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The Shoreline The Community Newsletter of Shore Regional High School - Winter 2008

The Global Student:

Preparing for worldwide success in the 21st Century.

Monmouth Park Highway 36 West Long Branch, NJ 07764 (732) 222 - 9300 (phone) (732) 222 - 8849 (fax) www.shoreregional.org

West Long Branch - Oceanport Monmouth Beach - Sea Bright


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The Shoreline

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Winter 2008

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Volume One

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Number One

The Shoreline is published by the Shore Regional High School Office of Public Information. Shore Regional High School Monmouth Park Highway 36 West Long Branch, NJ 07764 (732) 222 - 9300 www.shoreregional.org

Staff Leonard G. Schnappauf, Superintendent/Principal Dennis W. Kotch, Business Administrator Andrew W. Ker, Director of Public Information

The Shore Regional High School District Board of Education 2007-2008 Paul Rolleri, President (Oceanport) Ronald OʼNeill, VP (West Long Branch) David Baker (Monmouth Beach) Joan Brearley (Sea Bright) Diane Merla (West Long Branch) Anthony F. Moro, Jr. (Monmouth Beach) Russell T. Olivadotti (West Long Branch) Roderick A. Petschauer (West Long Branch) Frank J. Pingitore (Oceanport) Tadeusz “Ted” Szczurek (Oceanport)

The Shore Regional High School District Educational Foundation Board Members Thomas Duffy Joseph Lagrotteria Mary Lynn Mango Valerie Manzo Edward Miller Patricia Pfleger Pauline Poyner James Ronan Donna Ruane Leonard Schnappauf

A Note from the Superintentent Meeting Tomorrowʼs Challenges Today A few years ago, a committee comprised of faculty, staff and students came together to form the Shore Regional High School “Mission Statement”: “to educate the whole person to be selfaware, culturally aware, and involved in life-long learning.” It was immediately apparent that to live up to our mission, Shoreʼs already rigorous academic program would have to be even further enhanced. Beginning in 2007 an even wider array of Advanced Placement, honors and elective courses were offered. To actualize our goal of creating life-long, culturally aware learners, Shore Regional attained authorization as an International Baccalaureate World School. In assembling a dynamic staff to implement our academic programs, weʼve ensured that every student at Shore is exposed to a full liberal arts curriculum that stresses the interdependence of content areas and the importance of international-mindedness in a global society. Our commitment to the development of the whole person include numerous opportunities to become involved in extracurricular activities such as the acclaimed performing arts program, community service organization, or any of our unparalleled interscholastic athletic programs. Student and faculty dedication to these programs have led to a tradition of excellence. Weʼre constantly trying to “reach out” to our community for input. Parents are welcome to attend our monthly advisory meetings, take a tour of the campus with our Director of Curriculum or email any of our teachers and staff. I hope you enjoy reading this first issue of our new quarterly publication. Hopefully youʼll be able to get a glimpse of how weʼve procured a caring and safe environment in which students receive a quality, comprehensive education.

Leonard G. Schnappauf Superintendent and Principal


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A “state of the building� report from Business Administrator Dennis Kotch. At Shore Regional, times are changing and with time and change comes improvement. We continually strive to be prudent in our spending while remaining fiscally responsible to the communities that we serve. Through cost savings we have managed to improve many aspects of Shore Regional and have a very exciting plan for the near future. Recent improvements have included new whiteboards in every classroom, which replace the old chalkboards, new hallway lockers, new running track surface and the renovation and conversion of the old metal shop to a new art room.

Corporate donations have enabled Shore to purchase new scoreboards for the field hockey, soccer and Robert J. Feeney fields. Athletic fundraising brought forth the ability to purchase a television and stereo system for the fitness center that opened in 2006. Recently, a collaborative effort by the softball team parents, Coach Nancy Williams and the School Board, permitted the groundbreaking for a construction of new softball dugouts. The improvements will continue this summer with the complete renovation of three science labs and the installation of a new hardwood floor in our main gymnasium. We also must remain cognizant of the state of our failing heating system. The practice of wearing jackets and gloves, by both staff and students, to stay warm at Shore Regional has to end soon. Through assistance from our mechanical engineers and the School Board, I am developing a plan to replace this antiquated, inefficient system with a new, energy efficient system. We will continue this trend of gradual improvements in the coming years, while always being mindful of our fiscal responsibility to the taxpayers that support us. This is an exciting time to be a part Above: English Teacher Chris Schuster performs Hamlet in his parka. of Shore Regional as we strive to make this great school even better.

