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Magazine 2013

Exhibitions Oscar Tuazon People Tatzu Nishi Discovering Columbus Monika Sosnowska Fir Tree Configurations Thomas Schütte United Enemies Ugo Rondinone Human Nature Public Programs & Events Talks at The New School, Fall 2012 Monika Sosnowska, Carol Bove, Oscar Tuazon Configurations Artist Panel at MoMA PS1 Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, Allyson Vieira Talks at The New School, Spring 2013 Thomas Schütte, Susan Philipsz, Ugo Rondinone Exhibition Openings Spring 2013 Benefit


Doris C. Freedman Plaza Monika Sosnowska: Fir Tree

Oct 24, 2012 – Feb 17, 2013

Thomas Schütte: United Enemies

Mar 5 - Aug 25, 2013

Columbus Circle Tatzu Nishi: Discovering Columbus Sept 20 – Dec 2, 2012

Rockefeller Center Ugo Rondinone: Human Nature Apr 23 - Jul 7, 2013

The New School Public Art Fund Talks

Fall 2012 & Spring 2013

Brooklyn Bridge Park Oscar Tuazon: People

July 19, 2012 - Oct 13 2013


Magazine 2013

July 2012 - June 2013

Public Art Fund brings dynamic contemporary art to a broad audience in New York City by mounting ambitious free exhibitions of international scope and impact that offer the public powerful experiences with art and the urban environment. Board of Directors Jill Kraus

Staff Nicholas Baume

Chairman

Director and Chief Curator

Susan K. Freedman

Micah Bozeman

President

Assistant Project Manager

Andrew R. Brownstein, Esq.

Megan Burns

Vice President

Executive Assistant

Matthew C. Harris

Nora Gomez

Vice President

Lloyd Frank, Esq.

Communications and Digital Media Manager

Secretary

Jesse Hamerman

Charles Short

Senior Project Manager

Treasurer

Andria Hickey

Mickey Cartin Sophie Crichton Stuart Wendy Fisher Sara Fitzmaurice Allen Kolkowitz Linda Lennon Holly Lipton Ronay Menschel Rob Pruitt Linda R. Safran Patty Silverstein Jonathan Sobel Erana Stennett Billie Tsien David Wine Jenny Dixon

Associate Curator

Emeritus

Barbara Joelson Fife Emeritus

Kellie Honeycutt Communications Director

Rachel Nawi Development Director

Interns: Jenny-Lind Angel Communications

Blanca Begert Administration

Anna Blum Curatorial

Lillian Chen Communications

Monika Deeran Communications

Rebecca Fattell Communications

Clara Halpern Curatorial

Emily Hoerdemann Development

Coby Lerner Development

Sam Rauch

Kate Nelson

Project Manager

Development

Courtney Stern Development Associate Manager

Joni Renee Todd Finance and Human Resources Manager

Publication Executive Editor Kellie Honeycutt Deputy Editor Nora Gomez Contributors Nicholas Baume, Jesse Hamerman, Andria Hickey, Kellie Honeycutt, Sam Rauch

Anna Poe-Kest Projects

Sara Sciabbarrasi Projects

Samantha Shin Projects

Jenna Schneider Development

Justin Wolf Projects

Public Art Fund is a nonprofit organization supported by contributions from individuals, foundations, corporations and, in part, with funds from government agencies, including the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Exhibitions in the city’s public parks are made possible through the partnership of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; First Deputy Mayor Patricia E. Harris; Parks and Recreation Commissioner Veronica M. White; and Cultural Affairs Commissioner Kate D. Levin.


Letter from the Director and Chief Curator The past year has been one of the most dynamic periods in the history of Public Art Fund. Last fall we launched our striking new graphic identity and completely reinvented our website, presenting online for the first time our archive of more than 400 projects from the past 36 years. This is not only a dazzling index to creative activity in the urban spaces of New York City, but a unique resource for artists and art historians. The new website drew tens of thousands of visitors as they booked free passes for Tatzu Nishi: Discovering Columbus, our landmark installation that captured the imagination of the entire city. More than 100,000 people experienced Tatzu’s unforgettable installation from September through December, while millions more all over the world learned about it through press coverage and our robust social media presence. The project was an instant hit with our regular fans and also introduced us to a broad new audience, ensuring that our reach and impact continue to grow. In October we opened Monika Sosnowska’s strikingly elegant Fir Tree, the sculptural transformation of a towering spiral staircase, at Doris C. Freedman Plaza. Speaking at our ongoing series of Public Art Fund Talks, Monika eloquently addressed the influences on her work, including coming of age in post-Communist Poland with its legacy of austerely functionalist architecture. Later in the fall, we launched Configurations: Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, Allyson Vieira, a group show at MetroTech Center Commons in Brooklyn featuring major new works by four strong emerging artists. Oscar Tuazon’s People further expanded our horizons in that borough with a site-responsive installation at Brooklyn Bridge Park that runs through October. Contemporary German master Thomas Schütte’s pair of monumental bronzes, United Enemies, took its place in early March at the entrance to Central Park, creating a dialogue with the traditional figurative statues in and around the Park. Our annual spring benefit was more fun than ever, with brilliant projects by Olaf Breuning, David Colman & Ryan McNamara, and Rob Pruitt providing memorable, interactive experiences for our guests. Ugo Rondinone’s extraordinary installation at Rockefeller Center brought the spring season to a climax. Human Nature contrasted the ancient with the contemporary, activating the entire plaza with a series of nine colossal stone figures arrayed atop an 8,000 square-foot concrete base. Made from giant, rough-hewn blocks of Pennsylvania bluestone, the same material used to pave the plaza itself, the figures evoked both elemental human and architectural forms. The juxtaposition of the installation with its surrounding art deco campus of classic New York skyscrapers created a powerful, indelible image. We estimate that over th course of its run, more than 25 million people will have seen Human Nature. Warmest thanks for your engagement and support, which helped to make possible everything we accomplished in the last 12 months. I hope to see you over the summer at City Hall Park, where on July 24th we open the new group exhibition, Lightness of Being.

