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Printed on recycled paper Volume 24 | Issue 4

ptpubco.com

PRIME TIME April 2014

FOR NEW MEXICANS 50+ SINCE 1990

MONTHLY

Hikes for Ever y Quadrant of the City pg 16

Santa Fe Spotlight pg 10

Cover Photo By OddAxe Industries

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

“IT’S NOT JUST HOW YOU TREAT THE ILLNESS. IT’S HOW YOU TREAT THE PATIENT.” – MARY MERRELL,R.N.

FOUNDER AND CEO, AMBERCARE

When we created Ambercare our mission was clear. Choosing caregiving over cost-cutting. Compassion over compensation. Providing a level of loving care that would profit our patients first. 19 years later we still serve our patients from our heartstring, not our purse strings. Isn’t that the care you want for those you love? Call 1.877.861.0060 or visit ambercare.com HOME HEALTHCARE | HOSPICE | PERSONAL CARE SERVICES | MEDICAL SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

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Table of Contents FEATURES

4 8 12 13 17

Spring Yard Cleanup Diabetes and Hearing Loss Linked NM Author’s Corner Art Gallery Goes Green 50th Anniversary of Wilderness Act

Albuquerque 5010 Lomas Blvd NE

256.1610

Santa Fe 720 St. Michael’s Dr

469.0510

Rio Rancho 2003 Southern Blvd

917.9344

COLUMNS #5068

CROSSWORD PUZZLE 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

ACROSS 1. Patient’s need, for short 4. Entree choice 7. Offstage signaler 11. Opera solos 13. Oman’s location 15. Mayberry resident 16. Doing as well as one can with 19. Starter 20. Jumbo 21. Word with drum or mark 23. Tres divided by tres 24. Baby’s favorite seat 27. Wicked one 30. Con artist’s plot 34. Sweetheart 36. Oliver, for one 38. Genetic letters 39. Mountain ridge 40. Mich.’s neighbor 41. Travel __; trip planner 43. Sea, in French 44. Split grammatically 46. Ponders 47. Picnic spoilers 49. Looks intently 51. McKinley and Whitney: abbr. 52. H, in Greece 54 Asian nation: abbr. 56. In __; not present 61. Contemptuous writing 66. Outwits 68. “Queen of Jazz” 69. River in Belgium 70. Pub order 71. Pack away 72. Poet’s monogram 73. Suffix for differ or exist

10. 11. 12. 14. 17. 18. 22. 24. 25. 26. 28. 29. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 37. 42. 45. 48. 50.

First son Accessory ’75 Wimbledon champ Manner Universe Dependent upon 4 that sometimes follow A Officials, for short I love: Lat. Dagger Be plentiful Former student, for short Type of eagle Take back as a worker Sophia __ Turn away Hound or hamster Parsonage Dictates Toothpaste Boleyn and Bancroft Front porch items Dalai __ Elected official: abbr. Edible tuber Part of the mouth Opposite of concern Vacillate Digestive or skeletal: abbr. Explosive letters Word of disgust Generations Waist item French commune Suffix for sand or wind Fortas and Vigoda Head of France Numbered club Put to flight Salamander Prior to

5 20 21 25 28

Michael Parks Bugman Herb Doc Dr. Muraida Marc Simmons

EVERY MONTH 53. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 62. 63. 64. 65. 67.

DOWN 1. Catch 2. Be attracted to 1

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21 25

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48 52 57

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Classifieds Crossword Calendar Astrology

~ READER FEEDBACK ~

Climbing Adventure Strikes a Chord

By Prime Time Editor

P

rime Time magazine has traditionally been well received by readers who appreciate news they can use, interesting profiles of our 50-plus population, as well as our calendars and special event stories. We get calls, emails and letters thanking us for the articles and to give us ideas for upcoming stories and interesting people we may profile. That is just the sort of feedback we appreciate. Of particular note last month was our story about Juan Vigil, an Albuquerque man who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro at the age of 70. One reader, Arthur Ahr, let us know that he has

successfully made the climb as well. Ahr was 74 when he trekked Kilimanjaro in 2008, and Prime Time wanted to recognize him for his accomplishment as well. Ahr, a retired Sandia Laboratory employee, said of his adventure, “As I think back, climbing Kilimanjaro was a dream come true… did I really do that?” Congratulations to Ahr and all others out there living their dreams as well as testing their physical condition and mental fortitude. If you have an idea for a story about someone who is over the age of 50 and doing extraordinary things, please email primetime@ swcp.com.

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

Spring Yard Cleanup: Do it Yourself or Not? By Barb Armijo

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pril in New Mexico is notoriously unpredictable - still chilly in the mornings, the wind kicks up in the afternoons, and then cool temperatures set in at dusk. Such abrupt and frequent changes can take their toll on your lawn, outdoor plants and flowers. So now is the best time to begin

looking after them so that they look their best in coming months. Though the do-it-yourself approach is always an option, there are professionals who can help with the heavy lifting, especially if the weather is such that you want to stay inside. Sure, you can take your rose clippers and snip away, but then the branches need to be picked up and hauled off. Yes, you can

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thatch and aerate your lawn, but those clippings and plugs need to be raked and trashed. You can always do a lot of work yourself, but if you find it’s just more than you want to take on, there are professionals who can do it for you. Many companies will even help you mend your sprinklers and drip lines if they were damaged over the winter. Syra Roman and her business partner, James Boswell, of Freelance Laborers LLC, have been in business in Albuquerque for about five years, though they both bring decades’ worth of experience to the landscaping world, especially in New Mexico. “Anyone can do yard work,” Roman said. “But there are some things that probably are best done after getting good advice or having a professional do the work. You have to know what you are doing and know the times of the season that is best to trim trees and roses.” Roman said many of their clients call to have them do work after they have started to undertake it themselves. “I think people just get out there

and hack away at whatever’s out there,” she said. “That might sound funny, but it can be detrimental to a person’s plants. It’s also not a good idea to just throw a load of fertilizer on your lawn just because you are eager to see it get green.” Ernesto Montoya, who has been operating his yard maintenance business for 10 years, said there are some things homeowners can do themselves, but they sometimes become frustrated or tired before they are really finished with the job. “I know people want to clean up their yards this time of year,” Montoya said. “I have a lot of people who do all the cutting and pruning but then realize they have to haul it away. That’s where they run into trouble. Sometimes we can offer those services.” Here are some of the basics Montoya said average homeowners can easily do themselves: • Prune winter-killed branches to make room for new growth. • Cut back spent perennials and pull up old annuals. • Thin out crowded beds, and do some transplanting to fill in bare spots.

When You Need Cancer Care, Trust Albuquerque’s Top Docs

New Mexico Cancer Center's Oncology team was voted best in the city by their peers in the March 2014 Top Docs issue of Albuquerque the Magazine. Dr. Barbara McAneny was voted Top Doc with Dr. Annette Fontaine and Dr. Douglas Clark as runners-up in Oncology, and Dr. Clark Haskins was voted the Top Doc for Hematology.

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If you or someone you love is facing cancer, put your trust in us.


PRIME TIME

April 2014

5

Same-Sex Marriage in New Mexico By Michael C. Parks

S

ame--sex marriage has been controversial for years. Regardless of anyone’s personal views, however, same-sex marriage is lawful in New Mexico, and, as a result, same-sex married couples have the same rights and responsibilities as all other married couples under myriad state and federal laws. The Senior Citizens Law Office has been working to help educate affected couples about these rights and responsibilities, especially in regard to governmental benefits. Two court rulings are responsible for confirming those rights and responsibilities. Last June, the United States Supreme Court ruled that same-sex married couples are entitled to equal treatment under all federal laws and rules in which marriage is a factor, provided the couple married in a state that recognizes same-sex marriages. Last December, our state Supreme Court ruled that

the right of same-sex couples in New Mexico to marry, and to receive equal treatment with all other married couples under all our state laws, is required by the state constitution. Married couples have a broad range of rights and responsibilities under New Mexico laws. Many concern benefit programs, including those for state workers and retirees, and those for the public at large, including Medicaid. However New Mexico laws also govern a larger range of personal and familial matters, such as property ownership, inheritance, consumer protections, parenting and health care decision-making. Our state Supreme Court’s ruling requires equal treatment of same-sex married couples in all these matters. Many rights and responsibilities important to New Mexicans arise under federal laws, including benefit programs like Social Security, Supplemental Security Income and Medicare; benefits for

veterans, active and retired members of the military, and federal workers and retirees; immigration programs; certain student aid programs; and, of course, federal taxation. As a result of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling, most federal agencies promptly and fully implemented equal treatment for same-sex married couples under the programs they administer. The main exceptions involved the Social Security Administration, which processes eligibility for Social Security, SSI and Medicare. Although encouraging samesex married individuals to apply, SSA began to act only on specific types of benefits claims, and only in stages. First, SSA began approving claims for Social Security spousal benefits for senior (age 62 and older) spouses; then, several months later, for surviving spouse benefits. In January, SSA began approving claims for SSI benefits. However it was not until March 11 that SSA began processing such claims - or

Medicare applications based on same-sex marriage - by New Mexicans. Same-sex married couples here may experience glitches in accessing their rights and responsibilities under some laws and benefit programs. For example, although our state Supreme Court ruled that any terms in New Mexico law denoting a marital relationship, such as “family,” “husband,” “widow,” etc., must be construed as applying to same-sex married persons. Administrative staff may not be fully aware of this, and many applicable forms will be out-ofdate for some time. Persistence on the part of those affected may often be necessary. Mr. Parks is with the nonprofit Mandy Pino Center. Further information on this subject is available on Senior Citizens Law Office website, www. sclonm.org.

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ARAGON

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

Community Strengthened by Senior Center Garden By Prime Time Staff

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he Barelas Senior Center is the first among the City of Albuquerque Senior Centers to have a garden and garden club. Both help unite the community, ignite creativity in center members and allow public access to a beautiful space created by volunteers and donations. Patrick Turrieta, who volunteers at the Barelas Senior Center and is a member, came up with the idea and began preparing the land after city approval last year for what is now the El Camino Real Garden. El Camino Real Community senior permaculture gardeners who are members of any of the City of Albuquerque Senior Centers take their gardening as seriously as their sense of community. Gardeners visit

in the morning and late afternoon to garden, talk with friends and simply take in the beauty. In addition to providing the area residents with vegetables and flowers, this garden has netted a bumper crop of goodwill and friendship as the community and center participants meet in the garden to learn about gardening and its benefits. The shared experience allows the gardeners to socialize daily and express their creativity. In the garden, you can find a friendship garden, a veterans memorial, and even a tropical garden that is growing pineapples. More than 60 individuals have supported the garden with donations of garden supplies, equipment, seeds, plants and support. Turrieta calls these individuals the Garden Angels. During growing season,

the garden displays more than 100 varieties of plants, including flowers, herbs, spices and several types of vegetables, said Turrieta, the official garden keeper who conducts informational talks

for center members and the public. The garden even has Wi-Fi access. For more information, contact the Barelas Senior Center at 764-6436.

