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GRAPHIC DESIGN

Andrew spent a majority of his childhood and adolescence in the beach cities of the South Bay area of Los Angeles. Through over exposure to UV rays, sand, and slang, he dreams of a drastic escape. A journey filled with late nights, graffiti, high fashion, and of course blinding lights are sure to guide the way. When he finally reaches the days of his early twenties, leaving his Great Dane and Volvo behind, Andrew buys a oneway ticket to New York City. Little does he know, he will spend the next six years being chewed up, spat out, and gradually forged into a semi-adult, all without adopting a Brooklyn twang. In the scorching Summers and brutal Winters on the island of Manhattan, Andrew is bombarded with billboards, cutting-edge product releases, and an ever-changing atmosphere that never ceases to breathe. Nothing is permament he realizes, and nothing leaves a lasting impression other than simplicity.

Therefore he seeks to learn the trades of design and development with the attempts of upholding a minimalistic quality that is true to his form and taste. After a week’s worth of packing his posessions into boxes and and a five hour flight later, Andrew finds his feet back in the sands of Los Angeles to further his studies in Graphic Design with an emphasis in Branding at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising. Here we have a collection of work from his first class in Typography. Throughout the quarter, he learns the different uses of type, and the effect that it will draw towards the audience by manipulating its color, shape, and size.


ANDREW KIM GRAPHIC DESIGN

DREW911@GMAIL.COM (310) 308-1810

DREW911@GMAIL.COM (310) 308-1810

A position as a senior graphic artist that utilizes my sharp skills in desktop publishing, brand development, and web design. ACADEMICS

Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising Graphic Design - Branding

TECHNICAL PROFICIENCIES WINDOWS & MAC OS CS5.5 Photoshop CS5.5 Illustrator CS5.5 InDesign CS5.5 Dreamweaver CS5.5 Flash CS5.5 AfterEffects Microsoft Office Suite HTML C++ JAVA

VMAN Magazine Director of Web Development GQ Korea Creative Director Conde-Naste Publications GQ Magazine Assistant Art Director GO Media Contributing Designer Blizzard Entertainment Character Development

LANGUAGES

English Korean Japanese 10-KEY, 95 WPM


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TYPE UBIQUITOUS Written & Photographed by: Andrew Kim

Typography makes at least two kinds of sense, if it makes any sense at all. It makes visual sense and historical sense. The visual side of typography is always on display, and materials for the study of its visual form are many and widespread. The history of letter forms and their usage is visible too to those with access to manuscripts, inscriptions, and old books - but from others it is largely hidden. This book has therefore grown into something more than a short manual of typographic etiquette It is the fruit of a lot of long walks in the wilderness of letters: in part a pocket field guide to the living wonders that are found there, and in part a meditation on the ecological principles, survival techniques, and ethics that apply. The principles of typography as I understand them are not a set of dead conventions but the tribal customs of the magic forest, where ancient voices speak from all directions and new ones move to unremembered forms. One question, nevertheless, has been often in my mind. When all right-thinking human beings are struggling to remember that other men and women are free to be different,6and free to become more different.

Still, how can one honestly write a rulebook? What reason and authority exist for these commandments, suggestions, and instructions? Surely typographers, like others, ought to be at liberty to follow or to blaze the trails they choose. Typography thrives as a shared concern. And, there are no paths at all where there are no shared desires and directions. A typographer determined to forge new routes must move, like other solitary travellers, through uninhabited country and against the grain of the land, crossing common thoroughfares in the silence before dawn. The subject of this book is not typographic solitude, but the old, well- travelled roads at the core of the tradition: paths that each of us is free to follow or not, and to enter and leave when we choose - if only we know the paths are there and have a sense of where they lead. That freedom is denied us if the

“Typography

is the craft of endowing

human language

visual form,

with a durable

and thus with an Independent

these principles universals, because they are largely unique to our species. Dogs and ants, for example, read and write by more chemical means. But the underlying principles of typography are, at any rate, stable enough to weather any number of human fashions and fads. Typography is the craft of endowing human language with a durable visual form, and thus with an independent existence. Its heartwood is calligraphy - the dance, on a tiny stage. It is true that typographer’s tools are presently changing with considerable force and speed, but this is not a manual in the use of any particular typesetting system or medium. I suppose that most readers of this book will set most of their type in digital form, using computers, but I have no preconceptions about which brands of computers, or which versions of which proprietary software, they may use. The essential elements of style have more to do with the goals the living, speaking hand - and its roots reach into living soil, though its branches may be hung each year with new machines. So long as the root lives, typography remains a source of true delight, true knowledge, true surprise.

By all means break the rules, and break them beautifully, deliberately, and well. That is one of the ends for which they exist. Letterforms change constantly, yet differ very little, because they are alive. The principles of typographic clarity have also scarcely altered since the second half of the fifteenth century, when the first books were printed in roman type. Indeed, most of the principles of legibility and design explored in this book were known and used by Egyptian scribes writing hieratic script with reed pens on papyrus in 1000 B.C. Samples of their work sit now in museums in Cairo, London and New York, still lively, subtle, and perfectly legible thirty centuries after they were made. Writing systems vary, but a good page is not hard to learn to recognize, whether it comes from Tang Dynasty China, The Egyptian New Kingdom, typographers set for themselves than with the mutable or Renaissance Italy. The principles that unite these distant schools of design are based on the structure and scale of the human body - the eye, the hand, and the forearm in particular and on the invisible but no less real, no less demanding, no less sensuous anatomy of the human mind. I don’t like to call


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Friedrich August Renner was born in Wernigerode, Germany on August 9th, 1878. Growing up into his teenage years he studied Greek and Latin for 9 years, and then moved on to study art at a higher level, finishing his formal education in 1900. Following this Renner became involved with design and became concerned with typeface and book design. During the summer of 1924, Renner started to work on

what would become a typeface called Futura, his most well-known

work. Futura was a very important type of the time, especially in

Germany, as it was a movement towards the modern roman letter

and a departure from the Blackletter. Renner’s Futura has also

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become the inspiration and foundation for many geometric types

to date, and for that alone he deserves mention.

Futura is a geometric, sans-serif typeface designed by Paul Renner. It was designed between 1924 and 1926 and originally commeically was released in 1927 with light, medium, boild, and boild oblique styles. Renner was seen as a bridge between the traditionalist 19th century and the modern 20th century. Futura was derived from simple geometric forms and is based on stroked of near-even weight, which are low in contrast. It has the appearance of eefficiency and forwardness. Renner avoided the decorative and elimated the non-essential in his design. With its geometric shapes, Futura became representative of Bauhaus design style. It was also the font used for the plackard that was left by astronauts during the moon landing. It is still one of the most widely used typfaces of the 21st century.


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a n d r e FASHION INSTITUTE OF DESIGN + MERCHANDISING AN EXPLORATION OF THE HISTORY, USAGE, AND TERMINOLOGY OF TYPE AS USED IN THE GRAPHIC A...

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