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Educating the Gl

No long ago, Y2K gripped the nation in fear. However, some saw the turn of the As the new millennium dawned, the light that shone forth from it seemed to illuminate the halls of Shore Regional High School. Able to see the state of the school clearer than he ever had, Superintendent Leonard Schnappauf sensed the emergence of a new generation of student. Schnappauf foresaw a not-to-distant future in which students who took to technology like fish to water would assemble each day and demand their school remain on the cutting edge of instructional technique and access to information. Furthermore, these expectations would exist in an environment of rich social and athletic opportunities.

To say that Schnappauf was accurate would be an understatement. “By the year 2002, I saw Shore Regional on the frontier of embarking upon something very extraordinary”, says Schnappauf. “By this time”, he added, “more and more parents had begun the process of choosing a high school by the time their child was in the seventh grade.” With that in mind, Schnappauf, his administrative team and the Board of Education undertook the rigorous challenge of ushering in an academic renaissance at Shore Regional designed to impart to each and every student the knowledge and abilities to become an active part in their society and itʼs role in the global economy. A wave of fresh, dynamic, dedicated teachers

arrived in the fall and not long after new instructional aids appeared for them to utilize. A fully renovated library-media center, mobile carts stocked with wireless laptops, dozens of collegiate-level subscription databases: no time was wasted in smashing the archaic tendencies of twentieth century tedium and sweeping it out of the schoolhouse. Where once green “blackboards” absorbed the chalk that had been used upon them for the past forty years, now stood high-gloss “whiteboards”, ideal for not only writing upon, but also for projecting countless images from

high-resolution digital projectors, mounted in each and every classroom. But what would be the point of all this embracing of technology and the future? What if students failed “to make the grade in the global economy because they can't think their way through abstract problems, work in teams, distinguish good information from bad or speak a language other than English?”1 Surely their high school education would be at the root of such failure? Not in Schnappaufʼs mind. “In hiring highly qualified, competent and motivated teachers, our students learn from individuals who daily express passion for theirsubject, love for their profession and concern for the intellectual and emotional development of every student”, declares Schnappauf. And his talented staff has not balked.

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n of the century as an opportunity to actualize the promise of the future now. A trip down any of the wings of the school will provide scenes that attest to the intellectual and social feelings of positivity that abound at Shore Regional. An average day in “C-Hall” bears witness to events that range from instructor guided dissection of specimens to theatrical productions that recreate seminal events in World and American history. Not to mention the scores of students who hover over state of the art “graphing” calculators racking their brains. .

The renaissance envisioned by Schnappauf and the Board went beyond the raising of standards and the academic bar at Shore. Yes, teachers were deriving one-hundred percent passing rates on the New Jersey High School Proficiency Assessment (NJHSPA). And yes, Advanced Placement and Elective course offerings had more than doubled. But was this all at the expense of “fun”? Clearly the answer was no. The enhancing of traditional academic subjects came right alongside the implementation of new Art, Digital Media and Digital Production courses. Instead of routine trips to the cafeteria, more and more students could be seen lunching in “B-Wing” in an Art Studio or accessing the web wirelessly on a laptop in the media-center.New extracurricular activities, like the “Knitting Club”, “Model United Nations” and “Red Cross Club” germinated from the fertile environment that Shore had become in the early part of the new decade.

But, could a public school, one of the many “originally designed to educate workers for agrarian life and industrial-age factories”, make the marks of progress last?” 2 To answer this question, Schnappauf turned to his Director of Curriculum and Instruction. In the spring of 2005, the enthusiasm for the plan agreed upon spread through the school with electric velocity. It proclaimed that by 2008, Shore Regional would be among the nationʼs first 700 schools to implement an International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for ALL of itʼs students to partake in.

“The next few years are going to be very exciting,” says Schnappauf. “Youʼre going to see programs that range from Television production to Botanical Sciences become the norm here. Weʼve only yet begun to advance!” Schnappaufʼs enthusiasm is contagious. Itʼs difficult not to become swept up in a future that seems to be getting brighter each and every day.