April 26 & 27, 2014 | Expo New Mexico

New Mexico’s Premiere Home and Garden Show The perfect resource for home improvement enthusiasts and weekend gardeners. 300 booths featuring products and services for your home inside and out! HOURS: Saturday, 10:00 am–6:00 pm Sunday, 10:00 am–5:00 pm ADMISSION: $7 Adults $5 for Seniors Children 12 & under free **$2.00 OFF ADULT ADMISSION** if you bring in a child’s size garden tool, for the APS School Lending Tool Program

Guest Speaker, Steven Katkowsky

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Implant Dentistry Of The Southwest A. Burton Melton, D.D.S., P.A. Prosthodontist

For event info & discount coupon, visit www.abqhomeandgardenshow.com Find us on Facebook


PRIME TIME

Prime Time Publishing, LLC Home of

Prime Time Monthly News Family Caregivers Resource Guide 50+ EXPO

Super Senior Tennis

April 2014

7

Actual Spectrum Residents

Publisher/Editor

David C. Rivord primetime@swcp.com

Sr. Advertising Executive Joe A. Herrera primesales@swcp.com

Art Director

Ashley Conner primeart@swcp.com

Graphic Designer Dana Benjamin

Webmaster

Gary Rivord webmaster@primetimenm.com

Calendar Editor Liz Otero

Contributing Writers Barb Armijo Jim Craig Richard Fagerlund Beth Heavner Nichole Humphrey, RYT Mace Kochenderfer Dr. Gerard Muraida Michael Parks Shellie Rosen Marc Simmons

Get news and see event pictures on our new Facebook page at facebook.com/primetimepublishing!

Visit us at ptpubco.com P.O. Box 67560 Albuquerque, NM 87193

505.880.0470

The Publisher does not take responsibility for the accuracy or legitimacy of the advertiser’s message or that of the guest writer/columnists or any aspect of the business operation or conduct of the advertisers in the paper.

By Prime Time Staff

S

uper Senior Tennis is starting up again. It is aimed at anyone 60 years and older who

wants to take up the sport or return to it after an absence. The SST program consists of six weeks of lessons, April 7-May 16, with a make-up week of May 19, at sites in Albuquerque and Rio Rancho. That is followed by six weeks of round-robin play. The cost is $52 and includes a kick-off party April 5 and a graduation event. All instructors are experienced and certified. The sites, days and times are: Jerry Cline Tennis Center, corner of Louisiana and Constitution NE, Mondays and Wednesdays, 6-7 p.m. Highpoint Sports and Wellness, 4300 Laudau NE, Mondays and Thursdays, 10:4511:45 a.m. Arroyo del Oso, Spain and Wyoming NE, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11 a.m.- noon. Sierra Vista West Tennis Complex, 5001 Montano NW, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:309-30 a.m. Chamisa Hills Country Club, 500 Country Club Drive SE, Rio Rancho, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9-10 a.m. Lobo Tennis Club, 1414 University Blvd. SE, Mondays and Wednesdays, noon to 1 p.m. For more information, contact Don Larrichio at dlarrichio@aol.com or at 2968527.

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

Diabetes and Hearing Loss Linked By Beth Heavner

D

iabetes and hearing loss are two of America's most widespread health concerns. Nearly 26 million people in the United States have diabetes, and an estimated 34.5 million have some type of hearing loss. Is there a link? Yes, according to the National Institute of Health hearing loss is twice as common in people

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with diabetes as it is in those who do not have the disease. Also, of the 79 million adults thought to have prediabetes, the rate of hearing loss is 30 percent higher than in those with normal blood sugar. Hearing loss may be an under-recognized complication of diabetes, and after years of trying and failing to find a distinct relationship between type-2 diabetes and hearing loss, there has now been a confirmed relationship. In type 2 diabetics hearing loss is caused by neuropathy. Hearing depends on small blood vessels and nerves. These tiny blood vessels and nerves are part of the inner ear. If they fail to get enough blood and oxygen due to long-term hyperglycemia (high blood glucose level) they become damaged, thereby diminishing the ability to hear. Over time, that damage leads to noticeable hearing loss. This type of hearing loss is called sensorineural. Hearing loss can be so gradual that you may not notice it. Children and adults can experience hearing loss at any time. Never think you

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are too young to be losing your hearing. Ask yourself the following questions if you are concerned that you may be at risk for hearing loss: • Have your friends or family members complained that you are not listening? • Do you frequently ask people to repeat themselves? • Do you complain that people are always mumbling? • Do you have problems following conversations with more than two people? • Have people complained that you listen to the television or radio too loudly? • Do you have trouble understanding conversations in crowded rooms or loud busy restaurants? If you answered yes to more than one of those questions,

you should have your hearing tested to assess the existing loss and prevent further damage, especially if you are diabetic. All diabetics should have their hearing checked each year. The only way to prevent or reduce the risk of developing a significant hearing loss as a complication of type 2 diabetes is by closely monitoring your blood glucose levels, reducing hypertension, keeping off excess weight and doing daily exercise. Beth Heavner is an audiologist for Sandia Hearing & Audiology.

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PRIME TIME

April 2014

9

Seniors at Risk for Malnutrition WATCH Someone You Know and Help Save a Life By Prime Time Staff

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ndernourishment and malnutrition are serious problems for America’s growing 65 and older population. While estimates vary widely, the American Dietetics Association has reported that up to 85 percent of seniors are at risk for being undernourished or malnourished. It is also estimated that one in nine seniors experience some form of hunger or “food insecurity,” the inability to obtain sufficient food for their household. In response to this growing epidemic, Comfort Keepers across the nation have launched STOP Senior Hunger, a campaign that aims to raise visibility for the tremendous need for senior nutrition programs, education, family detection and support. Comfort Keepers is a franchise provider of quality in-home senior care to seniors and other clients who need help

with the activities of daily living. “As seniors age and change, so do their nutritional needs. By keeping them properly nourished and healthy, we can make a real difference in their quality of life,” said Sheryl Inglat, owner of Comfort Keepers in Albuquerque. “We want caregivers and family members to be aware of ways to monitor the nutrition of seniors in their care.” What is Malnutrition? Malnutrition is caused by a combination of a nutrient-poor diet, too little food and poor absorption. It can be compounded by physical, emotional and social problems. Malnutrition and undernourishment in seniors are not always obvious, so caregivers and loved ones should pay special attention to the signs. WATCH is a mnemonic that makes it easier to remember the five steps families should remember when observing nutrition in their loved ones: Watch for physical problems. Things to look for include bruising, dental difficulties, and sudden or sustained weight gain or weight

loss. Ask seniors about their eating habits. How have their eating habits, tastes, and likes and dislikes changed? Talk to a doctor. Discuss nutritional needs or problems specific to the loved ones’ unique needs or management of diseases. Check with a pharmacist. They can tell you about the potential for drug-food interactions and how medications may affect nutrient absorption. Have your visits during mealtime. This will help you observe eating habits first-hand. Seniors can improve their quality of life and preserve their independence longer by making dietary changes. About 30 million older Americans live with chronic diseases that nutrition therapies can be effective in managing and treating, according to the American Dietetics Association. Seniors should choose foods that are low in fat and sodium, high in fiber and calcium, flavorful, easy

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to chew, swallow and digest, and simple to prepare. Mealtime can become more enjoyable by trying new flavors and spices, making meals a social time, having meals prepared by someone else, or trying enriched foods for substantial snacks in between meals. To learn more about senior nutrition and the Comfort Keepers STOP Senior Hunger campaign, visit www.comfortkeepers.com/ stop-senior-hunger. If your group would like to participate in the Stop Senior Hunger food drive throughout the month of May, contact the Comfort Keepers offices, 232-7070 and 515-0001.


PRIME TIME

10 April 2014

Santa Fe Spotlight Baroque Holy Week Celebrated at Loretto Chapel

By Barb Armijo

S

ince 1980, Santa Fe Pro Musica has brought together outstanding musicians to inspire and educate audiences of all ages through the performance of great music. This month, the Santa Fe Pro Musica Baroque ensemble will feature soloist Kathryn Mueller, an acclaimed soprano. The concert, April 17-19, is scheduled to be held at the Loretto

Chapel and is billed as a Baroque Holy Week celebration through music. The works of Purcell, Pergolesi, Corelli, Bach and Handel will be performed. Santa Fe Pro Musica is a nationally recognized musical organization that has added to Santa Fe’s robust community of classical music concert goers. The group was founded by Thomas O’Connor, its music director and conductor, and Carol Redman, education and associate artistic director. Santa Fe Pro Musica has consistently expanded its repertoire, its audience and its reputation by offering a variety of programs and ensembles in several historic Santa Fe venues.

Santa Fe Pro Musica presents a selection of music from the last four centuries, including works for chamber orchestra, chamber ensemble and large-scale oratorios. The annual Baroque Christmas concerts, always a sell-out, are so popular that visitors from all over the world include them in their Santa Fe holiday plans. The Baroque Holy Week concert also is widely attended, so getting advance tickets is advised. Ticket prices range from $20 to $65. The organization’s educational outreach programs introduce classical music to New Mexico residents, including thousands of local students. For music

lovers of all ages, Santa Fe Pro Musica offers “Meet the Music,” a series of pre-concert talks one hour before every orchestra performance. For more information on Santa Fe Pro Musica and for tickets, visit its website, www. santafepromusica.com.


PRIME TIME

April 2014

Haverland Carter Lifestyle Group welcomes you to the best senior living in New Mexico

A l b u q u e r q u e’s O n l y L i f e C a r e Retirement C ommunity

G

orgeous premises and a variety of lifestyle options make La Vida Llena the one choice for LifeCare living in Albuquerque. Located in an upscale, walk-able neighborhood near stores, restaurants and outdoor recreation, our beautiful premises and variety of services make each day extraordinary.

Live here and start enjoying the best time of your life. Schedule your personal tour today. (505) 293-4001

Haverland Carter LifeStyle Group opens new Information Center

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new senior lifestyle is coming to Rio Rancho. Offering the apartment styles and amenities you would want with the lifetime financial protection and peace of mind of a true LifeCare community. The Neighborhood brings to Rio Rancho the same quality retirement that has been enjoyed for over 30 years in our flagship community, La Vida Llena in the Northeast Heights.

