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OR

OR

TEAM

Dennis Kennedy EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Zach Cochrane CREATIVE DIRECTOR

The

MANgazine om

Wyatt Wilkinson STAFF WRITER

M

P. c

Michael Burt ART DIRECTOR

ON

RA

Michael Aldini GRAPHIC DESIGNER Randy Dunbar PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

s A ng el es , C A

Jason Schroeder PRODUCTION MANAGER Taylor Ball DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Reed Upson ADVERTISING OPERATOR Lauren Ball DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Abby Karam FINANCIAL ANALYST Shari Kennedy BRAND SPECIALIST

Lo

Rosalind Hopper ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

On Ramp T h e M A N g a z i n e

Elizabeth Schroeder DIRECTOR SALES & MARKETING Ben Spencer DIRECTOR OF EVENTS Amanda Eyges MARKETING/EVENTS COORDINATOR Marty Kennedy FACILITIES MANAGER Alex Aguas DIGITAL PRODUCER Danielle Aguas DIGITAL COORDINATOR Cameron Crane AGENCY REP Josh Tobin IT MANAGER Eddie Gurrola VIDEO EDITOR 2

ON RAMP WINTER 2014

Each month, the magazine covers the people, passions and issues of numerous sports and style with the journalistic integrity that has made it the conscience of all men. It is surprising, engaging and informative, always with a point of view

that puts its readers in the drivers seat to success. In short, on the pages of OR one can find man’s version of food, movie, fitness, sex, music, travel, sports, and technology. This is the one and only MANgazine.

Should Would Could Did


WINTER

On Ramp The MANgazine

2014

CONTENTS 2 OnRamp Team 3 Editor’s Letter 7 Ignition 8 Ignition - Style - Top 5 Rookie Mistakes

EVERYONE’S FAVORITE DOG! ask Captain pg. 25

A LOOK BACK w/ the late Richard Avedon pg. 26

10 Ignition - Eats 12 Ignition - 5th Floor 14 atTIRE 17 Winter Edition 18 Ft. Louie Vito 25 Ask Captain 26 (A look back) Richard Avedon 30 The Last Stop

the VIEW

from

the TOP PG. 18

Professional Snowboarder Louie Vito

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Editor's Letter Dennis Kennedy EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Welcome! to th e first issue of On Ramp, Th e MANgazine. We aim to amuse, shock

and educa t e th e common man in to thinking abou t free li ving. Each quart er will incorpora t e a sea sonal edi tion tha t focuses on ei th er music, movies, sports, or style. A s your Edi tor-In-Chief I promise to bring forth th e stories and informa tion tha t will make you a be tt er person in this world. Too many people under value wha t th ey are, and over value wha t th ey're no t .

Before starting this magazine someone once told me a ft er I expressed h esi ta tion,

tha t e very morning you ha ve two choices: con tinue to sleep wi th your dreams or wake up and cha se th em. This commen t ended up being very sound advice. Do wha t you love, love wha t you do!

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IGNITION G 1 STYLE

2 EATS

The Lastest News on Style, Nutrition, Women

+

3 5th FLOOR

Style

Your Wheels ... Man Law THE ONRAMP YOU NEED TO LOOK AND FEEL YOUR BEST By: Dennis Kennedy Photography By: Dennis Kennedy

T

esque obsession about the latest and coolest. If you invest in a handful of sensible (and stylish) pairs and take care of them, you’ll be set for years. You just need to take that first step.

SAVE YOUR SOLE

hey reveal whether he takes pride in the little things. If he throws on a nice suit and pairs it with cheap, clunky lace-ups, he’s not what you’d call a detail man. And if he leaves his pricey wingtips scuffed and unpolished, he may not be the closer you’re looking for. There are numerous styles of shoes out there, but what’s great about being a man is that you can do perfectly well by sticking with just a few. You don’t need to maintain some Carrie Bradshaw -

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IGNITION

Style

Don’t just wing it. In an era of endless lines and travel hassles, you can still pack smartly, glide through the airport, and arrive in style. Here, Spanish tennis ace Fernando Verdasco dashes through Madrid-Barajas’s stunning Terminal 4 in the kind of suits, sports jackets, and slip-on shoes that will help you easily navigate the increasingly unfriendly skies. Style extends to your carry-on. Make it a neutral-toned wheelie with a front pocket (for awkward cargo) and an adjustable handle that comfortably cradles your briefcase. When traveling for work, pack your suit pants but wear your jacket. Hang it up when you board and it’ll still be fresh when you land.