Nicholas Baume


E xhibitions

People Oscar Tuazon

Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 1, Enter at Furman and Old Fulton Streets, Brooklyn July 19, 2012 - October 13, 2013

Bringing together industrial and natural materials that respond to both Brooklyn Bridge Park’s green spaces and its more urban features, Oscar Tuazon’s threesculpture exhibition, People, is inspired by the resourceful creativity of city neighborhoods. Suggesting sculptural variations on familiar playground designs, the works are enlivened by their everyday uses: a tree becomes a fountain; a makeshift handball wall is held straight by a tree trunk that also accommodates a basketball hoop; a cement cube breached by a tree frames the surrounding landscape and echoes the original piers along the waterfront. Originally scheduled to be on view through April 2013, the exhibition’s run has been extended through the fall, allowing visitors six more months to relax in the shade of The Rain, shoot hoops at People, or cool themselves with the refreshing trickle of water from A Machine. Major support provided by the Kraus Family Foundation. Additional support from Jennifer Napier Nolen & Malcolm Nolen and Two Trees Management Company. Assistance from Maccarone, NY.

@PublicArtFund #People

1 People, 2012. Sugar Maple tree, concrete, metal basketball backboard and hoop 2 The Rain, 2012. Red Oak tree, concrete 3 A Machine, 2012. Oak tree, water pump Courtesy the artist and Maccarone. Photos: Jason Wyche


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Discovering Columbus Tatzu Nishi

Columbus Circle Intersection of Eighth Avenue, Broadway, and West 59th Street, Manhattan September 20 - December 2, 2012

Tatzu Nishi’s first public work in the United States, Discovering Columbus recontextualized the historical monument at the center of Columbus Circle and temporarily transformed it into a contemporary artwork. Shifting the perspective of visitors who had only seen the 13-foot-tall statue of Columbus by gazing up from ground level, the artist built a room around the figure, placing it in the center of an American living room six stories above the city streets. The work featured many of the trappings of a domestic living room—a couch, a coffee table, a television, bookshelves, as well as custom wallpaper by the artist. And through large, loft-style windows, visitors enjoyed dramatic views of Central Park and Midtown Manhattan that were seen from Columbus’s perspective for the first time. The exhibition opened on September 20, 2012, and its original eight-week run was extended for two weeks by popular demand. Lead Sponsors: Time Warner Inc.; Related Companies; Bloomberg Additional funding is provided by The Bloomingdale’s Fund of the Macy’s Foundation; Charina Endowment Fund; Extell Development Company; Lauren & Martin Geller; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; Kraus Family Foundation; Nancy & Duncan MacMillan; The Marc Haas Foundation; The Moinian Group; David Rockefeller; The Secunda Family Foundation, Inc.; Patty & Howard Silverstein; The Silverweed Foundation; SL Green Realty Corp.; Billie Tsien & Tod Williams; Vital Projects Fund, Inc.; Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP; David Wine & Michael P. MacElhenny; The Zegar Family Foundation; and anonymous donors. Supported in part by The ABNY Foundation; Elise & Andrew Brownstein; Mickey Cartin; Joan Ganz Cooney & Peter G. Peterson; Marcia Dunn & Jonathan Sobel Foundation; Wendy Fisher; Linda Lennon & Stuart Baskin; Holly & Jonathan Lipton; The Moore Charitable Foundation; Nancy & Morris W. Offit; Red Crane Foundation; Heidi and Richard Rieger; The Rudin Foundation, Inc.; Linda & Andrew Safran; Trump International Hotel and Tower; and Young & Rubicam. Support for the conservation of the Columbus Monument provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation. Construction Partner: Tishman Construction, an AECOM Company Special thanks to Bloomingdale’s and Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams for providing furnishings; Bouchon Bakery and Café for event catering; FLOR, an Interface company, for modular floor covering; Samsung Electronics America for electronics; The Shops at Columbus Circle for hosting our information desk; Tender Creative for design services; Trove for producing custom wall coverings; and Artex Fine Art Services for conservation assistance. Public Art Fund gratefully acknowledges the partnership of Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; First Deputy Mayor Patricia E. Harris; Department of Parks & Recreation Commissioner Veronica M. White; Central Park Conservancy President Douglas Blonsky; Department of Design and Construction Commissioner David J. Burney; and Department of Cultural Affairs Commissioner Kate D. Levin.


Tatzu Nishi, Discovering Columbus, 2012 Top Photo: Go Sugimoto Other Photos: Tom Powel Imaging

@PublicArtFund #Discovering Columbus


E xhibitions

Discovering Columbus Tatzu Nishi The realization of each Public Art Fund exhibition is complex, often involving several years of work with an artist. Senior Project Manager Jesse Hamerman, who oversaw Discovering Columbus, explains its elaborate installation, giving readers a behind-the-scenes view into the making of a unique exhibition.

Tatzu Nishi’s project began with a fantastic, nearly unbelievable idea—to build a living room 70+ feet above the street in the center of one of Manhattan’s busiest intersections around a City monument. So many questions initially came to mind: How will the structure be built? How will the room stand up without any structural connections into the monument? Is this even possible? But our job is to make difficult feats of engineering seem invisible so that the artist’s dream can be realized and that vision, and the visitor experience, take the spotlight. Our first step was to reach out with a proposal to the owners of the site, the Department of Parks & Recreation and the Central Park Conservancy, who would provide conceptual approval before we moved forward. A project of this scale and ambition would also require the approval and partnership of myriad City agencies, among them the Cultural Affairs, Buildings, Design and Construction, Transportation, Police, and Fire Departments. We also collaborated with Tishman Construction, our frequent partners on ambitious works, on the creation of this highly unusual structure. Together with Tatzu, we determined that the room should be 27’ x 30’ atop six flights of completely freestanding scaffolding that would allow 100,000 visitors to climb to the room during the run of the exhibition. This structure would be built around an historic monument—not a single element of which our work could touch—that sat atop a major subway hub. The engineering was developed over a one-year period with these parameters in mind and included many design revisions to both the structure of the scaffolding, the design of the living room, and how it all sat on the ground. In the completed work, the illusion of the statue standing on a coffee table would be a reflection of the way these different elements could co-exist. Following nearly three years of planning, and having secured all of the necessary permissions and permits, we began erecting the scaffolding in early August 2012. While the public gazed up at the figure of Columbus, who now appeared to be standing on a large platform, trying to imagine what this exhibition might look like, we finally craned the sections of the room into place and began the internal build-out of the room. We installed the flooring, hung the wallpaper, and hooked up all the electric. We loaded in the furniture, hung the curtains, and placed the pictures and mirrors on the walls. The last thing to be installed was the coffee table on which Columbus would appear to stand, which came in two pieces resting on the floor. We clamped and glued it together around the monument, and at last our illusion was complete. From the very first visitors to the last, we marveled at the awed expressions and gasps of delight that could often be heard when visitors got their first glimpse of Columbus up close. Tatzu even took up temporary residence in New York City, popping by the room to meet visitors or pose for photos with fans. Tatzu Nishi, Discovering Columbus, 2012 Work in Progress Photos: Barbara Iams Korein


