, wound healing, organ transplantation, and toxicology as it relates to the immune system. Dr. Babcock also directs UC’s flow cytometry core facility. John F. Bradfield, PhD, DVM, DACLAM, is a veterinarian and the senior director of AAALAC International. In his current role at AAALAC International, Dr. Bradfield is responsible for education and outreach activities. Dr. Bradfield has many years’ experience with the accreditation process including as an ad hoc consultant and 10 years’ service as a council member of AAALAC International and as council president. He has served as director of the division of laboratory animal medicine and attending veterinarian at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and also as chair of the department of comparative medicine at The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. He has extensive experience in academic laboratory animal medicine, managing animal programs, and working with animal care and use committees. Prior to his career in laboratory animal medicine, Dr. Bradfield was a large animal practitioner. Dr. Bradfield earned his PhD in experimental pathology and has authored scholarly publications in various areas of laboratory animal medicine, wound healing, and vascular and platelet biology. Natalie A. Bratcher, MS, works as a 3Rs scientist/ alternatives coordinator and global animal welfare coordinator with AbbVie, Inc. Ms. Bratcher earned her master’s degree in cognitive and behavioral sciences from Illinois State University. In 2002, she began working at Abbott Laboratories as a neuroscience pharmacologist in the area of in vivo central nervous system diseases research. During that time, she developed a passion for improving research animal welfare and promoting the 3Rs; she recognized that

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


“while animal researchers have an ethical obligation to adopt alternatives whenever possible, they have little time to pursue the studies necessary to assess impact.” Ms. Bratcher therefore submitted a proposal to pursue such work through Abbott’s visiting scientist program. After a year as a visiting scientist, senior management agreed that having a full-time 3Rs scientist/alternatives coordinator would help to strengthen the company’s commitment and promote smarter science through the 3Rs. Ms. Bratcher has been in this role since 2010, where she serves as an ambassador for all AbbVie’s 3Rs efforts by vice chairing AbbVie’s alternatives committee, leading a number of working groups to drive the 3Rs globally, coordinating AbbVie’s annual global animal welfare awards program and recognition event, and serving as a scientific liaison to facilitate and communicate internal 3Rs efforts.

Carol Clarke, DVM, DACLAM, is the research staff officer specialist at USDA, APHIS, Animal Care. Dr. Clarke received her bachelor’s degree in the natural sciences from Johns Hopkins University and her DVM from the Tuskegee University School of Veterinary Medicine. After receiving her DVM, Dr. Clarke practiced small animal medicine in New York City, NY, for 13 years before entering the laboratory animal medicine training program at SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals in King of Prussia, PA. Upon completion of the program, she entered NIH in 1998 as the primate facility veterinarian for the Veterinary Resources Program. In 2001, she accepted a position with the Comparative Medicine Branch of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and became a Diplomate of ACLAM in 2005. During her 10 years with NIAID, she served as IACUC coordinator, vice chair of the rodent gnotobiotic committee, and chief of shared and central facility operations. In addition, she prepared all USDA, OLAW, and AAALAC annual reports. Dr. Clarke accepted a position with USDA in 2011, and currently serves as the research specialist staff officer at APHIS’ Animal Care headquarters, located in Riverdale, MD. Dr. Clarke is a member of the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee. S. Gail Eckhardt, MD, is professor and co-head of the division of medical oncology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center where she also holds the Stapp/Harlow Endowed Chair for Cancer Research. Dr. Eckhardt received her medical degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, TX, followed by residency training at the University of Virginia. After a post-doctoral fellowship at The Scripps Research Institute, she completed her medical oncology a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

faculty

Patricia A. Brown, VMD, MS, DACLAM, currently serves as the director of OLAW at NIH. OLAW oversees the use of animals in NIH-supported biomedical and behavioral research by providing guidance on and interpretation of the PHS Policy on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (PHS Policy); monitoring compliance with the PHS Policy; evaluating all allegations or indications of noncompliance with federal animal welfare requirements; and supporting educational programs that further the humane care and use of research animals. She received her Bachelor of Science in animal science from The Pennsylvania State University and her veterinary degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She served in the US Air Force for eight years and, while on active duty, earned a Master of Science in laboratory animal medicine from the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA. She joined the NIH in 1986, and has since served in clinical and management positions in the Veterinary Resources Branch, the National Cancer Institute, and the Office of Animal Care and Use, before joining OLAW in 2006 as the director. John A. Bryan, II, DVM, MS, is a veterinary medical officer, wildlife veterinarian, and IACUC chair with the National Park Service (NPS). Dr. Bryan was trained in wildlife disease and epidemiology at the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study prior to joining the NPS Biological Resource Management Division in Fort Collins, CO, where he currently serves as chair and attending veterinarian of the service-wide NPS IACUC. He also coordinates the NPS Veterinary Diagnostic Service. Dr. Bryan is a native Georgian, earning his bachelor’s degree in political science from Emory University and master’s and veterinary degrees from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine.