Travel light, fly HIGH

Top

5ive Rookie Mistakes

1. HAIRY SITUATION

Close the shirt and trim that unkept chest hair.

2. NO JORTS!

You like an idiot. period.

3. SOCKS W/ SANDALS

THere is never an occassion for this.

4. RUNNING SHOES AND JEANS

Leave those stink machines for the gym.

5. TRIM YOUR WALLET FAT Do you really need those 6 months worth of receipts? 8

ON RAMP WINTER 2014

DON’t EVEN THINK ABOUT

IT.

The little things do matter...make sure to pack only what you need.


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IGNITION ats

RECIPES AT ONRAMPMAG.COM

E

Homemade Acai Bowls

Zesty Chicken Tacos

WOW HER IN THE KITCHEN! BREAKFAST. LUNCH. W I N H ER. By: Kate McCay // Photographed By: Jim Horton

Cooking for a woman (almost) never fails. Simply making the effort -- despite the burnt mess you might come up with -- is often worth a week of pricey restaurant meals that hurt the wallet. But if you can cook for a woman and she actually enjoys it, then it’s far more likely you’ll be cooking her breakfast, too. That’s why we’ve put together this list of simple-but-impressive recipes that you can mix and match to heat things up in the kitchen. Not every man can cook well. Not every man has a desire to cook well, and not every man has to. But cooking for a woman from time to time is a guaranteed way to impress her, and every man should be able to competently cook a few simples. The following recipes involve

minimal ingredients and very few, uncomplicated steps to follow, but the rewards they bring are priceless. Pay specific attention to the suggestions for presentation. Women love a plate of food that looks and smells as good as it tastes. Ever since man created fire, we have been searching for new and better ways to prepare food. With regards to culinary evolution, our society has come quite a long way since the early days of roasting raw meat over open flames. Yet somewhere along the way, men lost their place and confidence in the kitchen. Blame it on progress, or blame it on convenience, the fact remains; most men cannot cook. Sure, we might stand guard over the grill on Labor Day weekend or have a few ‘signature dishes’ up our sleeves,

but collectively, our overall culinary knowledge and skills are limited. Even with the advent of ‘food television’ and popular shows like Top Chef, our interest in food is more focused around entertainment rather than on expertise. To be brutally honest, most of us were raised by a generation where cooking was not a central activity in our household, and if it was, it wasn’t done by the man of the house. Beginning in the late 1950’s through today, modern conveniences drastically reduced the need to possess culinary skills. The long lost sound of the dinner bell has been replaced by the sound of kids slamming car doors to meet Daddy at the neighborhood chain restaurant. ~ Make sure to follow the recipes on OnRamp.com ~

COOK LIKE A MAN 10

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Savory Flank Steak

Strawberry Shortcake Bites


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IGNITION

th Floor

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WHAT DO HER CLOTHES, SAY ABOUT HER

THE SIGNS TO LOOK OUT FOR By: Daniel Bates ON THE 1ST DATE Photography: Michelle Mares

It has long been said that clothes maketh the man. But it seems that what women wear can give a powerful insight into who they are too. Clinical psychologist Dr Jennifer Baumgartner has claimed our wardrobe decisions tell others about the secret desires that we are trying to hide. Too much cleavage suggests you are power hungry and keen for control while over-the-top jewellery implies you are insecure and may have financial difficulties. Dr Baumgartner, who is based in the U.S., said: ‘Your clothes reveal what is really going on internally. Your thoughts and feelings are laid bare in the closet you just have to look for them.’ In her book, the 34-year-old, who is also a wardrobe consultant, describes the errors women typically make when buying clothes. Many fall into the trap of only buying designer labels, wearing office clothes all the time or simply buying too much. Another typical problem is getting stuck in a style rut, defined as having not changed your look for the past five years. Meanwhile, wearing too much