“If you have the stamina to climb six flights of stairs, you should jog over to Tatzu Nishi’s wacky penthouse, perched atop a 70ft column in the middle of Columbus Circle… You will, I predict, fall under the spell of its whimsical surrealism.” -Ariella Budick, Financial Times, October 18, 2012 In October, we got a big surprise when Hurricane Sandy made its way through the northeast, closing our doors to visitors for a few days as the city braced for the storm and began its recovery. But when we reopened our doors, Columbus, and our work, had weathered the storm. And demand to visit the exhibition was so strong that we extended the exhibition by two weeks to accommodate additional visitors. And now, months after the exhibition has closed, the City has been treated to another gift—the full conservation of the monument, which we undertook in partnership with the Parks Department and which was completed this spring. People may never again have the chance to be face to face with Columbus, but their view of him from the ground will be that much clearer.


E xhibitions

Fir Tree Monika Sosnowska Doris C. Freedman Plaza Central Park, 60th Street and Fifth Avenue, Manhattan October 24, 2012 - February 17, 2013

This 40-foot-tall, black-painted steel sculpture in Doris C. Freedman Plaza was Monika Sosnowska’s first public artwork in New York City. Marking the threshold between the urban environment of Midtown Manhattan and the landscape of Central Park, Fir Tree is a staircase transformed. Its railings twist and stairs collapse to create a new, tree-like form. Its branches elegantly bend toward the ground, and a ribbon-like railing forms a twisting red line against the black silhouette of the sculpture. The work echoes the industrial staircases found on the exterior walls of Polish housing blocks, but in Fir Tree, Sosnowska used pulleys, cranes, and other heavy machinery to manipulate the familiar spiral form from a utilitarian object into a work of art. Major support provided by the Kraus Family Foundation. Additional funding is provided by Hauser & Wirth and an anonymous donor. In collaboration with the Polish Cultural Institute New York. Special thanks to Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg; First Deputy Mayor Patricia E. Harris; Department of Cultural Affairs Commissioner Kate D. Levin; Department of Parks & Recreation Commissioner M. Veronica White; and Central Park Conservancy President Douglas Blonsky.

@PublicArtFund #FirTree

Monika Sosnowska, Fir Tree, 2012 40’ x 8’ x 8’; painted steel, PVC On loan from a private collection Photos: James Ewing


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Configurations Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, Allyson Vieira MetroTech Center Commons Between Jay Street and Flatbush Avenue at Myrtle Avenue, Brooklyn November 11, 2012 - September 16, 2013

Configurations features new and recent works by four artists who are concerned with one of the essential elements of sculpture: the physical relationship between an object, its site, and the viewer. At the core of both the viewing experience and creation of the work is a relationship to the body. Each artist’s studio practice involves improvisation and experimentation with material and technique, often yielding distinctive surfaces and textures that invite touch. Slouching, standing tall, bent, or leaning, the freestanding objects in the exhibition suggest an anthropomorphic dimension that resonates with the physicality of the works in their surrounding environment. Configurations: Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, Allyson Vieira at MetroTech Center is part of an ongoing program organized by Public Art Fund, and sponsored by MetroTech Commons Associates and MetroTech companies including Forest City Ratner Companies, JPMorganChase, National Grid, WellChoice, and Polytechnic Institute of New York University. Special thanks to Forest City Ratner Companies and First New York Partners. Support for Valerie Blass’s Orca Gladiator, Sculpture Bidon, and (Meuble Mécanique) marche pied, lampe-marteau from Parisian Laundry. Support for Esther Kläs’s Gelift (RGB) from Peter Blum Gallery. Assistance provided by Galerie Jocelyn Wolf, Meyer Reigger, and Laurel Gitlen.

@PublicArtFund #Configurations 1 Katinka Bock, Personne, 2012. COR-TEN steel, zinc, bronze, concrete, corten steel shelter, 10’ 6” x 6” x 5’, bronze figure and basin, 7’ x 4’ 10”. Courtesy the artist and Meyer Reigger and Galerie Joceyln Wolff. 2 Allyson Vieira, Weight Bearing V, 2012, Weight Bearing VI, 2012, Weight Bearing VII, 2012. Concrete, steel, paint, 77” H x 77” W x 22”L (each). Courtesy of the artist and Laurel Gitlen. Photos: Nora Gomez 3 Allyson Vieira, Torso (Archaic) II, 2012. Mirror, plaster, gloves, glue, concrete, plaster-weld, wax, duct tape, wire, and drywall, 15 ¾” x 47 ¼” x 11 ½”. Torso (Severe) II, 2012. Mirror, plaster, concrete, plastic cup, resin, glue, plaster-weld, wire, and glove, 15 ¾” x 47 ¼” x 11 ½”. Torso (Decadent) II, 2012. Mirror, plaster, plaster-weld, chalk, concrete, watercolor, wax, gloves, paper, cups, cloth, glassine, glue, and blade, 15 ¾” x 47 ¼” x 11 ½”. Courtesy of the artist and Laurel Gitlen. 4 Valérie Blass, Sculpture Bidon, 2012. Laser print on granite, 70” x 51” x 9”. 5 Valérie Blass, Orca Gladiator, 2012 . Polystyrene, gypsum cement, epoxy compound, copper, 90” x 54” x 31”. 6 Valérie Blass, (Meuble Mécanique) marche pied, lampemarteau, 2012, [(Mechanical Furniture) walking foot, lamp hammer]. Bronze, found objects, 80” x 54” x 27”. Photos: Seong Kwon All works courtesy the artist and Parisian Laundry, Montreal 7 Esther Kläs, Gelift (RGB), 2012. Aquaresin, concrete, red: 46” x 30” x 32” , green: 48” x 33” x 26”, blue: 49” x 32” x 24”. Courtesy the artist and Peter Blum Gallery, NY. Photo: Nora Gomez