4 Footnotes 1 & 2: Wallis, Claudia, and Sonja Steptoe. "How to Bring Our Schools Out of the 20th Century." Time Magazine 10 Dec 2006:


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SO WHAT IS A

“WORLD SCHOOL”?

Despite some initial skepticism, the IB program is thriving. Coordinator Linda Ensor answers ten questions about the program and reveals how itʼs become a fixture at Shore.

So why did Shore need to become a “world school”?

Do students do anything but study, say like Community-Service?

The Shore Regional High School Board of Education applied for designation as an IB World School so that the students would have access to additional academic offerings. The addition of the IB courses to the high school's curriculum increases the depth of the program offerings at the school and enhances the students' experiences at Shore.

The goal of the IB program is to have students become informed and involved global citizens. The CAS (Creativity, Action, and Service) requirement supports that objective. Students pursuing the IB diploma must complete a total of 150 hours in these three areas. Doing so is not difficult, for many of our students are already heavily involved within the school and local communities. All IB students work with a CAS coordinator to identify and complete activities that satisfy this requirement.

What type of student will benefit most from participation in the IB program? Students who are motivated and curious are excellent candidates for the IB program. According to information published in the International Baccalaureate Organization's website, the ideal IB student should be knowledgeable, communicative, principled, open-minded, caring, reflective, well-rounded, and willing to take risks.

Describe a typical school day for an IB student. The IB students take courses in these six academic areas: Spanish, English, mathematics, science, visual art, and history. They also must take physical education in order to satisfy New Jersey's requirements for high school graduation. Additionally, all IB students take Theory of Knowledge during the spring semester of the junior year and fall semester of the senior year. These courses fill their eight-period school days.

What about all the rumors that IB is “Anti-American” and unpatriotic? Students in the IB program are encouraged to become internationally minded, but the courses do not encourage them to dismiss their own national heritage in that process. As they adopt a more open-minded attitude towards people in other countries, IB students tend to gain a greater appreciation for what their native countries offer them.


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How does the IB curriculum differ from that of the AP program? The IB curriculum offers students opportunities to explore selected topics in depth over the course of two years; the AP courses are designed to deliver information to students over the course of eight-nine months. As Mr. Osis, one of our history teachers explained, "AP tests give students the chance to demonstrate what they don't know. IB tests allow them to show what they do know."

Do IB students have to attend classesduring the summer? Over other breaks? Students in the IB program are given academic work to complete during the summer and over breaks. This is true for those students in AP courses, as well. Since the IB courses are taught over a two-year period, IB students are not required to attend classes during the summer or during breaks.

Will participation in the IB program help my child get into a good college? Colleges throughout the world recognize the IB Diploma Programme as one that prepares students well for university studies. Therefore, students enrolled in the IB program at Shore Regional High School will receive extra attention in the admissions process at colleges throughout the United States. On applications for admission, IB students will be given the opportunity to indicate their status as candidates for the IB diploma. This can give them special consideration in the admissions process. Many institutions have special merit scholarship programs for students who receive the IB diploma. For example, the University of Nebraska automatically awards its most prestigious scholarship to students who attain the IB diploma. Other schools have similar merit awards for IB diploma holders.

How are the current IB students faring academically? Shore Regional High School just began to offer the IB Diploma Programme in September 2007. The students have found the classes to be challenging and interesting. Overall, the students currently enrolled are succeeding academically. As they have gained experience with this new curriculum, their grades have improved.

Would you have enrolled your own children in the IB Diploma Programme? I wish this program had been available for my children. They would have definitely attended Shore Regional instead of the high school (High Technology High School) from which they graduated. I consider the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme to be mentally exciting, academically challenging, and personally gratifying. This program would have prepared them even better for college.

