Page 1

P O RT FO L I O COVER


2

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


LOGO


SAME TEXTURE

I NTROD U CT IO N

4

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


z

TABLE OF CONTENTS

big character

TABLE OF CONTENTS

6

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


1. COVER 2-3. LOGO 4-5. INTRO 6-7. TABLE OF CONTENTS 8-11. TYPOGRAPHICAL TERMS 12-15. PICTOGRAPHS 16-23. CHARACTER STUDIES 24-25. NEWSLETTER 26-27. SKETCH BOOK 28-29. LOGOS 30-31. UBIQUITOUS TYPE 32-39. HISTORICAL 40. MOMT POSTER 41-50. POPS 51. FONTS USED 52-53. PAGINATION


TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH TYPOGRAPH


HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS HICAL TERMS


10

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


ICTOG


RAPHS


P I C T O G

DES

STAR

14

OCE

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


G R A P H S

SIRE

EAN

FLAME


CHARACTER STUDIES INTRO

16

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


Character Studies Character Studies Character Studies

N

a

o one knows why ‘A’ is the first letter of our alphabet. Some think it’s because this letter represents one of the most common vowel sounds in ancient languages of the western hemisphere. Other sources argue against this theory because there were no vowel sounds in the Phoenician language. (The Phoenician alphabet is generally thought to be the basis of the one we use today.) No one also knows why the ‘A’ looks the way it does, but we can construct a fairly logical chain of events.Some say the Phoenicians chose the head of an ox to represent the ‘A’ sound (for the Phoenicians, this was actually a glottal stop). The ox was a common, important animal to the Phoenicians. It was theirmain power source for heavy work. Oxen plowed the fields, harvested crops, and hauled food to market. Some sources also claim that the ox was often the main course at meals. A symbol for the ox would have been an important communication tool for the Phoenicians. It somewhat naturally follows that an ox symbol would be the first letter of the alphabet.The Phoenicians first drew the ox head ‘A’ as a ‘V’ with a crossbar to distinguish the horns from the face. They called this letter “alef,” the Phoenician word for ox. Through centuries of writing (most of it quickly, with little care for maintaining detail) the alef evolved into a form that looked very different from the original ox head symbol. In fact, by the time it reached the Greeks in about 400 BC, it looked more like our modern ‘k’ than an ‘A’.

18

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


Benguait

ITC Benguiat is a decorative serif typeface designed by Ed Benguiat and released by the International Typeface Corporation (ITC) in 1977. The face is loosely based upon typefaces of the Art Nouveau period but is not considered an academic revival. The face follows ITC’s design formulary of an extremely high x-height, combined with multiple widths and weights.


Character Studies Character Studies Character Studies

T

f

he sound represented by the letter in Greek was a labial semivowel similar to the English w. This sound had disappeared early from the Ionic and Attic Greek dialects, so that the Ionic alphabet, which eventually came into general use in Greece, contained no digamma. It was retained, however, for some time in many local dialects and alphabets, including that from which the Etruscan (and through it the Latin alphabet) was derived. None of the various Greek forms occur in the Semitic alphabets. Its origin in the Greek alphabet has been a matter of dispute, some maintaining that it descends from Semitic vau and others, less convincingly, maintaining that it was merely differentiated from the preceding letter E by the omission of a horizontal stroke. In either case it is probable that the Greeks were not the innovators, since a form of the letter occurs in the Lydian alphabet. The letter was probably contained in an Asian alphabet from which the Greek, Lydian, and Etruscan were derived. In some very early Latin inscriptions, f was used in combination with h to represent the unvoiced labial spirant (English f). The h was soon dropped, and the sound was represented by the letter f alone. It was not required in Latin to represent the bilabial semivowel (w), for the Latins had taken the letter V to represent both this sound and the corresponding vowel (u). The letter f has represented the unvoiced labial spirant ever since. n the Faliscan alphabet the letter had the curious form resembling an arrow pointing up. The Latin cursive of the 5th century CE employed a lengthened form, and the letter was generally extended below the line in uncial writing. In Irish writing of the 7th century the form came to resemble the modern f, and the Carolingian added further rounding of the top. From this developed the modern minuscule f.

20

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

Old En

The Blackletter t sometimes referred Fraktur or Old English) wa Guthenburg Bible, on books printed in Europe typeface is re its dramatic thin and t and in some fonts, the ela

SPRING

2018


nglish

typeface (also d to as Gothic, as used in the ne of the first e. This style of ecognizable by thick strokes, aborate swirls on the serifs.