Carol R. Byerly, PhD, is a lecturer at the University of Colorado Boulder, where she specializes in and teaches American political history and military medical history. She earned her bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan, her master’s from Michigan State University, and her PhD from the University of Colorado Boulder. Professor Byerly was a contract historian for the Office of Medical History in the Army Office of the Surgeon General from 2001 to 2010, and has worked for the US Congress, the American Red Cross blood program, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. She also served in the Peace Corps and on the State of Colorado Commissions on Judicial Performance. Professor Byerly’s publications include Fever of War: The Influenza Epidemic in the US Army during World War I (New York University Press, 2005), and Good Tuberculosis Men: The Army Medical Department’s Struggle with Tuberculosis (Borden Institute, forthcoming). Professor Byerly resides in Boulder, CO, with her husband.


Keynote and Plenary Biographies Recognition Conference Information

faculty

training at the University of California, San Diego. Following this fellowship, Dr. Eckhardt joined the faculty of the cancer therapy and research center at the Institute for Drug Development in San Antonio, TX. In 1999, Dr. Eckhardt joined the faculty of the University of Colorado to set up a phase I program and, in 2004, became the director of the developmental therapeutics program in the University’s cancer center. Dr. Eckhardt is the principal investigator on grants involving early clinical trials and colorectal cancer research, and has conducted numerous phase I and II clinical trials. Her area of interest is in the preclinical and clinical development of combinations of molecularly targeted compounds, with a laboratory focus on colorectal cancer. John P. Gluck, PhD, is a professor emeritus of psychology and senior advisor to the president on animal research ethics and welfare at the University of New Mexico (UNM), and affiliate faculty of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics at Georgetown University. Trained at the University of Wisconsin in comparative psychology and experimental psychopathology, he completed his clinical psychology fellowship in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Washington. He worked for many years with nonhuman primate models of abnormal development, with a particular interest in the effects of early experience on learning. The complexity of justifications for animal use motivated Dr. Gluck to pursue a fellowship at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and NIH, where he studied general bioethics, clinical ethics, research ethics, and the moral standing of animals. He was the founding director of the UNM Research Ethics Service Project in the office of research, and co-director of the UNM Health Science Center Ethics Institute. He is lead editor of the volume Applied Ethics in Animal Research: Philosophy, Regulation, and Laboratory Applications (Purdue University Press, 2002), and co-author with Tom Beauchamp, Barbara Orlans, Rebecca Dresser, and David Morton of two editions of The Human Use of Animals: Case Studies in Ethical Choice (Oxford University Press, 1998 and 2008). He is currently completing a book about ethical transformation titled Learning to See the Animals Again: The Rediscovery of Ambivalence in the Use of Animals in Research. Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD, is founding director, core faculty member, and platform leader of Biomimetic Microsystems at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital, and a professor of bioengineering at Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He received his BA, MA, MPhil, MD, and PhD from Yale University. Dr. Ingber is a founder of the emerging field of biologically

inspired engineering, and his most recent innovation is a technology for building three-dimensional models of living human organs, or “organs on chips,” composed of microfluidic devices lined by living cells that mimic complicated human functions as a way to replace traditional animal-based methods for testing of drugs and the establishment of human disease models. In addition, Dr. Ingber has made major contributions to mechanobiology, tissue engineering, tumor angiogenesis, systems biology, and nanobiotechnology. He also has authored more than 375 publications and 85 patents, received numerous honors including the Robert A. Pritzker Distinguished Lecture Award from the Biomedical Engineering Society, and is a member of both the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Pieter Johnson, PhD, is an associate professor in the department of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he has also served as an IACUC member since 2008. He received a PhD in zoology from the University of Wisconsin—Madison in 2006, and a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from Stanford University in 1998. He has published more than 95 peer-reviewed articles, including papers in Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Proceedings of the Royal Society. Dr. Johnson was selected as a David and Lucile Packard Fellow in 2008, and received an NSF Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award in 2012. Dr. Johnson’s research focuses on disease emergence and species invasions, and his lab focuses on developing an ecological understanding of disease emergence as a prerequisite for intervention. Currently, his research program is directed at biodiversity loss and disease emergence; interactions between invasions and habitat alteration; and the effects of climate change on hostparasite dynamics. All have relevance to fundamental questions in ecology and applied conservation issues, and the results have been featured in newspapers and television programs including The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Geographic, British Broadcasting Company, Animal Planet, Discovery, and National Public Radio. Jori K. Leszczynski, DVM, DACLAM, is the director of the office of laboratory animal resources and a veterinarian at the University of Colorado Denver, and an assistant professor in the department of pathology in the School of Medicine. Dr. Leszczynski attended The Ohio State University for her bachelor’s and veterinary degrees, performed her residency in laboratory animal medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and became a Diplomate of ACLAM in 2004. In 2002, Dr. Leszczynski became the assistant director of the biological resources unit at the Cleveland Clinic