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T H E L A DY

OF SHORE REGIONAL

In only two years, the Shore Regional Art Department has undergone a truly wondrous renaissance. As beloved staff retired, the job of filling the void left in their classrooms fell to three dynamic, vibrant and supremely talented young women: Ms. Tracey Caltabilota, Mrs. Grace-Anne Bertolami and Mrs. Mari Lavin. Each a recipient of a Fine Arts degree from their respective universities, they all also utilized the New Jersey “Alternate Route” path to obtaining their teaching certificates. The benefit though, in being solely committed to the study of art at the university level has undoubtedly paid off. According to Bertolami, “Art becomes your life when you are immersed in a full schedule of demanding classes devoted to your craft.” Caltabilota and Lavin share Bertolamiʼs outlook and echo her sentiments that their teaching success is directly related to the rigor of their educational background. With their youthful energy perpetually visible, these young women have embarked upon numerous changes within their department. The establishment of two, new digital studios and a gallery-like workshop in the past six months have brought a flood of interest from current students. Not only did classroom alterations attract inquisitive students to the “art wing” of the building, but in December, the three advantageous teachers were successful in showcasing an enormous in-school exhibit of Gustav Klimtʼs work. “We wanted something that would create a ʻbuzzʼ amongst the student-body while at the same time exposing them to something new and challenging,” declares Lavin. “Theyʼd all seen Van Gogh and Picasso, and we all felt that Klimt would provide our students with an element of excitement and beauty that they hadnʼt yet been exposed to,” adds Bertolami.

Clearly they were right. On the first day of their D-Hall exhibit, students couldnʼt help but assemble and stare at the enormous, flowing satin artwork of Klimt. “The tactile nature of the exhibit and the brilliance of color that they exhibited just arrested their attention. We immediately took that enthusiasm and capitalized on it in class with discussion and further study,” recollects Caltabilota. Student reaction to the Klimt exhibit was exactly as Lavin had hoped. “Klimt has always been one of my favorite artistʼs. Heʼs influenced my own work with his decorative style.” Caltabiltota adds that his “glitzy and shimmery” works never take away from what Bertolami calls his unique ability to capture images of “very powerful” women. With the popularity of their first massive, tangible exhibit still fresh in the minds of students, the women of Shore Regionalʼs Art Department have already begun planning their next great presentation. What artist will be selected and how will they showcase this master? Only a trip through the kaleidoscopic gallery that has become “D-Hall” will answer that question.

Top Left: Mrs. Bertolami prepares to hang a satin canvas of Klimt Above (L to R): Mrs. Lavin, Ms. Caltabilota and Mrs. Bertolami


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Shore’s Resident Artist It wasnʼt long ago that Art teacher Tracey Caltabilota felt lost in the world. Within months of beginning her collegiate education she not only faced the challenges in adjusting to an undergraduate lifestyle, but also to the tragic loss of her brother Frank Jr., in a nationally infamous disaster at Seton Hall University. A semester off from school to collect her thoughts seemed to somewhat help regain her former composure. However it wasnʼt until she reenrolled in a collegiate class, Drawing 101, that the therapeutic release that art was to become for her was realized. “It took me to a different place. A place away from the stressed place that I was in,” recalls Caltabilota. As she made her way through her study in art, Caltabilota found that painting particularly enabled her to gain clarity.

With this newfound sense of creativity Caltabilota began creating a body of work that captured her new zeal for life. For her most recent work, she employed a palette of “bright and hot” colors with “dark edges” and “hard lines” that provide a viewer the ability to see the many layers she had applied to the canvas. Using brushstrokes that were almost “sculptural” she successfully created what became her first professionally shown work. A massive piece of thirty-individual paintings that, when juxtaposed together, created a single mural, Caltabilota beamed with modest pride when her work debuted at Ocean Groveʼs Main Avenue Galleria.

“Whenever I painted, I was able to expose who I was to myself and create something that deeply reflected my thoughts and feelings.” Not long after graduating, Caltabilota took a job as a Graphic Artist at Fort Monmouth in Eatontown, New Jersey. But after a few short months, Caltabilota claims she felt restless and incapable of tapping into the energy sheʼd felt in her recently concluded collegiate days. “I felt that art had become such an important therapy to me that I needed to find a way to bring that release, to bring that satisfaction to others,” Caltabilota remembers. So, back to school she went; sort of. After gaining acceptance into the New Jersey Alternate Route program, she successfully achieved employment at the high school she had graduated from herself years earlier. Armed with her passion for art and a desire to infuse it into the lives of students, Caltabilota found an immediate calling in teaching. “Not only did I find teaching professionally rewarding, but it also enhanced my personal creativity,” Caltabilota says.