Make an appointment today. Tomorrow never looked so good. (505) 994-2296

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PRIME TIME

NM Author's Corner

12 April 2014

Growing Up Bernalillo Style By Barb Armijo

G

enerations of New Mexicans grew up the way Madeline Tapia did. They knew where they came from, loved their tierra, their land, the way Mother Nature made it – rugged and yet so beautiful. “Growing Up In Bernalillo” is Tapia’s memoir. She tells the story of her upbringing in great detail, writing about her grandma Antonia from El Cañon, her relatives throughout the Rio Grande river valley, the traditions of family and the tough life of her father, a coal miner. While not everyone will recognize the places she describes, most will appreciate the story’s focus on love of family. Best of all, her memories are also told through the historical pictures of people and places in her life. While the book is in English, many of the phrases are retold in Spanish just the way her family spoke during her childhood.

Tapia’s story concentrates on her life from 1934 to 1954, the year she married Bill Tapia, her late husband. She tells of her wedding day when “La Marca de los Novios” was played by strolling guitar players from the church to the house where the reception was held – an event that has special significance even today when the song is played at most traditional receptions, and guests follow the bride and groom around a dance floor at the reception hall. Tapia lives in Rio Rancho with her second husband, Ricardo Gonzales, whom she said offered his “love and patience in listening” to all her stories as they unfolded in the chapters of her book. She is a member of the Meadowlark Writers Group and says she is planning to write the rest of her story in the near future. Retiring from the New Mexico Health and Environment Department has allowed her time to do what she loves, and that includes writing.

The book is dedicated to her five children, their spouses, her grandchildren and greatgrandchildren. Her story is a lasting legacy to them that she hopes inspires them to always remember from where they came before they get to where they are going.


PRIME TIME

April 2014

13

NM Artist Corner: Leis’ Going Green Exhibit Through May By Prime Time Staff

19th Annual

Snapp Price Projects Gallery@ Design Studio recently kicked off “Going Green,” a new exhibition featuring work by Albuquerque mixed media artist Marietta Patricia Leis. Leis celebrates color in her art, whether it is through lush reductive oil paintings or other media. “Going Green” is an exhibit that invites viewers to become entrenched in vibrancy and to contemplate and treasure our abundant natural world. In this body of work, she explores the stimulating nature of green - as well as its associations to place, spirit and the planet. As she draws on her extensive travel experience and her encounters with nature, Leis' oil paintings are rendered with a minimalist's palette through nuanced layers of textures, subtle gradations of color and luminous glazes. "My work encompasses multiple media, including paintings, drawings, sculpture, and installation. There is always an element of the sensory in my art — a texture, a color, a deep space — something to engage the senses of the viewer," Leis writes by way of introduction.

"The intention of the work is to contemplate boundaries, edges and limits. My abstract color fields run the risk of invisibility, but silence, patience, and deep listening is fundamental to the satisfaction of the viewer.” The late New York Times critic William Zimmer noted that Leis' paintings follow in the abstract sublime tradition of abstract expressionist painters Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman. Leis' 10-year survey in 2013 prompted Huffington Post critic Peter Frank to write: "Leis has translated the essences of places into non-objective icons that extol and focus the divine magic of such places. These are more than mere delights; they are quietly ecstatic revelations." “Going Green” will remain on exhibit until May 15. Snapp Price Projects Gallery@ Design Studio LLC is located at 201 Third St. NW, Suite G in Albuquerque. ABOUT THE ARTIST: Marietta Patricia Leis has been awarded numerous artist residencies throughout the world, which have facilitated her deep immersion into diverse cultures and environments. Her work is shown internationally

Brought to you by:

Wednesday, October 8th from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Embassy Suites (located at Lomas & I-25) Food, Fun, Health Screenings & Entertainment! Also sponsored by:

SANDIA HEARING Free transportation to & from the event from the senior centers in Albuquerque sponsored by the City of Albuquerque Department of Senior Affairs. For More Information Call Prime Time 505-880-0470

and is in many public collections. Leis, who has a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of

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14 April 2014

PRIME TIME


PRIME TIME

April 2014

Parkinson’s Cases Expected to Increase

April designated as month to help fight the disease.

pril is Parkinson’s Awareness Month, with April 11 designated as World’s Parkinson’s Day, when people worldwide are encouraged to gain a better understanding of the disease and serve as advocates for Parkinson’s patients and their families. About 1 million Americans have Parkinson’s, often

neurodegenerative brain disease, and cases are expected to increase significantly worldwide in the next 20 years as the aging population expands. Research shows that in addition to advanced medications, movement and exercise help slow the disease’s progression, help manage symptoms and are central to maintaining balance and mobility in people with Parkinson’s, the foundation says. To help raise awareness about the disease and to help find a cure, the National Parkinson

associated with tremors, slow or uncontrolled movement, and impaired balance. Between 50,000 and 60,000 new Parkinson’s cases are diagnosed annually in the United States, according to the National Parkinson Foundation. There is no cure for this

Foundation asks people to join the cause in a variety of ways. These include spending time with someone who has Parkinson’s; volunteering for a local chapter event; participating in a local fundraiser; joining a local support group, or creating your own; and starting a daily exercise

By Prime Time Staff

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routine. Early diagnosis of Parkinson’s gives individuals the best possibility for healthier living. Initial warning signs of Parkinson’s disease include: tremor or shaking; small handwriting; trouble sleeping; trouble moving or walking; constipation; a soft or low voice; masked or serious-look face; dizziness or fainting; and stooping or hunching over. Anyone experiencing any of these symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease is encouraged to see a doctor to help diagnose the illness and rule out other possible symptom causes. The muscle-movement disease is not fatal in and of itself, but the Centers for Disease Control lists Parkinson’s complications as the 14th leading cause of death in America. Research specialists worldwide continue to study and improve diagnosis and treatment options with the aim to find a cure. For more information about Parkinson’s disease and Parkinson’s Awareness Month, visit www.parkinson.org, or call 1-800-4PD-INFO (473-4636).

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Local support groups include: • The Albuquerque Parkinson’s Disease support group: Meets the third Saturday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Presbyterian HealthPlex, 6301 Forest Hills NE.  The HealthPlex also offers a Parkinson’s Exercise Program. For more information, contact Mari Lyford at 823-8399. • The Rio Rancho support group: Meets the second Monday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Rio Rancho Senior Center, 4330 Meadow Lark Lane SE. More groups and classes can be found on the website of the New Mexico Chapter of the American Parkinson’s Disease Association at www.nmapda.org. Source: Right at Home, Inc. The international franchise organization has an Albuquerque location that works to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s and helps loved ones caring for anyone dealing with limitations of the disease.


PRIME TIME

16 April 2014

Hiking Not Just Available in Mountains Albuquerque Offers Trails in All Quadrants of the City By Barb Armijo

S

hedding the winter doldrums is easy in New Mexico where hiking is one of the best ways

to see spring come alive. Even if you are in the city of Albuquerque, there are plenty of opportunities to get outdoors.

Prime Time has found hikes/ walks in each of the four quadrants of the city. They are easy to moderate for most people, and each offers different scenery. Take in one or take in all, here they are: Northwest Albuquerque Petroglyph National Monument How to get there: The monument's visitor center is located on the West Side of Albuquerque. From Interstate 40, take the Unser, exit (#154), and proceed north 3 miles to Western Trail. Turn left, or west, onto Western Trail and follow the road to the visitor center. From Interstate 25, take the Paseo del Norte exit (#232) and

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proceed west to Coors Road exit south. Head south on Coors Road to Western Trail. Turn right, or west, onto Western Trail and follow the road to the visitor center. For access to view the dormant volcanoes access, note that the City of Albuquerque renamed Paseo del Volcan to Atrisco Vista Boulevard. What you might see: Petroglyph National Monument is a day-use park, which means the visitor center and each of the trailhead parking lots close at 5 p.m. Visitors are allowed to hike among the volcanoes and Rinconada or Piedras Marcadas canyons from sunrise to sunset by simply parking outside of the gated parking lots. Park staff will inform you of your trail options based on your time availability and the degree of difficulty of the trails, then provide you with driving directions to the trail of your choice. Be sure to get your official park brochure and trail maps while there. Travel time through the park can be 30 minutes or four to five hours, though the average visit is between one and two hours. For more information on the park, visit www. cabq.gov, then click on Things to Do, then on Open Spaces, and scroll down to Petroglyph National Monument. Northeast Quadrant Armijo Trail, Sandia Mountains How to get there: Take I-40 east from Albuquerque, then drive north on NM 14 for 6 miles. Take the turn-off to the Crest Highway (NM 536). Drive 1.7 miles to the Sulphur Canyon Picnic Ground entrance. Make an immediate left turn on the asphalt road going uphill; after one-half mile, the road comes to a T at a parking area, where you may leave your car. What you might see: Armijo Trail is easy to follow, with only a very slight uphill grade on a 4-mile loop. The trail meanders uphill, in many places running parallel to a small stream. Follow Armijo Trail to its intersection with Faulty Trail, which is marked by a sign. Continue your hike by heading north on Faulty Trail. After a

mile or so, you will reach a high overlook above Cienega Canyon. Faulty Trail then heads down into the canyon below to the intersection with Cienega Trail, marked by a sign. To complete this loop hike, turn right (east) on Cienega Trail down to the trailhead, then continue along the asphalt pavement for a half mile or so to your car. Southwest Quadrant Rio Bravo Open Space and Paseo del Bosque Trail How to get there: Take the I-25 Rio Bravo exist, driving west past Second Street to a turnoff on the right before crossing the Rio Grande. The trails are along the Bosque. This is a very nice, easy hike. What you might see: This southern access point to the Rio Grande Valley State Park offers great views, shade, access to other

paths along the Paseo del Bosque trail, fishing, and plenty of peace and quiet. It is fully accessible, so wheelchair users can utilize the loop trail as well. During the easy, flat paths, hikers will see cottonwoods – lots of them. Winding along the banks of the Rio Grande, this is part of the the largest continuous cottonwood forest in the Southwest. The trail, and others along the Paseo del Bosque, is a unique and inviting outdoor destination that has tremendous views of the river. One of the best features about this trail is its versatility. Horses and hikers can use the naturally surfaced paths adjacent to the paved trail. Southeast Quadrant


PRIME TIME

Historic Nob Hill, Walking tour How to get there: From I-40, take the Carlisle exit south to Central Avenue, and park between Washington and Carlisle along Central to be in the heart of Nob Hill. Walkers can go to www. visitalbuquerque.org for a walking map and information on this 1.3mile tour. What you might see: While it was more difficult to come up with a hike in Southeast Albuquerque, there actually is an urban hike that also is a historic stroll through some of the city’s oldest

April 2014

17

neighborhoods. This is a 1.3mile trek that can be challenging because you have automobile traffic to contend with. On the plus side, there are places to eat, drink and shop along the way. But stay outdoors and you will see one of Albuquerque’s most interesting neighborhoods. You will walk through the vibrant, ever-changing commercial corridor of small local businesses along Central Avenue and see parks and historic homes in surrounding residential neighborhoods.