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United Enemies Thomas Schütte Doris C. Freedman Plaza Central Park, 60th Street and Fifth Avenue, Manhattan March 5 - August 25, 2013

Installed at the southeast entrance to Central Park, Thomas Schütte’s monumental bronze, United Enemies, takes on one of the most traditional forms of public art— the bronze figure—reframing it both physically and metaphorically. The work has its origins in a series of small clay figures Schütte created in the early 1990s during a residency in Italy at a time when several politicians had been arrested for corruption. Though they draw on the tension of this time period, the two figures in the work are mythical, pushing apart as they are literally bound together. Standing on tripods of bundled poles instead of a pedestal or even legs, the paired forms are highly abstracted—their heads emerge from swaddling robes, encircled by knotted ropes that conceal their limbs as their aged faces express anguished emotions. Generous support provided by Wendy Fisher, Peter Freeman, Inc., Amanda & Glenn Fuhrman, Kenneth & Anne Griffin, and Linda Lennon & Stuart Baskin.

@PublicArtFund #UnitedEnemies

Thomas Schütte, United Enemies, 2011 Photos, top and right: Nora Gomez Photos, left: Jayson Wyche


E xhibitions

Human Nature Ugo Rondinone

Rockefeller Center Plaza Between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and 49th and 50th Streets, Manhattan April 23 - July 7, 2013

Mythic in scale and imagery, visceral in character and impact, Human Nature reconnects the contemporary world with our distant origins. Ugo Rondinone created the work specifically for Rockefeller Plaza where it was installed between 49th and 50th Streets, at the site made famous by the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree each winter. As if transported from another time, the nine colossal stone figures, hewn from bluestone from a quarry in northern Pennsylvania, stand like ancient sentries in stark contrast to the modern buildings that surround them. Ranging in height from 16 to 20 feet and weighing some 30,000 pounds each, their immovable legs form gateways through which visitors may pass, sensing the tactile surfaces of these primal forms. Ugo Rondinone: Human Nature is presented by Nespresso and organized by Public Art Fund and Tishman Speyer. Promotional support from the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia.

@PublicArtFund #UgoNYC

Ugo Rondinone, Human Nature, 2013 Photos: James Ewing


E xhibitions

Human Nature Ugo Rondinone Project Manager Sam Rauch relates the complex process involved in the production of one of our most intricate projects to date.

In the eyes of a visitor to Rockefeller Plaza, the nine colossal stone figures that make up Ugo Rondinone’s Human Nature might allude to any number of iconic or archetypal depictions of the human form. To a project manager, however, they represent something else entirely: the result of a process in which nearly 270,000 lbs. of raw stone was quarried, assembled, shaped and re-assembled, engineered and reinforced, and finally, over the course of three nights, craned in to one of the City’s most highly-trafficked blocks. On top of this, an 8,000 square foot concrete pedestal was cast in place to create one of the largest artwork “bases” in the world, designed to conform perfectly to every inch of the sloping, irregular street surface below. In other words, all artistic content aside, an exhibition on the scale of Human Nature represents the work of many people to overcome a variety of logistical challenges and to make the seemingly impossible appear effortless. Our two-week installation process began with the pouring of nine 18’ x 8’ concrete slabs of varying thickness, each slab poured to have an imperceptible 0.6% southward slope (mirroring the pitched surface of the plaza) and topped with a 10,000 lbs. steel plate. These pads and plates absorbed and distributed the weight of the sculptures—themselves up to 30,000 lbs. apiece—to ensure the structural integrity of the plaza and the underground shopping and dining concourse directly below. Every one of Ugo’s nine figures is made up of five or six bluestone slabs, each weighing as much as 7,500 lbs. With the support pads and plates in place on Rockefeller Plaza, we installed three figures per night over the course of three nights. The stones were delivered via trailer convoy from their quarry in rural, northwestern Pennsylvania, and each figure was assembled stone by stone with the use of a crane (for lifting) and bucket lift (to allow technicians to secure the component stones together using steel rods). The legs of each figure were fitted with “shoes” consisting of steel mounting plates unique to the footprint of each stone; this mounting hardware established a firm connection between the sculptures and the much larger steel plates upon which they stood. The process was only half-finished once the sculptures were in place, however. The final aspect of the installation was to fill a discrete area of the plaza between sculpture bases with sheets of blue Styrofoam and to cover everything—foam and steel plates—with a 2” thick layer of poured concrete. This concrete “skim coat” created an unbroken plane the size of a city block that disguised all the structural supports and allowed visitors and sculptures alike to share a common elevation. With this unifying element in place, nine distinct sculptures became one artistic environment for these ageless giants.