Her satisfaction became even more evident when a local contractor told the director of the gallery that he wished to buy six of the pieces “on the spot”. As Caltabilota excitedly recalls, “I almost had a heart attack. I thought to myself, Wow, someone feels passionately about my work the same way I do!” Enthusiasm for her work as a professional artist seems only to have grown in recent months. Now on display in various stores at The Town Shoppes in Ocean Township (throughout February), Caltabilotaʼs work has made her embrace her role as a teacher even more. Affirms Caltabilota, “I want to prove to my students that a person who got a C+ in her high school art class can make it in the world of art. I want them to see that no matter what, when you believe in your work and use it as an outlet for good, the possibilities are limitless”. Sheʼs come a long way since her days of receiving that C+ at Shore; just look at some of your neighborʼs walls and you might notice why.

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Shore Players Set To Un

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Pictures (clockwise): Students Sean Coffey and Amy Allgor work with set designer Fred Sorrentino. Max Izenberg and Kris Fonselius rehearse. A view from the highest point on stage overlooks the Shore Auditorium. Members of the ensemble twirl about. Shields displays one of the many hand-sewn costumes to be worn. Choreographer Nicole DeVincenzo runs through a number with student performers. (center)Sarah Middough, “Belle”, beams as she tries her costume on for the first time.

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Unveil Another Beauty In the eleven years that Allen Shields has directed theatrical productions for Shore Regional, nothing seems to have provided him with a greater challenge than bringing the musical Beauty and the Beast to life. When asked if this was his most ambitious project to date, Shields replied with a deadpan, “Oh God, yes.” Simply by entering the back of the Shore Regional auditorium validates his statement. Racks of elaborate costumes, massive sets and dozens of young student-performers can be seen everywhere. Itʼs almost overwhelming for Shields. Almost. “Iʼm working with extremely talented people who make this job manageable,” says Shields. Heʼs referring to people like choreographer Nicole DeVincenzo, set designer Fred Sorrentino, and technician Rob Ulrich all who have collaborated with Shields for years. “Weʼve got six set changes in the first twenty-three pages of the script. You canʼt pull that off without ridiculously talented people!” exclaims Shields. Concerning the “ridiculously talented”, it would seem that Shields has found a truly gifted performer in sophomore Sarah Middough. Playing the female lead “Belle”, Shields declares, “Sarah is one of the most naturally gifted student actors that Iʼve ever been around. Her ability to perform inspires everyone around her.” Middough, a sixteen year old from Oceanport, reciprocates Shieldsʼ praise. “Allen is an amazing director. During every rehearsal he helps you see how hard work will pay off into a brilliant show”. For years, students had wished to perform Beauty and the Beast on the Shore stage. It wasnʼt until the final Broadway curtain of the musical in June of 2007 that it became possible. That was when Music Theatre International Licensing House released the musical from copyright restrictions. Shields immediately seized the opportunity to perform the work, presenting to the Board of Education in September. His vision was met by enthusiastic approval and so began the immense task of bringing one of Broadwayʼs most successful shows to a high school auditorium in West Long Branch. But Shields wasnʼt about to let go of any of the spectacular elements that made the Broadway show a smash, just because it was coming to a smaller

venue. Instead, he called upon a devoted group of parents who selflessly invest hours of their time to tasks like costume making and chauffeuring students to frequent practices. “Itʼs like preparing for eight Super Bowls,” claims Shields. He adds, “We become a team in which everyone knows their role and works together to achieve a common goal; the execution of eight, enthrallingly entertaining, live performances that captivate audiences of all ages.” “The whole cast is incredibly energetic and have really connected with their respective characters,” said senior Kris Fonselius. Fonselius will play the evil Gaston when the curtain goes up on February 29th. Itʼs on that date that Shore Playersʼ production of Beauty and the Beast will be premiered at a “Gala” affording the general public an opportunity to interact with the cast and crew. Freshman Jennifer Townsend, part of the ensemble cast in her first Shore Players production, can barely contain her excitement. “Shore Players is something you hear about when youʼre in grammar and middle school. The quality of the production that you see when youʼre in the audience defies what a ʻhigh-school playʼ is stereotyped as.” Junior Olivia Chalakania, whose father once graced the Shore stage, agrees. “Everyone involved in this production has risen to the challenge of bringing this show to our school. We want people to feel our passion and enthusiasm each and every performance.” Echoing Chalakaniaʼs sentiments, sophomore TJ Manzo cites how the play appeals to a wide audience. “This show has some of the cartoonish elements of the Disney movie, but it also presents a few of the darker elements from the Broadway show. They really blend together in an awesome way!” Shields is clearly energized by his student performers. His ability to bring out the best of them has paid off in numerous nominations for the Paper Mill Playhouse Rising Star Awards and the Basie Awards. By the looks of this yearʼs production, thereʼs no doubt further accolades are in store for him and the extraordinary people involved in Shore Players.