Local Events Celebrate 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act

By Prime Time Staff

I

n 1964, then-President Lyndon Johnson signed the Wilderness Act, which created America's national wilderness preservation system of federal lands. This law designated certain lands to be "administered for the use and enjoyment of the American people in such manner as will leave them unimpaired for future use and enjoyment as wilderness, and will provide for the protection of these areas and the preservation of their wilderness character." New Mexico was the first state to establish a wilderness area - the Gila Wilderness in southwest New Mexico. Today, 50 years later, the state has 25 congressionallydesignated wilderness areas allowing past, present and future New Mexicans to take special pride and additional pleasure in enjoying the benefits of the wilderness. To celebrate the golden anniversary of the act, Bernalillo County Open Space is partnering with the U.S. Forest Service,

the National Park Service, and the Fish and Wildlife Service to present a free educational series. The family-friendly events will provide an in-depth look at the establishment of the Wilderness Act, examine the wilderness areas of New Mexico, explore challenges of managing wilderness areas in today’s urban society and even examine the future of our wilderness areas. April 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m.: “Wilderness 101” at Bachechi Open Space, 6029 Isleta SE. Karl Malcolm from the Forest Service will present an overview of the Wilderness Act. Following that, the documentary “Wild by Law” will be screened outdoors at the adjacent Bachechi Environmental Education Building.  May 17, 7-8 p.m.: “Wilderness in New Mexico: A Virtual Tour” at the Petroglyph National Monument Visitor Center, Unser Blvd., at the Western Trail NW. Enjoy an evening under the stars at the Petroglyph National Monument with Diane Souder, who will present a slideshow of

wilderness areas throughout New Mexico. July 19: “Management, Challenges and Opportunities of Wilderness Areas” at the Sandia Ranger Station in Tijeras (time TBA). A panel of experts will talk about some of the challenges and opportunities of managing wilderness area in New Mexico. The focus will be on fire, wildlife, trails and public use issues. August 23, 7-10 p.m.: “Looking to the Future of Wilderness” at Valle del Oro National Wildlife Refuge and the Gutierrez-Hubbell House, 6029 Isleta Blvd SW, in the South Valley. This event will start with a sunset hike at the new urban wildlife refuge, Valle del Oro, at the site of the former Price’s Dairy. After that, there will be a short youth presentation and an outdoor screening of short films made by children, plus a featured film, at the Gutierrez-Hubbell House. Don’t forget to take a picnic blanket and dinner for this outdoor event.

To register for these events, visit www.bernco.gov/openspace or call 314-0398. For more information about the Wilderness Act, including a complete list of events for the anniversary and details on a national conference in Albuquerque on October 15-19, visit www.wilderness50th.org.


PRIME TIME

18 April 2014

Senior Olympics Receives Lodgers Tax Funding

N

ew Mexico Senior Olympics, Inc. is conducting the 36nd Annual Senior Olympics State Summer Games on July 16-19th at New Mexico Military Institute and other sports venues in Roswell NM. Senior Olympics goals are to improve and maintain

g ! n i fy sier i l a ea u Q ow n

the health and wellness of senior adults 50+ by focusing attention on the importance of regular and constructive activity and senior sports competition. We anticipate 1200+ athletes to attend. Winners of the State Summer Games are qualified to compete at the upcoming National Senior Games scheduled for Minneapolis MN in 2015. NMSO received City of Roswell Lodgers Tax funding in the amount of $57,000.00 to promote and advertise the Senior Olympics State Summer Games which are OPEN TO ALL New Mexico residents 50+ who have qualified at a Local Sanctioned Game Site. Eligible athletes may register starting April 1st thru June 16th. Early bird registration is only $45.00 thru May 16th, $60.00 by May 30th or $70.00 as a late registration by June

36th Annual

16th. Athletes are required to qualify in the sport/event at local games in order to compete in Summer Games. Athletes may now qualify at any of the 29 sanctioned local games sites located throughout the state with the stipulation that an athlete must also qualify in a minimum of one event at the game site in the county in which he/she resides in regardless of placement. Visit the NMSO website for a complete list of local game sites. Senior Olympics State Summer Games offers 30 individual sports to choose from, so you are sure to find something to fit your training style. Competitions include Air Gun, Archery, Badminton, Basketball Free-Throw, Basketball 3 Point Shot, Bowling, Cycling, Disc Golf, Dance, 8 Ball Pool, Field, Fun Events, Golf, Horseshoes, Pickleball, Race-Walk, Racquetball, Frisbee Accuracy, Frisbee Distance,

New Mexico

Huachas (Washers), Soccer Accuracy, Softball Distance, Road Race Run, Shuffleboard, Swimming, Table Tennis, Talent Show, Tennis, and Track. For most competitions athletes are divided into five year age categories -50-54, 55-59, 60-64 , 65-69, 70-74, etc. For more information on qualifying for Senior Olympics State Summer Games call NMSO in Roswell, NM at 1-888623-6676 or email nmso@ nmseniorolympics.org. NMSO is funded in part by the N M Aging and Long -Term Services Dept. for health promotion activities and is a non profit 501(c)3 organization.

Q Lo ual ca ify lly

Senior Olympics

SUMMER GAMES 30+ Sports • 1,200 Athletes

July 16-19 Roswell, NM nmseniorolympics.org • 1-888-623-6676 Sponsored in part by the City of Roswell Lodger’s Tax Fund

“You don’t stop playing because you grow old,

you grow old because you stop playing.”


PRIME TIME

April 2014

NM Senior Olympics Local Contacts Location:

Local Coordinator:

Phone Number:

Email:

Albuquerque

Bret Steinmetz

505-880-2800

bsteinmetz@cabq.com

Isleta

Renee Chavez

505-869-9770

POI23002@isletapueblo.com

Laguna

Darlene Correa

505-552-6034

dcorrea@lagunarainbow.org

Sandoval County Romero Sanchez

505-231-2334

Margaretsanchez212@q.com

Santa Fe

Christina Villa

505-955-4725

cvilla@santafenm.gov

Valencia

Marcos Castillo

505-352-7663

castillom@loslunasnm.gov

Get Moving! By Nichole Humphrey, RYT

E

xperts have recently learned that even moderate daily exercise is not enough to counteract the sedentary lifestyles that most Americans lead. Inserting short breaks of movement every hour can lower blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol and waist size. The fountain of youth might just be movement; below are few options to try during long periods of sitting: 1. Find an excuse to move every 30 minutes to an hour; walk to freshen your coffee or tea, take the stairs, walk to get your mail, walk to see a coworker or friend nearby rather than email or phone. 2. Look for opportunities to stand while you work; stand up to read an article or a long email. If it makes sense for your environment and state of physicality, try sitting on a fitness ball rather than a desk chair. Sitting on a ball requires core engagement and encourages good posture. 3. Stretch! Keep hips and

legs awake open while stuck in a desk chair, incidentally this is a nice hip opener even if you aren’t stuck in your chair Seated hip opener: 1. Begin seated upright at the front edge of a chair 2. Take the right ankle on top of left knee flex the foot 3. Place the left hand to the right heel, gently press those two surfaces together 4. Take right hand to right thigh and rotate the right thigh bone out slightly 5. Inhale and lengthen from the tailbone to the crown. Then exhale and bring your chest forward any amount, as much as you can without strain. Create action like you would bring breast bone over the front of the shin. There will be a small natural rounding in the back but keep the spine nice and long. 6. Take a deep in breath into the right hip. On your next inhalation, keep the spine long and come all the way back up 7. Repeat on the opposite side.

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19


PRIME TIME

20 April 2014

ask the Pest-Proof Your Home bugman or pets. A better option is to go around your house and pestproof it so pests can't enter. The purpose of pest-proofing your home is to help keep cockroaches, ants, scorpions, centipedes, spiders, rodents and other pests out. It will also prevent you from needing to hire a pest control company to spray pesticides in or around your home. Along with pest proofing your house, remember to keep all of your sink, tub and floor drains closed at night. This will prevent cockroaches from coming up the drains from the sewer system or septic tank. If you don't have a drain cover, you can fill a Ziploc bag with water and place it over the drain. That will keep the roaches out. Food-grade Diatomaceous Earth (DE) and Niban Bait help a great deal with pest proofing. You can get DE from a feed store and Niban online from www. pestcontrolsupplies.com. I will explain below where to put these products. The first step is to install door

Email questions to www.askthebugman.com or call 505-385-2820.

W

e are going to have a very dry year, which means there will be a large number of insects and other arthropods coming out of the desert looking for water, often inside homes. The mountain bugs will be a nuisance in the east side of Albuquerque, Placitas and parts of Valencia County. The desert visitors will be common in Rio Rancho, Corrales, Bernalillo, most of the West Side of Albuquerque, Belen, Los Lunas and Socorro. What should you do? One option is to spray pesticides around the perimeter of your home. This isn't something I generally recommend, particularly if you have children

Do You Get It? PRIME TIME MONTHLY

Delivered!

sweeps on all outside doors that need them. If you can slide a piece of paper under a door, it needs a door sweep. Also add a door sweep to a door going into the garage. Don't leave any debris lying around the house. Debris provides a good hiding place for cockroaches, scorpions and centipedes. If you have firewood, stack it away from the house as it will attract black widows. When you have branches touching the house or roof, it will allow access for acrobat ants and carpenter ants. You should trim back the branches and keep them from touching the roof during the warm months. Also, sweep down any spider webs around the outside of the house and seal edges of vents so ants can't enter.   It is important, too, to seal openings around pipes, as this is another way to keep roaches out. Even mice will come in through a pipe opening. However, before sealing the hole, inject some DE into the void. This will kill any insects or spiders hiding there and prevent anything from getting around the seal and entering your home. When you have pipes entering a crawl space, it would be best to seal them from under the house if possible. There is usually a space between the floor and the bottom of the cabinet, and if you seal it from the top, cockroaches may

get in under the bottom of the cabinet. It would be a good idea to blow some DE into the void to kill anything in there. Attic vents should be completely screened. If there are any openings, rodents, bats, wasps and other unwelcome pests could come in and infest the attic. A crawl space door should be opened and all spider webs swept away. Then the wood should be sprayed with water and dusted with DE to prevent future spider webs. When you get to the garage, you will probably find that the door doesn't close tightly and never will. There are almost always small areas at either side of the door to allow entry for insects or rodents. As mentioned previously, make sure there are door sweeps on the door entering the house. Put Niban Bait in any areas behind storage or shelves where roaches can hide. Niban will last three or four months, so you only need to apply it a couple of times a year. Niban is made from boric acid and is perfectly safe. This procedure will keep most crawling insects and other arthropods out of your house. Check your home every few months to make sure all of the work you did is still in place and effective. You can contact me at askthebugman2013@gmail.com if you have any questions.