Ugo Rondinone, Human Nature, 2013 Work in progress Photos , top: Sam Rauch Photo, bottom: Jason Wyche


P ublic P rograms

Public Art Fund Talks

Fall 2012 at The New School Oscar Tuazon, Monika Sosnowska, Carol Bove Configurations Artist Panel at MoMAPS1 Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, Allyson Vieira Spring 2013 at The New School Thomas Schütte, Susan Philipsz, Ugo Rondinone

The Public Art Fund Talks Series has showcased some of the most dynamic and innovative artists engaging with issues of public practice for more than 15 years. This season we invited six artists to present lectures about their own work for the first time in New York. The format is surprisingly rare as artists are often joined by curators and other scholars, and, despite the simplicity of the form, it can be far from conventional. This first person perspective—the voice of the artist without directives or interpretation—has been an inspirational part of our public programs, with each lecture opening the audience to a more intimate understanding of the artist’s work. The fall season featured three artists whose practice originated in an engagement with the built environment. Drawing on elements of architectural and design history—including Modernism, Brutalism, and even DIY construction—Oscar Tuazon, Monika Sosnowska, and Carol Bove, each addressed the psychological, social, and cultural significance of the built environment in relation to their own work. Oscar Tuazon’s artist talk moved fluidly between a performance of spoken word and candid descriptions of the language of sculpture, space, and architecture, all of which led him to explore public space. In his lecture, he asked the audience to consider “where does the [art]work end…if you show

something in a room, it’s in the room, but if you take a work outside then how do you know where the work ends and the world begins?” In October, on the occasion of her project

for Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Monika Sosnowska’s lecture traced the influence of communist-era Polish architecture in her work. Framing her research on the period and its relationships to architecture in the West, she shared rarely-seen views of her work: from her surreal interior replicas, to her large-scale twisted steel sculptures created from the building frames themselves. The final talk of the season featured a wide ranging lecture by Carol Bove, whose public works were recently exhibited at Documenta 13 in Kassel, Germany and at The High Line in New York. Beginning with a clip from Star Trek, which situated public art as a kind of alien artifact, Bove’s lecture opened up a dialogue on the potential of language, form, and communication in public sculpture.

Images, this page: Oscar Tuazon, Monika Sosnowska, Carol Bove Opposite page: Thomas Schütte, Susan Philipsz, Ugo Rondinone Photos: Vera List Center


The spring season brought together a group of artists whose works explore the nature of sculpture and art’s ability to alter our experience of public space. The season launched with a rare public lecture by German artist Thomas Schütte entitled “From Small to Large.” The artist described his use of models and their relationship to his large-scale public sculptures and architectural projects. In his words, through his work he “wanted to tell stories with models and tiny things as a way to escape the minimal sculpture that I grew up with.” Taking sculpture to its limits, Susan Philipsz’s artist talk traced the evolution of her site-specific audio installations, sharing with the audience the historical, site-specific details of research that she gathered when developing each piece. The audience was also able to hear rare sound recordings of several of the artist’s key works. Ugo Rondinone delivered the final talk of the season, leading the audience through a poetic visual tour of his recent comprehensive survey exhibition at the Aargauer Kunsthaus, The Night of Lead, which featured a number of his unique bodies of work and demonstrated his acute sense of form, space, and language. When asked about how he translates his practice from inside the museum or gallery to public space, Rondinone stated: “A public sculpture is a challenge because it should reach as

much of the public as possible, either by alienating people or embracing people. It is a completely different space, not a protected space like the white cube, which for me is far more interesting. I am not an artist who wants to create a provocation in public, rather I want to embrace the public so I use simple signs with universal meaning.” As an adjunct program to our Public Art Fund Talks, 2012 also marked a new partnership with MoMA PS1 who hosted an opening program for the exhibition Configurations. In early November, as part of MoMA PS1’s Sunday Sessions, Valérie Blass, Katinka Bock, Esther Kläs, and Allyson Vieira discussed issues of sculpture and studio-based practice as well as how process had influenced their own transition from working in the gallery space to the public realm. Together these public programs helped to shape new conversations about the field of public art in New York City and beyond, revealing new perspectives with each artist’s shared experience. We are looking forward to our fall season already! Andria Hickey, Associate Curator (Exhibitions & Public Programs)

Public Art Fund Talks at The New School are organized by Public Art Fund in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School. This program is made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.


E vents

Discovering Columbus Tatzu Nishi Preview & Dinner (September 24, 2013) 1 Tatzu Nishi, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg 2 Carson Gleberman, Jill Kraus, Marnie Pillsbury 3 Matthew & Jennifer Harris 4 Nicholas Baume, Jonathan Sobel 5 David J. Burney, Kate D. Levin 6 Mickey Cartin, Katie Parfenoff 7 Allen Kolkowitz, Chris Kusske, Beatrice & Lloyd Frank 8 Bob Williams, Lori Griffith, Mitchell Gold, Anne Keating 9 Stephen Ross, Patricia E. Harris, Jay Kriegel 10 Sara Fitzmaurice, Kyle MacLachlan & Desiree Gruber 11 Agnes Gund, Nicholas Baume 12 Kathryn & Bruce Beal 13 Tatzu Nishi, Susan K. Freedman, Andrew Safran Photos: ŠPatrick McMullan Sylvain Gaboury/PatrickMcMullan.com

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Fir Tree Monika Sosnowska Viewing (October 23, 2012) 1 Monika Sosnowska, Marc Payot 4 Jill Kraus, Susan K. Freedman, Veronica M. White Photos: Liz Ligon

Configurations Opening (November 10, 2012) 2 Esther Kl辰s, Andria Hickey, Peter Blum 5 Jeannie Riddle, Jessica Lin Cox 7 David Norr, Arlene Shechet, Alyson Vieira 8 Guest, Megan Burns, Jonathan Munar

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Photos: Josh Strauss

United Enemies Thomas Sch端tte Viewing (March 5, 2013) 3 Nicholas Baume, Thomas Sch端tte 6 Nicholas Baume, Susan K. Freedman, Peter Freeman 9 Ronay Menschel, Thomas Sch端tte Photos: Liz Ligon

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Human Nature Ugo Rondinone Opening Reception & Dinner (April 23, 2013)

1 Jill Kraus, Susan K. Freedman, Ugo Rondinone, John Giorno, Nicholas Baume, Keith Douglas 2 Pirkko Ackermann, Eva Presenhuber, Linda Yablonsky 3 Frederic Levy, Tom Madden 4 Nathaniel Axel, Olympia Scarry 5 Lily Cole, Sadie Coles 6 Anne Collier, Matthew Higgs 7 Charles Short, Susan K. Freedman, Stuart Baskin, Linda Lennon, Chet Krayewski 8 AdriĂĄn Villar Rojas, Ugo Rondinone, Klaus Biesenbach, Nicholas Baume 9 Guest, Elizabeth Peyton 10 Adam McEwan, Joel Wachs, Shelley Fox Aarons, Phil Aarons 11 Susan Almrud, Cathy Bacich 12 Markus Rischgasser, Richard Flood 13 Jerry Speyer, Ugo Rondinone 14 Lisa Phillips, Barbara Gladstone