jewellery could be an attempt to tell others you are rich, but actually implies that you are having actual money problems. Cleavage-exposing clothes, such as those favoured by actress Christina Hendricks, are about feeling powerful and in control and – perhaps unsurprisingly – ‘knowing people will be looking at you’. Women who button up their clothes are actually telling their boss that ‘femininity means weakness, not power’, while high heels can make women appear less intelligent but also inspire confidence by making the wearer as tall as their male colleagues. And if you often find yourself in jeans and trainers with unkempt hair, beware. Far from enjoying some downtime, you may be ‘overly identifying with motherhood and suppressing other parts of yourself. A young girl choosing a short skirt could be an attention seeker, while an older woman doing the same is having difficulty accepting that she is a grown-up. Dr Baumgartner said: ‘All of our behaviours, from the food we eat to the men we date, are motivated by internal factors.

“Your clothes reveal what is really going on internally.”

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atTIRE

By land and sea, travel the road less traveled... in STYLE

Day

Hat $29: Brixton. Sandals $49: Rainbows. Shoes $115: Allen Edmonds ‘fastball.’ Sunglasses $110 Rayban Wayfarer. Shorts $47: Rhythm Solid. Watch $195: Michael Kors MK8309. Bracelet $38: Kiel James Patrick. Shirt $55: Quiksilver. 14

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Night

Bag $815: Mulberry Holdall. Belt $65: Nordstrom. Cufflinks $55: Anchor. Bow Tie $40: Nordstrom. Shoes $345: Allen Edmonds ‘Strand.’ Watch $315: Nixon Diplomat SS. Sunglasses $115 Rayban Aviator. Shirt $75: Topman. WINTER 2014 ON RAMP

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The featured issues each quarter recognize some of the greatest alpha dogs in the world. The in-depth interviews and journalism dig deeper than any other. It’s the brand for active, successful, professional men who want represent control over their physical, mental and emotional lives. We give men the tools they need to make their lives better through in-depth reporting covering everything from fashion and grooming to health and nutrition as well as cutting-edge gear, the latest entertainment, timely features and more.


Bear Mountain Resort Big Bear Lake, California 18

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L Louie Vito has been one with the

snow almost since birth. By age 3, this freestyle Olympic snowboarder was

happily swooshing down the slopes on skis. But then came the fateful day he

and his dad spotted some boarders on the slopes.

FLIPPING @ OUT 8, 0 00 ft.

Curious, they tried it out, and soon

thereafter, a family of skiers became a family of snowboarders.

Though Vito loved the idea of

becoming an aerospace engineer, he was born to be an athlete. When he was younger he had contemplated

becoming a gymnast, but it was his

passion for powder that kept bringing him back to the mountain. In eighth grade he enrolled in the Stratton

Mountain School, a boarding school

in Vermont, and since then he’s never looked back.

Louie Vito, Professional Snowboarder. The rising star of Men’s Snowboarding is ready for US. it’s all fair game now...and we won’t hold back!

Photographed by: Terry Richardson

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Top: 2012 US Open Mammoth, CA Bottom: 2012 US Open Mammoth, CA

Q+A

OR: Thinking back to when you experienced snowboarding for the first time? LV: I was 6. In the Midwest, out 20

ON RAMP WINTER 2014

“IF YOU’RE GOOD ENOUGH,

in the boonies, it was something new. My family had a great time trying it. I think my mom was happy because of snowboarding’s image and the fact that my dad was also out there among a bunch of 15 and 24-year-olds. It was a pretty funny scene. But we both were having a blast just figuring it all out. OR: So when you were first starting, were you ever nervous or afraid of doing a trick? LV: You always have a little bit of a fear in you, but that’s what makes it so much better when

