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JOSEPH GODON-LEVITT TALKS ABOUT

LOVE

LIFESTYLE//CHANCE//CULTURE

RICHARD AVEDON

A PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST

many sides of...

Marilyn Monroe LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

LA Magazine/Volume 1/ Feb 2014

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LOOK INSIDE LA MAGAZINE

Editor-in-Chief Michelle Mares

Art & Photo Ashley Andrade Cody Diodato Michelle Mares

Production Dennis Kennedy Kerry Kuwata

Digital Chelsey Moffat

Fashion Dennis Kennedy

TODAY YOU WILL READ ABOUT EVENTS, SHOWS, MUSIC, PLACES, FOOD, AND GAMES THAT IS PART OF THE L.A. LIFE. TODAY YOU WILL SEE PHOTOS OF WHAT L.A. IS REALLY ABOUT. SO PLESE STAND OR SIT AND ENJOY THE SHOW.

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MAGAZINE


LIFESTYLE∙CHANCE∙CULTURE LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

To begin with this magazine is for those who support Los Angeles and who love the city. IT is for those who are awesome (which is everyone) and who love to find out crazy things about Los Angeles that normally you would not know. Ok back to me. Let’s see a little background of me is sports, people, and design. That is my life. Every issue i will talk about anything you want. If you have a question about me send it in and ill answer one question every issue. Do not be shy. Like today i will start off with something simple like i speak spanish and english. Well anyways i will let you get back to the magazine. xoxo

Michelle Mares

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GET THE EXPERIENCE

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Get out to the beach and enjoy the 365 days of beautiful weather. by Michelle Mares Photograph by Michelle Mares

anta Monica Beach is unique among California beach vacation locations because of the array of activities available. From swimming and surfing to biking and volleyball, from outdoor chess to beachside gymnastics, Santa Monica is a haven for those seeking an active, outdoors vacation. For many the single greatest reason to visit Santa Monica is to enjoy the ultimate Southern California beach. Enjoy 365 days of sunshine a year a nearly constant gentle ocean breeze. Cycling, movie shoots, beach vol-

leyball games, and the finest of people-watching all happen here, and it’s no wonder. People love to gather at this California beach, partially because it is so pristine.Santa Monica Beach in particular is a natural asset that we take great care to preserve; the city of Santa Monica cleans and rakes the sand daily, and even offers a “trash valet” service on Fridays, weekends and holidays. Lifeguard stations are staffed during all daylight hours – though the lifeguard headquarters provides 24-hour assistance.

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GIVE LOVE ON VALENTINE’S DAY GIVE the greatest gift which is love. JOSEPH GORDON-LEVITT It’s that time of year again, when love is in the air. Everywhere you will see stores packed with people buying cards, candy, flowers, balloons, and every sweet thing you can think of. But, what’s the true meaning of Valentine’s Day from Joseph Gordon-Levitt eyes.? It’s a wonderful day to show your loved ones that you love them, and it’s a way to spend time together. Valentine’s Day is a great day for people to express their love for each other. Whether in a relationship, a family member, or a friend. Valentine’s Day should be a celebration of your love with someone else, or a celebration of independence, hehe. Some people enjoy being single and independent, 8 LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

by Michelle Mares It’s hard to imagine any more perfect storm for a relationship than a combination of 1) enhanced expectations on the part of one’s sweetheart; 2) a discrepancy between those expectations and reality; and 3) a refusal to communicate the precise nature of the desire, because “if I had to tell him, it wouldn’t count.” The resultant volatile mix is potent enough to spawn relational damage.


REWARD YOURSELVE AFTER A LONG DAY Reward yourself, give yourself a day off. by Michelle Mares Take a spa day A day at the spa doesn’t have to be expensive. Check your local spas for specials. Most of them have discounts for new visitors and monthly specials for everyone. Maybe you can’t afford to splurge on a full day of pampering, but that doesn’t mean you can’t indulge at all. Ask for a half-day package that combines three or four treatments. Even just a massage and a facial are enough to help you relax and feel good.

Get away for the weekend Take a break and get away for a weekend of pampering. Book a night or two at a hotel and take advantage of its services. Order room service and an in-room massage. Lounge at the hotel pool, relax in the hot tub or get a treatment at the spa. Indulge a little and pamper yourself. Even if the hotel is in your own city, it will seem like a getaway just because you’re in different surroundings.