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Photos: ŠPatrick McMullan Nicholas Hunt/PatrickMcMullan.com

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Spring 2013 Benefit: Discovering Public Art Fund April 11, 2013 82 MERCER On April 11, some 450 guests joined us to celebrate a year of exhibitions and public programs at our 2013 Spring Benefit. Guests were treated to artist projects by David Colman & Ryan McNamara, whose riff on an airport security checkpoint formed the entrance to the event; Olaf Breuning, whose carnival-inspired work encouraged guests to collectively paint a canvas by throwing balls at cups filled with paint; and Rob Pruitt, whose panda-themed flea market featured unique items for sale. Special thanks to our benefit co-chairs Lori & Alexandre Chemla Jill & Peter Kraus Linda Lennon & Stuart Baskin Holly & Jonathan Lipton Rob Pruitt Linda & Andrew Safran Patty & Howard Silverstein Dan Tanzilli In partnership with Absolut Art Bureau 1 Daniel Lechner, Dan Tanzilli 2 Gordon Davis, Erana Stennett 3 Nicholas Baume, Peter Kraus, Jason Kraus, Susan K. Freedman 4 Andrew Brownstein & Elise Brownstein, Linda Lennon & Stuart Baskin 5 Toni Bernstein, John Reinsberg, Patty Silverstein & Howard Silverstein 6 Adam Pendleton, Angela Goding, Tim Bishop 7 Jonathan & Holly Lipton 8 Katherine Brinson, Christopher Lew 9 Eric Diefenbach, Laura Skoler, JK Brown, Tony Oursler 10 Billie Tsien & Tod Williams 11 Jenna Lyons 12 Nicholas Baume, Olaf Breuning, Mo Rocca 13 Linda Safran, Caroline Safran 14 Ryan McNamara, David Colman 15 Afdhel Aziz, Olaf Breuning, Alban de Pury 16 Nicholas Baume, Rob Pruitt

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Support for Public Art Fund Public Art Fund relies on generous contributions from corporations, foundations, government agencies, and individuals to realize its mission to bring dynamic contemporary art to a broad audience. THANK YOU to everyone who supported Public Art Fund between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, helping us to re-imagine the streetscape with ambitious exhibitions that transform how we see and experience New York City. To learn more about the projects your generosity makes possible and to see a full list of our supporters, please visit PublicArtFund.org.

Public Support Lower Manhattan Development Corporation; National Endowment for the Arts; New York City Department of Cultural Affairs; New York State Council on the Arts

Contributors $100,000 & Above Bloomberg Philanthropies; Forest City Ratner Companies & First New York Partners; The Marc Haas Foundation; Jennifer & Matthew Harris; Jill & Peter Kraus; The Estate of Marian O. Naumberg; Nespresso; Related Companies; The Silverweed Foundation; Time Warner Inc.; Tishman Construction, an AECOM Company; Tishman Speyer $50,000-$99,999 Anonymous; Charina Endowment Fund; Lori & Alexandre Chemla; Marcia Dunn & Jonathan Sobel; Lauren & Martin Geller; Andrew Goffe; Nancy & Duncan MacMillan; Parïsian Laundry; David Rockefeller; The Secunda Family Foundation, Inc.; Patty & Howard Silverstein; SL Green Realty Corp. and The Moinian Group; Vital Projects Fund, Inc.; Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP; The Zegar Family Foundation $25,000-$49,999 The Bloomingdale’s Fund of the Macy’s Foundation; James Keith Brown & Eric Diefenbach; Elise & Andrew Brownstein; Mickey Cartin; Extell Development Company; Wendy Fisher; Peter Freeman, Inc.; Gladstone Gallery; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; The William and Mary Greve Foundation; Anne & Kenneth Griffin; Hauser & Wirth; Linda Lennon & Stuart Baskin; Holly & Jonathan Lipton; The New York Community Trust– AllianceBernstein Foundation Fund; Michael MacElhenny & David Wine; Linda & Andrew Safran; Marc & Diane Spilker; Billie Tsien & Tod Williams $10,000-$24,999 Toni & Seth Bernstein; Laura & Lloyd Blankfein; Peter Blum Gallery; Katherine Farley & Jerry Speyer; Barbara J. Fife; FITZ & CO.; Sara Fitzmaurice & Perry Rubenstein; Beatrice & Lloyd Frank; Amanda & Glenn Fuhrman; Joan Ganz Cooney & Peter G. Peterson; Marian Goodman Gallery; Elizabeth & Stephen Gruber; Andrea Krantz & Harvey Sawikin; Sarah & Eric Lane; Maccarone;