you accomplish, whether it’s fear or something physical. Any obstacle you have, if you overcome it, that feeling you have is so priceless. If it’s kind of a gnarly trick you might have more nerves before you land it, but you can’t even put into words how good it feels. That keeps pushing me in snowboarding. You want to keep going with that feeling because it’s so priceless. OR: For instance, you were the first one to do the backside 1080, which you did at just 17. LV: Once you get the taste of the

contest, you want to keep on achieving that. I always shoot for the top and settle for less. You always want to set your sights high and your goals high. You want to work hard to be the best, be at the very top. OR: What is the real difference when you’re out there between first and third place? Is it a mental game? LV: No one remembers second. I don’t want anyone to beat me in anything I do; I’m one of the most competitive people. If we’re playing Monopoly, I want to win.


THEY CAN’T IGNORE YOU.”

If we’re playing basketball—I’m 5 ‘5”, I’m not Kevin Durant—I want to win. I suck at tennis, but I love playing tennis. I want to win. It’s just how I’ve been raised, and it’s how I am, pushing myself to be the best. I don’t want anyone to beat me in anything. OR: It sounds like you have a good father. What wisdom has he imparted? LV: “If you’re in trouble, you’re doing well. If you fail, you succeed.” He has a quote for everything. They’re motivational and his thinking was sometimes a

little bit ahead of snowboarding’s time. When older snowboarders were getting ready for the Olympics in ’98, he would ask them about trainers, and they’d be like, It’s not cool. Now I have a trainer and I think it’s one of the best things I’ve done. OR: He helped you lose 10 pounds and 10 percent body fat—did it really make a difference? LV: I’m pretty short and pretty stocky. So before I had a trainer, I had a lot of upper-body strength and weight. I met John at the

Dancing With the Stars finale [Vito was a contestant on season nine]. Apolo was there, and I’m always that person where, if I meet an elite athlete, I have to [pick their brain] and apply it to my own life. John, from the moment he saw me, said, “I think you’re too top- heavy.” From the footage he watched, he said, “I think I can get you to 155.” What he would do is he wanted to slim me down and lower my center of gravity. But I was nervous because I have thick legs—like, tree-trunk legs—and a booty to match. I was

Top: 2010 Winter Olympics Whistler, Canada Bottom: 2011 US Open Copper Mountain, CO

like, I’m going to look like a bowling pin if I don’t lift upper body! He’s like, Trust me—you’re going to get smaller but look bigger. So I changed the way I ate and did his workouts, and before you know it, I was smaller. I got down to 135. At 135, I looked bigger than I was at 155. OR: Has it helped you? LV: Yeah. I’ll watch old footage and be like, Holy cow, I didn’t realize that I was that flat. I can’t believe I didn’t fall. When you land flat, you jar yourself. But [now] I don’t have to carve out of WINTER 2014 ON RAMP

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“I want to beat Shaun White.

If I have to beat him to win, then great. But if he gets

3rd place and I get 2nd, that isn’t a successful contest for me because I didn’t win.”

it—my upper body and my head are getting me out of it. Now my balance is better and I’m definitely stronger and I can take flatter landings now. OR: Does that ever come into trouble in your romantic life? LV: My dating life has been pretty relaxed. I travel so much that when I did have girlfriends, [they knew] that snowboarding is number one. When I was younger, the chance of me marrying [a particular] girl was pretty slim, and snowboarding was what was paying the bills. It’s getting me to where I want to go. I just want

to where I want to go. I just want them to know I’m not going to skip a snowboard contest to hang out. I’m not going to go skip something that’s important because you want to go on vacation. The only time it has hurt my dating life is if they don’t understand that and I can’t make plans three months in advance because I don’t know what I’m doing three days from now. OR: When do you start planning for the 2014 Olympics? LV: It’s always there to keep you motivated, but you might not be training for that one thing. There

are a lot of contests in between and I want to do well in those contests. But if I do well in those con- tests, it keeps me on the right path going in. OR: Do you have a pre-competition ritual that you do? LV: Normally I have this song that I strap in to. They usually tell you to get ready three people out, so I have one song that I listen to when I’m strapping in and one song that I listen to when I snowboard the actual contest. I listened to the same two songs every contest last year. OR: Are you planning any tricks

you can tell us about? LV: No, I’ve learned a new trick over the summer, another double, so now I have five doubles that I can do and I just want to make up a good run. And it’s not necessarily one trick that will make a difference; it’s a combination of all of them.