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Doing What She Does Best Many high school students share the same fears: getting good grades, maintaining friendships, not getting lost in the crowd. Not only does Amy Parent, a junior from Oceanport, have to worry about these things, but she also has the constant burden of knowing that at any moment, she might suffer an epileptic seizure. It happened this year at a football game, and, it happened this year during a “normal” school day. Whereas a young person of lesser tenacity and determination might be spirit broken by these unfortunate incidents, Amy Parent continues to overcome them and find new ways of enriching the lives of her fellow students. Amy and her family have battled Epilepsy since she was four years old. Yet never has the struggle seemingly overcome Amy in her quest to be her best in her high school years. Sheʼs been an integral part of Music Teacher Kevin Pryorʼs band, playing the clarinet and performing at numerous concerts and games. As an academic-minded student, Amy admittedly references how beneficial it is to have a skilled and personable “in-class-support” system of teachers and administrators. Although her history of illness might keep her from being the center of every conversation during her lunch period, Amy nonetheless feels that sheʼs become a superior listener because of it. “I think my friends and other people may come to me because they know that Iʼll just listen and stay neutral, even when itʼs a stressful situation,” Amy says. Currently, Amyʼs maturity and forethought are being utilized to help implement a “Student Support Stress Therapy Group” through the office of Shore Awareness Counselor Jennifer Pallante. As Amy describes it, “itʼd be cool because it would give kids who want to talk and just be themselves a place where they could feel totally comfortable doing so.” Such refreshing optimism and enthusiasm have helped make the halls of Shore Regional a more aware and sensitive place for all those who travel them.

(top)The cover of the September/October issue of Epilepsy USA that featured Amy and her parents. (middle) Amyʼs daily dose of seizure medicines. (bottom) Amy and her mom Kim on a cold day during midterms.


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The

Volunteer Spirit

The current school year has yet again showcased the caring and volunteer nature of the students in Shoreʼs Interact Service Organization. With the first semester of the school year having come to a close, Interact has already myriad accomplishments ranging from raising over a thousand dollars for the Epiphany House through a Thanksgiving Pie Sale, to serving a Holiday Dinner at Asbury Parkʼs Boys and Girls Club. Shore Interact, sponsored by the Long Branch Rotary, is a service club for young people ages 14 to 18. Rotarians provide support and guidance, but the club is self-governed and is co-advised by faculty members Nicole Andreasi and Andrew Ker. In recent years, Shore Interact has grown to an enrolled membership of over two-hundred students. Leadership skills and personal integrity are fostered by participation in a Rotary Youth Leadership Academy (RYLA) each June. Both at RYLA and during the school year,Interactors display helpfulness and respect for others. In the spring of 2007, graduating senior and interact member, Francesca Pietri accomplished Interactʼs goal of advancing international understanding and goodwill by orchestrating a campaign that ultimately brought freshwater to over a thousand people in a povertystricken part of Nicaragua. Numerous year-round service events emphasize the value of individual responsibility and hard work.

The Fall semester alone saw Shore Interactors stocking shelves at the Long Branch Food Pantry, fundraising for and walking in the annual Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event, assembling “Trick-or-Treat” bags for ill-children residing in Monmouth Medical Centerʼs Valerie Fund and staffing area blood drives for the American Red Cross. The spring of 2008 will be an incredibly busy and rewarding one. Students involved in Interact are already signing up to participate in the BigBrotherBig-Sister “Bowl For Kids Sake”, the Stu dent-Faculty Charity Basketball Game and other events. The chance to again win “best water-station” at the New Jersey marathon has already created a “buzz” amongst student volunteers who are already concocting ways to outdo themselves at this popular New Jersey attraction on Sunday, May fourth.