Ronay & Richard Menschel; Donald R. Mullen; Jennifer Napier Nolen & Malcom Nolen; Ellen & George Needham; Elin & Michael Nierenberg; Nancy & Morris W. Offit; Red Crane Foundation; Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia; David Teiger; Two Trees Management Company; Young & Rubicam $5,000-$9,999 Anonymous; The ABNY Foundation; Absolut Art Bureau; Jemilah & Sascha Bauer; N.S. Bienstock, Inc.; Miriam & Jon Birge; The Buhl Foundation; Nancy Coles & Jeffrey Goldstein: Betty Chen & Peter Coombe; Mr. & Mrs. Christopher M. Condron; Sophie Crichton Stuart; Barbara & Eric Dobkin; Martin & Rebecca Eisenberg; Elizabeth Fearon Pepperman; Lisi & Robert Gheewalla; Courtney & Joseph Goldsmith; Steve Henry & Philip Shneidman; Stephanie & Tim Ingrassia; Randye Kaplan & Gerald Blitstein; Chet Krayewski & Charles Short; Mike Latham; Carol LeWitt; Naomi Milgrom Kaldor & John Kaldor; The Moore Charitable Foundation; Movado Group, Inc.; Polish Cultural Institute New York; Lori & John Reinsberg; Heidi & Richard Rieger; The Rudin Foundation, Inc.; Melissa Schiff Soros & Robert Soros; Shonni Silverberg & John Shapiro; Bonnie & Daniel Tisch; Sheryl & Daniel Tishman; Trump International Hotel and Tower; Abby Wender & Rohan Weerasinghe; Caroline & Daniel Werther $1,000-$4,999 Anonymous [2]; A G Foundation; Carolyn Alexander; Sarah Arlotti & John Margenot; Richard Armstrong; Madeleine & David Arnow; John Auerbach & Andrew Black; Sherry Baker; Candace Barasch; Laurie Beckelman; Paul Beirne; David Beitzel & Darren Walker; Marianne Boesky Gallery; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery; Gavin Brown’s enterprise; Angela & Jacob Buchdahl; The Bunchberry Fund; Iris Cantor; Sabrina & Mark Carhart; Vin Cipolla; Diane M. Coffey; James Cohan Gallery; Sarah & Steven Cohen; Tami & Larry Cohen; Anita Contini & Stephen Van Anden; Paula Cooper Gallery; Nina Damato; Mark di Suvero; Hester Diamond; Eleven Rivington/Van Doren Waxter; Sharon E. Fay & Maxine Schaffer; Debra Fine & Martin Schneider; Charlotte Ford; Ford Foundation; Karen Freedman & Roger Weisberg; Marilyn Friedman & Thomas Block; Brooke Garber & Daniel M. Neidich; Martha & Jim Gingrich; Suzanne Gluck & Thomas Dyja; Benjamin Godsill; Dorian Goldman & Marvin Israelow; The Grodzins Fund; Eleanor Grosz & Larry Zweifach; Desiree Gruber; Mimi and Peter Haas Fund; Christine & Andy Hall; Lynn & Harold Handler; Hugh Hardy; Cynthia Hazen Polsky & Leon Polsky; Marieluise Hessel Artzt & Ed Artzt; Susan & Michael Hort; Jacqueline Humphries; Anne Huntington; Sharon & Richard Hurowitz; Innisfree M & A Incorporated; Samita & Howard Jacobs; Japan Society Gallery; Rochelle & Barry Kaplan; Stuart Katz; Herbert Kayden; Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; Ellen Kern; Wendy Keys & Donald Pels; Allen Kolkowitz & Chris Kusske; Mihail S. Lari; Glenn Ligon; Lisson Gallery; Jeanette W. Loeb; Lori Massad; Peter Mensch; Lisa Messinger & Aaron Panken; Metro Pictures; Kara Moore; Lori & David Moore; Jay Nydick; Katherine O’Brien; Linda Pellegrini; David B. Peterson; Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz; Gustavo Rangel; Charles Renfro; The Rosenkranz Foundation; Lisa Roumell & Mark Rosenthal; Martha & Robert Rubin; Fiona & Eric Rudin; Malia Simonds & Elliot Kirchner; Laura Skoler; Nicki & Harold Tanner; Peggy & David Tanner; Nancy B. Tieken; Times Square Alliance; Jean & Raymond Troubh; Esme Usdan; Gordon VeneKlasen; Elaine & Alan Weiler; Jan & Barry Zubrow; Dana Zucker & Brahm Cramer $500-$999 Shane Akoroyd; Naomi & Stephen Antonakos; ARK Restaurants Corporation; Liddy Berman; March & Philip Cavanaugh;