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@askCaptain

Ask Captain All man’s best friend The Dog. The Myth. The Legend

My supervisor promised me a raise but said he had to clear it with his boss first. It’s been about a month. How often can I bug him about it? Parker - Las Vegas, NV

Ask every day and it’s nagging. Ask every week, it’s annoying. Ask every 3 or 4 weeks, it’s called doing your job and fighting for what’s right. Ask and keep getting the runaround? It’s called adios.

My wife and I started using a close friend as a Real-Estate agent. It turns out he’s terrible. How do we excuse ourselves from this situation? Doug - Milwaukee, WI First, hash it out with your wife and explain why it’s such a risk to stay with this guy. Then tell your pal you’re sorry but that you just think mixing business with pleasure is taking you down a path you don’t want to follow. He won’t like it, but the bottom line is that you can have a little regret now, or a lot of regret later if you let this go on. I work like a dog but can barely manage all my projects. Would I seem lazy if I asked for a lighter load? Gary - Charlotte, NC Yep, you would. But I know a loophole. If there’s someone in your office who isn’t slammed with work, ask the boss to offload some of your stuff onto him (or her). Here’s how you put it: “I’m very excited about [the boss’s pet project] and want to make it a priority so I can devote 110 percent of my energy to it.” It’s a tricky play that could become messy if your colleague finds out, but any sensible boss wants efficiency and will appreciate your focusing on the goals that matter.

Properly Greet a Woman Want to avoid the awkward bob-and-weave of a mismanaged hello? Then choose quickly between a hug, a handshake, says Peter Post, author of Essential Manners for Men. It’s the safe play. And definitely shake her hand if she’s a business contact or someone to whom you wish to show formal respect (like, say,

I always buy flowers for Mom on Mother’s Day. This year I want to change it up. Any ideas? Rick - Fort Worth, TX One thing’s for sure: Your ma doesn’t want another lilac or tulip or rose. What she does want is a big old bouquet of your time. I’m not saying you have to spend a boatload of cash to score frontrow seats and VIP backstage passes to the hottest Broadway musical. Just think about where you two have had your best times together, and find a way to revisit them—with a special extra perk. She’ll take on a glow that’ll last longer than any flower. My friend keeps inviting me to go to church with him. I’m not religious, and I wish he’d stop asking. What’s a nice way to handle this? Mike - San Diego, CA Say you ask a woman out and she says she’s busy. You’ll try again, right? But if she says she’s just not interested, you won’t. Same rule applies here: No matter what the situation, making excuses just delays the inevitable. Don’t lead him on. Tell him your faith is personal and that you’d like to keep it that way. If he is a real friend he will respect what you are telling him.

At a busy restaurant, does greasing the host’s palm really land a table faster? Gus - New York, NY If the place is crowded and there’s a 90-minute wait, what can the host do, magically make an empty table appear? You think he’s David Blaine? What, Gus? You want to shake his hand? Oh, it happens to have a folded-up twenty? And no other customers were able to see what you just did? He might have a table opening up in just a few moments, kind sir. My girlfriend’s brothers are giving me the serious cold shoulder. What’s the best way to win them over? Zach - Ames, IA In this place, I see a lot of guys who make bad impressions. But I also see guys who make good impressions. So, without looking like a total tool, just make a nice gesture or two to seal a good feeling. Buy a round (or three) of beers, schedule a round of golf, or just do something that tips them off that you’re a good guy with good intentions and that you won’t be treating their sis with any disrespect. Because if you do that, the only thing that’ll happen is that they’re going to go a few rounds with you. Also, give it some more time, it will work out.

your new girlfriend’s mother). If she’s someone closelike family or a good friend-go in for the hug. And if your relationship is still fuzzy-think first dates and friends of friends-then go in for a cheek kiss. Just pair it with a gentle embrace, keep a little distance, and remember: “It’s cheek to cheek, not a real kiss,” says Post. Unless she goes for the lips, in which case, hey, it’s only polite to reciprocate. - Captain

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Richard

AVED

FAHEY KLEIN PRESENTS A MAJOR RETROSPECTIVE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHERS WORK.