For more information on Interact, send an email to Interact@shoreregional.org

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ALUMNI

SPOTLIGHT Giancarlo Fiorentini (ʻ04) and Jon Grimm (ʻ04) bring lights, cameras and action to Shore! In a tension filled room, two young filmmakers “pitch” their script to a discerning panel. Both are Senior film students at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and know that theyʼre in competition with scores of other talented filmmakers. Having honed their script, cast the film and found a producer, they anxiously await the panelʼs approval or rejection. Theyʼre confident, but they also know that NYU only chooses half of the proposed student scripts for production. Aside from the opportunity to screen the finished film at the prestigious NYU First Run Film Festival, both know that their careers in filmmaking hang on this one panelʼs opinion. And then the verdict comes: GREENLIT. The relief that both Giancarlo Fiorentini (ʻ04) and Jon Grimm (ʻ04) felt after their “pitch” to the NYU production panel was not so alien to either of these perfection-driven, young men. Not too long ago in the halls of Shore Regional, they experienced similar quelling of nervousness and anxiety. When they screened their first work as high school sophomores, they dreaded teacher and peer rejection. “We made a comedic film for a (L to R) Grimm and Fiorentini creative project in Mrs. Muldoonʼs English class,” recalls Fiorentini. He adds, “All I can remember is self-consciously sitting in class hoping not to get laughed at.” “Instead of us, the filmʼs jokes got laughed at, and we felt kind of validated,” reminisces Grimm. After that initial success, the two aspiring artists began spending hours writing, producing, acting and directing. They created films both for academic subjects and for their newfound love of filmmaking. As Grimm recounts, “all of a sudden we were just totally immersed in it. I was writing research papers on film history in Mr. Kerʼs class while at the same time working with Giancarlo on Godfather parodies in Mrs. Difedeʼs Italian class. We just couldnʼt get enough!” Although their enthusiasm hadnʼt waned by the time both graduated in the spring of 2004, it didnʼt at first

lead them to undergraduate film study. Both enrolled at separate colleges in the fall and attempted to undertake more “traditional” majors. “One night we were talking on the phone and we just decided that if we weʼre going to do this film thing, we had to do it now,” remembers Fiorentini. So the two college freshmen put in their transfer paperwork, assembled an impressive portfolio from their days as novice high school filmmakers and by the spring of 2005 both received letters accepting them into NYUʼs filmmaking program. The move to New York came with apprehension for both Grimm and Fiorentini. “Once the thrill of being accepted had sunk in, we became very nervous,” Fiorentini mentions. “We were nervous about a lot of things. Moving to the city, the level of competition we were going to encounter, people not getting our sense of humor: we worried about all of those things,” Grimm explains. Hard work and diligence helped them overcome those initial nerves. In the past three years, the duo have churned out success after success. Now with production set to start on their untitled senior work, their modest confidence can be seen again in the very halls of Shore Regional. In April of 2008, Grimm and Fiorentini will spend an entire weekend filming a large portion of their film at the high school. For forty-eight hours, the school will possess the aura of a professional film set, under the helm of these two, young, Shore alumni. “Weʼre truly grateful that the Board of Education and Superintendent Schnappauf so warmly received our letter of interest to film at Shore,” states Grimm. He goes on to say, “This project means a lot to us and we feel that weʼll be able to feed off of the energy that we feel from being back in the place that helped put us on this path.” Although the final film will take months being prepared in the editing and mixing studios, itʼs safe to say that both Fiorentini and Grimm have arrived.

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Think Five!

Students of AP Calculus Teacher Nicole Andreasi Serve Up Some Delicious Math Imagine doing Calculus for fun. Yeah, didnʼt think so. The idea of sitting down and opening up a giant book filled with formulas, equations and derivatives doesnʼt exactly have the appeal of a theme-park amusement ride. But add the idea of sitting down to a free, three-course meal just for attempting a few word-problems and it might be a different story.