Cumulus Studios; Clifford Davis; Peggy & Gordon Davis; DFW Fund; Virginia Dwan; Judith R. & Alan H. Fishman; Simon Franks; Hugh Freund; Galerie Lelong; Nancy & Dennis Gilbert; Meg & Bennett Goodman; Jane Hait; Astrid T. Hill; Ara K. Hovnanian; Brenda Levin; Anne Livet; Susan & Glenn Lowry; Jenna Lyons; Candice Madey; Joyce Menschel; The Sue and Eugene Mercy Jr. Foundation; Sara E. Nathan & Joel D. Kazis; Mia Pearlman; Platt Byard Dovell White; Tracy Pollan & Michael Fox; Douglas Polley; Leslee & David Rogath; Sheri & Robert Rosenfeld; Nicole Russo; Ann Sacher; Jennifer Sage & Nicholas Grabar; Barbara Schwartz; Erica & Eric Schwartz; Susan & Jeffrey Stern; Ruth & Andrew Suzman; Judy and Warren Tenney Foundation; Monica & Peter Tessler; Regina Valdes Montalva & Joseph P. Depaola; Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc.; Melinda Wang; Helen & Peter Warwick; Jessie Washburne-Harris & Michael Lieberman; Philip Waterman, Jr.; Jennifer Weiser; Sabrina Wirth $100-$499 Anonymous; Diane Abbey; Elizabeth Abele; Alexander Adler; Nancy & Ziggy Alderman; Enid & Jerome Alpern; Judith & Alan Appelbaum; Augusto Arbizo; Cory Arcangel; Alice Aycock; Staci & John Barber; Judith Balick-Fried & Paul Fried; Bank of America Charitable Foundation; Martin Basher; Doreen & Gilbert Bassin; Sarah Bell & Gregg Trueman; Jessica & Ken Berkowitz; Andreas Beroutsos; Todd Bishop; Louis Blumengarten; Adam Blumenkrantz; Bethanie Brady; Jill Braufman & Daniel Nir; Matt Burgermaster; Jane & John Burton; Ann & Lawrence Buttenwieser; Catherine Cahill & William Bernhard; Robin Caiola & Kevin Sheekey; Erin Cantor; Anne Canty & Victor Quintana; Leslie Cecil & Creighton Michael; Jack Ceglic; Sylvia Chivaratanond; James Clark; Charlotte Cohen; Peter J. Cohen; Anthony Constantinople III; Anita Cooney; Avery Corman; Darby Curtis & Mark Ginsberg; Anne Davis; Nancy & Richard Davis; Suzanne Davis & Rolf Ohlhausen; Cecilia Dean; Carol Dempster; Joel Dictrow; Fred Dorfman; Margaret A. Doyle; Alma Egger; John Elder; Laura Ensler & David Rivel; Rosa Esman; Natly & Robert Esnard; Jennifer Falk; Wendy Feuer; Adam Fields; Ben Fink Shapiro; Judith & Samuel Florman; Ruth Frankfurt; Nina Freedman & Michael Rosenblum; Lauren Friedland; Pamela Friedlander & Steve Yesner; Molly & Kenneth Garelick; Bruce Geismar; Jennifer George; Lisa Goldberg; Laurel Gonsalves; Florence & Malcolm Graff; Francis Greenburger; Dorian Grinspan; Barbara Harris; Barbara Haws & William Josephson; Warren Heller; Carole & Gordon Hyatt; E. William Judson; Paul Kasmin Gallery; Susi Kenna; Sherry King; Theresa Kleinberg & James Kainen; Kreëmart; Birgit Kurtz; Ruth Lande Shuman; Anne & Mark Landman; Arnaud Lavrard; Peter D. Lax; Maria & Jack Lehman; Elisabeth Levin; Mrs. Wilbur A. Levin; Bobye List; William M. Lynch; Chico MacMurtrie; Matthew Marco; Elizabeth & Michael Mayers; Karen McLaughlin & Mark Schubin; John Melick; Marjorie & Morgan Miller; Susan Milmoe; Paul Morris; Hannah Motley; Ruthard Murphy; Richard Newman; Morris Orden; Nadine Orenstein; Janice C. Oresman; Melvin Pekarsky; Linda Plattus; Susan & Randolph Randolph; Mark Rappaport; Katie Rashid; Nancy & James Reinish; Allison Rodman; Andrea & Frank Roediger; Barbara Glazer Rosenblatt & Randall Lee Rosenblatt; Gillian & Eric Rosenfeld; Sheri & James Rosenfeld; Margaret Russell; Barbara Sahlman; Phyllis Samitz Cohen & Steven Cohen; Jeanne & Robert Savitt; Ann & Mel Schaffer; Lauren Schlesinger & Adam Glickman; Tami Schneider; Ellen Schoninger & Efriam Grinberg; Seaport Apples; Elizabeth & David Sherman; Barbara Shuster; Janet & Benjamin Shute; Rose & John Simonds; Susanna Singer; Paul Sperry; Madonna K. Starr; Sonya Starr; Abbe & Peter Steinglass; Nancy Stillpass; Suzanne Strassburger; Ellen & Bob Sunness; Helen S. Tucker; Dorothy & Arnold Turtz;

Andrea & Paul Vizcarrondo, Jr.; Jules Vo-Dinh; Lorraine & Adam Weinberg; Madeline Weinrib; Idell & Lawrence Weisberg; Judith Weller; Saul Wenegrat; Arthur Weyhe; Christian Wirtz; Lary S. Wolf; Judith Wolfe; Catherine & Thomas Wornom; James E. Young; Lori Zabar & Mark Mariscal; Beth Zadek & Joph Steckel In-Kind Contributors Absolut Art Bureau; Derrick Adams; Altour; Artex Fine Art Services; Iwan Baan; John Baldessari; Bloomberg Philanthropies; Bloomingdale’s; Peter Blum Gallery; Mel Bochner; Katinka Bock; Tanya Bonakdar Gallery; Bortolami Gallery; Bouchon Bakery and Café; Bowery Hotel; Olaf Breuning; Gavin Brown’s enterprise; Mickey Cartin; Ceramica; Cheim & Read; Chen Chen and Kai Williams; David Colman; Conrad Hotel; Paula Cooper Gallery; Iran do Espírito Santo; Spencer Finch; Galerie Jocelyn Wolff; Galerie Eva Pressenhuber; Galerie Meyer Riegger; Gladstone Gallery; Laurel Gitlen; Liz Glynn; Mark Handforth; Mary Heilmann; Sabine Hornig; Luis Jacob; Sean Kelly Gallery; Jim Kempner Gallery; Lisa Kereszi; Anton Kern Gallery; Esther Kläs; Maccarone; Christian Marclay; The Maritime Hotel; Justin Matherly; Ryan McNamara; Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams; Andrew Moore; Tatzu Nishi; Tony Oursler; Brent Owens; Giuseppe Penone; Elizabeth Peyton; Jack Pierson; Rob Pruitt; Redling Fine Art; Yancey Richardson Gallery; Ugo Rondinone; Clifford Ross; Perry Rubenstein Gallery; Samsung Electronics America; Tomas Saraceno; The Shops at Columbus Circle; David Shrigley; Tom Slaughter; Slavs and Tatars; Mika Tajima; Tilton Gallery; Tatiana Trouvé; Trove; Oscar Tuazon; Allyson Vieira; VSA Partners; Gary Webb; Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP

Director’s Circle Thank you again to all of our donors, including those who joined our newly launched Director’s Circle! This dynamic membership group invites art enthusiasts and patrons to engage more deeply with art and artists while ensuring that Public Art Fund has the resources needed to realize its mission. As part of our closest family of supporters, Director’s Circle members enjoy a range of special events, such as intimate dinners with artists, studio visits, and private collection tours—all designed to provide unique access and insights to some of the most compelling art of our time.

Director’s Circle members enjoyed an unforgettable visit to a private Hudson Valley collection this past spring. To join the Director’s Circle or learn more about this important group and the exciting roster of upcoming events, visit PublicArtFund.org or call 212.223.7806.


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Š 2013 Public Art Fund All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission in writing from the publishers.


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MoMA PS1 Configurations Artist Panel Discussion Nov 11, 2012

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Downtown Brooklyn Configurations

Nov 11, 2012 - Sept 16, 2013


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Š 2013 Public Art Fund All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission in writing from the publishers.

Cover image:

Ugo Rondinone Human Nature Rockefeller Center April 23 - July 7, 2013 Photo: James Ewing


Public Art Fund Magazine 2013