...only $12.95 per year! Mail a check for $12.95 & this form to: PRIME TIME MONTHLY NEWS P.O. BOX 67560 ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87193

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LIFETIME MEMBERSHIP IN THE BUGMAN’S BUG CLUB

I

f you want to join and you live in the Albuquerque, I will come out to your home and do a termite inspection. I will also show you how to pest-proof your home so pests can’t get in. I will answer any pest questions you may have and you will get a copy of my book, Safe & Effective Pest Management. I will also put you in the database and if you have any pest problems in the future, I will help you solve the problems. All of this for just $50! And it is a lifetime membership. You will never have to expose your family and pets in your home to toxic pesticides again. Contact me via email at AskTheBugman2013@gmail.com or by phone at 505-385-2820 to schedule an appointment and join the Bug Club.


PRIME TIME

Recipe For Eggcellent herb doc Health

April 2014

21

Shellie Rosen, DOM

Shellie Rosen is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine. She can be reached at 505.999.9468 or via her website at Bodyvolve.com

W

hen patients tell me they wish they could eat eggs, my first response is, “Then why don’t you?” Eggs are easy to prepare, packed with protein, full of B vitamins and can be purchased

in any quantity. When grown and harvested responsibly, eggs have a low environmental impact given their nutritional offering. And there is no better way to eat an egg than with a dash of hot sauce, or a sprinkle of cayenne. This hot couple is more than just comfort food. Though cholesterol in eggs was once considered an antagonist, several epidemiological studies (large groups throughout individuals’ lives), have been conducted to determine if

moderate consumption of eggs was a significant factor in heart disease. These studies did not show a clear risk. In fact, they revealed that eggs might increase HDL (the good cholesterol). On the flip side, they also showed potentially negative links between egg consumption, Type 2 diabetes and heart disease.  While it is wise to consider the amount of cholesterol consumed from eggs, research has shown it may be other foods, such as bacon, butter and cheese (products high in saturated fats), that could play a larger role in heart disease. So it is possible that eggs have received unfair negative attention. Perhaps how we eat eggs is the solution to eating them for health. A common pairing with eggs is hot sauce. Studies have shown that capsaicin and capsinoids from cayenne (in hot sauce), work to break down egg proteins on your plate and in your intestines, and also enter deeply within the body to heat and stimulate the metabolism, breaking down fat. This is a traditional pairing that creates a delicious and healthy alchemy.  Additionally, do not separate the egg yolk from the whites; the combination of the two help

get your Prime Time online

@

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to modulate and harmonize each other. Plus, the yoke contains all the protein. If whites are used alone, follow up with a refreshing glass of warm water, a squeeze of lemon, a dash of cayenne, then add maple syrup to taste. This will help to break down the overly cloying effect of the egg white.  For optimal nutrition, purchase locally grown, pasture-fed, roaming hens organic eggs. There is much controversy over the treatment of hens in our nation’s mass-produced egg factories. The treatment of the hens reduces

their quality of life, which does not produce healthy eggs, and they are often fed unnatural diets that reduce nutritional benefits. Studies have revealed that omega-3 fats and vitamin E are significantly higher in pasture-fed hens.  Abundant Blessings, Dr. Shellie L. Rosen, DOM

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Schedule your personal tour.

505.797.8600

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A Senior Living Community | elmcroft.com 7101 Eubank Boulevard, NE | Albuquerque, NM 87122


22 April 2014

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House Cleaning Services Reasonable and dependable 19 years experience Call Debbie at 505-821-6427

CAREGIVERS Only the best caregivers become Visiting Angels! We are seeking Experienced Caregivers to work Part Time with seniors in Albq. or Rio Rancho. Must pass background check, be 21+ and have a reliable vehicle with Ins. Call 821-7500 Mon thru Thu 9am to 3pm HOME FOR SALE Well-maintained 2 BR/2 Bath, 14x72, mobile home located in The Albuquerque Meadows adult community. Two master bedrooms with walk-in closets, large living room, built-in buffet in dining room, kitchen with big pantry, and an outside storage unit.  All appliances stay. $17,500.  Contact Pat or Craig at (505) 821-1991.

THE ALBUQUERQUE MEADOWS 55+ MOBILE HOME PARK Beautiful, well-maintained, 2BR/2BTH doublewide in the Albuquerque Meadows Senior Mobile Home Community. Rare find with tape & texture walls, 2 living areas and a gourmet kitchen. Home has a huge car port, a storage shed, and refrigerated air. Only $45,000! Ask for Pat or Craig @ (505) 821-1991. D#00540

MANICURE/PEDICURE Senior Special Manicure and Pedicure $30 2 blocks North of I-40 on Rio Grande Blvd NW Call Pat 505-259-4503 MISCELLANEOUS ERRANDS & SERVICES ErrAnns Are Us Need help with errands? Grocery Shopping, Light Housekeeping,Pet Sitting, House Sitting, Ride to Dr’s office, Church, the store and more. ErrAnns Are Us would love to help you. Call 505 839-4517 or 505 235-2087 Licensed & Bonded Time Countess Concierge Service Personal assistance for seniors. Shopping, laundry and home services. Non-medical senior care check-in’s. Let Linda assist you. 505-362-5152 Bonded REVERSE MORTGAGE Call for a free reverse mortgage brochure from Northern New Mexico's premier reverse mortgage specialist, John Ruybalid, NMLS#201470, Mortgage Partners - Santa Fe, 320 Paseo De Peralta, Ste. E, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (505) 690-1029, www.nmreversemortgage.com WANTED Industial, scientific, and medical antiques,1950s or older. Give us a call! 505-252-0376. VOLUNTEERS

Richard J. Berry, Mayor

Jorja Armijo-Brasher, Director

The City of Albuquerque Department of Senior Affairs RSVP (Retired Senior Volunteer Program) is recruiting volunteers 55 years of age and older for the following opportunities. For information call 764-1616.

PRIME TIME

Animal Humane New Mexico is in need of donations of dry cat and dog food To make a donation, please call Ellen Schmidt at 938-7863. Grain-free food is especially needed. The Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) Advisory Council needs members to join its efforts in promoting awareness and educating the community about FGP and senior issues. Council members advocate on behalf of FGP volunteers, evaluate the Program’s effectiveness, and assist in the recognition of Foster Grandparents by raising funds and in-kind resources. The Council currently meets once a month at the Barelas Senior Center. For more information call 764-6412. Senior Affairs Transportation Drivers: The City of Albuquerque Department of Senior Affairs Nutrition and Transportation Division provides transportation for seniors to or from various meal sites throughout Albuquerque and Bernalillo County. We also provide transportation to medical appointments, grocery shopping etc., for our curb to curb service. Volunteers are needed to help with the increasing demand for transportation services. Help is needed for daily four- hour shifts Monday – Friday. If you have, or are able to obtain, a City of Albuquerque City Operators Permit and can work from either 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon or 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Please call 764-1616. Senior Center Volunteer Driver: Bear Canyon Senior Center provides transportation to & from in-town and out-of-town trips on a regular basis. When applicable, drivers may also receive free admission and lunch when providing transportation to trip destinations. A driver is needed Monday, Wednesday and Friday mornings, 8:00-10:30 to transport members to the UNM pool for adapted aquatics (Drivers may also participate). Volunteers will be required to obtain a City of Albuquerque City Operators Permit. Volunteer driver opportunities are also available at other senior centers. Please call 764-1616


PRIME TIME

April 2014

Classifieds

Albuquerque Public Schools Truancy Intervention Initiative: Volunteers are needed to perform a variety of clerical support and outreach activities to assist schools and the district in addressing the issue of truancy. Volunteer are asked to commit to a minimum of one hour a week. Please call 764-1616. Family Promise of Albuquerque Math Specialist: Will assist parents who need help passing the GED or the accuplacer for CNM in the area of math. Volunteers are needed Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 12:30. (Partial shifts available during those times as well). Career Counselor: Will assist parents in our shelter program to job searches. Volunteers may be helping to write resumes or submit online applications. Volunteers should have strong writing skills. You may also choose to drive parents to job fairs and to submit paper applications. Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to12:30 (Partial shifts available during those times as well.) Reading Specialist: The reading specialist will assist parents who need help passing the GED or the accuplacer for CNM in the area of reading, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8:30 to 12:30 (Partial shifts are also available). Peanut Butter & Jelly Family Services Work with parents and children birth through age 5 in a Therapeutic Preschool classroom under direct supervision of the teacher. Serve as a passenger on the school bus to accompany children and parents while en route to school or home. Please call 764-1616. Skills: Cultural competence, Strong organizational skills, Constructive interpersonal communication skills, Dependability, Understand, and demonstrate agency confidentiality and HIPAA privacy practices, Must be able to lift and /or move 10 pounds and occasionally up to 25 pounds. Full description of volunteer duties available on request. Peanut Butter & Jelly Family Services: Fathers Building Futures Volunteers needed for Fathers Building Futures, a workforce development center at 4301 Fourth Street NW, designed to give men (fathers) a second

chance after returning home from prison and jail and now seeking training and employment in order to support them and their families. Experience with the following would be helpful: business administration, accounting, sales or specific microbusiness: auto detailing, mobile power wash, woodworking, construction or handy man service. Hours can vary based on availability. Please call 764-1616. Animal Humane, Clinic Receptionist Two-Hour Shifts Available Four Days per Week. Volunteers needed to answer incoming phone calls, give information on spay/neuter and shot services and schedule appointments. Training provided. Qualifications: good phone skills and computer proficiency. Volunteers are needed for two hour shifts. Shifts are 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Meals on Wheels of Albuquerque is in need of volunteers in the kitchen any day Monday through Friday from 9 am-11am. Drivers are needed to deliver meals to the homebound any day Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 a.m.. (Use of personal vehicle is required). Please call 764-1616. Catholic Charities needs volunteers for the following position. Senior Transportation Services Driver (Use of personal vehicle is required); agency gives mileage reimbursement. Volunteers will provide transportation to medical appointments, grocery shopping etc. door to door service. Please call 764-1616. For at least three hours a week, Any day Monday – Friday Adelante Development Center Inc. Benefits Counseling Center! Volunteers are needed to assist seniors and persons with disabilities in determining eligibility and enrollment for subsidized benefit programs. Volunteers will perform administrative tasks, such as copying, filing, data entry, phone calls, and interviewing to screen individuals. Training will be provided. Various two and four hour shifts are available between 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. Skills: Bilingual English/ Spanish preferred, customer service skills, proficiency with

Crossword CROSSWORD PUZZLE 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

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Solutions on page 30


PRIME TIME

24 April 2014

Classifieds computer software; MS Word, Excel, and Outlook, ability to maintain confidentiality, positive and energetic team member. Please call 764-1616 Albuquerque Reads Program: Volunteer tutors are needed for the Albuquerque Public Schools (APS). The Albuquerque Reads Program is located at four elementary schools. Tutors will play an important role to help kindergarten students get on the early track to success through reading. Please call 764-1616. Volunteer tutors are needed for: One hour a morning, Once a week, Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays Alzheimer’s Association Volunteers needed for various duties: Volunteers must have the ability to perform various clerical duties and other assignments as directed, one to Three days per week. Help advance research and mobilize public support. Flexible work days are available. Hours: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Please call 764-1616.