Character Studies Character Studies Studies Character Character Studies Studies Character Character Studies

B B

efore you yell at me, yes I am doing another post about the history of an assorted piece efore you yell at me, yes I am of grammar’s immeasurable doing another post the arsenal. What can Iabout say? I’m history of an assorted piece a Grammar Nazi, and this stuff interest of grammar’s me. But that’s besidesimmeasurable the point. This arsenal. What can I say? I’mof time, I won’t be covering the history acontractions Grammar Nazi, and this stuff interest (which you can read here, me. But the point. This if you sothat’s wish),besides but question marks time, I won’t be covering the history of instead. The question mark is a universally contractions (which you can read here, recognised symbol, and yet its origins ifremain you soquite wish), but question marks mysterious indeed. And instead. The question mark is a are universally these two sets of origin stories as recognised andget, yet its different assymbol, stories can butorigins I’ll try and remain mysterious indeed. And do my quite best to cover both. these two sets of origin stories are as different as stories can get, but I’ll try and The Romans! do my best to cover both. The first (and admittedly the less likely) of the two stories starts where The Romans! most things inevitably start: in Rome. The story The goes first (and themark less that admittedly the question likely) of the two stories starts where actually originated from the Latin word most things inevitably start: inThis Rome. qvaestio, meaning question. word The story goes that the question was reportedly abbreviated in themark Middle actually from word Ages byoriginated scholars as justthe qo.Latin Eventually, qvaestio, meaning question. This a capital “Q” was written over theword was reportedly abbreviated in the “o”, and it formed one letter. Then,Middle it Ages by scholars just qo. Eventually, morphed into theas modern question mark awe capital wasHere’s writtena over theso you know“Q” today. picture “o”, it formed one letter. can and visualize it. However, theThen, actualit morphed into the modern question mark evidence that this is the case is almost we know today. Here’s a picture so you non-existant, for no medieval manuscript can visualize it. However, the actual found thus-far supports this idea. In fact, evidence that the this opposite is the case is almost it seems that holds true; the non-existant, for no medieval question mark morphs to lookmanuscript more like a found thus-far supports fact, q rather than less like a this q asidea. time In passes. it seems that the opposite holds true; the question Alcuin ofmark York morphs to look more like a q ratherThe than lessaccepted like a q asstory timeby passes. more linguists is that of Alcuin of York and his Alcuin of York “lighting flash” of a symbol. Alcuin himself was a The more accepted by England scholar living in 8th story century linguists is that of Alcuin of York and his “lighting flash” of a symbol. Alcuin himself was a scholar living in 8th century England

22

PORTFOLIO

?

when he received an invitation from Charlemange to join his court. Without hesitation, Alcuin accepted and made his when heFrance. received an invitation from way to Whilst in France, Alcuin Charlemange to join his court. Without wrote a myriad of books and poems. hesitation, andpunctuation made his Around thisAlcuin time, accepted the need for way to France. Whilst in France, Alcuin in writing was becoming more and more wrote a myriad of books and poems. evident, for books were now not only Around time, need for punctuation spokenthis aloud butthe read silently by monks in writing was becoming more and more on their lonesome. Without knowing evident, books nota only where tofor pause orwere stop,now it was bit hard spoken aloud but read silently by While monks for monks to enjoy their reading. on their lonesome. Without knowing there was an old system pioneered by, where to pause it wasinaplace bit hard you guessed it, or thestop, Romans using for monks to enjoy their reading. While a bunch of dots, it wasn’t sufficient. To there wasthis, an old system pioneered by, combat Alcuin created the punctus you guessed it, the Romans in place using interrogativus to signal an inflection at athe bunch of dots, it wasn’t sufficient. To end of a clause. The symbol itself combat this,over Alcuin the Roman punctus was a tilde onecreated of the old interrogativus to signal an inflection dots. imageHere’s a picture to held at you the end of This a clause. The symbol visualise. “decoration” overitself the dot was a tildeinover one ofuse theup olduntil Roman remained constant the 13th dots. imageHere’s a picture to held you century at the end of all clauses, when visualise. This “decoration” over the dot scholars in Paris decided to standerdise remained in constant use up until the 13th punctuation. They chose Alcuin’s punctus century at the end of all clauses, when interrogativus to embody solely the scholars in Paris tothe standerdise interrogative. By decided that time, “lightning punctuation. They chose Alcuin’s flash” had been turned upwards, punctus and one interrogativus to embody solely could easily recognise it as the the modern interrogative. ByBy that time, “lightning question mark. the 17ththe century, when flash” had been turned upwards, andmark one printing came around, the question could easily recognise it as the modern was used as a universal symbol around question mark. By the 17ththe century, when the Western world. When Arab world printing came around, the question mark discovered it, they flipped it to match with was universal symbol around theirused rightas to aleft writing style. Eventually, the Western world. When the Arab world most languages picked up the question discovered it, they flipped it to match with markright and to used as their own. At the turn their left itwriting style. Eventually, of thelanguages 21st century, the up question mark is a most picked the question sort of international super-star, being used mark and used it as their own. At the turn bythe billions peoplethe every day. And that of 21st of century, question mark is ais the history of that little mark at the end of sort of international super-star, being used sentences that happen to day. be questions. by billions of people every And that is the history of that little mark at the end of sentences that happen to be questions.