~ By: Kely Smith

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DON A Self Portrait of an Artist


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4 1 Ronald Reagan 2 John Ford 3 Elizabeth Taylor 4 Andy Warhol

W

hat do Jean Genet, Jimmy Durante, Brigitte Bardot, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jacques Cousteau, Andy Warhol, and Lena Horne have in common? They were a few of the many personalities caught on film by photographer Richard Avedon. For more than fifty years, Richard Avedon’s portraits have filled the pages of the country’s finest magazines. His stark imagery and brilliant insight into his subjects’ characters has made him one of the premier American portrait photographers. Born in New York in 1923, Richard Avedon dropped out of high school and joined the Merchant Marine’s photographic section. Upon his return in 1944, he found a job as a photographer in a department store. Within two years he had been “found” by an art director at Harper’s Bazaar and was producing work for them as well as Vogue, Look, and a number of other magazines. During the early years, Avedon made his living primarily through work in advertising. His real passion, however, as was the portrait and its ability to express the essence of its subject.

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Nastassja Kinski

“All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.”
– RA

Versace Advertisement WINTER 2014 ON RAMP

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Ezra Pound

Twiggy 30

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As Avedon’s notoriety grew, so did the opportunities to meet and photograph celebrities from a broad range of disciplines. Avedon’s ability to present personal views of public figures, who were otherwise distant and inaccessible, was immediately recognized by the public and the celebrities themselves. Many sought out Avedon for their most public images. His artistic style brought a sense of sophistication and authority to the portraits. More than anything, it is Avedon’s ability to set his subjects at ease that helps him create true, intimate, and lasting photographs. Throughout his career Avedon has maintained a unique style all his own. Famous for their minimalism, Avedon portraits are often well lit and in front of white backdrops. When printed, the images regularly contain the dark outline of the film in which the image was framed. Within the minimalism of his empty studio, Avedon’s subjects move freely, and it is this movement which brings a sense of spontaneity to the images. Often containing only a portion of the person being photographed, the images seem intimate in their imperfection. While many photographers are interested in either catching a moment in time or preparing a formal image, Avedon has found a way to do both. Beyond his work in the magazine industry, Avedon has collaborated on a number of books of portraits. In 1959 he worked with Truman Capote on a book that documented some of the most famous and important people of the century. Observations included images of Buster Keaton, Gloria Vanderbilt,

Pablo Picasso, Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Mae West. Around this same time he began a series of images of patients in mental hospitals. Replacing the controlled environment of the studio with that of the hospital he was able to recreate the genius of his other portraits with non-celebrities. The brutal reality of the lives of the insane was a bold contrast to his other work. Years later he would again drift from his celebrity portraits with a series of studio images of drifters, carnival workers, and working class Americans. Throughout the 1960s Avedon continued to work for Harper’s Bazaar and in 1974 he collaborated with James Baldwin on the book Nothing Personal. Having met in New York in 1943, Baldwin and Avedon were friends and collaborators for more than thirty years. For all of the 1970s and 1980s Avedon continued working for Vogue magazine, where he would take some of the most famous portraits of the decades. In 1992 he became the first staff photographer for The New Yorker, and two years later the Whitney Museum brought together fifty years of his work in the retrospective, “Richard Avedon: Evidence”. He was voted one of the ten greatest photographers in the world by Popular Photography magazine, and in 1989 received an honorary doctorate from the Royal College of Art in London. Today, his pictures continue to bring us a closer, more intimate view of the great and the famous.

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Avedon died on October 1st, 2004.

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“If a day goes by without my doing something related to photography, it’s as though I’ve neglected something essential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to wake up.” - RA JFK and Jackie Kennedy 1 Twiggy 2 Catharine Deneuve 3 Marlon Brando 4

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Kennedy pubdesign single