New Mexico PBS Member Services Needs volunteers to fold and stuff monthly renewals to send to members. Volunteers are needed on the 3rd Thursday of each month for at least 4 hours. Training will be provided. Please call 764-1616. Ronald McDonald House Family Room Volunteers to greet families and sign them in, maintain laundry room, stock food and drinks and help families with their needs. Volunteers are asked to work one three hour shift per week. Please call 764-1616. 9:00a.m. – 12:p.m., 12:00p.m. – 3:00p.m., 3:00p.m. – 6:00p.m., 6:00p.m. – 9:00p.m. Albuquerque International Sunport Ambassador Volunteer: The volunteer will assist directing airport travelers and visitors in navigating the Albuquerque International Sunport and provide answers to questions regarding a variety of information. Parking will be provided for the volunteers. This program operates 7 days a week. Please commit to at least one 4-hour shift per week.

Please indicate below which shift you would most likely be interested in. There are three different shifts available. You can decide which day/days you would like to volunteer. Please call 764-1616. 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Ombudsman Program: Ombudsmen are advocates and problem solvers for residents in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Please apply if you are looking for a rewarding experience that makes a difference in the lives of the elderly. Time commitment: 3 hours per week, any day Monday-Friday. Please call 764-1616. Volunteer Exercise Instructors are needed for the Department of Senior Affairs Mealsite Program.  Prior group fitness leading experience is ideal but not necessary.  We will train anyone with a passion for senior health. This is an excellent opportunity to stay fit while helping our senior members achieve and maintain their fitness goals. Please call 764-1616. Lead exercise

classes Almost every day of the week for one hour. Mileage reimbursement is available to RSVP volunteers. RSVP is part of Senior Corps and is administered by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS). The purpose of RSVP is to recruit senior volunteers into public, government and nonprofit organizations to meet community needs. For this and other volunteer opportunities call 764-1616. The Desert Willow Gift Shop in the Palo Duro Senior Center is located at 5221 Palo Duro NE. The Manager of the gift shop is looking for seniors who make craft items. These items will be sold on consignment with 90% going to the crafter. The crafter must be a member of a City of Albuquerque Senior Center. The gift shop will be accepting handmade items starting January 6th, Monday – Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., Call 888-8105 for further information. Rate - $1 per word, $10 minimum Box Border - Additional $10 Bold First Line - Additional $5 Photo - Additional $5 Call 880-0470

Bernalillo County Open Space Offering Educational Programs By Prime Time Staff

B

ernalillo County Open Space is planning a host of free educational and entertainment events for the spring and summer. The following events, focusing on gardening, water management and nature, are scheduled this month: April 5, 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.: “Soil Structure and Soil Building” at the historic GutierrezHubbell House, 6029 Isleta SE. Soil is the crucial building block of any garden. Attending this workshop will help you to understand how to determine what type of soil you have and how to build healthy soil over time to increase fertility and productivity. Shawn Hardeman will discuss soil science, what soil is made of and what that means to the backyard farmer. Participants can even take

to the event a jar of their own soil to complete a simple soil test. The event is free, but registration is appreciated. Visit www.bernco.gov/ openspace. Or contact Open Space Coordinator Colleen LanganMcRoberts at (505) 314-0398. April 11 and 12: “Water Harvesting Catchments for Wildlife.” East Mountain property owners are invited to attend this free training on constructing water catchments for wildlife. The benefits of such catchments in times of drought can be life saving for animals roaming the East Mountains in search of water. Participants will get hands-on experience as well as qualify to apply for funding to install a wildlife catchment on their own property. Space is limited. Participants must register and own land in the East Mountains. The April 11 session is from 5:30 to

8 p.m. at the James McGrane Jr. Public Safety Complex, 48 Public School Road, Tijeras. The April 12 session is from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sabino Canyon Open Space, 34 Forest Road 252, Tijeras. To register, visit www.bernco.gov/ openspace or call 505-314-0398. April 19, 6 – 10:30 p.m.: “Jazz Under the Stars” at Bachechi Open Space, 9521 Rio Grande NW. The entire family can enjoy a free star party featuring the Albuquerque Astronomical Society. Take your picnic blanket and dinner. From 6 to 7 p.m., there will be a solar scope and picnic, along with a live broadcast by The Oasis radio station 103.7. From 7 to 8 p.m., the Astronomical Society will give a presentation on stargazing basics. And from 8 to 10:30 p.m., you can stargaze with the Astronomical Society and enjoy a live acoustic guitar performance

by Ambrose Rivera. For more information, visit www.bernco.gov/ openspace or call 505-314-0398. April 19, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: “Garden Planting and Appropriate Plants” at the historic Gutierrez-Hubbell House, 6029 Isleta SE. Every devoted gardener knows that choosing plants that are appropriate for their climate and region can make the difference in success or failure. In this session, participants will learn tried and true varieties that add both beauty and abundance to the home landscape and garden. Correct timing and technique for planting will also be covered in this workshop. The session is free, but registration is requested. To register, visit www.bernco.gov/ openspace or call (505) 314-0398.


PRIME TIME

the doc is in Dr. Gerard Muraida

Dr. Gerard Muraida specializes in geriatric medicine and family practice. Rays Damage Skin Year-round

T

hough summer is not quite here, it is never too soon to be mindful of the sun, to help prevent health problems as well as signs of aging. Excessive sunlight exposure may result in some deleterious effects on the skin. These effects can range from mild redness due to sunburn, to the development of skin cancer. Excessive sun exposure can also hasten the wrinkling process. Photoaging is the effect of chronic ultraviolet radiation on the skin superimposed upon the intrinsic aging process. Wrinkled skin with irregular hyperpigmentation or depigmentation, fragile small blood vessels termed telangiectasias, may appear as well as roughened skin lesions: actinic keratoses or invasive carcinoma. In addition to wrinkling and blotchiness, over time the sun's ultraviolet light damages the fibers in the skin called elastin. When these fibers break down, the skin begins to sag, stretch and lose its ability to return to its original place after stretching. The skin tears more easily and may take longer to heal. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun is the No.1 cause of skin cancer, but ultraviolet light from tanning salons is just as harmful. Exposure to sunlight during the winter months puts you at the same risk as exposure during the summer. Cumulative sun exposure mainly contributes to the development of basal cell and squamous cell skin cancer. On the other hand, episodes of severe sunburns, usually before age 18, can cause melanoma later in life. The three types of skin cancer are basal cell, squamous cell and melanoma. The first two make up more than 95 percent of all skin cancers and have a high cure rate

April 2014

Don’t Be in the Dark About the Sun when detected early. Melanoma, however, is an aggressive skin cancer that can spread to other organs and is responsible for 75 percent of all skin cancer deaths. Fair-skinned or freckledskin individuals have the highest risk of sunburn. Although darker skinned individuals have a lower risk, they can still develop any of the skin cancers mentioned above. If you have had a significant lifetime of sun exposure due to occupation, or place of residence, see a dermatologist or have your primary care specialist do a complete skin evaluation. It is also wise to examine yourself for any new moles or new crusty and itchy areas. Take note of any mole that has changed in color, shape or size. Pay particular attention to areas of your skin that are frequently exposed to the sun. Be aware that skin cancers can occur in any area of the body. Definitive diagnosis is accomplished by examination under a microscope of a sample of the “mole.” The following are some tips to help prevent skin cancer: Avoid direct sun exposure as much as possible during peak ultraviolet radiation hours of 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Apply sunscreen with a sun protection factor, or SPF, of 15 or greater 30 minutes

before sun exposure and then every few hours thereafter. Choose contact lenses that offer UV protection and wear sunglasses with total UV protection. Eighty percent of a person's

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lifetime sun exposure is acquired before age 18. As a parent/ grandparent, be a good role model and foster skin cancer prevention habits in your children/ grandchildren.

Our Services Include liberation. vibration. reservation. For more information call: 505-275-2275 www.havencarenm.com Locally owned & operated

An eclectic mix of informative and entertaining programs await you on KUNM – your passport to the worlds of news, music, community and culture. Publicly supported. Publicly responsive. KUNM is an essential part of New Mexico’s day. KUNM 89.9FM | STREAMING LIVE 24/7 AT KUNM.ORG


PRIME TIME

26 April 2014

Calendar Singles Over 60 Here's our current Calendar for April 2014: Second Wednesday: 11:00 am Movie & Pie

Albuquerque Singles Over Sixty, (SOS), is a social group for singles 59 years of age or older. This is a great place to make new friends, enjoy a variety of fun activities, and even get some fun exercise from our walks, hikes, and dances. Best of all, it's free! This group is sponsored by PrimeTime Monthly for New Mexicans 50+, so there are no fees to join or to attend the events. To join us, visit the SOS website at: http://www.meetup.com/abqsos/ Once you are a member, you can attend any of the events. ART Through June 30 Exhibition: En la Cocina with San Pasquale at National Hispanic Cultural Center, Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. San Pasquale is the beloved "saint of the kitchen." Admission: $3, adults; $2, seniors, kids, free; Sundays, free. Call 246-2261; visit nhccnm.org. April 4 516 Arts First Friday open house, 516 Central Ave SW, 5-8 p.m., free admission. Visit the Heart of the City exhibition, get a free haircut with Gabriel Jaureguiberry from ACE Barbershop and participate in handson flower making with Vecinos Artist Collective. Space is limited: for haircut appointments, contact claude@516arts.org. Call 242-1445; visit 516arts.org. Third Fridays Neighborhood ARTScrawl, 5-8 p.m. The Third Friday ARTScrawl focuses on arts and galleries in Albuquerque - rotating each month between Old Town, Route 66, and the Northeast Heights. There will be

God Learning Channel #27 DISH TV

Fourth Wednesday: 11:00 am Movie & Pie Every Thursday: 10:00 am Morning Walk Every Thursday: 6:00 pm Dancing Every Friday: 5:30 pm Play Cards Every Friday: 7:00 pm Dancing Every Saturday: 1:00 pm Lunch & Cards Every Sunday: 10:00 am Walk (events may be added or cancelled later)

gallery openings, artist receptions, demonstrations and more. For details, visit artscrawlabq.org. COMMUNITY EVENTS April 2 Live at the KiMo: Spotlight on Health: with host Dr. Barry Ramo, Diabetes: Recent Findings on Controls and Treatments, 7:30 p.m. Tickets, $3$5, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311; holdmyticket.com. April 4 A celebration of the music of Elvis Presley in Old Town, 5-8 p.m. Free admission. Elvis impersonations & karaoke contest with prizes, classic cars, food & drinks. Cast your vote for the 'People's Choice' award! Call 311; visit cabq.gov/cultural services. April 4 Elvis Day Book Signing at Treasure House Books & Gifts, 2012 S. Plaza St. NW, 6 p.m. Free admission. Author Steve Brewer signs his Elvisthemed mystery novel "Lonely Street" and other works as part of Old Town Plaza's "Elvis Day" celebration. Call: 242-7204; visit facebook.com/ treasurehousebooks. April 4 Animal Myth Day, at Zoo ABQ BioPark, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Separate fact from fiction at Discovery Stations around the Zoo during Animal Myth Day. Admission: adults, $12.50; children, $4, seniors, $5.50. Call 311; visit cabq.gov/ biopark.

