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PROJECT THIRD WORLD of the brain have been found related to aggression and are thus in part responsible and predictive of violent behaviour. These abnormalities and imbalances occur mainly at the prefrontal cortex (frontal lobe), the region of the brain which controls personality, decision making and social behaviour, also linked back to evolutionary ideologies of desire for personal advantage, social power and dominance ( Elbert, Weierstall & Schauer, 1997). Psychological studies have shown that damages in the prefrontal cortex can result in violent behaviour, and have more specifically attributed to damages of regions which are responsible for making moral judgements. These areas are situated not only in the pre-frontal cortex but the amygdala too (Society for Neuroscience, 2007). The Amygdala is the part of the brain which is crucial for learning to associate stimuli with punishments and reward , as well as being activated when there is threat (which is why facial signs of fear are impaired when this region of the brain is damaged) (Davidson, et. al 2006). Accidents which involve brain injury or acts of violence themselves can therefore contribute to the prevalence of violence and violent behaviour in individuals. Violence can come about not only from emotion, aggression or environments, but

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through unfortunate circumstances of injury or accidents. This is another problem we face in trying to reduce violence. Furthermore, if moral judgement can be clouded in violent individuals and moral understanding cab be reconstructed, violence can become a rational means of fulfilling a purpose for many people. This is especially dangerous in situations like collective violence, such as terrorism and genocide, those that involve conflicts between nations and groups (World Health Organization, 2015) which receive high levels of political and public attention, but leave a large number of people questioning how such violent acts can be carried out. Because we are social creatures, and our decisions, personality and emotional ranges vary, it should come as no surprise that different levels of activation or impairment in these brain regions could be present in those who conduct or carry out ware fare or global scale violence. More so, emotional dysfunction is linked to violent behaviour which can help explain why it can be hard to supress or control aggression and violent behaviour. Emotion is normally regulated in the human brain by a complex circuit which consists of the orbital frontal cortex, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, and other connected regions.

OCT 2015

Profile for Positively Transforming World

PTW: October 2015  

Terrorism, Extremism and Violence. We end our focus on world issues talking to ex-Jihadist Usama Hassan and 'Escape From ISIS' documentary d...

PTW: October 2015  

Terrorism, Extremism and Violence. We end our focus on world issues talking to ex-Jihadist Usama Hassan and 'Escape From ISIS' documentary d...

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