Get a mini makeover If you are in a bit of a rut, head to your local salon (or even the department store makeup counter) and get a mini makeover. A new haircut or professional makeup application does more than make you look good -- it also helps you feel great. Pay attention to the makeup application tricks and hairstyling techniques so that you can recreate the look at home with ease.

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many faces of...

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By the end of 1946 her hair had become a platinum shade of blonde and her name was changed to Marilyn Monroe LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

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many faces of...

In

1926 a girl was born in the charity ward at the Los Angeles County Hospital who would become one of the most cele-

brated and enduring icons of all time Marilyn Monroe. Norma Jeane Mortenson’s childhood was volatile as she was passed from family members to family friends and frequently stayed in orphanages as a result of her mother’s mental health. To avoid another orphanage stay a family friend orchestrated a marriage proposal when she was sixteen years old. In 1937, 11-year-old Monroe found a home with “Aunt” Ana Lower, a relative of McKee’s. Here, Monroe had a stable home life until Lower developed health problems. Subsequently, McKee arranged a marriage between 16-year-old Monroe and Jim Dougherty, a 21-year-old neighbor. Monroe and Dougherty were married on June 19, 1942. When her husband was sent to the Pacific with the merchant marine, Norma Jeane began working on an assembly line at an aeronautical plant.

In 1956 the New York Times film critic Bos-

ley Crowther reported on her breakthrough role, “HOLD onto your chairs, everybody, and get set for a rattling surprise. Marilyn Monroe has finally proved herself an actress in Bus Stop. She and the picture are swell!”

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To avoid another orphanage stay a family friend ochestrated a marriagze proposal when she was six teen years old LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

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many faces of...

Although it didn’t get good reviews The Misfits is

one of Monroe’s most staggering and indelible per formances. She received a Golden Globe award for her per formance in Some Like It Hot and a Golden Globe nomination for her per formance in Bus Stop.

In 1962 Marilyn Monroe bought her first home

in Brentwood and began decorating it with purchases from a trip she had made to Mexico. She died that same year in her new home under controversial circumstances. Regardless, Marilyn Monroe’s personal history, achievements and contributions have made her one of the world’s greatest icons. She inspired musicians, writers and artists like Madonna, Elton John, Lady Gaga, Joyce Carol Oates and Andy Warhol to name just a few with her timeless glamour and extraordinary character. More relevant today than ever Marilyn Monroe lived a life and left a legacy that continues to excite fans all over the world.

Over a little more than a decade Monroe capti-

vated audiences through a multitude of comedic and dramatic roles. Audiences loved her breathy, blonde bombshell appeal combined with her light comedic approach in How To Marry A Millionaire, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, The Seven-Year Itch and Some Like It Hot. She was serious about her craft and delivered believable, flawed characters in Don’t Bother To Knock and Niagara. She worked closely with Lee Strasberg at The Actor’s Studio who referred to her as one of the two students out of “hundreds and hundreds” that stood out above the rest. The other was Marlon Brando.

Marilyn Monroe lived a life and left a legac y that c ontinues to exc ite fans a ll o ver the world

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many faces of...

By this time, several different photographers were taking pic-

tures of Monroe for pinup magazines, often showing off Monroe’s hourglass figure in two-piece bathing suits. Monroe was such a popular pinup girl that her picture could be found on several covers of pinup magazines in the same month. In July 1946, these pinup pictures brought Monroe to the attention of casting director Ben Lyon of 20th Century Fox, who called Monroe for a screen test.

Monroe’s screen test was a success and in August 1946, 20th

Century Fox offered Monroe a six-month contract with the studio having the option of renewing it every six months.When Dougherty returned, he was even less happy about his wife becoming a starlet. The couple divorced in 1946. Up until this time, Monroe had still been using her married name, Norma Jeane Dougherty. Lyon from 20th Century Fox helped her create a screen name. He suggested the first name of Marilyn, after Marilyn Miller, a popular 1920s stage per former, while Monroe chose her mother’s maiden name for her last name. Now all Marilyn Monroe had to do was learn how to act. DiMaggio’s attentiveness to Monroe during her illness led to rumors that Monroe and DiMaggio might reconcile. However, a bigger rumor of an affair was about to begin. On May 19, 1962, Monroe (wearing a sheer, flesh-colored, rhinestone dress) sang “Happy Birthday, Mr. President” at Madison Square Garden to President John F. Kennedy. Her sultry per formance started rumors that the two were having an affair.