Motivation seems to be what this young woman is all about. A 2003 graduate of The College of New Jersey, Andreasi also holds an MA in Mathematics from Georgian Court University (she also currently serves as an instructor there). Her AP results speak for themselves: of the fortyeight students who have taken the AP Calculus exam under her tutelage, forty-five of them scored

Thatʼs the idea behind Advanced Placement Calculus teacher Nicole Andreasiʼs “Midterm Review Dinner”. Since Andreasi took over the class in 2004, her students have

assembled the evening before every midterm with dishes that range from homemade baked ziti to “kiwi pie”. Why? As Andreasi proclaims, “nothing motivates teenagers like good food!”

with a four or five. For those unfamiliar with the AP grading scale, a score of four or five is the highest mark a student can attain and almost always assures the granting of collegiate credit. The Midterm Dinner is the halfway point for Andreasiʼs students. After ending their junior year with an informational meeting, Andreasi sends them into the summer knowing that their attendance at voluntary review sessions will only serve to increase their chances for success. A “boot-camp” at the end of August

transitions right into the first day of school where students are met with their first test. Not that “Miss A” is all work and no play. Thatʼs where the Midterm Dinner comes in. This year,studentshave brought a wide array of dishes with them. Andreasiʼs classroom is flooded with the scent of fresh pasta, grilled veggies and baked goods. All of the students laugh and eat together in preparation for a rapid-fire review that comes with “prizes” purchased by Andreasi for each student who participates and tries their hardest. “Having a teacher as committed and knowledgeable as “Miss A” makes us feel like we can do this,” asserts senior Bryan Guadagno.

His observations are well made. With a track record like Andreasiʼs, the AP Calculus class of 2008 looks to be yet another tremendous success.


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Shore Regional High School prides itself in being an extended family many in our community. In the final column of each issue, aptly titled The Last Word, weʼd like to give community members an opportunity to elaborate on just how the Shore “family” has affected them. In this issue, Mr. Joe DeLeonardo, a member of the Shore Regional Building Security staff, shares his thoughts on his colleague and friend Wendy Delehanty, who recently lost her husband to a long battle with cancer.

The Shore Regional community is a close knit one and when something happens that affects one of our own, we all feel it. Recently a member of our security staff, Wendy Delehanty, lost her husband of 23 years, after a four year courageous battle against cancer. Jim Delehanty and his family have a long history with Shore Regional, he and his seven siblings are all Shore alumni and he and Wendy have three daughters, two of them currently enrolled at shore. Their oldest daughter graduated in 2005. Throughout Jimʼs battle with cancer Wendy managed to keep a smile on her face and be an active member of Shoreʼs staff, parentʼs associations and overall supporter of the school. Her strength and positive outlook was an inspiration to all who came in contact with her. Wendy came to work everyday, aided in keeping the building secure, helped move the students to class in an organized fashion, made sure lunch periods went smoothly, posted articles on the bulletin board, and assisted in various other duties. At the same time she kept the Shore family updated on Jimmyʼs condition, his surgeries and treatments. Of course her priority was her family, but the students, faculty, staff, and administration at Shore went through the ordeal with her and became an extension to her family. When Wendy suffered this terrible loss, the Shore family immediately offered her any support she might need. The Shore Regional community could never take away the void she was feeling, however, they are there to ease as much of the pain as they can.

-Joe DeLeonardo

Wendy has allowed us to reprint a very lovely thank you card she recently wrote . To Our Shore Family – Words cannot express how grateful our family is for all of the support, prayers and love that you have so graciously offered during Jimmy’s illness. We have and will find strength from you as we encounter many rough times ahead. For decades Shore Regional has always been a memorable place for the Delehanty family. Many of the photos and special memorabilia we shared at Jimmy’s tribute came from the high school’s fields, gym, halls and classrooms. Many relationships that began forty years ago between Jimmy and his schoolmates grew into lifelong friendships for our family. The strong community here at Shore is truly an essential link in our family circle. Jimmy was proud our girls attended his alma mater. Both he and I know firsthand what a special place it is. Sincerely, Wendy, Stacy, Kelsey and Courtney


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POSTAL PATRON Monmouth Park Highway 36 West Long Branch, NJ 07764

Shore Regional High School

NON-PROFIT US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT #10 W.LONG BRANCH NJ 07764

UPCOMING EVENTS AT SHORE REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

Shore Players presents: “Beauty and the Beast” 2/29/08 - 3/2/08 3/6/08 - 3/8/08

Interact Service Club Student vs. Faculty Charity Basketball Game March 18, 2008 - 7pm

Spring Break 3/21/08-3/28/08 (school reopens 3/31)

School Elections April 15, 2008 4pm - 9pm


The Shoreline - Volume I No. I (Winter 2008)