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


IRON WORKS This gothic type face resembles

some of the charecteristics of black letter and gothic font familys, with a script like style.


NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER NEWSLETTER


weekly

DENIM DAY

April 23- May 4th

Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

DIY AIR PLANTS We’re celebrating Earth Month! Add more greenery to your apartment by decorating your own plant pottery to take home with you. Supplies will be provided. Tuesday, April 24 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. FIDM MODETM Magazine Hosts:

The Industry Club Welcomes:

Celebrity Fashion Designer

Thursday. April 26 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425 The Industry Club Hosts:

Pinkies Up:

An email ettiquette workshop

Lost for words when you have to send a professional email? No worries, we got you! Join us for tea time and learn the unwritten rules of email etiquette to make the best impressions. Tuesday, May 1 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425

#endrapeculture Wednesday, April 25 All Day Phi Theta Kappa Hosts:

Girl Power Day

Ladies! Let’s have a serious Intrested in being a fashion designer and entreprenuer? (and fun) chat about Hear from celebrity designer, our bodies. Remove the Walter Mendez, whose creations stigma that comes with have been featured onAy pril being a woman. Embrace celebrities like Beyonce, Selena your femininity and feel Gomez, Jennifer Lopez, empowered with PTK. Who runs and more.

A

23 - M 4

Tuesday, April 24 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Room 425 Phi Theta Kappa Social:

A Look Behind Self Defense Class the Magazine

Interested in learning what it takes to put a magazine together? Join FIDM MODETM Magazine for our first photoshoot of the quarter, a make-over!

Wear denim with a purpose, support survivors, and educate yourself and others about sexual assualt and rape! Sign our pledge to support survivors.

Join PTK for this safety workshop led by Peace Over Violence. Empowerment self-defense is a set of awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies, and physical techniques. These enable one to successfully prevent, escape, resist, and survive violent assaults. Sign up in Room 425. Friday, April 27 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 500 Student Council Hosts:

Confidence Workshop

You got what it takes, you just haven’t realized it yet. Learn impactful ways to let your confidence speak for you. Whether your’e asking someone out on a date, going to an interview, networking or asking for a raise, confidence is key. Wednesday, May 2 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425

the world?!

Tuesday, May 1 11:15 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Room 425 FIDM MODE™ Magazine:

FIDM Tote Bag Challenge!

Looking for a way to get involved in MODE™ Magazine? Here’s your chance to showcase your talent. MODE is looking for fun and creative designed FIDM Tote Bags to feature in their upcoming issue. Take the classic FIDM Tote and transform it with fabric, paint, patches, beads, rhinestones or anything that inspires you. 10 lucky winning designs will get chosen! Stop by Student Activities, Room 425 for more details to apply. Sketches are due May 3. The Industry Club Hosts:

Dress for Success Workshop!

You are what you wear! Learn about proper attire for interviewing for the workplace. Plus, get advice on how to stand out in group interviews! Tuesday, April 18 2:45 pm - 3:30 pm Room 425


SK

ETCH BOOK


LOG

LO

MOMT


GOS

OGOS


30

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


W

es Wilson, who is generally acknowledged as the father of the ’60s rock concert poster, he was born Robert Wesley Wilson, on July 15, 1937, in Sacramento, California. Wilson grew up without theSpecial interest in art that is typical of most of his Contemporary poster artists. Instead, he was moreinterested in nature and the outdoors, studying forestry and horticulture at a small junior college in Auburn, California. He attended San Francisco State, but dropped out in 1963, where his major, at that time, had become philosophy. Wilson’s introduction to the Bay Area scene is an example of serendipity at its finest. The time was late 1965 and early 1966, and the whole San Francisco alternative culture scene was justemerging. We then bring together Wes Wilson, who had a natural talent for art and an interest in printing, with Bob Carr, who had formed, in his basement, the small firm Contact Printing. Carr was in touch with the whole San Francisco beat poetry and jazz scene, which was now in the process of transforming itself. Wilson, who had become Carr’s assistant and partner, was doing the basic layout design for most of the work. The press also did handbills for the San Francisco Mime Troupe fundraising benefits, the socalled ‘Appeal’ parties, as well as for the Merry Prankster Acid Tests. The Mime Troupe and the Acid Tests were linked to the emerging dance-hall scene through this series of benefit concerts, so it is no surprise that the new dance venues, like the Avalon Ballroom and Fillmore Auditorium, soon found their way to Contact Printing. Wilson designed the handbill for the first Trips Festival, now considered one of the seed events marking the advent of the emerging San Francisco scene. He also attended this event and was deeply moved by what he saw and experienced.