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Foundation, and was named associate director in 2004. In 2006, she moved to Colorado to become the director and attending veterinarian of the biological resources center at National Jewish Health and, in 2009, she moved to her current position at the University of Colorado Denver. In early 2013, Dr. Leszczynski was named the interim director and attending veterinarian at the University of Colorado Boulder to oversee a complete reorganization of their animal program, as well as to assist them with addressing regulatory compliance issues until a permanent director was hired. Dr. Leszczynski has served on several committees for ASLAP and ACLAM, and she was president of AALAS’ Mile High Branch in 2009. She currently sits on ASLAP’s Board of Directors and is on AALAS’ ILAM Committee. Dr. Leszczynski is a member of the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee. Natalie L. Mays, BA, LATG, CPIA, received her bachelor’s degree in microbiology from Miami University in Oxford, OH, is a graduate of AALAS’ ILAM program, and obtained her Laboratory Animal Technologist certification from AALAS and CPIA certification from PRIM&R. Ms. Mays is the director of the office of the IACUC and IBC at New York University Langone Medical Center (NYULMC). In this position, she is responsible for the administrative management of the IACUC and IBC. Prior to joining the team at NYULMC, Ms. Mays was the IACUC director at Columbia University and Columbia University Medical Center. She has served on IACUCs since early 1988 in various capacities, including in the role of regulatory compliance and training coordinator. Ms. Mays has been active in AALAS at the local and national levels serving on various committees. She is a member of PRIM&R’s Diversity Advisory Group and the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee.

Gordon Roble, DVM, DACLAM, is the clinical veterinarian for both the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine Division of Laboratory Animal Resources, and the NYU Office of Veterinary Resources. He also holds the position of research assistant professor at the NYU School of Medicine, and serves as the director of the NYU-Regeneron Post-Doctoral Training Program in Laboratory Animal Medicine. Matthew D. Rosenbaum, DVM, MS, DACLAM, is an attending veterinarian and director of the biological resource center at National Jewish Health in Denver, CO. Dr. Rosenbaum earned a bachelor’s degree in biology at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and his DVM at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He earned his master’s degree in microbiology at Colorado State University while completing residency training in comparative medicine. He obtained ACLAM board certification in 2010. His experience includes a role as the attending veterinarian at CARE Research, LLC, a contract research organization, and as an assistant professor in the department of comparative medicine at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC. Dr. Rosenbaum has served on various IACUCs and IBCs and as an ad-hoc consultant for AAALAC International since 2011.

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o

faculty

Letty V. Medina, DVM, DACLAM, is the associate director of animal welfare and compliance at AbbVie, Inc. Her primary responsibilities are to ensure that AbbVie adheres to all animal regulations, adopts the most ethical animal research practices, and continues to enhance an ethical culture for animal research with innovative 3Rs initiatives. She is the past chair of the 3Rs Leadership Group of the Innovation and Quality Consortium. Dr. Medina earned her Bachelor of Science in biology at the University of Notre Dame, and her DVM from Texas A&M University. She completed her laboratory animal medicine post-doctoral training at the University of Illinois at Chicago, and she is a Diplomate of ACLAM. Dr. Medina is passionate about promoting ethics as a part of good science and advocates for stronger ethical leadership from the biomedical research community to help proactively advance the most humane science. Dr. Medina is a member of the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee.

Jon D. Reuter, DVM, MPVM, DACLAM, is the senior director of the animal resources department, senior staff scientist, and attending veterinarian at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, CA. He is actively involved in programmatic affairs including directing and managing a busy animal resource staff in husbandry and operations, veterinary care, colony management, behavioral testing, and regulatory compliance. Prior to his work at the Salk Institute, Dr. Reuter graduated from the University of California, Davis. He then attended the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and earned his DVM and a master’s degree in preventative veterinary medicine. After veterinary school, he entered a post-doctoral residency program in laboratory animal science at the University of Michigan. During the residency, his research interests were in the field of infectious disease with focus on nanomolecular countermeasures to potential biological warfare agents such as anthrax and influenza. Dr. Reuter was recruited to Yale University’s Section of Comparative Medicine, where he led a successful infectious disease research laboratory and supported the Yale Animal Resources Center and IACUC. Dr. Reuter has served on multiple AALAS and ACLAM committees, is an ad hoc specialist with AAALAC International, and is a member of the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee.