Variety of Programs from Hebraic & Bible Roots

April 5 New Mexico Philharmonic presents: Introduction to the Classics Series -- Program 4, Brahms, Robert and Clara Schuman Triangle, at KiMo Theatre, 6 p.m. Tickets: $10$30, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311; holdmyticket.com. April 5 Hydrangeas bloom in the Spring Pastels Show, at ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Pastel blue

hydrangeas and multi-color fuchsias fill the Mediterranean Conservatory. Price included with admission. Call 311; visit cabq.gov/culturalservices. April 5 Free CPR Class at North Domingo Baca Senior Center, 7521 Carmel NE, 1-2 p.m. Learn to perform hands-only CPR through this free class. People are encouraged to register by calling the host senior centers. Call 764-6475, 311 or visit cabq.gov. April 9 The N.M. Assn of the Federation of Teachers, retirees (NM/AFT) will meet on April 9, 2014 from 1p.m. - 3p.m. at the AFT Office 530 Jefferson Street in Albuquerque.  The featured speaker will be Roy Aragon to speak on "Preserving Social Security and Medicare".  For more information contact VP, Carolyne DeVore-Parks  (505) 271-2078  or President Patrick Prescott pmprescottenterprises@yahoo.com. April 12 Fiestas de Albuquerque in Historic Old Town Plaza, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission. Featuring food, Mariachis, Ballet Folklorico, live music, dance, and activities throughout the plaza. Call 311, visit cabq.gov/culturalservices. April 22 Presbyterian Kaseman Hospice Re-Open House Tour the leading edge, newly-designed, larger hospice rooms and amenities inside Kaseman Presbyterian Hospital before it accepts patients. Tuesday, April 22 – 4-6 p.m. – Self-guided and guided tours available. Kaseman Presbyterian Hospital 8300 Constitution NE – ABQ April 24 New Mexico Humanities Council & the KiMo Theatre presents: Water Crisis in the West: Thinking Like a Watershed, Rural Perspectives: Farmers & Ranchers, 7-10 p.m. Free admission. Call 311; visit nmhum.org. April 26 Albuquerque Renaissance Faire, Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Dr. NE, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Enjoy food, music, archery, fencing, arts, and activities all recreated from the Middle Ages. Admission: Adults, $10; children 4-12, $5; children 3 and under free. Call 311; visit cabq.gov/ culturalservices/balloonmuseum. April 24-27 Pueblo Days: Spring Art Market, at Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th St. NW, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Daily events include Native American dance performances, films, an art market and more. Admission: $6 adults, $5.50 seniors, $3 students & kids. Call 8437270; visit indianpueblo.org. May 1, 2 PERA Retirees! The Retired Public Employees of New Mexico (RPENM), a non-profit, non-union organization that advocates specifically for you, will hold its annual Spring Membership Conference on May 1 & 2, 2014 at

the Sheraton Albuquerque Uptown. Registration fee of $30 includes a panel discussion on retiree/senior services, a reception with live music and a silent auction, the opportunity to hear guest speakers on topics of interest, updates from the organization, a delicious buffet lunch, and the chance to win a cash raffle &/or door prizes. For registration details, call (505) 280-8459 or email us at rpenm@ rpenm.org or visit our website http:// rpenm.org/. DANCE Through May Casino/Cuban-Style Salsa and Rueda de Casino, at Call National Hispanic Cultural Center; 6-7 p.m., beginning and intermediate classes; 7-8 p.m., intermediate class. Classes are every first and third Tuesday through May. Cuban son, rumba, swing dance, mambo, cha cha, and more influence this rich form of salsa dances. Suggested donation: $5-$10. Contact Sarita Streng at 288-8713; visit nhccnm.org. HEALTH Adapted Aquatics taught at the UNM's Therapy Pool. The warm water and buoyancy help the participants increase strength, mobility, flexibility and range of motion. 50+ Sports and Fitness Program instructors conduct all classes. Call for costs and times, 880.2800. MUSIC First Friday The American Recorder Society meets at 7:15 p.m. in the adult annex at Heights Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 8600 Academy NE. All skills levels welcome. Call 228-8196 or visit rgrecorders.org/abq. April 4 Soweto Gospel Choir, at Popejoy Hall, 8 p.m. The choir celebrates the unique and inspirational power of African Gospel music. The 52-member choir, under the direction of Beverly Bryer, draws on the best talent from the many churches in and around Soweto, South Africa. Admission: $10-$40. Visit popejoypresents.com. April 16 Casey Neill at Special Collections Library, 423 Central NE, noon; and Taylor Ranch Library, 5700 Bogart NW, 6:30 p.m. Free concerts. Neill is a songwriter and bandleader with a sound that explores ballads, highoctane indie-folk, and Scots/Irish melody. Call: 848-1376, 897-8816; visit ampconcerts.com. April 26 The Westside Concert Chorale, under the direction of Jerrilyn Foster, will present its spring concert, “A Tapestry of American Music”, on Saturday, April 26, 2014, at 7:00 p.m. at Las Placitas Presbyterian Church, 7 Paseo de San Antonio, Placitas, 505-867-5718, and on Sunday, April 27, 2014, at 3:00 p.m. at Rio Rancho Methodist Church, 1652 Abrazo Rd NE, Rio Rancho, 505-8920404. The program is a tribute to American composers, including George


PRIME TIME

April 2014

Calendar and Ira Gershwin, Meredith Wilson, and Moses Hogan, and to American music including the selections Down to the River to Pray, I Got Rhythm, and The Music Man. Tickets are available at the door for $7.00 for seniors and students and $12.00 for adults. THEATRE April 4 Friday Date Night at the KiMo: Road House (1989), Crazy for Swayze, 8 p.m. A tough bouncer is hired to tame a dirty bar. Tickets: $5-$7, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311. April 11 Friday Date Night at the KiMo: Ghost (1990), Crazy for Swayze, 8 p.m. After being killed during a botched mugging, a man's love for his partner enables him to remain on earth as a ghost. Tickets: $5-$7, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311. April 12, 13 New Mexico Young Actors presents: Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs at KiMo, 2 p.m. A delightful musical adaptation of the Brothers Grimm classic fairy tale. Princess Snow White seeks refuge with seven dwarfs after

the queen learns that there is someone more beautiful than she. Tickets: $10$12. Call KiMo: 768-3544. April 18 Friday Date Night at the KiMo: To Wong Foo Thanks for Everything, Julie Newmar (1995), Crazy for Swayze, 8 p.m. Three drag queens travel crosscountry until their car breaks down, leaving them stranded in a small town. Tickets: $5-$7, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311. April 23 NM PBS & Film at the KiMo: “Medora,” 7 p.m., free admission. A community beset by a crippled economy and dwindling population is the setting for this documentary following a downbut-not-out varsity basketball team. Call 311; visit itvs.org/films/Medora; or communitycinema.org. April 27 Sunday Matinee at the KiMo: The Elephant Man (1980), 2 p.m. Sir Anthony Hopkins Festival. A Victorian surgeon rescues a heavily disfigured man who is mistreated while scraping a living as a side show freak. Tickets: $5$7, at the KiMo, 768-3522 or 311.

Indian Pueblo Cultural Center April Events

Weekend Native American Dance Performance

11 am & 2 pm Spring/Summer schedule April 5 & 6 / April 12 & 13 Pueblo Weaving Workshop Workshop conducted by well-known weaver, Louie Garcia The Pueblo weaving tradition is the oldest surviving Pueblo art form in existence today. Information call Kay @ 505-212-7052 April 16 5 pm Coffee & Conversation 5:30 pm – 7 pm The Honorable Tommy Jewel will talk about his experiences at the historic Albuquerque Indian School. FREE to the Public April 23-27 35th Annual American Indian Week Pueblo Days 9 am – 5 pm Weekend Indian Art Market, Native American Dances, food, fun & more!

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Senior Hall of Fame Honoree Inductions Dinner & Silent Auction

Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 4-9 PM Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid Hotel North 5151 San Francisco NE Albuquerque, NM 87109 Individual Tickets $50 Sponsorships starting at $500

This Year’s Honorees Senior Hall of Fame Inductees are exceptional members of our society who have demonstrated a lifetime of community service and have worked tirelessly to improve the lives of others

~ Barbara Brennan ~ ~ Caroline Gaston ~ ~ Ronald T. Montoya ~ ~ Ellen Ann Lembke Ryan ~

To purchase tickets, or for more information about sponsorships and advertisements please call: 505.800.1400

About Silver Horizons

Silver Horizons New Mexico, Inc. is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life of senior citizens in Albuquerque and Bernalillo County. In addition to recognizing and honoring outstanding citizens over the age of 65 through the Senior Hall of Fame, Silver Horizons fulfills its mission through a variety of programs such as Food Distribution, Home Repairs, Home Safety Modifications like wheelchair ramps and grab-bars. We are committed to helping with Utilities through our Senior Assistance Fairs.

The Senior Hall of Fame Silent Auction will be featuring: "Valley of Fire" 16" x 20" "Valley of Fire" is a giclée print of original artwork by local artist Robert L. Benjamin, New Mexico resident since 1971. “Valley of Fire” is for sale now at regular price and will be available for sale unframed for the month of June 2014 for the bid price after the event. A portion of all sales of “Valley of Fire” will benefit the foundation. Contact Prime Time Publishing at 720-6541 or email: prime.time.art@gmail.com for purchase information.