W

es Wilson single-handedly pioneered what is now known as the psychedelic poster. His style of filling all available space with lettering, of creating fluid forms made from letters, and using flowing letters to create shapes became the standard that most psychedelic artists followed. It helped put the “psychedelic” in the art. The first clear example of this, and a key piece in Wilson’s history, was the poster BG-18, done for a show with the Association at the Fillmore Auditorium. Set in a background of green is a swirling flame-form of red letters. With this poster came a new concept in the art of that time, perhaps the first true psychedelic poster. (shown to the right).


36

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


I

n summary, it is safe to say that the psychedelic poster, as we have come to know it, was defined by Wes Wilson sometime in the summer of 1966. Wilson pretty much reigned supreme among the poster artists at that time. But, by mid 1967, there were any number of good artists, many of whom had cut their teeth on Wilson’s lettering and style. A disagreement with Bill Graham about what had been agreed to, as far as payment, led to Wilson resigning his tenure as the primary Fillmore poster artist. Fairness to him in these matters was a matter of principle. Wilson did his last poster for Bill Graham in May of 1967, although he continued to produce posters for a number of other venues, including several more for the Avalon Ballroom.

Today, Wes Wilson creates paintings, but still occasionally does new posters or new art of interest. He is in good health and has six children and ten grandchildren so far. He and his wife of over 40 years, Eva, who is now a doctor of psychology, are still living on their farm in southwest Missouri.


38

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


POPS POPS POPS POPS POPS POPS POPS


Week 1 pop! visual project issue one

volume eleven in this issue: frank ocean picasso

kanye west

marilyn monroe frida kahlo

42

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


Week 2 p

o

p

!

v i s u a l

p r o j e c t

i s s u e

o n e

v o l u m e i

n

t

h

e l e v e n i

s

i

s

s

u

e

:

p i c a s s o f r a n k k

a

n

o c e a n y

e

w

marilyn monroe f r i d a

k a h l o

e

s

t


Week 3 vol u

me

ele v

en

p roj e c t

pop!

visual

iss

ue

on

e

in this issue: pic as so marilyn monroe

kanye west frank ocean PORTFOLIO

frida kahlo

44

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


Week 4 in t his issue: frank ocean frida kahlo picasso kanye west marilyn monroe

o ne

pop!

i s s ue

vo lume eleven

visual pro ject


Week 5 p

o

v i s u a l

p

!

p r o j e c t

v o l u m e e l e v e n i s s u e o n e i n t h i s i s s u e : kanye west pic a sso frank ocean marilyn monroe frida kahlo

46

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


p i c a s so

Week 6

frida kahlo kanye west frank ocean vi sua l pro ject issue o ne vol u me eleven in t his issue:

marilyn monroe

pop!


Week 7 pop!

v

v

o

l

u

m

i

s

e

u

e

a

l

l

e

p

v

e

i

i n

frank ocean

48

marilyn monroe

j

s

u

e

c

t

n

s

t h i s

frida kahlo

PORTFOLIO

r o

e

o

n

e

i s s u e :

picasso

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

kanye west

SPRING

2018


Week 8

pop!

fkanye rankocean wes t m a y l r i n m o n r o e pi c asso frida kahlo vi sual pro ject vol ume eleven

issue o ne in t his issue:


Week 9

50

PORTFOLIO

M A T T H E W M O S C O S A

SPRING

2018


FONTS USED COOLVETICA HELVETICA HELVETICA NEU/BOLD/ ITALIC HELVETICA LIGHT OBLIQUE WES WILSON ALPACA PADALOMA ANTIPASTO DRODIGA BODONI 72 FUTURA MEXCELLENT CHALET OLDE ENGLISH BENGUAIT IRORN WORKS PLANTAGENET CHEROKE BAUHAUS


Matthew Moscosa

Typography Portfolio


Portfolio final  
Portfolio final  
Advertisement