Keynote and Plenary Biographies Recognition Conference Information Mary Jo Shepherd, DVM, CPIA, is director of the office of the IACUC at Columbia University. In this position she administers an IACUC for a large animal care and use program. She has served on IACUCs since early 1988, and was a member of five IACUCs for a number of years while serving as attending veterinarian for a privately owned medical device testing laboratory. She has spent over eight years working in the pharmaceutical industry. Dr. Shepherd is currently active in PRIM&R, and previously served as the chair of the Council for CPIA. In 2012, she received PRIM&R’s Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Shepherd has been active in AALAS at the local and national levels, and is currently serving on AALAS’ editorial review board. In addition, she has been actively involved in the planning of the New Jersey Association for Biomedical Research’s annual IACUC conference for over 11 years, and has served on the Americans for Medical Progress Board of Directors for five years. Dr. Shepherd is a member of the 2014 IACUC Conference Planning Committee.

faculty

Rivka L. Shoulson, DVM, MPH, is a clinical veterinarian and the chief of quality assurance and training at Columbia University. Dr. Shoulson has a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Cornell University and a DVM from Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine. After veterinary school, Dr. Shoulson completed a residency in laboratory animal medicine while simultaneously earning a Master of Public Health in molecular toxicology at Columbia University. Dr. Shoulson has a strong interest in training and risk assessment. She recently developed computerbased training modules to help facilitate training and compliance at Columbia University. Adam Shriver, PhD, is a post-doctoral fellow in the department for medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Shriver’s research focuses on the emotional aspect of pain and improving quality of life measures in people with advanced dementia. Prior to his current work, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Rotman Institute of Philosophy and University of Western Ontario’s Mind and Brain Institute, where he worked on the problem of using brain imaging to assess well-being in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. He received his PhD from the philosophyneuroscience-psychology program at Washington University in St. Louis in 2012. His work has focused on the ethical implications of advances in our understanding of neurobiology and in technologies that interrogate and intervene on neurological functioning in both the human and animal contexts.

Robert S. Sikes, PhD, is a professor of biology and director of the basic animal services unit at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. He currently serves as vice president of the American Society of Mammalogists, and he chairs the animal care and use committee for that organization. His background and research experience is exclusively with wild vertebrates, both in the field and in captivity. Janet D. Stemwedel, PhD, is an associate professor of philosophy at San José State University (SJSU). Her teaching and research focus on philosophy of science and ethical issues in scientific research. Dr. Stemwedel has served as the nonscientist member of SJSU’s IACUC since 2007, and became director of the SJSU Center on Ethics in 2013. She also writes about the ethics of animal research on the popular weblogs Doing Good Science (http://blogs.scientificamerican. com/doing-good-science/) and Adventures in Ethics and Science (www.scientopia.org/blogs/ethicsandscience/). She received a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and philosophy from Wellesley College (1989), and doctorates in physical chemistry (1994) and philosophy (2001) from Stanford University. Richard J. Traystman, PhD, is vice chancellor for research and a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Colorado Denver. He has spent more than 35 years working on the regulation of brain blood vessels, cardiac arrest/cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and stroke. Dr. Traystman received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Long Island University in 1963 and 1966, respectively. He received his PhD from Johns Hopkins University Medical Center in 1971, and then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Bowman Gray School of Medicine (now Wake Forest University School of Medicine). Dr. Traystman has received numerous awards for his work, including the Asmund S. Laerdal Memorial Lecture Award from the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Society of Anesthesiologists Excellence in Research Award, the Robert M. Berne Distinguished Lecturer Award from the American Physiological Society, the Society of Critical Care Medicine Excellence in Research Award, and the Distinguished Scientist Award from the American Heart Association. He was associate editor for the American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, deputy editor for Critical Care Medicine, and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism. He has made major contributions to our understanding of how the brain and its circulation respond to clinical disease states such as stroke and cardiac arrest, and his work is striking for its breadth and application to the adult, neonate, and fetal brain.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 2 adv i ns ti anci tuting o nal e ti hani cal m al re se c aarrc e h a ncdon u sf e rceom ncm e i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


Maps

maps

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


maps

Maps

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


maps

a pr i l 2- 3 , d e nve r , c ol ora d o


Please note the following updates to our conference guide:

BLOG SQUAD

Stay tuned to our blog, Ampersand, for daily reflections on the 2014 IACUC Conference from PRIM&R Blog Squad member, Derek Fong, VMD, DACLAM, a clinical veterinarian at the University of Colorado Denver. Visit Ampersand at www.primr.org/blog.

YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORKING RECEPTION

On Wednesday, April 2, 8:00-10:00 PM, connect with other young professionals interested in animal care and use and research ethics. Relax after a busy day in Denver at Katie Mullen’s Irish Restaurant & Pub, located in the lobby of the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel. Don’t forget to bring the drink ticket you received with your registration materials!

SUPPORTERS AND EXHIBITORS

Please note the following addition to this year’s exhibitors:

Next Life for Animals 303.517.6004 | www.next-life.org Booth: 10 Next Life for Animals is a virtual network of volunteers throughout the United States that is ready to welcome hardto-place animals into loving homes. A young organization, Next Life has placed dogs and cats taken from abuse and other sensitive situations. Founder, Mike Stabler (formerly of Kindness Ranch), also focuses on finding homes for retired research dogs and cats.

p rim&r’ s 20 1 4 i ns ti tuti o nal ani m al c a r e a n d u s e c om m i t t e e c on f e r e n c e


GOLD SUPPORTER

BRONZE SUPPORTERS

EXHIBITORS


Schedule at a Glance Monday, March 31 7:00–8:00 AM 8:00 AM–5:30 PM 8:00 AM–5:00 PM 5:00–6:30 PM

Tuesday, April 1 7:00–8:00 AM 8:00 AM–5:00 PM

Wednesday, April 2 7:00–8:00 AM 7:00–8:00 AM 8:00–8:15 AM 8:15–9:00 AM 9:00–9:15 AM 9:15–10:45 AM 10:45–11:15 AM 11:15 AM–12:30 PM 12:45–1:45 PM 12:45–1:45 PM 2:00–2:45 PM 2:45–3:00 PM 3:00–4:30 PM 4:30–4:45 PM 4:45–6:00 PM 6:00–7:15 PM 6:00–7:15 PM

Thursday, April 3 7:00–8:00 AM 7:00–8:00 AM 7:00–8:00 AM 8:00–8:15 AM 8:15–9:00 AM 9:00–9:15 AM 9:15–10:45 AM 10:45–11:15 AM 11:15 AM–12:30 PM 12:45–1:45 PM 12:45–1:45 PM 2:00–2:45 PM 2:45–3:00 PM 3:00-4:30 PM 4:30–4:45 PM 4:45–6:00 PM 6:00–7:00 PM

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Continental Breakfast Essentials of IACUC Administration—Intensive IACUC 101: “The Basics” Pre-Conference Programs Networking Reception

Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom D Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Continental Breakfast 2014 AAALAC International Conference: The Path to Success Under AAALAC's New Standards

Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom ABC

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Continental Breakfast Continental Breakfast to Welcome First-Time Attendees Welcome from the 2014 IACUC Conference Co-Chairs Keynote Address: S. Gail Eckhardt, MD Remarks from PRIM&R’s Executive Director Emerita, Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH Panel I Coffee Break Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series A Common Ground Networking Lunch Luncheon with LAA Recipient Joan Rachlin, JD, MPH Keynote Address: John P. Gluck, PhD Break Panel II Coffee Break Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series B 2014 IACUC Conference Welcome Reception and Meet and Greet the Supporters, Exhibitors, and Poster Presenters Speed Mentoring

Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom D Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza/Exhibit Foyer See schedule for room locations Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom D Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza/Exhibit Foyer See schedule for room locations Plaza/Exhibit Foyer Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Continental Breakfast CPIA® Networking Continental Breakfast AALAS Learning Library Continental Breakfast Welcome from the 2014 IACUC Conference Co-Chairs Pillars of PRIM&R Lecture: Thomas D. Albright, PhD Remarks from PRIM&R’s New Executive Director, Elisa A. Hurley, PhD Panel III Coffee Break Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series C Lunch Research Ethics Book Group Lunch and Book Signing with author Emily Anthes Henry Spira Memorial Lecture: Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD Break Panel IV Coffee Break Didactic Sessions and Workshops Series D Closing Reception

Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom D Governor’s Square 11 Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza/Exhibit Foyer See schedule for room locations Plaza Ballroom EF Plaza Ballroom D Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza Ballroom ABC Plaza/Exhibit Foyer See schedule for room locations Plaza/Exhibit Foyer

2014 IACUC Conference Guide  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you