Then another rumor began that Monroe had also been hav-

ing an affair with the President’s brother, Robert Kennedy.Leading up to her death, Monroe was depressed and continued to rely on sleeping pills and alcohol. Yet it was still a shock when 36-year-old Monroe was found dead in her Brentwood, California, home on August 5, 1962. Monroe’s death was marked “probable suicide” and the case closed. DiMaggio claimed her body and held a private funeral. Many people have questioned the exact cause of her death. Some speculate it was an accidental overdose of sleeping pills, others think it may have been purposeful suicide, and some wonder if it was murder. For many, her death remains a mystery.

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Her sultry performanc e started rumors that the two were ha ving an affa ir


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B.

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D.

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BUZZ GEAR

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A. LUST HEADPHONES

B.DIESEL WALLET

C. HENSHERS BAG

D.FALSE GLASSES

E. TOTAL CASES

F. APPLE IPAD 2

F. LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

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Made in Downtown LA

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vedon

A PORTRAIT OF AN ARTIST

Fahey Klein presents a major retrospective of the photographers work.

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R Richard Avedon, world famous photographer. What do Jean Genet, Jimmy Durante,Brigitte Bardot, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jacques Cousteau, Andy Warhol, and Lena Horne have in common? They were a few of the many personalities caught on film by photographer Richard Avedon. For more than fifty years, Richard Avedon’s portraits have filled the pages of the country’s finest magazines. His stark imagery and brilliant insight into his subjects’ characters has made him one of the premier American portrait photographers. Born in New York in 1923, Richard Avedon dropped out of high school and joined the Merchant Marine’s photographic section. Upon his return in 1944, he found a job as a photographer in a department store. Within two years he had been “found” by an art director at Harper’s Bazaar and was producing work for them as well as Vogue, Look, and a number of other magazines. During the early years, Avedon made his living primarily through work in advertising. His real passion, however, was the portrait and its ability to express the essence of its subject.

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It is Avedon’s ability to set his subjec ease that helps him create true, intimate lasting photographs.


cts at e, and

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As Avedon’s notoriety grew, so did the opportunities to meet and photograph celebrities from a broad range of disciplines. Avedon’s ability to present personal views of public figures, who were otherwise distant and inaccessible, was immediately recognized by the public and the celebrities themselves. Many sought out Avedon for their most public images. His artistic style brought a sense of sophistication and authority to the portraits. More than anything, it is Avedon’s ability to set his subjects at ease that helps him create true, intimate, and lasting photographs. Throughout his career Avedon has maintained a unique style all his own. Famous for their minimalism, Avedon portraits are often well lit and in front of white backdrops. When printed, the images regularly contain the dark outline of the film in which the image was framed. Within the minimalism of his empty studio, Avedon’s subjects move freely, and it is this movement which brings a sense of spontaneity to the images. Often containing only a portion of the person being photographed, the images seem intimate in their imper fection. While many photographers are interested in either catching a moment in time or preparing a formal image, Avedon has found a way to do both. Beyond his work in the magazine industry, Avedon has collaborated on a number of books of portraits. In 1959 he worked with Truman Capote on a book that documented some of the most famous and important people of the century. Observations included images of Buster Keaton, Gloria Vanderbilt, Pablo Picasso, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mae West.

Often containing only a portion of the person being photographed, the images seem intimate in their imperfection. LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

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Around this same time he began a series of images of patients in mental hospitals. Replacing the controlled environment of the studio with that of the hospital he was able to recreate the genius of his other portraits with non-celebrities. The brutal reality of the lives of the insane was a bold contrast to his other work. Years later he would again drift from his celebrity portraits with a series of studio images of drifters, carnival workers, and working class Americans. Throughout the 1960s Avedon continued to work for Harper’s Bazaar and in 1974 he collaborated with James Baldwin on the book Nothing Personal. Having met in New York in 1943, Baldwin and Avedon were friends and collaborators for more than thirty years. For all of the 1970s and 1980s Avedon continued working for Vogue magazine, where he would take some of the most famous portraits of the decades. In 1992 he became the first staff photographer for The New Yorker, and two years later the Whitney Museum brought together fifty years of his work in the retrospective, “Richard Avedon: Evidence�. He was voted one of the ten greatest photographers in the world by Popular Photography magazine, and in 1989 received an honorary doctorate from the Royal College of Art in London. Today, his pictures continue to bring us a closer, more intimate view of the great and the famous. Avedon died on October 1st, 2004.

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TAKE ME TO LA... PLEASE 32 LA MAGAZINE FEB2014

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