April 25 Culture’s Night Out 6pm – 8pm Meet up and coming young Native artists at this happening event that includes art demonstrations, freestyle dance workshop, energetic music and one-of-a- kind t-shirt designs. Exhibitions Saints of the Pueblos Mosaic Patterns of the Thunderbird 100 Years of State & Federal Policy: The Impact on Pueblo Nations Albuquerque Indian School Retrospective Pueblo Harvest Café at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center Party on the Patio Starting April 10th every weekend thru November Live music, drink specials, all you can eat horno baked pizza & more!

Robert Benjamin limited edition giclée.


PRIME TIME

28 April 2014

history Marc Simmons

Dr. Marc Simmons is New Mexico’s best known & most distinguished historian. He has written more than 40 books, several of which won awards including “Albuquerque: A Narrative History.” Comments to him can be posted at ptpubco.com under his columns.

I

t would be difficult to find any people in the world more addicted to one food then New Mexicans are to their chile. Originally domesticated and developed by the Indians of central Mexico, the chile was borrowed by Spanish conquistadors. They got their seeds from the Aztecs and brought them to the Rio Grande Valley in the 16th century. The plant found a natural home in the arid uplands of the Southwest. Rich in vitamin C, chile formed one of the main food crops of both the Spanish colonists and Pueblo Indians. Long strings of chiles, called ristras, were a common item of barter. They were also donated to the royal treasury and converted

The Enchantment of Chile to cash whenever the king asked for contributions to help fight his European wars. Brilliant red chile strings, hung on the walls of adobe houses to dry, are among the most memorable scenes of New Mexico in the fall. And they are the special delight of makers of picture postcards. It is not surprising then that the New Mexico Legislature in 1965 adopted the chile, along with the frijol, or pinto bean, as the official vegetables of the state. Not only is the chile a main ingredient of native cooking, but it is also one of New Mexico's most important export products. Experts claim that different soil and climatic conditions mark the chile from each region with a distinctive flavor. Thus, chile grown in such places as the Mesilla Valley, Velarde or Chimayo each have loyal fans who will swear that their product ranks first in taste and tanginess. For newcomers to the state, New Mexico chile may be an acquired taste. New England writer Charles F. Loomis, traveling through in the

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early 1880s, stopped on a winter day at a farmer’s hut in the canyon east of Albuquerque. He asked for a meal, and when given a bowl of "red," he thought it was stewed tomatoes. "I swallowed the first big spoonful at a gulp," he wrote. "And then I sprang up with a howl of pain and terror, fully convinced that these New Mexicans had assassinated me by quick poison. "My mouth and throat were consumed with living fire, and my stomach was a pit of boiling torture. I rushed from the house and plunged into a snowbank, biting the snow to quench that horrible inner fire." "Poison? No, indeed. It was only the universal red pepper of the Southwest, the reddest, fiercest, most quenchless red pepper you ever dreamed of." After further trials, Loomis came to love the dish, and he later admitted, "I never missed and longed for any other food as

I did for chile when I got back to civilization." To this day, many newcomers to the state fall under the chile spell, once they become accustomed to the taste. New Mexico's old folk culture had a number of uses for chile outside the kitchen. A single pod soaked in vinegar made a remedy for rheumatism. Burning chile seeds, it was believed, drove bedbugs out of the house. And a solution of chile and water was sprinkled on garden plants as an insect repellent.

Aries April, 2014 By Jim Craig

A

ries (The Ram) March 21 – April 19 Aries, you can expect some positive gains in the areas of finance, travel and your personal relationship. With these gains there will be times when you tend to allow your expenses to become overextended. Employing your savvy management and communications skills along with your positive attitude will successfully guide you through these problem-laden timeframes. Your friends and family members will become an even greater part of your life during the year and rely on you for advice and support. You should remain vigilant in guarding against false rumors being spread by co-workers about your career interests and aspirations. The primary element associated with your sign is fire, so an Aries can be seen as being overly aggressive in pursuing job-related interests. Focusing on long-term goals is the most suitable way to maintain your positive mindset during these occasionally challenging times. An Aries can be overly controlling in relationships. Guarding

against this tendency will help avoid tension in your home environment. Paying close attention to the needs and interests expressed by your partner will ensure that the relationship averts unnecessary stress and tension. Your health will be excellent throughout most of the year if you abstain from reflecting on formerly negative issues. Avoid excessive participation in strenuous physical exercises, but instead become involved in a regular regimen of comfortably sustainable activities such as walking, yoga, stretching, and deep breathing. Settling into a comfortable exercise routing will help you remain positive throughout each day. Invincibility is a prevalent aspect of your zodiac stone, the diamond. This stone is closely aligned with fire and symbolizes eternal love. Capitalize on your capacity for clarity of purpose, attraction of assets, and good fortune in all areas of your life. You possess nearly limitless capabilities in whatever areas you choose to pursue, but must maintain a vigilant awareness of these attributes for continuously validation.


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April 2014

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30 April 2014

Teaching an Old Dog a New Trick By Mace Kochenderfer

the smartest financial decision you ever made. his article is being Most already know that a written specifically for HECM reverse mortgage is the senior homeowner a HUD insured Home Equity that absolutely does NOT need Conversion Mortgage. This a reverse mortgage. Please program is reserved for set your preconceived notions homeowners 62 and older to the side for a few minutes and (for the moment) does and let me introduce an idea not have any income or credit that few have considered. I score requirements. The will explain why obtaining a homeowner retains ownership reverse mortgage, especially and the home is typically if you don’t need one, may be passed on to the heirs. Nothing new here; it has ANSWER TO #1116 been this way since 1989. ANSWER TO #5068 However, did you know H AM C U E R T L C A S I A O P I E that the unused Line of A R I A S M A K I N G T H E B E S T O F Credit actually gets bigger E N O R M O U S over time? The Line of O P E N E R E A R U N O Credit has the ability to L A P D EM ON S C A M grow beyond the original R N A loan amount. Think about H A R D Y L O V E R A R E T E I N D A G E N T this carefully for a moment M U S E S M A E R P A R S E and take a look at some A N T S P E E R S M T S real numbers provided by E T A S Y R S A T I R E Moody’s Analytics and A B S E N T I A G E T S T H E B E T T E R O F Research. (Moody's is E L L A S T O U T an independent essential Y S E R

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Fact # 4 The Financial Planning Association (FPA) supports a Reverse Mortgage strategy for a senior’s retirement! For many years, the Financial Planning community has viewed Reverse Mortgages as an excellent tool to maximize Social Security benefits and protect your liquid assets in a down market. Also, many seniors who own their home free and clear and have no need for a Reverse Mortgage can easily enhance their estate value by hundreds of thousands of dollars by guaranteed higher than market rates and compounding growth of their asset. Within 5 minutes, we will show you and your Financial Planner how simple this strategy is. The FPA supports using a Reverse Mortgage as a risk management tool in conjunction with a two-bucket investment strategy to meet a retirement goal. You worked hard for your money. Now, let it work hard for you! Helping you move forward, In Reverse .

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component of the global capital markets, providing credit ratings, research, tools and analysis that contribute to transparent and integrated financial markets.) Today, we will assume you are 62 and own a $200,000 home free and clear. In 20 years, Moody’s projects that the home will be worth $360,000. If you got a reverse mortgage Line of Credit established today for $100,000 and did not utilize it, the Line of Credit is expected to be worth about $415,000 in 20 years. The Line of Credit is now $55,000 more valuable than the home itself! At this point (age 82), let’s pretend that you need some assistance and are considering an assisted living development. You have two choices. If you did not do a reverse mortgage 20 years earlier, you would need to sell the home. After listing and showing your home for months (and all that goes with it) and after typical agency fees and closing costs, you would net $328,000. However, if you had established a reverse mortgage, you could request the entire $415,000 and it would be immediately deposited into your bank account tax free. Remember, reverse mortgages have a “Non-Recourse Clause” written into the mortgage and is guaranteed by the government. This means that you cannot be held responsible and could give the home to the bank and move on with your life with a clean slate. You were selling your home anyway, so why should you care if it becomes the property of a new owner or a bank? You don’t. But wait, you have $415,000! You only sold the home to get your equity out to pay for assisted living. You now have the needed cash to comfortably afford home health care (instead of assisted living) AND you get to stay in your home. As an additional exercise and to show you the power of compounding, let’s take

the unused Line of Credit out another five years to look at the numbers when you are 87. Your home would be worth about $435,000 and the Line of Credit is now valued at $595,000. That is a much bigger number and demonstrates the power of compounding. So, here are your choices… 1. You don’t get a reverse mortgage and your heirs inherit a property that they will ultimately sell. If you never want to consider a reverse mortgage, this is the outcome. It is plain and simple and historically how an asset is passed to heirs. 2. If you get a reverse mortgage and never take the opportunity to tap it, your heirs simply inherit the home and its value (minus the reverse mortgage closing costs and the costs involved in selling a property). Yes, some equity was spent on closing costs and you never utilized the benefit other than knowing you had a large Line of Credit that you could quickly rely upon in a time of need. You can liken this scenario to an insurance policy that you paid for but never used. Yes, money was spent but it bought you peace of mind and there certainly some value in that. 3. You get a reverse mortgage and use the funds as you see fit (pay for medical issues, remodel, vacations, going out to dinner, etc.). Have fun! 4. Or, you get a reverse mortgage and do not use it for many years while the Line of Credit grows and is compounding silently behind the scenes. Years later, you liquidate it and have a big pile of tax free cash to spend however you like. Of course, whatever you do not spend still is passed onto your heirs (who, frankly speaking, would probably rather have the cash over a home anyway). Did you learn a new trick? Mace Kochenderfer, CRMP is a Certified Reverse Mortgage Professional and owner of New Mexico Reverse Mortgage. He can be reached at 897-4900.


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32 April 2014

Your story is our story. Presbyterian Medicare Advantage plans make Medicare simple. We offer a full range of options, plus access to Presbyterian’s health system and doctors. Learn how simple Medicare can be by attending one of our no-obligation seminars. To reserve your seat, call (505) 923-8458 or 1-800-347-4766 seven days a week, 8 am to 8 pm. TTY for the hearing impaired is 1-888-625-6429. We also offer personal consultations in your home, or you can sign up online at phs.org/medicare.

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Every Tuesday at 2:00 pm and every Thursday at 10:00 am Presbyterian Medical Group 4005 High Resort

A sales person will be present with information and applications. For more information or for accommodation of persons with special needs, call 1-800-347-4766/TTY 1-888-625-6429, 8 am to 8 pm seven days a week. Presbyterian Senior Care (HMO) and Presbyterian MediCare PPO are Medicare Advantage plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Presbyterian Senior Care (HMO) and Presbyterian MediCare PPO depends on contract renewal.

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